Tag Archives: Sport Touring Motorcycle Reviews

2023 KTM 790 Duke and 1290 Super Duke GT | First Look Review

2023 KTM 1290 SUPERDUKE GT
2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT

KTM North America Inc. has announced the 2023 Duke and Super Duke Duke range. After a brief hiatus, the 790 Duke and 1290 Super Duke GT will be back in KTM’s lineup, and they’re joined by the returning 890 Duke R and 1290 Super Duke R Evo. The 2023 KTM Duke and Super Duke range will begin shipping to authorized KTM dealers in December 2022, but pricing has not yet been announced.

Related Story: 2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo | Road Test Review

2023 KTM 790 Duke

2023 KTM 790 DUKE
2023 KTM 790 Duke in new gray and black motif

Introduced in 2017, the KTM 790 Duke sold more than 29,000 units, and was later upgraded to the 890 Duke. KTM says the 2023 790 Duke is a “true mid-range motorcycle” that joins the 890 Duke R to fill the gap between the 390 Duke and the 1290 Super Duke R Evo.

Related: 2019 KTM 790 Duke | First Ride Review

Related: KTM 200 Duke, 390 Duke, 890 Duke, and 1290 Super Duke R | Comparison Review

The 790 Duke will be powered by KTM’s LC8c parallel-Twin DOHC engine with 799cc of displacement and two balancer shafts for smooth power delivery and minimum vibration.

2023 KTM 790 Duke
2023 KTM 790 Duke

The 2023 KTM 790 Duke features throttle-by-wire, a PASC slip/assist clutch, three ride modes (Rain, Street, and Sport), lean-angle- sensitive Motorcycle Traction Control (MTC), cornering ABS with Supermoto mode, a full-color 5-inch TFT display, and LED lights front and back.

Optional features include Quickshifter+, Motor Slip Regulation (MSR), cruise control, tire-pressure monitoring, and Track mode, which includes traction control slip adjuster, anti-wheelie mode, launch control, and three levels of throttle response variation. The bike has a 3.7-gal tank and a dry weight of 383.6 lb.

2023 KTM 790 Duke
2023 KTM 790 Duke

In terms of looks, the 2023 KTM 790 Duke introduces two new colorways to the mix: a traditional KTM orange scheme and an all-new gray and black motif.

2023 KTM 790 DUKE
2023 KTM 790 Duke in traditional orange scheme

2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT

2023 KTM Super Duke GT
2023 KTM Super Duke GT

The KTM 1290 Super Duke GT sport-touring bike has also returned to North America for 2023. KTM says the bike was “designed to offer riders a unique Grand Touring experience but engineered to be a true Sports bike underneath the touring parts.”

Related Story: 2019 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT | First Ride Review

The 2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT has enhanced emissions control and a reworked 1,301cc LC8 V-twin engine and the same standard features of the 1290 Super Duke R Evo.

2023 KTM Super Duke GT
2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT

However, the WP APEX semi-active suspension on the 1290 Super Duke GT has been geared for the long-distance tourer, enabling the rider to set the suspension according to four different riding situations: Rider, Rider & Pillion, Rider & Luggage, or Rider, Pillion & Luggage. On top of that, the anti-dive function is fitted as standard. The larger 6.1-gal tank also contributes to the touring capabilities.

The wheels are also the same as the 1290 Super Duke R Evo and boast a weight savings of 2.2 lb of unsprung mass over the old set of rims. These all-new lightweight wheels are wrapped in new Continental ContiSportAttack 4 tires, boasting a sportier and more stable riding experience while delivering on the demand for a sportier tire to match the bike’s versatility. The 1290 Super Duke GT has a dry weight of 476 lb.

2023 KTM Super Duke GT
2023 KTM Super Duke GT

A new 7-inch TFT display has a newly designed layout, and the setup is completed by the new switchgear that KTM says not only feels premium but also allows for intuitive interaction between the rider and the dash itself.

The 2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT will also debut an all-new navigation system called Turn-by-Turn Plus, which will be available via KTMconnect and further enhance the touring experience. TBT+ allows navigation instructions to be projected directly on the TFT display.

2023 KTM Super Duke GT
2023 KTM Super Duke GT

Powered by SYGIC, TBT+ can also operate offline, allowing riders to plan their journey and adventure from remote locations, with the Navigation feature using industry-standard mapping to guide riders to their destination of choice. There’s also an advanced search feature and a diverse range of POIs including gas stations, restaurants, and rest stops. Or you can select one of your pre-saved destinations directly from the TFT dash.

2023 KTM Super Duke GT
2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT

The new system also allows for waypoints to be skipped without prompting a turnaround. The system will merely recalculate and find the next available route to get you back on track. Also, the last 10 destinations searched are automatically saved and available directly on the dashboard.

2023 KTM 890 Duke R

2023 KTM 890 DUKE R
2023 KTM 890 Duke R

KTM says the 790 Duke is great for introducing a new generation of riders to the world of the Duke naked bike, “and when they’re ready to take things to the next level, the 2023 KTM 890 Duke R is waiting.” The company added that the 890 Duke R is as comfortable on mountain roads as it is on the track.

Related: 2022 KTM 890 Duke R | Road Test Review

In addition to the standard features mentioned above for the 790 Duke, the 2023 KTM 890 Duke R has adjustable, track-ready WP APEX suspension, monoblock Brembo Stylema calipers grabbing 320mm front discs, and Michelin Power Cup II tires. The bike has a 3.7-gal tank and a dry weight of 377 lb.

2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2023 KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R EVO
2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

Taking it up a notch, KTM’s flagship street motorcycle, the KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo, underwent its most significant update in 2020, boasting a number of tweaks and engineering improvements, including a reworked 1,301cc LC8 engine and an all-new chassis.

In 2022, the latest incarnation of “The Beast” was launched with the same LC8 engine making a claimed 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque. The bike was dubbed the “Evo” thanks to the evolution of the second-generation WP APEX Semi Active Suspension with damping adjusted in real-time based on conditions in three preset modes: Sport, Street, and Comfort. Rear spring preload can be set via the TFT display’s menu over a 20mm range in 2mm increments.

Related: 2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo | Road Test Review

2023 KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R EVO
2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo

KTM says the 2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo has “the most power and torque in the family and the most advanced electronics to keep it all under control.” The bike features Motorcycle Stability Control (MSC) with cornering ABS by Bosch including Supermoto ABS, ride mode technology, and multi-stage, lean-angle sensitive Motorcycle Traction Control (MTC) using a 6 axis lean angle sensor, and cruise control. The bike has a 4.2-gal tank and a dry weight of 441 lb.

For more information, visit the KTM website.

The post 2023 KTM 790 Duke and 1290 Super Duke GT | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

This 2023 motorcycle buyers guide highlights new or significantly updated street-legal models available in the U.S. So far, only a few 2023 models have been announced, mostly adventure bikes, and we’ve had a chance to test several of them. We include a couple of 2024 teasers too. We will continually update the guide as new models are available, so be sure to bookmark this page and check back often.

Related Story: 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

Organized in alphabetical order by manufacturer, our guide includes photos, pricing, key update info, and links to first looks and – when available – first rides, road tests, and video reviews of each motorcycle.

2024 Can-Am Origin

Can-Am Electric Motorcycle Pulse Origin
Can-Am Origin

OK, we’ve gotten a bit ahead of ourselves with this one since the earliest you can buy it will be mid-2024. At the annual Club BRP event in August2, Can-Am unveiled two all-new, all-electric motorcycles – the Origin dual-sport and the Pulse roadster (below). Detailed specs won’t be provided until mid-2023 (at Can-Am’s 50th anniversary celebration), but both will be powered by BRP’s all-new, proprietary Rotax E-Power technology, said to provide “highway-worthy speeds with plenty of horsepower and torque.”

The Can-Am Origin has rally-style bodywork, fork guards, and spoked wheels, in diameters that appear to be 21 inches in front and 18 inches out back, common sizes for off-road tires. The final drive is enclosed, and Can-Am reps would not reveal whether power is sent to the rear wheel via chain (used on nearly all dual-sports) or belt (used on many production electric bikes).

Read our Can-Am Origin and Pulse First Look Review

2024 Can-Am Pulse

Can-Am Electric Motorcycle Pulse Origin
Can-Am Pulse

The Can-Am Pulse has the muscular stance of a streetfighter, with racy-looking cast wheels shod with sportbike rubber and a sculpted “tank” that keeps the bike’s profile in line with conventional gas-powered motorcycles. The Origin dual-sport (above) and Pulse roadster share key design elements: distinctive LED headlights, large TFT displays, edgy white and gray bodywork, a bright yellow panel covering their battery packs, inverted forks, single-sided swingarms, single-disc brakes front and rear, and solo seats. Rear cowls may cover pillion seats; passenger footpegs are not visible on either machine, but production versions will likely have passenger accommodations.

Read our Can-Am Origin and Pulse First Look Review

2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura

2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura T
2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura T

The 2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura is powered by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve 799cc parallel-Twin borrowed from the previous-generation KTM 790 Adventure and makes a claimed 95 hp and 57 lb-ft of torque. Equipped with throttle-by-wire, it has two ride modes (Sport and Rain) and cruise control. It has a chromoly-steel frame, fully adjustable KYB suspension, J. Juan triple-disc brakes with cornering ABS, and a 7-inch TFT display.

The base-model 800 ADVentura S (for Street) has cast wheels and an MSRP of $9,499. The up-spec 800 ADVentura T (for Terrain, shown above) has spoked wheels, a quickshifter, a tire-pressure monitoring system, a steering damper, a skid plate, crash bars, handguards, and a centerstand. MSRP is $10,499. They should be available in late 2022 or early 2023.

Read our 2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura First Ride Review

2023 KTM 450 SMR

2023 KTM 450 SMR
2023 KTM 450 SMR

Designed for the track only, the 2023 KTM 450 SMR has a 449.9cc liquid-cooled, SOHC Single putting out a claimed 63 hp, and the engine weighs just 59.5 lb, nearly a pound lighter than the previous model. In addition to the features riders already love about the KTM 450 SMR (read our review of the 2021 model here), the 2023 model includes a redesigned Pankl Racing Systems 5-speed gearbox and a new Quickshift sensor on the shift drum for clutchless upshifts, which can be disabled through the handlebar switch.

Other updates for the 2023 KTM 450 SMR include a revised shock mount, redesigned high-grade aluminum CNC-machined triple clamps offering increased grip surface, altered longitudinal and torsional flex and frame-wall thickness, suspension updates, revised ergonomics, and more. KTM is still only listing the 2022 model pricing of $11,999.

Read our 2023 KTM 450 SMR First Look Review

2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar

2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar
2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar

Harley-Davidson and its LiveWire brand have introduced the second all-electric model, the 2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar, which is smaller, lighter, and less expensive than the LiveWire ONE.

Related Story: 2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire | First Ride Review

The street-tracker is said to produce 80 hp and weigh less than 440 lbs, yielding a 0-60-mph time of just 3.5 seconds. City range is said to be 100 miles, and highway range will be significantly lower.

LiveWire offered 100 serialized “Del Mar Launch Edition” models (shown above) with an exclusive paint scheme and a unique wheel design for $17,699, but all were sold out in the first 18 minutes. Those who missed the opportunity can get their name on a waiting list for when regular production models ($15,000) are available in the spring of 2023.

Read our 2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mark First Look Review

2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411

2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411
2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411

The 2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411 brings scrambler styling to the Himalayan adventure bike platform, which was updated for 2022. It’s powered by an air-cooled 411cc single-cylinder engine carried in a Harris Performance chassis. Royal Enfield says the Scram 411’s versatile geometry and comfortable ergonomics give the lightweight bike a unique combination of on-road agility and capability on trails. It’s available in nine different color/style configurations, and MSRP is $5,099.

