Tag Archives: Sport Touring Motorcycle Reviews

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello | First Look Review

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

2021 marked Moto Guzzi’s 100-year anniversary, and the Mandello Del Lario brand celebrated the momentous occasion with special-edition models and a traveling museum exhibit. By September 2021, Guzzi shifted its focus from the rearview mirror to the road ahead, giving fans a sneak peek of the all-new 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello sport-tourer.

After keeping the details under wraps for months, Moto Guzzi finally unveiled the V100 Mandello’s full details and specs at EICMA 2021. Just as the V100 moniker suggests, the new sport-touring model houses a 1,042cc transverse V-Twin. The liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve mill not only produces 115 horsepower and 77.4 lb-ft of torque but also benefits from a new compact block architecture. Compared to the V85 TT’s air-cooled, 853cc, transverse V-Twin, the liter-size V100 powerplant is shorter by 4.1 inches.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

Guzzi puts that compact design to good use with a 58.5-inch wheelbase. A long single-sided swingarm with shaft drive steadies the Mandello at high speed while the compact chassis maintains agility in the esses. The tubular-steel frame cuts weight by utilizing the 1,042cc engine as a stressed member and the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension automatically tunes the handling characteristics to rider and the road.

On the electronics front, the throttle-by-wire system offers Travel, Sport, Rain, and Road ride modes. The system adjusts the V100’s three different engine maps, 4-level traction control, three engine braking settings, and suspension calibration to suit each situation. Equipped with a Marelli 11MP ECU and 6-axis IMU, the new Goose also touts cornering ABS, adaptive LED lighting, and cruise control.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

Despite the full electronics suite, the sport-tourer’s industry-first adaptive aerodynamics steals the spotlight. Consisting of wind deflectors mounted at the sides of the 4.6-gallon fuel tank, the innovative system adapts to the current speed and ride mode. The deflectors provide 22% more wind protection in the fully-deployed position, and along with the electronically-adjustable windscreen, amplify the cockpit’s comfort beyond the generously-padded seat, high-mounted handlebars, and 5-inch TFT dash.

The 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello’s MSRP or availability have not yet been announced. It will come in two variants, a base model and a premium model with standard Öhlins semi-active suspension, heated grips, a quickshifter, and the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia system.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

For more information or to find a Moto Guzzi dealer near you, visit motoguzzi.com.

The post 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 BMW K 1600 Lineup | First Look Review

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
BMW has updated its entire K 1600 lineup for 2022 (from left): K 1600 B, K 1600 GT, K 1600 Grand America, K 1600 GTL.

There are four models in BMW’s K 1600 lineup – the K 1600 GT sport-tourer, the K 1600 GTL luxury sport-tourer, the K 1600 B bagger, and the K 1600 Grand America. All are powered by a liquid-cooled, 1,649cc inline-Six that debuted on the 2012 BMW K 1600 GT and K 1600 GTL, which shared Rider’s 2012 Motorcycle of the Year award.

All four models have received updates for 2022, starting with revisions to the engine to meet Euro 5 regulations, including updated BMS engine control, two knock sensors, and two additional lambda probes. BMW says the six-cylinder engine still makes 160 peak horsepower, though it now arrives at 6,750 rpm, 1,000 rpm earlier than before. Peak torque has increased to 133 lb-ft, up from 129, at 5,250 rpm.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
The K 1600 lineup is powered by a 1,649cc inline-Six that makes 160 horsepower and 133 lb-ft of torque.

Standard equipment on all K 1600 models now includes engine drag torque control (MSR), which compares the rotational speeds of the front and rear wheels in the same way as the standard Dynamic Traction Control and thus determines the slip or traction capacity at the rear wheel, with input on lean angle from the new 6-axis IMU. The level of intervention depends on riding mode (Dynamic, Road, or Rain).

Also new on all K 1600 models is BMW Motorrad Dynamic ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment) “Next Generation,” with revised calibration and new automatic load level compensation. The semi-active suspension adjusts damping based on conditions based on input from front and rear sensors and the new IMU.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 review
New welcome, good-bye, and follow me home lighting is standard on all 2022 BMW K 1600 models.

Also new are “welcome,” “good-bye”, and “follow me home” light functions. When the ignition is switched on, a “welcome” light function is activated. The headlight and taillight remain on for a short time and then fade to the waiting state before the engine starts. After switching off the ignition, the front and rear lights are also automatically activated briefly for the “good-bye” function which illuminates the area around the motorcycle. After switching off the ignition, the “follow me home” function allows the rider to activate the lights by briefly pressing the high-beam headlight button to assist with maneuvering in parking spaces or opening the garage at home.

A new full LED headlight consists of nine LEDs for the low-beam headlight and eight LEDs for the high-beam headlight. The standard “adaptive headlight” function features a low-beam LED headlight which turns into the curve according to the lean angle. The cornering function now operates through a range of ± 35 degrees (up from ± 24 degrees) for better illumination. It also adjusts up or down by 2 degrees during acceleration and braking.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
The K 1600s get a new high-definition 10.25-inch TFT color display.

Like the R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental, the new K 1600 models features a 10.25-inch high-definition TFT color display with integrated map navigation (via the BMW Motorrad Connected app) and Bluetooth connectivity. For protection against the elements, the display is equipped with a hardened glass cover with an anti-reflective and fingerprint-resistant coating. Functions such as “My vehicle,” “Navigation,” “Radio,” “Media,” “Telephone,” and “Settings” menus can be selected via displayed tiles, and features such as cruise control, riding modes, and audio are seamlessly integrated into the display. The Multi-controller wheel is used to manage some functions.

Standard on the K 1600 GTL and K 1600 Grand America and optional on the K 1600 GT and K 1600 B is BMW’s new Audio System 2.0, with antennas now integrated into the bodywork. Whereas the previous audio system was connected to the motorcycle as a primarily independent system, Audio System 2.0 is integrated into the electrical system. Menu control and setting options as well as the unique display screens are said to make the audio experience a seamless listening experience. The system offers more customization functions as well as SiriusXM satellite radio with 1-year subscription.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 review
Option 719 “Midnight” features a the paint finish in Meteoric Dust II Metallic with a “Galaxy” theme.

The new K 1600 GT, GTL, B, and Grand America are available in three color options each: a standard color, a style variant, and Option 719. Option 719 “Midnight” is particularly noteworthy, which is only available for K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America. The highlight of this variant is the paint finish in Meteoric Dust II Metallic with the “Galaxy” theme depicted using the water transfer printing method.

MSRP pricing begins at $22,545 for the K 1600 B, $23,895 for the K 1600 GT,

$26,895 for the K 1600 GTL, and $27,745 for the K 1600 Grand America. Motorcycles will be in dealerships starting in February 2022.

Below is a summary of colors, details, standard equipment, options, and accessories for each model. For more information or to find a BMW dealer near you, visit bmwmotorcycles.com.

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Standard

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GT in Black Storm Metallic
  • Black Storm Metallic body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black
  • Front fender in Black Storm Metallic
  • Radiator cowls in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic
  • Front brake calipers in black

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Sport style

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GT in Light White/Racing Blue Metallic/Racing Red
  • Light White/Racing Blue Metallic/Racing Red body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black with gray piping and decorative stitching
  • Front part of the front fender in Light White
  • Radiator cowls in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic
  • Gold-anodized front brake calipers

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Option 719

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GT in Option 719
Mineral White Metallic
  • Mineral White Metallic body color with lines
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black (Optional Option 719 seat with diamond top-stitching in saddle brown and cloud print)
  • Front part of the front fender in Mineral White Metallic
  • Radiator cowls in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Mineral White Metallic
  • Chrome slipstream deflector trim
  • Front brake calipers in black
  • Optional Option 719 classic forged rims

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Standard

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL in Black Storm Metallic
  • Black Storm Metallic body color
  • Frame in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine in platinum
  • Seat in black
  • Front fender in Black Storm Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Exclusive style

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL in Gravity Blue Metallic
  • Gravity Blue Metallic body color
  • Frame in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine in platinum
  • Seat in black
  • Front fender in Gravity Blue Metallic, rear part in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine spoiler in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Chrome slipstream deflector trim
  • Chrome strips on cases