Read our 2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411 First Ride Review

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050

The 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 has a liquid-cooled, 1,037cc 90-degree V-Twin. When we tested the 2020 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT, it made 96 hp at 8,500 rpm and 66 lb-ft of torque at 6,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno. The 2023 V-Strom 1050 has a 6-speed gearbox with higher 1st and 6th ratios, an updated throttle-by-wire system, a new ABS control unit, a new CAN (Controller Area Network) wiring system, and a new 32-bit ECM (Engine Control Module).

The new V-Strom 1050 also includes many features previously only available on the XT models, including a 6-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (SIRS) electronics suite – which includes ride modes, cornering ABS, multimode traction control, cruise control, and braking systems that compensate for hill starts, slope, and load – as well as an up/down quickshifter, a new 5-inch TFT display, a new windscreen, and more. Pricing has yet to be announced.

Read our 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 1050DE First Look Review

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE and V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

The 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE and 1050DE Adventure share the same engine as the 2023 Suzuki V-Strom, as well as the new and updated features of the V-Strom (see above) and will replace the previous V-Strom 1050XT and V-Strom 1050XT Adventure models.

However, the DE models are more geared toward off-road adventures, featuring a 21-inch front wheel with a tube-type rim for maximum durability, a 17-inch tubeless rear wheel, and Dunlop Trailmax Mixtour adventure tires. They also add a new Gravity (G) traction control option in the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, the ability to switch off ABS at the rear wheel, their own dedicated chassis geometry and suspension system, a longer swingarm, and other adventure motorcycle-specific offerings. The DE Adventure adds a set of 37-liter aluminum panniers with an anodized silver finish that attach to powdercoated, stainless-steel carriers. Pricing has yet to be announced.

Read our 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 1050DE First Look Review

2023 Triumph Tiger 1200

2023 Triumph Tiger 1200 GT Pro
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200 GT Pro. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

The folks in Hinckley have been busy. They’ve shaved 55 pounds off the new 2023 Triumph Tiger 1200, given it a 147-hp Triple, and equipped it with an all-new chassis and electronics.⁠ Five variants are available: the street-focused GT ($19,100), GT Pro ($21,400), and GT Explorer ($23,100) and the off-road-ready Rally Pro ($22,500) and Rally Explorer ($24,200).⁠

Read our 2023 Triumph Tiger 1200 First Ride Review

The post 2023 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Long-Term Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT won Rider’s Motorcycle of the Year award last year, and we’ve tested it over a period of 12 months. Photos by Kevin Wing.

Related Story: 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Road Test Review

Mileage: 6,294
Base Price: $14,899 (2021); $14,999 (2022)
Accessories: $729.95

After a year together, it’s finally time to say goodbye to our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year. We’ve had a great time with the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, so we’re sad to see it go.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
We added several Yamaha factory accessories to improve wind protection, storage capacity, and passenger comfort.

The Tracer 9 GT is the culmination of several generations of development and refinement, and the result is a fantastic lightweight sport-tourer built around Yamaha’s 890cc inline-Triple, which is good for 108 hp at 10,000 rpm and 63 lb-ft of torque at 7,200 rpm at the rear wheel. This is one of the most fun and engaging engines around – it’s like hanging out with three hellraising buddies who know how to keep it cool in polite company but love to get rowdy when the clock strikes 6,500 rpm.

In stock trim, the Tracer 9 GT is a versatile, comfortable machine that served us well on day rides, weekend jaunts, and multiday trips. We appreciated the Yamaha’s good wind protection, upright riding position, generous legroom, dual-height seat (31.9/32.5 inches), and adjustable handlebar and footpeg positions. None of our testers complained about soreness in wrists, lower backs, or shoulders, nor was engine heat ever an issue.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
We replaced the OE Bridgestone tires with Dunlop Sportmax Roadsmart IVs.

Any time the road turned twisty, we were glad to be on the Tracer. With its raucous engine, excellent chassis, and semi-active suspension, we attacked corners with gusto, enjoying the confidence boost that a well-sorted motorcycle can provide. 

To get to the good stuff, we logged many miles on the slab. One of our nits to pick is how busy the engine is in 6th gear at freeway speeds. At 65 mph, the engine turns 4,200 rpm. We lost count of how many times we grabbed ghost shifts to 7th thinking there might be another gear up top. We’d like to try a rear sprocket with one less tooth to make the gearing taller.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
Yamaha’s Touring Windshield is taller and wider than stock.

In terms of maintenance, we did routine checks of tire pressure, oil level, chain tension and lubrication, and such. We changed the oil and filter after about 5,000 miles, and we used the recommended Yamalube products. We also took the Tracer to our local Yamaha dealer after a safety recall was announced that all 2021-22 MT-09 and Tracer 9 GT models had an improperly programmed ECU that could cause engines to stall unexpectedly in certain circumstances. It was fixed quickly at no charge.

The Tracer proved to be unforgiving of laziness with the clutch when pulling away from a stop, both before and after the recall repair. Without adequate revs, we’d stall the Tracer like a newbie.

After about 5,000 miles of hard use, the rear Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT tire was toast. We spooned on a set of Dunlop Sportmax Roadsmart IV radials, and they’ve provided excellent grip and ride quality. MSRP for the Roadsmart IV tires is $189.95 for the front (120/70ZR17) and $250.95 for the rear (180/55ZR17). You can read our Roadsmart IV review here.

To enhance the Tracer 9 GT’s touring ability, we installed several Yamaha factory accessories, including the Touring Windshield ($179.99), Top Case Mounting Kit ($116.99), 50L Top Case ($289.99), 50L Top Case Backrest Pad ($74.99), and 50L Fitted Top Case Inner Bag ($66.99). 

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
We installed Yamaha’s 50L Top Case. It’s also available in a 39-liter size.

Installation was straightforward. The Touring Windshield is 2.8 inches wider and 3.2 inches taller than stock, and it made a big difference in terms of wind protection. The Tracer’s 30-liter saddlebags are large enough to hold a full-face helmet in each side. The 50L Top Case bumps total storage capacity to 110 liters, and the backrest pad was appreciated by passen-gers.

Over the course of nearly 6,300 miles, we averaged 44.4 mpg, which yields 222 miles from the 5-gallon tank (premium unleaded is required). Our fuel economy ranged from as high as 60.4 mpg to as low as 33.7 mpg, the latter after giving it the whip in a serious headwind.

After whining to Yamaha reps about having to return the Tracer 9 GT, we wiped away our tears when they offered us a lollipop: an accessorized 2022 MT-10. Stay tuned to find out how we get along with the Tracer’s big brother.

The post 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Long-Term Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Kawasaki Announces More 2023 Returning Models

Kawasaki announced the return of several sport, retro sport, naked, cruiser, adventure touring, and dual-sport models to its motorcycle lineup. These 2023 motorcycles are set to arrive in Kawasaki dealerships during the summer months.

Models included in this announcement are the Ninja 1000SX, Ninja 400 and 400 ABS, Z H2 and H2 SE, Z900RS and Z900RS Cafe, Z400 ABS, the Vulcan S and Vulcan 900 lineups, 1700 Voyager ABS, Versys-X300 and Versys-X300 ABS, and the KLR650 lineup.

To read about the 2023 KLX300 dual-sport, KLX300SM supermoto, Ninja ZX-6R sportbike, and new Elektrode electric balance bike, click here.

2023 Kawasaki Ninja 1000SX

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Ninja 1000SX in Emerald Blazed Green / Metallic Diablo Black / Metallic Graphite Gray

The Kawasaki Ninja 1000SX is back with its refined sport-touring capabilities, combining the power of a supersport with the feel of an upright sportbike and familiar Ninja styling.

The Ninja 1000SX features a 1,043cc liquid-cooled inline-Four, Kawasaki Traction Control, Kawasaki Intelligent anti-lock Braking System (KIBS), Kawasaki Quick Shifter, 4.3-inch all-digital TFT color instrumentation, and electronic cruise control.

Related Story: 2020 Kawasaki Ninja 1000SX | Road Test Review

The Ninja 1000SX includes rider aides such as electronic cruise control and integrated riding modes that combine traction control and Power Modes, and it is compatible with the Kawasaki RIDEOLOGY THE APP.

This 2023 model will be offered in Emerald Blazed Green / Metallic Diablo Black / Metallic Graphite Gray starting at $13,199

2023 Kawasaki Ninja 400 and Ninja 400 ABS

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Ninja 400 in Metallic Magnetic Dark Gray/ Metallic Matte Twilight Blue

Ideal for both experienced riders and newer riders looking to step up from a lower displacement bike, the 2023 Ninja 400 sport motorcycle offers the largest displacement in its category.

The 2023 Ninja 400 features a 399cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin, a slip/assist clutch, a lightweight trellis frame, Uni-Trak rear suspension, a 310mm semi-floating petal disc brake and 2-piston caliper in the front, and 220mm petal disc brake and 1-piston caliper in the rear.

Related Story: 2018 Kawasaki Ninja 400 ABS | First Ride Review

A low seat height (30.9 in.), twin LED headlights, and high-grade multifunction dash instrumentation make the Ninja 400 the ideal choice for riders looking to enter the sport-riding scene.

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Ninja 400 in Pearl Blizzard White / Metallic Carbon Gray
Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Ninja 400 in Metallic Carbon Gray / Metallic Matte Carbon Gray

For 2023, the Ninja 400 and the Ninja 400 ABS are available in Metallic Carbon Gray / Metallic Matte Carbon Gray, Pearl Blizzard White / Metallic Carbon Gray, and Metallic Magnetic Dark Gray/ Metallic Matte Twilight Blue. The Ninja 400 starts at $5,299, and the Ninja 400 ABS starts at $5,699.

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Ninja 400 ABS KRT Edition in Lime Green / Ebony

The Ninja 400 ABS KRT Edition is painted in a Lime Green / Ebony color scheme and starts at $5,899. The Ninja 400 KRT Edition without ABS will come in the same color scheme starting at $5,499.

2023 Kawasaki Z H2 and Z H2 SE

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Z H2 in Metallic Phantom Silver / Metallic Carbon Gray

The flagship model of the Kawasaki Z lineup, the 2023 Z H2 features a balanced supercharged 998cc liquid-cooled inline-Four, a 6-speed dog-ring gearbox, a slip/assist clutch, a lightweight trellis frame, high-performance Showa suspension components, and Brembo monoblock brake calipers.

Related Story: 2020 Kawasaki Z H2 | First Look Preview

The bike also offers an IMU-based electronics package, Kawasaki Quick Shifter (KQS), Kawasaki Launch Control Mode (KLCM), Kawasaki Cornering Management Function (KCMF), electronic cruise control, integrated riding modes, all-digital TFT color instrumentation, smartphone connectivity via RIDEOLOGY THE APP, and LED lighting.

For 2023, the Z H2 comes in Metallic Phantom Silver / Metallic Carbon Gray and starts at $18,500.

The Z H2 SE offers the same features that come standard on the Z H2, with the addition of the Kawasaki Electronic Control Suspension (KECS) with Skyhook EERA Technology, which adapts to road and riding conditions in real-time, providing the ideal amount of damping by combining high-level mechanical components with the latest electronic control technology and reportedly giving the rider a smoother ride as it continually adapts to the road surface in real-time.

For braking power, the 2023 Z H2 SE will once again feature Brembo Stylema monoblock brake calipers, a Brembo front brake master cylinder, and steel-braided lines.

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Z H2 SE in Metallic Matte Graphenesteel Gray / Ebony / Mirror Coated Black

The 2023 Z H2 SE will be offered in Metallic Matte Graphenesteel Gray / Ebony / Mirror Coated Black starting at $20,700.

2023 Kawasaki Z900RS and Z900RS Cafe

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Z900RS in Metallic Diablo Black / Metallic Imperial Red

The Kawasaki Z900RS retro-sportbikes reignites the classic style of the original Z1 900 motorcycle.

The 2023 Z900RS and Z900RS Cafe feature a 948cc liquid-cooled inline-Four, a slip/assist clutch, horizontal back-link rear suspension, authentic retro styling, an iconic teardrop fuel tank, a tuned stainless steel exhaust system, a round LED headlight, and bullet-shaped analog dials.

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Z900RS Cafe in Metallic Diablo Black

For 2023, the Z900RS comes in a Metallic Diablo Black / Metallic Imperial Red paint scheme starting at $11,949. The Z900RS Cafe adds cafe-racer styling with a front cowl, a special seat, and a drop handlebar, and is available in Metallic Diablo Black starting at $12,399.

2023 Kawasaki Z400 ABS

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Z400 ABS in Metallic Matte Graphenesteel Gray / Metallic Spark Black

Described in a 2018 Rider First Ride Review as a “Ninja 400 with a flat handlebar and no fairing,” the Kawasaki Z400 ABS naked sportbike features a 399cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin, a slip/assist clutch, streetfighter styling, a lightweight chassis, an upright riding position, a low seat height (30.9 in.), and standard ABS.

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Z400 ABS in Pearl Robotic White /Metallic Matte Graphenesteel Gray

For 2023, the Z400 ABS is available in Metallic Matte Graphenesteel Gray / Metallic Spark Black and Pearl Robotic White /Metallic Matte Graphenesteel Gray starting at $5,399.

2023 Kawasaki Vulcan S, Vulcan S ABS, and Vulcan S Cafe

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Vulcan S in Metallic Flat Spark Black

The Kawasaki Vulcan S sport cruisers are geared to fit a wide range of riders as a result of not only the bikes’ reported starting curb weight just shy of 492 lb but also the exclusive Ergo-Fit sizing system, which includes 18 possible configurations for the handlebar, footpegs, and seat.

Related Story: 2016 Kawasaki Vulcan S Cafe Road Test Review

Both bikes feature a 649cc liquid-cooled DOHC parallel-Twin and sportbike-derived chassis and suspension. The 2023 Vulcan S Cafe also comes equipped with three-tone paint, signature tank badging, sport striping, and a dark-tinted windshield deflector.

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Vulcan S in Cafe Pearl Storm Gray / Ebony

For 2023, the Vulcan S is available in a Metallic Flat Spark Black colorway starting at $7,349, the Vulcan S ABS is offered in Pearl Matte Sage Green / Metallic Flat Spark Black starting at $7,899, and the Vulcan S Cafe is available in Pearl Storm Gray / Ebony starting at $8,099.

2023 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic, Vulcan 900 Classic LT, and Vulcan 900 Custom

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic in Metallic Spark Black /Metallic Magnesium Gray

In our “Middleweight Touring Cruisers” comparison test, which included the Vulcan 900 Classic LT, Rider EIC Greg Drevendstedt wrote: “Cruisers are about style and sensation. How a cruiser looks is just as important as how it sounds and feels.”

All three of the 2023 Vulcan 900 cruiser models feature a 903cc liquid-cooled, fuel-injected V-Twin and a low seat height (26.8 in.).

The Vulcan 900 Classic features rider footboards with a heel/toe shifter, tank-mounted instrumentation, and a 180mm rear tire. The Vulcan 900 Classic LT features a studded seat with standard passenger backrest, leather saddlebags, and a height-adjustable windscreen. The Vulcan 900 Custom features wide drag bars and forward-mounted footpegs, a low center of gravity for easy handling, custom styling with a teardrop tank, parallel slash-cut pipes, and pinstripe wheels.

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic LT in Pearl Storm Gray / Ebony
Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom in Pearl Matte Sage Green / Flat Ebony

For 2023, the Vulcan 900 Classic is available in Metallic Spark Black /Metallic Magnesium Gray starting at $8,999. The Vulcan 900 Classic LT is available in Pearl Storm Gray / Ebony starting at $9,999 with a 24-month limited warranty, and the Vulcan 900 Custom is available in Pearl Matte Sage Green / Flat Ebony starting at $9,499.

2023 Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Voyager ABS

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Voyager ABS in Pearl Storm Gray / Ebony

The 2023 Vulcan 1700 Voyager ABS touring cruiser features a 1,700cc liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, transverse 52-degree V-Twin, Kawasaki Advanced Coactive-braking Technology (K-ACT II) ABS, throttle-by-wire, and electronic cruise control.

Related Story: 2012 Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Voyager ABS | Road Test Review

The bike has a frame-mounted fairing, an intercom-headset compatible audio system, and integrated luggage. For 2023, the Vulcan 1700 Voyager is available in Pearl Storm Gray / Ebony starting at $19,299.

2023 Kawasaki Versys-X 300 and Versys-X300 ABS

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki Versys-X 300 in Pearl Matte Sage Green / Metallic Matte Carbon Gray

With a compact Ninja-derived 296cc liquid-cooled DOHC Twin, the Kawasaki Versys-X 300 is a nimble, lightweight motorcycle that’s suitable for commuting or touring.

Related Story: 2018 BMW G 310 GS vs. Kawasaki Versys-X 300 vs. Royal Enfield Himalayan

The Versys-X 300 has a lightweight chassis, long-travel suspension, a low seat height (32.1 in.), front cowling with a tall windscreen, and a rear carrier.

The 2023 Versys-X 300 is available in Pearl Matte Sage Green / Metallic Matte Carbon Gray starting at $5,899, while the ABS model comes in the same color scheme starting at $6,199.

2023 Kawasaki KLR650 and KLR650 ABS

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki KLR650 in Pearl Storm Gray

The KLR650 sports a 652cc liquid-cooled Single nestled in a recently redesigned high-tensile double-cradle frame. In 2022, the bike was upgraded with new improved ergonomics, bodywork, a taller two-position adjustable windscreen, a larger aluminum rear carrier, increased generator capacity, and an LED headlight. It features all-digital multifunction instrumentation, an optional ABS system, and 7.9 inches of front travel coupled with 7.3 inches of rear travel.

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki KLR650 in Pearl Solar Yellow
Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki KLR650 in Candy Lime Green

The 2023 KLR650 is available in three colorways – Pearl Storm Gray, Pearl Solar Yellow, and Candy Lime Green – and starts at $6,899. The KLR650 ABS is offered in Pearl Storm Gray starting at $7,199.

2023 Kawasaki KLR650 Adventure and KLR650 Adventure ABS

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki KLR650 Adventure in Cypher Camo Gray

The KLR650 Adventure model is built off of the standard KLR650 platform and designed for the rider who is looking for increased carrying capacity and convenience. It comes equipped with factory-installed side cases, LED auxiliary lights, engine guards, a tank pad, and both a DC power outlet and USB socket. It’s available both with and without ABS.

The 2023 KLR650 Adventure is available in Cypher Camo Gray starting at $7,899, while the KLR650 Adventure ABS also comes in Cypher Camo Gray starting at $8,199.

2023 Kawasaki KLR650 Traveler ABS

Kawasaki 2023 returning models
2023 Kawasaki KLR650 Traveler ABS in Pearl Solar Yellow

The KLR650 Traveler model consists of the same features found on the standard KLR650 as well as a factory-installed top case and both a DC power outlet and USB socket. It comes equipped with ABS.

The KLR650 Traveler ABS is offered in Pearl Solar Yellow starting at $7,599.

For more information, visit the Kawasaki website.

The post Kawasaki Announces More 2023 Returning Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL | Road Test Review

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
BMW’s K Series lineup, which includes the K 1600 GTL and three other models, has been thoroughly updated for 2022. We logged 2,000 miles on the GTL for this road test. Photos by Kevin Wing.

It has been four decades since BMW introduced the K 100, its first motorcycle powered by a liquid-cooled in-line 4-cylinder engine. Known as the “Flying Brick,” the 987cc Four was laid on its side, with the cylinder head on the left and the crankshaft on the right. In 1988, the K 100 became the first motorcycle equipped with anti-lock brakes.

Check out Rider‘s 2022 Motorcycle Buyer’s Guide

From such humble, idiosyncratic roots grew a K Series family tree with many branches, including the K 75 (essentially a K 100 with a cylinder lopped off), the futuristic K 1 (winner of Rider’s first Motorcycle of the Year award in 1990), the 167-hp K 1200 S sportbike (its transverse-mounted engine marked the end of the “Flying Brick” era), and the opulent K 1200 LT luxury-tourer (available with such options as a CD changer and a small refrigerator).

BMW gave its K Series a clean-sheet reboot for 2012 when it launched the K 1600 GT sport-tourer and K 1600 GTL luxury-tourer. Compared to its K 1300 predecessor, the K 1600 engine grew from four cylinders to six, and displacement increased from 1,293cc to 1,649cc.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
The K 1600’s six cylinders are canted forward 55 degrees, but Kevin Duke got them nearly vertical at the bike’s launch in South Africa. Photo courtesy BMW Motorrad.

The perfectly balanced, incredibly smooth in-line Six was – and still is – one of the best engines ever stuffed into a production motorcycle. Mild and unassuming at cruising speeds, a hard twist of the right grip releases a wail like a long-tailed cat caught under a rocking chair. Generating 160 hp and 129 lb-ft of torque at the crank, the engine supplies stump-pulling grunt at any rpm in any gear. At the K 1600 GT/GTL world press launch in South Africa, my colleague Kevin Duke – at the time Editor-in-Chief at Motorcycle.com; now EIC at American Rider – demonstrated the Six’s prodigious torque by pulling an impressive wheelie on the nearly 800-lb GTL.

With features such as throttle-by-wire, ride modes, lean-angle-adaptive traction control, electronically adjustable suspension, and an industry-first cornering headlight, not to mention class-leading comfort, wind protection, and storage capacity, the K 1600 GT and K 1600 GTL were groundbreaking machines in their respective segments.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
The K 1600 GTL was Rider’s 2012 Motorcycle of the Year.

The K 1600 GTL was the unanimous choice for Rider’s 2012 Motorcycle of the Year award. “The K 1600 platform makes the most sense parked under the GTL luxury-tourer’s standard equipment,” we said. “Stacked against its luxo competition [i.e., the Honda Gold Wing], the GTL offers less weight, more power and load capacity, and, if the owner of one wants more of a sport-touring experience, the top trunk is easily removed (and it fits and is offered as an accessory for the GT). Comfort is equal to or better than anything in the luxury-touring class, and the GTL steers, stops, and handles like it weighs even less than its 776 pounds ready-to-ride.”

Aluminum Anniversary

Over the past 10 years, the K 1600 platform has evolved and expanded. From 2012 to 2017, there were just two models: the GT, which has saddlebags (but no trunk), sport-touring ergos, and a short windscreen, and the GTL, which adds a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest, a plusher two-up seat, and a larger windscreen.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
With six cylinders generating 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, the mighty GTL howls like a banshee when wrung out on a backroad.

For 2018, BMW introduced the K 1600 B bagger, which has a tubular handlebar, streamlined saddlebags, and a lower profile than the GT thanks to a shorter windscreen, lower seats, and less suspension travel. Next came the K 1600 Grand America, which is to the B what the GTL is to the GT, with a trunk, a taller windscreen, and more generous rider and passenger accommodations.