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Option 719

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL in Option 719
Mineral White Metallic
  • Mineral White Metallic body color with lines
  • Frame in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine in platinum
  • Seat in black (Optional Option 719 seat with diamond top-stitching in saddle brown and cloud print)
  • Front fender in Mineral White Metallic with chrome bar, rear part in Monolith Metallic Matte
  • Engine spoiler in Monolith Metallic Matte
  • Tank center cover in Mineral White Metallic
  • Chrome slipstream deflector trim
  • Chrome strips on cases
  • Optional Option 719 classic forged rims

2022 BMW K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America: Standard

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 Grand America in Black Storm Metallic
  • Black Storm Metallic body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black
  • Front part of the front fender in Black Storm Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic

2022 BMW K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America: Exclusive style

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 B in Manhattan Metallic Matte
  • Manhattan Metallic Matte body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black
  • Front part of the front fender in Manhattan White Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic

2022 BMW K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America: Option 719 “Midnight”

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 review
2022 BMW K 1600 Grand America in Option 719 “Midnight” Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • Meteoric Dust II Metallic body color with water transfer printing method
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Option 719 seat in black with diamond top-stitching and model designation
  • Front part of the front fender in Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • “Midnight” badge

Standard Equipment on 2022 BMW K 1600 GT, GTL, B, and Grand America

  • Black Storm Metallic paint
  • 10.25-inch TFT screen with BMW Motorrad Connected app navigation
  • Audio System 2.0 with fairing speakers (K 1600 GTL)
  • Shaft drive
  • Slipper clutch
  • Reversing aid
  • Hill Start Control Pro
  • Dynamic Engine Brake Control
  • Adjustable windscreen
  • Cast aluminum wheels
  • Duolever front suspension
  • Paralever rear suspension
  • Integral ABS with ABS Pro
  • Dynamic Traction Control
  • Dynamic ESA “Next Generation”
  • Steering stabilizer
  • Tire pressure monitor
  • 12v power socket
  • Cooled, mobile device charging compartment
  • Electronic immobilizer
  • Heated grips and seat
  • Adaptive LED headlight, LED turn signals and rear light
  • Multi-controller
  • Programable function buttons
  • Dynamic Cruise Control
  • Ride modes
  • Luggage rack
  • Centerstand
  • Comfort footrests
  • Integrated side cases in body color
  • Top case in body color (K 1600 GTL)

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Optional equipment and accessories

  • Premium Package
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • Audio System 2.0
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Stand-alone options

  • Style: Sport Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red metallic
  • Option 719 Mineral White Metallic
  • Option 719 bench seat
  • Floor lighting
  • Option 719 forged classic wheels
  • Low seat (30.7-inch / 31.5-inch seat height, -1.2 inches)
  • 2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Optional equipment and accessories
  • Premium Package
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Stand-alone options

  • Style: Exclusive Gravity Blue Metallic
  • Option 719 Mineral White Metallic
  • Option 719 bench seat
  • Floor lighting
  • Option 719 forged classic wheels
  • High seat (31.5-inch seat height, +2.0 inches)

2022 BMW K 1600 B: Optional equipment and accessories

  • Bagger Package
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar
  • Center stand
  • Grand America Package
  • Grand America styling
  • Top case in body color
  • Audio System 2.0
  • Floorboards
  • High windshield
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar
  • Centerstand

2022 BMW K 1600 B: Stand-alone options

  • Option 719 bench seat
  • Floor lighting
  • Forged handlebar
  • Option 719 forged classic wheels
  • High seat (31.5-inch seat height, +2.0 inches)

The post 2022 BMW K 1600 Lineup | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Video Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT video review
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT in Liquid Metal (Photo by Joseph Agustin)

We test the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, which won Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year award. It’s a fully featured sport-tourer powered by an 890cc inline-Triple that makes 108 horsepower at 10,000 rpm and 63 lb-ft of torque at 7,200 rpm at the rear wheel. MSRP is $14,899.