In all, I’ve probably logged 15,000 miles on various K 1600 models. I attended the K 1600 GT/GTL launch in South Africa in 2011, and in the years that followed, I spearheaded comparison tests of the K 1600 GTL vs. the Honda Gold Wing, the K 1600 GT vs. the Kawasaki Concours 14, and others. In 2014, I tested the short-lived ultra-premium K 1600 GTL Exclusive. Three years later, I flew to North Carolina for the launch of the K 1600 B and then rode one 3,500 miles through 14 states on my way back to California. And in 2018, my wife, Carrie, and I picked up a K 1600 Grand America from BMW’s headquarters in New Jersey and spent a week riding it through New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont on our way to and from the Americade rally.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
Dynamic Electronic Suspension Adjustment (ESA) “Next Generation” has improved damping calibration and now provides automatic load leveling.

For 2022, BMW has given the K 1600 platform its most extensive update yet, starting with the engine, which now meets Euro 5 regulations and makes a claimed 160 hp at 6,750 rpm (1,000 rpm earlier than before) and 133 lb-ft of torque (up from 129) at 5,250 rpm. All models get a new 6-axis IMU that informs most of the electronic rider aids, and standard equipment now includes engine-drag torque control, Dynamic ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment) “Next Generation” with automatic load leveling, a 10.25-inch TFT color display with integrated navigation (via the BMW Motorrad Connected app) and Bluetooth connectivity, BMW’s Audio System 2.0 (on the GTL and Grand America), and several new comfort and convenient features.

Grand Touring Luxury

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
Luxurious two-up accommodations include wide, supportive seats with backrests, large footrests, excellent wind protection, and 155 liters of storage.

In June, I picked up a K 1600 GTL with only 55 miles on its odometer in Riverside, California. The standard GTL ($26,895) has a Black Storm Metallic paint scheme. Our test bike had the $795 Exclusive Style Package, which includes Gravity Blue Metallic paint, black tank trim, chrome slipstream deflectors, and chrome saddlebag trim. It was also equipped with the $1,850 Premium Package, which adds Keyless Ride, a central locking system, a bi-directional quickshifter, LED auxiliary lights, and engine protection bars, as well as floor lighting ($100). Our GTL’s as-tested price comes to $29,640, and the destination charge adds another $795.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
Standard equipment on all K 1600 models, two slipstream deflectors (the right one shown in its deployed position) direct air into the cockpit when desired.

My first task was to download the BMW Motorrad Connected app and use it to pair my iPhone to the bike. Replacing the dash cradle that held a BMW Navigator GPS unit (a $900 option) is a new air-conditioned smartphone charging compartment. The windscreen must be raised to access the top-loading compartment, and pressing a button next to the TFT display opens it. The compartment lid is secured by two latches, and pressing the button typically released the left latch but not the right one. The button and latches were balky through our test, and my iPhone 12 Pro with its slim Otterbox case was a tight fit, making it sometimes difficult to get both latches to catch when I pressed down on the spring-loaded compartment lid.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
Most smartphones fit in the air-conditioned charging compartment, but some are a tight fit.

To use the app’s turn-by-turn navigation, I had to set the app’s location access on my iPhone to “always” and change the phone’s display auto-lock (sleep mode) to “never,” both of which accelerate battery drain. Rather than leave my phone in my pocket, I used BMW’s specially angled adapter cable ($30) to charge my phone while the compartment’s A/C kept it cool. When the ignition is turned off, the windscreen automatically lowers to prevent someone with sticky fingers from opening the nonlocking phone compartment. If you want to remove your phone when you get off the bike, you must remember to do so before shutting off the power.

As much as I appreciate not having to spend another $900 on BMW’s Navigator GPS, the smartphone solution doesn’t work as well as it should. With practice, the steps involved become easier, but the app’s user experience needs to be simplified, and the smartphone compartment is too fiddly. On a $30,000 motorcycle, I don’t want to fight with the smartphone compartment or the windscreen every time I put my phone in or take it out. I also shouldn’t have to remove the protective case so my phone fits better. And if I had the taller, wider Max version of the iPhone? Forget it. It wouldn’t fit.

Once I got the maps for Southern California downloaded to the app, the app paired to the bike, my phone’s settings dialed in, and my home address punched into the app, the on-screen navigation worked great and provided clear routing for my 125-mile ride home to Ventura.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
The large 10.25 TFT display clearly shows navigation and other info.

The enormous 10.25-inch TFT display, which first appeared on the R 1250 RT and is also on the R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental, has crisp graphics that are large and easy to read. The screen is large enough that the navigation can be on the left and vehicle info on the right. BMW’s Multi-Controller wheel, which debuted on the K 1600 GT and GTL a decade ago and has since migrated to other premium BMW models, remains one of the easiest menu navigation devices available.

New on all K 1600 models are four configurable Favorites buttons, which are located within reach on the fairing to the left of the fuel tank. Each button can be programmed to provide quick access to 18 different functions, including everything from the grip and seat heaters to phone contacts and call history. Navigating to some of these functions through the menus can take multiple steps, so shortcut buttons are useful. However, the buttons are not backlit, nor are any of the buttons on the handlebar switchgear, making them difficult to use at night. On a flagship luxury touring bike, the little details matter.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
On the left side of the fairing are the four configurable Favorites buttons and one of two lockable fairing compartments.

Road Worthy

Out on the road, the K 1600 GTL is large and in charge. The rider sits deeply into the 29.5-inch nonadjustable seat, which has wrap-around lumbar support. Those with long legs will want the optional high seat that’s 2 inches taller. The passenger sits on a wide, plush seat with large grab handles and a well-padded curved backrest built into the trunk. Both the rider and passenger perch their boots on wide, rubber-covered footrests.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
The GTL has a comfortable, upright seating position, but the standard 29.5-inch seat limited legroom for our 6-foot-tall tester with a 34-inch inseam. BMW offers a taller accessory seat that adds 2 inches.

GEAR UP
Helmet: Schuberth C5 Modular
Jacket: Fly Racing Off-Grid
Gloves: Fly Racing Brawler
Pants: Fly Racing Resistance Jeans
Boots: Fly Racing Milepost

Wind protection is first-rate. The large fairing punches a huge hole in the wind, and the aerodynamic windscreen smoothly parts the air. With the screen in the lowest position, airflow hit me at helmet level and assisted the ventilation of my Schuberth C5 modular helmet, but it caused some buffeting for Carrie when she rode as a passenger. Raising the windscreen 5 inches to full height, I had to look through the screen, but it created a quiet bubble of air for both of us. On either side of the bike, between the upper fairing and side panels, are two slipstream deflectors. In their normal closed position, they help push air out around the rider. When opened, they direct fresh air into the cockpit.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
The GTL’s electric windscreen can be adjusted over a 5-inch range (shown fully raised).

Measuring more than 8 feet from nose to tail and weighing 802 lb with its 7-gallon tank full, the Premium-equipped GTL is a long, heavy machine. You certainly feel that heft when lifting it off the sidestand or pushing it around the garage, but it’s less apparent on the road. The top-heavy bike tends to fall into turns and has remarkably light steering despite its size. Occasionally it has a vague, slightly disconnected feel when cornering, which is most likely due to its unconventional Hossack-style Duolever front end.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
The GTL has lighter steering than one expects for an 802-lb motorcycle, but feedback from the Duolever front end is relatively vague.

The GTL has three ride modes – Dynamic, Road, and Rain – that adjust throttle response, engine drag-torque control, Dynamic Traction Control, and Dynamic ESA, with input from the new 6-axis IMU. BMW has been refining its suite of electronics for years, and their integration and responsiveness are impressive. All the bits of data flying around in the background never intrude on the riding experience. The connection between the right grip and the rear wheel is direct, and the growl from the 6-into-2 exhaust with howitzer-sized cans taps into the brain’s pleasure center.

For braking, enormous 320mm discs – two in front and one in back – are grabbed by a pair of gorilla-grip 4-piston front calipers and a supporting 2-piston rear caliper. It’s hard to believe such a big bike can stop so fast and with so much feel at the front lever – and with barely any fork dive thanks to the Duolever design. The GTL is equipped with BMW’s Partial Integral ABS, so the hand lever applies the brakes to both wheels, while the foot lever applies braking only to the rear wheel.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
Each saddlebag can accommodate a full-face helmet.

Out of the Fog

After a series of daylong solo and two-up test rides, I was itching to put some miles on the GTL, so with photographer Kevin Wing astride our Yamaha Tracer 9 GT long-term test bike, we left Ventura early one morning and headed up the coast. After stopping in San Luis Obispo for gas and coffee, we rode up Highway 1 to Big Sur, arriving just in time for lunch. We had tri-tip tacos on the back deck of Fernwood Bar & Grill in the shade of towering redwoods.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
Mark Twain once said, “The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco.” The Pacific Ocean is the world’s largest fog machine.

Even though it was late July, for the previous two hours we had ridden through thick, cold fog and erratic wind gusts, so I kept the grip and seat heaters cranked up to fight off the chill. Our plan was for late-light photography on the Monterey Peninsula, but the marine layer had the coast completely socked in. Instead, we continued north on Highway 1 to Santa Cruz, crossed over the coastal range to San Jose, and then made our way to San Francisco. After crossing the fogbound Golden Gate Bridge, we climbed into the mountains of Marin County until we were out of the pea soup.

Our photo shoot lasted until after the sun went down, so it was dark when we rode along a series of tight, twisty roads through a dense forest on our way to the town of Mill Valley. Like all K 1600s, the GTL has a new headlight array that includes a pair of position lights made up of six LEDs, four high beams made up of eight LEDs, and a central low beam made up of nine LEDs. All the lights are bright, and, informed by the IMU, the low beam expertly rolls left and right through a 35-degree arc based on lean angle to directly light into corners.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
Taking a break in the shade of a redwood grove. The GTL’s removable, carpet-lined trunk accommodates two helmets and has an LED interior light.

Also new this year are “welcome,” “goodbye,” and “follow me home” light functions that activate the headlights, taillights, and auxiliary lights when turning the ignition on and off. Our test bike also had optional floor lighting, which activates an LED puddle light when the ignition is turned off.

By the time we checked into a motel, it was after 9 p.m. and we had been on the road for 15 hours. Packing and unpacking the GTL is a breeze. Two small fairing pockets in front of the rider’s shins, two saddlebags, and a top trunk provide 115 liters of total storage capacity. Tapping a button on the Keyless Ride fob remotely locks or unlocks all the storage compartments and luggage (except for the smartphone compartment). The saddlebags and trunks are removable, and the trunk has an interior light to help find stuff in the dark.

We were on the bikes again at 6 a.m. for a morning shoot, and then we made our way south. Our hopes for shooting the GTL at a Marin Headlands overlook with the Golden Gate Bridge in the background were thwarted by heavy fog. We filtered through city traffic, cruised the freeway, and took Skyline Boulevard (State Route 35) along a high coastal ridge under a canopy of redwoods, stopping for lunch at Alice’s Restaurant, a well-known moto hangout.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review

Kevin and I put in another 15-hour day of shooting and riding, logging 800 miles of our 2,000-mile test in just two days, many of them on some of the best curves in California. Hustling the big GTL through a tight set of twisties takes some work, but the reward is one of the most viscerally and aurally exciting corner exits one can hope for – lather, rinse, and repeat. When the road straightens out, it cruises smoothly and quietly, like a Great White shark gliding through the depths to conserve energy.

BMW’s K Series has come a long way in four decades, and 10 years on, the K 1600 GTL continues to impress.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Road Test Review
Would you ride 400 miles to watch a sunset? With a vista like this and a bike like the K 1600 GTL, we’d happily do it again.

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL Specs

Base Price: $26,895
Price as Tested: $29,640 (Exclusive Style Package, Premium Package, floor lighting)
Warranty: 3 yrs., 36,000 miles
Website: BMWMotorcycles.com

ENGINE
Type:
Liquid-cooled, transverse in-line Six, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,649cc
Bore x Stroke: 72.0 x 67.5mm
Compression Ratio: 12.2:1
Valve Insp. Interval: Varies, computer monitored
Fuel Delivery: BMS-X EFI, 52mm throttle valves x 6
Lubrication System: Dry sump, 4.75-qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated wet clutch w/ quickshifter (as tested)
Final Drive: Shaft

CHASSIS
Frame: Cast-aluminum-alloy twin-spar main frame w/ engine as stressed member & aluminum subframe; cast-aluminum Paralever single-sided swingarm
Wheelbase: 63.7 in.
Rake/Trail: 27.8 degrees/4.2 in.
Seat Height: 29.5 in.; optional high seat: 31.5 in.
Suspension, Front: BMW Duolever w/ Dynamic ESA, 4.5-in. travel
Rear: BMW Paralever w/ single shock & Dynamic ESA, 5.3-in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual floating 320mm fixed discs w/ 4-piston calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 320mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.50 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast, 6.00 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 190/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 802 lb (as tested)
Load Capacity: 432 lb (as tested)
GVWR: 1,234 lb

PERFORMANCE
Horsepower: 160 hp @ 6,750 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Torque: 133 lb-ft @ 5,250 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Fuel Capacity: 7.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 39 mpg
Estimated Range: 273 miles

The post 2022 BMW K 1600 GTL | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

BMW Announces Updates to Select 2023 Models

BMW Motorrad USA has announced the first round of updates and changes to its 2023 lineup of motorcycles and scooters, which will begin production in August 2022. BMW says it has made an effort to streamline the range of available options, with one comprehensive equipment package available for most models.

2023 BMW C 400 GT

2023 BMW C 400 GT in Callisto Gray Metallic
2023 BMW C 400 GT in new Callisto Grey Metallic with gold front brake calipers

The BMW C 400 GT saw several updates in 2022 and remains the only gas-powered scooter in BMW’s lineup. The 350cc liquid-cooled Single makes a claimed 34 hp at 7,500 rpm and 26 lb-ft of torque. Power is transmitted through a CVT (Constantly Variable Transmission) and a rigid aluminum double-sided swingarm with a swingarm bearing designed for reduced vibration.

In 2022, the C 400 GT got new throttle-by-wire, upgraded braking and traction control, and other updates. For 2023, the scooter has been updated so that the comfort turn indicator can be switched off in the menu for the instrument cluster. All U.S. models automatically add the Premium Package, which includes a heated seat and heated grips.

The C 400 GT starts at $8,245. Previous color options of Alpine White and Triple Black remain the same, while the Callisto Grey Metallic has added gold front brake calipers.

2023 BMW C 400 GT in Triple Black
2023 BMW C 400 GT in Triple Black
2023 BMW C 400 GT in Alpine White
2023 BMW C 400 GT in Alpine White

2023 BMW CE 04

2023 BMW CE 04 Avantgarde Package with Magellan Grey Metallic
2023 BMW CE 04 in Avantgarde Package with Magellan Grey Metallic

BMW took “urban mobility” up a level to “electromobility” in 2021 with the CE 04, an electric scooter that features a liquid-cooled, permanent-magnet electric motor making a claimed 42 hp. Top speed is 74.5 mph, with standing start acceleration of 0-30 mph in 2.6 seconds. BMW claims a range of 80 miles on the battery, with approximate standard charging time of four hours and 20 minutes (65 minutes with the optional quick charger).

ABS is standard, as are a 10.25-inch TFT color screen with integrated map navigation and extensive connectivity and three ride modes – Road, Rain, and Eco. For 2023, the CE 04 has been updated so the self-canceling turnsignal can be switched off in the menu for the instrument cluster.

2023 BMW CE 04 in Light White
2023 BMW CE 04 in Light White

All U.S. CE 04 models automatically add the Premium Package, which includes an adaptive headlight, Pro ride modes, cornering ABS, quick charge capability, a heated seat, tire-pressure monitoring, and a centerstand. The CE 04 starts at $11,795. Color choices of Light White and the Avantgarde Package with Magellan Grey Metallic remain unchanged.

2023 BMW G 310 R, G 310 GS

2023 BMW G 310 R in Passion Racing Red
2023 BMW G 310 R in new Passion Racing Red
2023 BMW G 310 GS in Rallye Kalamata Dark Gold Metallic
2023 BMW G 310 GS in new Rallye Kalamata Dark Gold Metallic

BMW’s entry-level roadster, the G 310 R, and G 310 GS adventure bike both have a 313cc liquid-cooled Single that makes a claimed 34 hp at 9,250 rpm and 20.6 lb-ft of torque. Power is delivered via a 6-speed gearbox and chain final drive, and the G 310s were upgraded in 2021 to include throttle-by-wire and a slipper clutch, as well as adjustable brake and clutch hand levers. ABS is standard, but other 2021 updates included a new LED headlight and indicators.

2023 BMW G 310 R in Polar White/Racing Blue
2023 BMW G 310 R in new Polar White/Racing Blue
2023 BMW G 310 R in Cosmic Black 2
2023 BMW G 310 R in Cosmic Black 2

For 2023, BMW hasn’t made any equipment changes to the G 310s, which starts at $4,995 for the G 310 R and $5,695 for the GS. For colors, on the G 310 R, Passion Racing Red style replaces Passion Kyanite Blue Metallic, Sport Polar White/Racing Blue style replaces Sport Limestone Metallic, and Cosmic Black 2 remains unchanged. On the G 310 GS, Sport Polar White/Racing Blue replaces Triple Black, the Rallye Kalamata Dark Gold Metallic style replaces Rallye Kyanite Blue Metallic, and Cosmic Black 3 remains unchanged.

2023 BMW G 310 GS in Polar White/Racing Blue
2023 BMW G 310 GS in new Polar White/Racing Blue
2023 BMW G 310 GS in Cosmic Black 3
2023 BMW G 310 GS in Cosmic Black 3

2023 BMW F 750 GS

2023 BMW F 750 GS in Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red
2023 BMW F 750 GS in new Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red

The BMW F 750 GS adventure bike features an 853cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin that makes a claimed 77 hp at 7,500 rpm and 61 lb-ft of torque. The bike has a 6-speed gearbox, a slip/assist clutch, and chain final drive. BMW’s cornering ABS and traction control are standard, as are the Road and Rain ride modes.

For 2023, the F 750 GS has added RDC real-time gradient tire-pressure monitoring, and the self-canceling turnsignal can now be switched off in the menu for the instrument cluster. All U.S. F 750 GS models automatically add the Premium Package, which includes GPS Prep, cruise control, LED headlight, Gear Shift Assist Pro, Dynamic Pro and Enduro Pro ride modes, heated grips, a luggage rack with case holders, tire-pressure monitoring, MSR Dynamic Engine Brake Control, and Dynamic Electronic Suspension Adjustment (not available with low suspension). Individual options include low suspension, a centerstand, M Endurance chain, a comfort seat, and an extra-low seat.

2023 BMW F 750 GS in Triple Black
2023 BMW F 750 GS in Triple Black
2023 BMW F 750 GS in Light White
2023 BMW F 750 GS in Light White

The F 750 GS starts at $9,995. For colors, the Triple Black with Black Storm 2 and Light White remain unchanged for 2023, and the Sport Light White/Racing Blue Metallic/Racing Red replaces San Marino Blue Metallic.

2023 BMW F 850 GS and F 850 GS Adventure

2023 BMW F 850 GS in Trophy Gravity Blue Metallic
2023 BMW F 850 GS in new Trophy Gravity Blue Metallic
2023 BMW F 850 GS Adventure in Rallye Kalamata Matte Metallic 2
2023 BMW F 850 GS Adventure in new Rallye Kalamata Matte Metallic 2

With similar displacement as the F 750 GS but a little more muscle, the F 850 GS and GS Adventure both have an 853cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin making a claimed 90 hp at 8,000 rpm and 63 lb-ft of torque. Power is delivered through the 6-speed gearbox with a slipper clutch and chain final drive. Switchable cornering ABS, Automatic Stability Control (aka traction control), and Rain and Road ride modes are standard.

The F 850 GS has adjustable brake and clutch hand levers, and the GS Adventure adds adjustable rear brake and gear shift levers. Both models have an adjustable windscreen, and for 2023, RDC real-time gradient tire-pressure monitoring has been added, and the self-canceling turnsignal  can be switched off in the menu for the instrument cluster.

All U.S. F 850 GS and GS Adventure models automatically add the Premium Package, which includes an LED headlight, Gear Shift Assist Pro, Pro ride modes, heated grips, luggage rack with case holders, Keyless Ride, tir- pressure monitoring, MSR Dynamic Engine Brake Control, Dynamic Electronic Suspension Adjustment (not available with low suspension). The GS Adventure Premium Package adds GPS Prep, cruise control, LED auxiliary lights, and aluminum side case holders.

2023 BMW F 850 GS Adventure in Light White
2023 BMW F 850 GS Adventure in Light White
2023 BMW F 850 GS Adventure in Triple Black
2023 BMW F 850 GS Adventure in Triple Black

Individual options for both bikes include low suspension, a centerstand, M Endurance chain, off-road tires, cruise control, a comfort seat, and an extra-low seat. The GS adds a Touring Package with GPS Prep and cruise control, and the GS Adventure adds low suspension, off-road tires, a centerstand (not available with low suspension), a double seat, a Rallye seat, and a low seat.

The F 850 GS starts at $12,595 for 2023. For colors, Trophy Gravity Blue Metallic replaces Racing Blue Metallic, and both Racing Red and the Triple Black with Black Storm Metallic 2 style remain unchanged.

2023 BMW F 850 GS in Racing Red
2023 BMW F 850 GS in Racing Red
2023 BMW F 850 GS in Triple Black
2023 BMW F 850 GS in Triple Black

The F 850 GS Adventure starts at $13,595, with the Rallye Kalamata Matte Metallic 2 style replacing Mineral Grey Matte Metallic. Light White and the Triple Black with Black Storm Metallic 2 style remain unchanged.

2023 BMW F 900 R and F 900 XR

2023 BMW F 900 XR Sport Racing Blue Metallic
2023 BMW F 900 XR in new Sport Racing Blue Metallic

Both the F 900 R roadster and F 900 XR adventure bike have an 895cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin that makes a claimed 99 hp at 8,500 rpm and 67 lb-ft of torque. They have a 6-speed gearbox, a slipper clutch, and chain final drive. ABS, Automatic Stability Control, and Rain and Road ride modes are standard, as are adjustable brake and clutch hand levers and a 6.5-inch TFT display. For 2023, BMW has added RDC real-time gradient tire-pressure monitoring, and the self-canceling turnsignal can be switched off in the menu for the instrument cluster.

All U.S. F 900 R models automatically add either the Comfort Package (M Endurance chain, Keyless Ride, and heated grips) or the Premium Package, which includes the M Endurance chain, Keyless Ride, heated grips, GPS Prep, cruise control, saddlebag mounts, Gear Shift Assist Pro, Pro ride modes, MSR Dynamic Engine Brake Control, Adaptive Headlight, Headlight Pro, cornering traction control, tire-pressure monitoring, and a centerstand (not available with low suspension). The F 900 XR automatically adds the Premium Package, which includes everything in the 900 R Premium Package, plus cornering ABS.

Individual options on the 900 R include a high seat, a low seat, and low suspension. Individual options on the 900 XR also includes low suspension (not with Dynamic Electronic Suspension Adjustment or centerstand), as well as handguards, a centerstand, and a low seat.

2023 BMW F 900 R in Black Storm Metallic
2023 BMW F 900 R in Black Storm Metallic
2023 BMW F 900 R in Sport Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red
2023 BMW F 900 R in Sport Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red
2023 BMW F 900 R in Bluestone Metallic
2023 BMW F 900 R in Bluestone Metallic

The F 900 R starts at $8,995, and for 2023, the three colors of Black Storm Metallic and styles of Sport Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red and Bluestone Metallic remain unchanged.