For 2021, the new Tracer 9 GT gets the larger crossplane Triple from the MT-09, which is lighter, more fuel efficient, and more powerful. An all-new aluminum frame is made using a controlled-fill diecast process that reduces mass and increases rigidity. A new aluminum swingarm is more rigid, and a new steel subframe increases load capacity and allows an accessory top trunk to be mounted along with the larger 30-liter saddlebags. New spinforged wheels reduce unsprung weight, and they’re shod with grippy Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires.

In addition to updated throttle response modes and all-new KYB semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT now has a 6-axis IMU that enables a suite of electronic rider aids adapted from the YZF-R1, including lean-angle-sensitive traction control, ABS, slide control, and lift control. It also has full LED lighting (including cornering lights) and a new dual-screen TFT display. The rider/passenger seats have been upgraded, and the rider’s ergonomics are adjustable.

Check out our video review:

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Specs

Base Price: $14,899
Website: yamahamotorsports.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 890cc
Horsepower: 108 @ 10,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 63 lb-ft @ 7,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Bore x Stroke: 78.0mm x 62.1mm
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 59.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.9/32.5 in.
Wet Weight: 503 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 48.7 mpg
Estimated Range: 243 miles

The post 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is an exciting, affordable addition to the middleweight sport-touring category.

Triumph has released an exciting new middleweight sport-tourer, the 2022 Tiger Sport 660. The new Tiger Sport will share the engine from the new Trident released earlier this year, and Triumph claims this is the first triple to make its way into the middleweight sport-touring segment.

Triumph sees the new model appealing to two groups of motorcyclists, newer riders moving up to a bigger bike, and veteran riders looking for a thrilling all-rounder. It says the new Tiger Sport has a narrow stand-over feel and the seat is on the low side at 32.8 inches, which should make it accessible to a broad range of riders in terms of height and experience.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Triumph hopes the new Tiger will attract rookie riders moving up to a first big bike and veteran riders looking for a thrilling all-rounder.

The 660cc triple-cylinder engine is designed to provide a broad torque band across a wide rev range and strong top-end horsepower.

The 660 Sport has a full-size windscreen that should be ideal for long-haul excursions, whereas the rest of the sleek design has a tall but sporty influence, including a stubby stainless-steel silencer. A slip/assist clutch should make for a slick work of the 6-speed gearbox and an up/down quickshifter is available as a factory option.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Sizable color-matched luggage and cast aluminum rack are optional.

Triumph says the 660 Sport has exceptional handling, and on paper at least, the bike appears to live up to the claim. The Sport is fitted with Showa’s lightweight 41mm separate function fork (SFF), where each fork leg performs a separate function, one side for damping and the other for spring, and at the rear, a Showa dual-rate monoshock is adjustable for preload. Claimed peak power is 80 horses at  8,750 rpm, 5% more than the V-Strom, and claimed peak torque is 47.2 lb-ft, on par with the Versys, and yet the Tiger Sport weighs 20 pounds less than either.

The Tiger Sport 660 has stats that promise sports performance, but the tall, adjustable screen, 4.7-gallon gas tank, integrated side case mounts, and pillion grab handles cater to riders looking to make longer excursions with or without a passenger. Side cases, with a combined capacity of 57 liters, and a 47-liter top box (and cast aluminum luggage rack) are available options and can be color-matched.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Integrated pillion grab-handles are fitted as standard, as are the mounts for attaching the optional side cases.

Braking is supplied by Nissin, 2-piston calipers on twin 310mm discs, with a single-piston rear caliper on a 255mm disc. Standard tires are Michelin Road 5, which promise versatility in riding conditions and styles. ABS is fitted as standard, and the brake lever is adjustable for reach.

Throttle-by-wire allows for two riding modes, Road and Rain, as well as switchable traction control. A small TFT color display is integrated into a larger LCD and shows all the key information, and allows for menu selections and connectivity. All-around LED lighting, self-canceling indicators, and key fob immobilizer are all standard.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
A small, color TFT is integrated into a larger LCD.
2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Integrated side-case mounts leave a clean look when not in use.