The F 900 XR starts at $11,695. The Sport Racing Blue Metallic style replaces Racing Red and adds an engine spoiler, and both Triple Black with Black Storm Metallic 2 and Light White remain unchanged.

2023 BMW F 900 XR in Triple Black
2023 BMW F 900 XR in Triple Black
2023 BMW F 900 XR in Light White
2023 BMW F 900 XR in Light White

2023 BMW R nineT, R nineT Pure, R nineT Scrambler, and R nineT Urban G/S

2023 BMW R nineT Pure in Option 719 Underground/Light White
2023 BMW R nineT Pure in new Option 719 Underground/Light White
2023 BMW R nineT Scrambler in Manhattan Metallic Matte
2023 BMW R nineT Scrambler in new Manhattan Metallic Matte

Introduced in 2013, BMW’s R nineT range – R nineT, R nineT Pure, R nineT Scrambler, and R nineT Urban G/S – saw updates in 2021, so there are only style and option changes for the 2023 lineup. The range still includes a 1,170cc air/liquid-cooled Boxer Twin that received newly designed cylinder heads with a new turbulence system in 2021. The engine makes 109 hp at 7,250 rpm and 85.5 lb-ft of torque (claimed). The R nineT range features a 6-speed gearbox, a single-plate dry clutch, and shaft final drive.

Cornering ABS, a new shock absorber with travel-dependent damping, and Rain and Road ride modes were added as standard to the entire range in 2021, as well as new instrumentation and LED headlamp and indicators. Automatic Stability Control is standard across the range, and with the exception of the R nineT Pure, each bike now offers Pro ride modes as part of the included Select Package, with the R nineT adding Dynamic ride mode and the Scrambler and Urban G/S adding Dirt. Pro ride modes, including Dynamic ride mode, are options on the R nineT Pure.

With the exception of the R nineT Pure, all U.S. R nineT models automatically add the Select Package for 2023, which includes Pro ride modes, heated grips, cruise control, Adaptive Headlight, MSR Dynamic engine brake control, and cornering traction control.

New individual options for the R nineT include an aluminum fuel tank (with or without sanded welds), Option 719 Wheels (Classic and Sport), and billet packs. The R nineT models starts at $15,945. For 2023 colors, Option 719 Mineral White Metallic/Aurum has been removed. Option 719 Aluminum Matte, Option 719 Night Black/Aluminum Matte, and Black Storm Metallic remain unchanged.

2023 BMW R nineT in Option 719 Aluminum Matte
2023 BMW R nineT in Option 719 Aluminum Matte
2023 BMW R nineT in Option 719 Night Black/Aluminum Matte
2023 BMW R nineT in Option 719 Night Black/Aluminum Matte
2023 BMW R nineT in Black Storm Metallic
2023 BMW R nineT in Black Storm Metallic

For the R nineT Pure models, new individual options for 2023 include spoked wheels, Design Option Silencer, low suspension, and heated grips. The Pure starts at $10,995. For colors, Teal Blue Metallic Matte has been removed, Option 719 Underground/Light White has replaced Blackstorm Metallic/Racing Red, Option 719 Pollux Metallic/Light White replaced Cosmic Blue/Light White, and Mineral Gray remains unchanged.

2023 BMW R nineT Pure in Option 719 Pollux Metallic/Light White
2023 BMW R nineT Pure in new Option 719 Pollux Metallic/Light White
2023 BMW R nineT Pure in Mineral Gray
2023 BMW R nineT Pure in Mineral Gray

For the R nineT Scrambler, individual options include low suspension, spoked wheels (only with low suspension), Design Option gold wheels (not with low suspension), black cross-spoked wheels (not with low suspension), off-road tires, a high brown seat, and billet packs. The R nineT Scrambler starts at $12,995. For 2023 colors, Manhattan Metallic Matte replaces Kalamata Metallic Matte, Option 719 Underground/Light White replaces Blackstorm Metallic/Racing Red, Option 719 Pollux Metallic/Light White replaces Cosmic Blue Metallic/Light White, and Granite Gray Metallic remains unchanged.

2023 BMW R nineT Scrambler in Option 719 Underground/Light White
2023 BMW R nineT Scrambler in new Option 719 Underground/Light White
2023 BMW R nineT Scrambler in Option 719 Pollux Metallic/Light White
2023 BMW R nineT Scrambler in new Option 719 Pollux Metallic/Light White
2023 BMW R nineT Scrambler in Granite Gray Metallic
2023 BMW R nineT Scrambler in Granite Gray Metallic

For the 2023 R nineT Urban G/S, individual options include Design Option Silencer, Design Option gold spoke Wheels, black cross-spoked wheels, chrome header pipe, off-road tires, low seat, and billet packs. The R nineT Urban G/S starts at $12,995, and the colors Light White and Imperial Blue Metallic have been added.

2023 BMW R nineT Urban G/S in Light White
2023 BMW R nineT Urban G/S in new Light White
2023 BMW R nineT Urban G/S in Imperial Blue Metallic
2023 BMW R nineT Urban G/S in new Imperial Blue Metallic

2023 BMW R 1250 GS and R 1250 GS Adventure

2023 BMW R 1250 GS in GS Trophy Gravity Blue Metallic Matte
2023 BMW R 1250 GS in new GS Trophy Gravity Blue Metallic Matte
2023 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure in GS Trophy Gravity Blue Metallic
2023 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure in new GS Trophy Gravity Blue Metallic

The R 1250 GS and R 1250 GS Adventure are legendary travel enduro motorcycles. Both bikes have a 1,254cc air/liquid-cooled Boxer Twin that makes a claimed 136 hp at 7,750 rpm and 105 lb-ft of torque. They sport a 6-speed gearbox, a slipper clutch, and shaft final drive. Inclination- and corner-optimized ABS, cornering traction control, Hill Start Control, and three ride modes – Eco, Rain, and Road – are standard.

For 2023, the automatically added Premium Package for each bike includes Pro ride modes, which includes additional modes (Dynamic, Dynamic Pro, Enduro and Enduro Pro), riding mode preselection (individualization of numbers of riding modes), automated Hill Start Control Pro, Dynamic Brake Control, and engine brake control.

Both bikes also now come with RDC real-time gradient tire-pressure monitoring (added to the included Premium Package for the R 1250 GS and the Comfort Package for the 1250 GS Adventure), and the self-canceling turnsignals can be switched off in the menu for the instrument cluster.

All U.S. R 1250 GS and GS Adventure models automatically add the Premium Package, which includes, in addition to those details mentioned already, Keyless Rride, silencer, chrome header, heated grips, tire-pressure monitoring, GPS Prep, cruise control, handguards, case holders, Dynamic Electronic Suspension Adjustment, Gear Shift Assist Pro.

Individual options for the R 1250 GS include the Enduro Package, passenger kit (standard and low), low suspension, heated seat, M lightweight battery, sports suspension, LED auxiliary lights, handlebar risers, off-road tires, aluminum case mounts, black or gold cross-spoked wheels, low Rallye bench seat, and billet packs.

The R 1250 GS starts at $17,995, and for 2023 colors, GS Trophy Gravity Blue Metallic Matte replaces Edition 40 Years GS Blackstorm Metallic and includes cross-spoked wheels, Rallye seat, sport windshield, radiator protectors, frame protectors, enduro footrests. The Rallye Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red style remains unchanged, as does the Triple Black with Black Storm Metallic/Black/Agate Gray style. Light White also returns for 2023.

2023 BMW R 1250 GS in Rallye Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red
2023 BMW R 1250 GS in Rallye Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red
2023 BMW R 1250 GS in Triple Black with Black Storm/Metallic Black/Agate Gray
2023 BMW R 1250 GS in Triple Black with Black Storm/Metallic Black/Agate Gray
2023 BMW R 1250 GS in Light White
2023 BMW R 1250 GS in Light White

For the R 1250 GS Adventure models, individual options include passenger kits (standard and low), heated seat, LED auxiliary lights, handlebar risers, off-road tires, black or gold cross-spoked wheels, Rallye bench seat, and billet packs.

The R 1250 GS Adventure starts at $20,345. The GS Trophy Gravity Blue Metallic style replaces Edition 40 Years GS Blackstorm Metallic and includes cross-spoked wheels, Rallye seat, sport windshield, radiator protectors, frame protectors, and enduro footrests. All other color choices – Rallye Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red style, Triple Black with Black Storm Metallic/Black/Agate Gray, and Ice Gray – remain unchanged.

2023 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure in Rallye Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red
2023 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure in Rallye Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red
2023 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure in Triple Black with Black Storm/Metallic Black/Agate Gray
2023 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure in Triple Black with Black Storm/Metallic Black/Agate Gray
2023 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure in Ice Gray
2023 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure in Ice Gray

2023 BMW R 1250 RT

2023 BMW R 1250 RT in new Option 719 Meteoric Dust 2 Metallic

In 2020, BMW announced several technical and aesthetic updates to the R 1250 RT sport-tourer. It features a 1,254cc air/liquid-cooled Boxer Twin that makes a claimed 136 hp at 7,750 rpm and 105 lb-ft of torque, a 6-speed gearbox with a slipper clutch, and shaft final drive. Starting in 2021,  full integral and cornering-optimized ABS and cornering traction control were added as standard equipment. The Eco ride mode was also added as standard to the existing Rain and Road modes, among several other standard features. For 2023, RDC real-time gradient tire-pressure monitoring has been added to the Comfort Package, and the self-canceling turnsignal can be switched off in the menu for the instrument cluster.

All U.S. R 1250 RT models automatically add the ZPP Premium Package, which includes Keyless Ride, silencer, chrome header, central locking, heated seat, alarm, enhanced connectivity, 12V socket, Dynamic Electronic Suspension Adjustment, Gear Shift Assist Pro, Pro ride modes, active cruise control, adaptive headlight, auxiliary lights, MSR Dynamic Engine Brake Control, Headlight Pro, audio system, and tire pressure monitor. Individual options include the Option 719 bench seat, high or low seat, Option 719 Classic or Sport wheels, high windshield, sport windshield, tubular handlebars, and billet packs.

2023 BMW R 1250 RT in Sport Racing Blue Metallic
2023 BMW R 1250 RT in Triple Storm Metallic 2
2023 BMW R 1250 RT in Alpine White

The R 1250 RT starts at $19,695. For colors, Option 719 Meteoric Dust 2 Metallic replaces Mineral White Metallic, but the Sport Racing Blue Metallic style, Triple Storm Metallic 2, and Alpine White remain unchanged.

2023 BMW S 1000 R

2023 BMW S 1000 R in new Black Storm Metallic

The S 1000 R roadster was almost completely redesigned for 2021. The 999cc oil/water-cooled inline-Four was modeled off the S 1000 RR and makes a claimed 165 hp at 11,000 rpm and 84 lb-ft of torque. Power is transmitted to the rear wheel via a 6-speed gear box with longer gear ratios from 4th through 6th. The bike has a chain final drive, and slipper clutch was added in 2021.

Also added as standard in 2021 were cornering ABS and traction control, all-around LED lighting, and three ride modes: Rain, Road, and Dynamic. Pro ride modes – including Dynamic Pro with adjustable wheelie control, Hill Start Control Pro, MSR, and DBC – come as part of the 2023 Premium Package, which is included with all U.S. S 1000 R models. RDC real-time gradient tire-pressure monitoring has also been added to Premium Package, and the self-canceling turnsignals can be switched off in the menu for the instrument cluster.

Other aspects of the Premium Package include Keyless Ride, USB port, heated grips, cruise control, Shift Assist Pro, Dynamic Damping Control, engine spoiler, Adaptive Headlight, MSR dynamic engine brake control, and Headlight Pro. Individual options include passenger kit, M-forged wheels, seats, carbon pack, and billet packs.

2023 BMW S 1000 R in new Sport Bluestone Metallic/Black Storm style
2023 S 1000 R in M Package Light White/M Motorsport

The R 1000 R starts at $13,945. For colors, Black Storm Metallic replaces Racing Red in 2023, the Sport Bluestone Metallic/Black Storm style replaces Hockenheim Silver Metallic, and the M Package Light White/M Motorsport remains unchanged.

2023 BMW S 1000 XR

2023 BMW S 1000 XR in Racing Red

BMW says the S 1000 XR sport-adventure-tourer “combines athleticism and long-distance performance in perfect form.” The bike received updates for 2020  similar to those on the S 1000 R . Like its stablemate, the XR has a 999cc oil/water-cooled inline-Four that makes a claimed 165 hp at 11,000 rpm and 84 lb-ft of torque. It has a 6-speed gear box – with the gear ratios lengthened for 4th through 6th gear in 2020 – as well as a slipper clutch and chain final drive.

Partially integral Race ABS, cornering traction control, Dynamic Electronic Suspension Adjustment, and Pro riding modes – including Hill Start Control Pro and MSR – are standard, and all U.S. S 1000 XR models automatically add the Premium Package, which includes Keyless Ride, GPS Prep, USB port, tire-pressure monitoring, handguards, a centerstand, luggage rack, Dynamic ESA pro, Gear Shift Assist Pro, heated grips, cruise control, Adaptive Headlight, and LED auxiliary lights. The self-canceling turnsignals can be switched off in the menu for the instrument cluster, and RDC real-time gradient tire-pressure monitoring has been added to the Touring Package. Individual options include the M Endurance chain, Design Option Wheels, M-forged wheels, low suspension, high windshield, and high or low seat.

2023 BMW S 1000 XR in Triple Black with Black Storm Metallic 2
2023 BMW S 1000 XR in M Package with Light White/M Motorsport

The S 1000 XR starts at $16,945, and all colors – Racing Red, Triple Black with Black Storm Metallic 2, and M Package with Light White/M Motorsport – remain unchanged.

2023 BMW K 1600 GT, K 1600 GTL, and K 1600 B, and K 1600 Grand America

BMW 2023 K 1600 GT in new Option 719 Meteoric Dust II Metallic

All four models of the K 1600 range received updates for the 2022 lineup to meet Euro 5 regulations. All the bikes are still powered by 1,649cc oil/water-cooled inline-Six but included updated BMS engine control, two knock sensors, and two additional lambda probes in 2022. They still make a claimed 160 hp but at 6,750 rpm (1,000 rpm lower than before) and increased 133 lb-ft of torque – up from 129. Power is transmitted via a 6-speed gearbox, a multiple-disc wet clutch, and shaft final drive.

Engine drag-torque control, Dynamic Electronic Suspension Adjustment, and cosmetic and instrumentation updates were also made for 2022. Integral cornering ABS, cornering traction control, Hill Start Control Pro, tire-pressure monitoring, and three ride modes – Rain, Road, and Dynamic – are all standard. For 2023, Keyless Ride is also standard, the self-canceling turnsignals can be switched off in the menu for the instrument cluster, and RDC real-time gradient tire-pressure monitoring has been included with the Premium Package, which is automatically added to the K 1600 GT and GTL, and the ZBP Bagger Package and Grand America Package for the K 1600 B and Grand America respectively.

The Premium Package for both the GT and GTL includes Gear Shift Assist Pro, central locking, LED auxiliary lights, anti-theft alarm, and engine protection bars. The GT Premium Package adds an audio system.

Individual options for both include the Option 719 Bench Seat, floor lighting, and Option 719 Forged Wheels. The GTL adds a high seat and tubular handlebars.

2023 BMW K 1600 GT in Black Storm Metallic
2023 BMW K 1600 GT in Sport Light White/Racing Blue Metallic/Racing Red

The K 1600 GT starts at $23,895. For colors, Option 719 Meteoric Dust II Metallic replaces Mineral White Metallic, and both Black Storm Metallic and the Sport Light White/Racing Blue Metallic/Racing Red style remain unchanged.

2023 BMW K 1600 GTL in new Option 719 Meteoric Dust II Metallic
2023 BMW K 1600 GTL in new Exclusive Gravity Blue Metallic
2023 BMW K 1600 GTL in Black Storm Metallic

The K 1600 GTL starts at $26,895. For 2023, Option 719 Meteoric Dust II Metallic replaces Mineral White Metallic, the Exclusive Gravity Blue Metallic style replaces Elegance Manhattan Metallic, and Black Storm Metallic remains unchanged.

Both the Bagger Package (for K 1600 B) and the Grand America Package (for K 1600 Grand America) include Gear Shift Assist Pro, central locking, anti-theft alarm, audio system, footboards (or alternate compartment on the Bagger), LED auxilary lights, engine protection bars, and a centerstand. The Grand America Package adds a high windshield, additional speakers, and a top case.

Individual options for both bikes include a storage compartment, Option 719 bench seat, floor lighting, forged handlebars, Option 719 Forged Wheels, and high seat (only for Grand America).

2023 BMW K 1600 B in Black Storm Metallic
2023 BMW K 1600 B in Option 719 Meteoric Dust 2 Metallic
2023 BMW K 1600 B in Exclusive Manhattan Metallic Matte

The K 1600 B starts at $22,545 and the Grand America starts at $27,465. For colors on both bikes, all three options – Black Storm Metallic, Option 719 Meteoric Dust 2 Metallic, and the Exclusive Manhattan Metallic Matte style – remain unchanged.

2023 BMW K 1600 Grand America in Black Storm Metallic
2023 BMW K 1600 Grand America in Option 719 Meteoric Dust 2 Metallic
2023 BMW K 1600 Grand America in Exclusive Manhattan Metallic Matte

For more information or to find a BMW dealer near you, visit the BMW motorcycles website.


Rider Motorcycle Buying Program. Get up front prices on local inventory. View Inventory 

The post BMW Announces Updates to Select 2023 Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650 | First Ride Review

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650
Kawasaki’s venerable Versys 650 sport-tourer has been updated for 2022 with traction control, updated styling with an adjustable windscreen, and a new TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity. Photos by Kevin Wing.

My 2009 Kawasaki Versys 650 was one of the best utilitarian two-wheelers I’ve owned, but since I’m always putting miles on test bikes, I hardly ever rode it. When I realized I’d added only 500 miles to the odometer in five years, a deep sense of shame prompted me to sell it. After listing it on Facebook Marketplace, it was gone in a flash. Due to the high prices for used motorcycles right now, I earned a small profit – about a dollar for every mile I put on it.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650
The only colorway for the 2022 Kawasaki Versys 650 LT is Metallic Spark Black/Metallic Flat Spark Black.

Flash forward a few months and I’m wending my way through the twisty interior of San Diego County aboard a 2022 Kawasaki Versys 650. It’s the $9,999 LT version with hard saddlebags and handguards, which only comes in Metallic Spark Black/Metallic Flat Spark Black this year. The base model is available in the same color for $8,899, or in Candy Lime Green/Metallic Flat Spark Black/Metallic Spark Black for $9,099.

Check out Rider‘s 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Not surprisingly, the 2022 upgrade is a much better motorcycle than my just-sold 2009 model, but they still have a lot in common despite 13 years of separation. The seating position, performance, and overall essence of the motorcycle remain virtually unchanged, but a few key aspects go a long way toward improving the bike’s desirability.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650
The new TFT display is a welcome upgrade. The screen is bright and easy to read.

New for ’22 is a full-color 4.3-inch TFT display that is a major improvement over the previous instrument panel, and light-years beyond the one on my ’09 model. The layout of information is modern and clean, blending everything – the gear position indicator, fuel gauge, tach, speedo, clock, tripmeter, etc. –  into a centrally located format. A rider can choose between a black or white background, and the screen brightness automatically adjusts to ambient light levels.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Gear Up:
Helmet: Sena Impulse
Jacket: Spidi H2Out
Gloves: Spidi TX-2
Pants: Rev’It Campo
Boots: Alpinestars SMX-1 R

Simultaneously depressing two analog buttons on the display allows a Bluetooth connection to be established between the Versys and Kawasaki’s Rideology smartphone app. The app features a useful and handy maintenance log, general bike info, and the ability to record rides as well as share them with others.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

During the ride, when the bike and app are talking to one another, the TFT display will notify the rider when a new call or email has been received. The part of my ride recorded with the Rideology app showed that I traveled 79 miles for 1.34 hours from Orange to San Diego counties at an average speed of 54 mph. The map, however, displayed a straight line from point A to point B, not an accurate GPS mapping of the twists and turns.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

My old Versys’ windscreen was adjustable only if I were willing to remove the four bolts necessary to position it differently, which rarely, if ever, happened. The inefficiency of the process meant a rider found a likable position for the windscreen and that’s where it stayed. The new Versys features an easily adjustable windscreen that can be raised and lowered to four different settings over a 3-inch range. It’s a two-handed affair with one hand depressing the lock button while the other moves the windscreen, but it’s worth the small effort. The upper position deflects wind quite well while the low position puts the rider more in the wind stream.

The new windscreen is the cherry atop a redesigned upper fairing that shares a family resemblance with its liter-bike counterpart, the Versys 1000. The sides of the new cowling are ducted to move air around the rider while the dual headlights are now bright, low-wattage LEDs. The rear of the Versys matches the front with aggressively pointy style and a new LED taillight.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Anti-lock brakes now come standard on all Versys 650 models, as does traction control. The 649cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin powering the Versys isn’t a tire shredder – when we dyno tested a 2020 Versys 650, it sent 63 hp and 43 lb-ft of torque to the rear wheel – but it can certainly break traction given enough throttle when leaned over. TC has two settings, with the first being less intrusive and the second providing a more conservative safety net that should prove beneficial to newer riders or experienced ones caught in low-traction conditions. If desired, traction control can be switched off entirely via a switch located on the left switchpod.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Kickstand up and traveling south on Interstate 5 toward San Diego, the Versys felt like a comfortable and familiar old shoe. Exiting the slab and venturing into the twisties, it soon becomes apparent the Showa suspension’s stock settings were a tad soft for my taste. Once stopped, a few stiffening clicks of preload on top of the left fork leg, a few clicks of tensioning rebound on top of the right fork leg, and a few stiffening twists of the remote preload adjuster on the rear shock dialed things in for tackling the road ahead.

The 28-liter saddlebags are large enough to accommodate a full-face helmet, though without much room to spare. There is also a helmet lock if you need to secure your lid when the saddlebags are full of other incidentals. The ignition key unlocks the saddlebags and allow them to be removed from the motorcycle. For those requiring more storage, Kawasaki offers a matching 47-liter top case along with other accessories, such as heated grips and a GPS mount.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

The bike’s peppy midrange thrusts its 503-lb claimed curb weight forward in enthusiastically manageable fashion. Dual 2-piston calipers grip 300mm petal discs to slow the party down with equal efficiency. When leaned over, the Versys holds its line effectively and transitions to and fro confidently.

The 5.5-gallon fuel tank combined with efficient fuel consumption allows for extended mileage between fuel stops. (During our 2020 test, we averaged 46 mpg for 253 miles of range.) That’s great news for commuters or anyone wanting to incorporate longer trips into their Versys ownership. Complementing the Versys’ fuel range is an ergonomically neutral riding position that is one of the things I loved most about my old Versys as well as the new one.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Like my old Versys, the new version is a modern, solid, middleweight jack-of-all-trades that’s as steadfast as a motorcycle can be. It responds dutifully to what’s asked of it, whether that be cruising around the city, commuting to work, or taking off on long weekends or longer tours. During my Versys ownership never once did it fail to start, or run badly once started, even though it spent most of its time languishing in my garage.

My old Versys didn’t have ABS, traction control, a remote preload adjusting shock, TFT display, a slip/assist clutch, LED lights, or an easily adjustable windscreen, and it didn’t look nearly as good as the ’22 Versys. In 2009, the MSRP of a base-model Versys was $7,099, which is just over $9,700 in today’s dollars. The new bike offers much more for less money, and the touring-ready LT is a fantastic bargain.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Base Price: $8,899
Price as Tested: $9,999 (LT model)
Website: Kawasaki.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 649cc
Bore x Stroke: 83 x 60mm
Horsepower: 63 hp @ 8,700 rpm (rear-wheel dyno, 2020 model)
Torque: 43 lb-ft @ 7,300 rpm (rear-wheel dyno, 2020 model)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 55.7 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 33.3 in.
Wet Weight: 503 lb (as tested)
Fuel Capacity: 5.5 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 46 mpg


Rider Motorcycle Buying Program. Get up front prices on local inventory. View Inventory 

The post 2022 Kawasaki Versys 650 | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT | Road Test Review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Suzuki’s all-new GSX-S1000GT+ is a street-tuned sportbike that’s outfitted for touring with a fairing and windscreen, comfortable rider and passenger accommodations, and 36-liter side cases. Photos by Kevin Wing.

Suzuki is helping sport-tourers make a comeback. With the rise of adventure bikes over the past decade, sport-tourers got shoved aside, relegated to the dark corners of showroom floors. Development cycles stretched out, and model updates became few and far between. That’s a shame. Not everyone wants a motorcycle with a 19-inch front wheel, a 34-inch seat height, and a jungle gym’s worth of crash bars.

Check out Rider‘s 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

As the name implies, sport-tourers combine go-fast performance and touring prowess into a single package. What’s not to love about a superbike engine tuned for the street, a chassis built for both speed and comfort, and ergonomics that won’t make you cry uncle after an hour in the saddle? With their 17-inch wheels shod with grippy radials, sport-tourers love to lean, and modern electronic rider aids help keep things in check.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The GSX-S1000GT and GT+ are available in Metallic Reflective Blue or Glass Sparkle Black.

Enter the new-for-2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT ($13,149) and GSX-S1000GT+ ($13,799), the latter distinguished by its color-matched side cases. Color options are the Metallic Reflective Blue of our test bike or Glass Sparkle Black. The GT is built on the same platform as the GSX-S1000 naked sportbike we tested recently. But unlike the GSX-S1000F that was in Suzuki’s lineup until 2020, which was little more than a GSX-S1000 with a fairing bolted on, the GT is a true grand tourer.

Look Good, Feel Good

The GT’s bodywork is distinctive and angular, with a wedge-shaped front fairing that juts sharply forward and houses a V-shaped LED position light and a pair of mono-focus LED headlights (for low beam, only the right lamp is illuminated). Attached to the top of the fairing are mirrors perched on the ends of long stalks and a nonadjustable windscreen. Lower fairing panels keep the radiator and much of the engine hidden, and they are vented to pull hot air out and away from the cockpit.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Compared to the GSX-S1000F, the GSX-S1000GT’s handlebar is 0.9 inch wider and 0.6 inch closer to the rider.

GEAR UP:
Helmet: Scorpion EXO-R1 Air
Jacket: Scorpion Optima
Gloves: Scorpion Havoc
Pants: Scorpion Covert Pro Jeans
Boots: Sidi Gavia Gore-Tex

Two-up comfort was an important consideration in the GT’s development. All the rider and passenger touchpoints – the handlebar, footpegs, and rear grab handles – are rubber-damped to minimize vibration. Compared to the GSX-S1000F, the handlebar is 0.9 inch wider and 0.6 inch closer to the rider, allowing for more steering leverage and a nearly upright seating position. The wide, slightly dished rider’s seat sits 31.9 inches off the deck and is comfortable enough for long days in the saddle. A sporty amount of cornering clearance necessitated high placement of the footpegs, sacrificing some legroom, and they are positioned just below the rider’s hips.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The $650 upcharge for the GT+ adds lockable, removable, weather-proof, color-matched saddlebags.

Seat height for the passenger is 34.2 inches, and the 2.3-inch boost in height provides a better view over the rider’s shoulders. Large grab handles allow the passenger to hold on securely to the bike rather than just a strap on the seat or the rider’s hips. Both the front and rear seats have thick, supportive foam and are covered in a slightly grippy weather-resistant material.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Each 36-liter saddlebag is large enough to hold most full-face helmets.

To accommodate the added weight of a passenger and luggage, the GT has a trellis-style subframe that provides both strength and visual flair. The GSX-S1000GT+ comes standard with side cases that hold 36 liters (and up to 11 lbs) on each side, and they’re large enough to fit most full-face helmets. The saddlebags are easy to open, close, lock, remove, and reinstall, and they are keyed to the ignition. The only downside is that they cannot be left unlocked for quick access.

Paying the $650 premium for the GT+ is money well-spent. High-quality, lockable, removable, weatherproof saddlebags are undeniably convenient and practical. And buying the cases and necessary hardware as standalone accessories will set you back more than $1,000.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The GT is the first Suzuki to be offered with a TFT display. The default screen has an analog-style tach, digital speedo, and other info.

To further enhance the GT’s touring ability, Suzuki gave the bike a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display, all-new switchgear, and Bluetooth connectivity. The TFT has a large analog-style tachometer, a digital speedometer, and a fuel gauge on the left side, as well as an array of bike and trip info on the right. It also has a sensor that automatically switches the background from white in bright light to black in low light.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Pairing Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app provides access to contacts, phone, maps, music, and calendar.
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The mySPIN app enables turn-by-turn navigation using REVER and other apps.

Buttons on the left switchgear allow the rider to adjust settings and navigate menus. Installing the Suzuki mySPIN smartphone app and pairing via Bluetooth provides access to contacts, phone, maps, music, and calendar functions, which are displayed on the TFT screen. You’ll need a Bluetooth helmet headset to make/receive calls, listen to music, or hear turn-by-turn directions. A USB port on the dash provides on-the-go charging for devices.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The GSX-S1000GT’s new switchgear is user-friendly.

In Thrust We Trust

Like the GSX-S1000, the GT is powered by a 999cc in-line Four adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5 (2005-2008). It’s been retuned to make the engine more suitable for the street, but there’s still plenty of heat in the kitchen. On Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno, the GSX-S1000 churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm. Updates to the engine include new camshaft profiles, new valve springs, new throttle bodies, a revised airbox, and a Euro 5-compliant 4-2-1 exhaust. Together, they result in an extra 2 hp at the peak and smoother horsepower and torque curves.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably. Slaloming back and forth on a series of curves with grace and confidence requires accurate additions and subtractions of fuel and air, and the Suzuki mixes them perfectly. Using a throttle-by-wire system, turning the right grip directly activates the throttle position sensor, which sends instantaneous signals to a servo motor that precisely moves the throttle plates. Throttle response is further enhanced by a long, tapered intake tract that is narrower at the bottom where the 10-hole injectors are located.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Bending the GSX-S1000GT+ through a series of fast curves is pure pleasure.

The GT’s throttle-by-wire also enables the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes (Active, Basic, and Comfort) that adjust throttle response and power delivery, 5-level traction control, cruise control, and Suzuki’s Easy Start, Low RPM Assist, and Bi-Directional Quick Shift systems. ABS is also part of the electronics package, but with no IMU, neither it nor the TC are lean-angle adaptive. The 6-speed transmission has a cable-actuated slip/assist clutch. Gear changes using the quickshifter are fast and smooth, and clutch action is light with predictable engagement. Both the clutch and brake levers are adjustable for reach.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

Being derived from a Superbike championship-winning sportbike like the GSX-R1000, the GSX-S1000GT has a massive twin-spar cast-aluminum frame that surrounds the engine and attaches to a cast-aluminum swingarm. KYB suspension – a fully adjustable 43mm inverted fork and a link-type rear shock that’s adjustable for preload and rebound – is taut yet comfortable.

Brembo 4-piston radial-mount monoblock front calipers are mated to fully floating 310mm rotors, and they offer strong power and precise feedback. A Nissin 1-piston rear caliper squeezes a 240mm disc. The GT rolls on six-spoke, 17-inch cast-aluminum wheels shod with Dunlop Roadsmart 2 sport-touring radials that deliver reliable grip and neutral cornering behavior.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT is a finely tuned instrument of performance. Its in-line Four is uncommonly smooth with a linear powerband, its throttle-by-wire system provides a tight, direct connection between the right grip and the rear wheel, and the quickshifter is one of the slickest we’ve ever used

On the Road Again

Suzuki hosted a two-day press launch for the GSX-S1000GT+, with a test route that started and ended at its U.S. headquarters in Brea, California. Back-to-back 300-mile days gave us a chance to thoroughly evaluate the GT in a wide range of conditions, including traffic-choked freeways, wide-open highways, and tight, technical backroads. We followed that up with more miles on a test bike over several weeks on home turf.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

The qualities that impressed us about the GSX-S1000 – impeccable smoothness, predictable handling, unflappable stability, and linear power delivery – carry over to its GT sibling. Likewise, its braking and suspension components and electronic rider aids were selected to deliver sporting performance without inflating the retail price.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

Where the GT really stands out is its rider and passenger comfort, cruise control, instrumentation and connectivity, and, on the GT+, stylish and useful saddlebags. Weighing in at 521 lbs with its 5-gal. tank full, the GT+ is much lighter than open-class sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT (615 lbs), Yamaha FJR1300ES (644 lbs), and Kawasaki Concours 14 (691 lbs). It weighs more than the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT (503 lbs) but makes significantly more rear-wheel horsepower (136 vs. 108). With its cornering ABS and TC and semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT also costs $1,200 more than the GSX-S1000GT+ ($14,999 vs. $13,799).

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

If the GT has one notable shortcoming, it’s the nonadjustable windscreen. Though Suzuki says it and the bodywork were developed in a wind tunnel, airflow over the windscreen hit me square in the chest and created a lot of turbulence around my helmet. Of course, the size of the rider plays a role in aerodynamics (I’m 6 feet tall), but the lack of height adjustability means you get what you get. Suzuki makes an accessory touring windscreen ($169.95) that is 2.75 inches taller and has a more vertical pitch near the top, but one was not available during our test.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

Other available accessories include heated grips, a two-tone rider’s seat with a suede-like cover embossed with the GSX-S GT logo, axle sliders, ring-lock tankbags (small and large), tank pads and protectors, and wheel rim decals.

We’re glad to see Suzuki helping bring the sport-touring class to its former glory. The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ Specs

Base Price: $13,149 (GT)
Price as Tested: $13,799 (GT+ w/ 36L side cases)
Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
Website: suzukicycles.com
ENGINE
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse in-line Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 999cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm
Compression Ratio: 12.2:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 15,000 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ throttle-by-wire, 40mm throttle bodies x 4
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.6 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
CHASSIS
Frame: Twin-spar cast aluminum frame & swingarm
Wheelbase: 57.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm inverted fork, fully adj., 4.7 in. travel
Rear: Single linkage shock, adj. spring preload & rebound, 5.1 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 310mm floating discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.5 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast, 6.0 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 190/50-ZR17
Wet Weight: 521 lbs (as tested)
Load Capacity: 405 lbs (as tested)
GVWR: 926 lbs
PERFORMANCE
Horsepower: 136 hp @ 10,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 73 lb-ft @ 9,300 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 35.5 mpg
Estimated Range: 178 miles

The post 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com