The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is available in three color schemes: Lucerne Blue & Sapphire Black, Graphite & Sapphire Black, or Korosi Red & Graphite (for an extra $125), which also comes with sporty graphics. The standard version has an MSRP of $9,295 and will be available in dealers starting in February 2022.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Specs

Base Price: $9,295
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, inline triple, DOHC w/ 4 vpc.
Displacement: 660cc
Bore x Stroke: 74 x 57.7mm
Horsepower: 80 hp @ 8,750 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Torque: 47.2 lb-ft @ 6,250 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain
Wheelbase: 55.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 23.7 degrees/3.8 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Wet Weight: 454 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gals.

The post 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT | First Look Review

Suzuki has released the successor to the GSX-S1000F, the new 2022 GSX-S1000GT and GT+ models.

We took a first look at Suzuki’s aggressively redesigned GSX-S1000 naked sportbike back in April, and rumors of a sport-touring variant have been amplifying ever since. Enter the new GSX-S1000GT, successor to the S1000F, with all the performance of the new S1000 on which it is based, and all the comfort and features expected from a long-haul tourer.

As with the new Hayabusa, the new GT model is fitted with Suzuki’s Intelligent Ride System (SIRS), which includes the Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (SDMS), Traction Control, Ride by Wire Electronic Throttle, Bi-Directional Quick Shift, Suzuki Easy Start, and Low RPM Assist systems.

It is powered by a street tuned version of the GSX-R sportbike’s 999cc, in-line four-cylinder engine, which has been updated with a revised intake and exhaust camshafts, cam chain tensioners, valve springs, and redesigned clutch and gearshift components. Suzuki says the enhancements deliver a broader, more consistent torque curve while meeting Euro 5 emissions compliance standards.

The GSX-S1000GT also utilizes the S1000’s twin-spar aluminum frame and aluminum-alloy braced swingarm from the GSX-R1000. Fully adjustable KYB suspension, ABS-equipped radial-mount Brembo monoblock calipers biting 310mm floating rotors. A new trellis-style sub-frame creates secure attachment points for the 36-liter side cases and promises an improved passenger experience.

2022 GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with integrated side-cases.

A new cast-aluminum, rubber-mounted handlebar provides a relaxed body position, coupled with rubber footpeg inserts for long-haul comfort. Rider and passenger seats benefit from a new sporty design maximizing comfort on long rides, and both seats sport a new cover material that balances grip with freedom of movement and integrates well with the new grab-bar design. Equipped with all-around LED lights, the distinctive horizontally arranged headlights match the latest Suzuki styling.

The GSX-S1000GT is equipped with a 6.5-inch, full-color TFT LCD screen set into the inner fairing above the handlebars for enhanced visibility and protection from debris. The brightness-adjustable TFT panel features a scratch-resistant surface and an anti-reflective coating and integrates with the SUZUKI mySPIN smartphone connectivity application. A USB outlet can also be used to connect and charge a smartphone.

The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT will be available in two color schemes: Metallic Reflective Blue, and Glass Sparkle Black, each set off with distinctive GT logos. Manufacturers suggested pricing for both the GT and GT+ are yet to be announced.

For more information, please visit: suzuki.com 

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 Specs

Base Price: TBD
Website: suzukicycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse in-line four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 999cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm
Transmission: 6-speed, wet multi-plate assist clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 57.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.94 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Wet Weight: 498 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.

The post 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year

2021 Motorcycle of the Year

Our first Motorcycle of the Year was awarded to the 1990 BMW K1, and for the past 31 years we’ve limited contenders to current model-year motorcycles that are new or significantly updated. In recent years, however, production timing and model-year designations have become more fluid.

And then there’s the economic shutdown last year caused by the pandemic, which disrupted the global supply chain for everything from toilet paper to semiconductors. Some manufacturers were forced to delay the release of certain models, while others skipped the 2021 model year altogether.

We’ve posted announcements of new/updated 2022 models as early as January of this year. And so far, we’ve ridden 2022 motorcycles from BMW, Honda, Indian, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha. To give all makes and models a fair shake during the calendar year when they are released and most relevant, eligible contenders for this year’s MOTY include any new/updated motorcycle released since last year’s award that are available for testing.

2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

There were plenty of motorcycles to consider, and we’ve narrowed them down to 10 contenders and one winner. Without further ado…

THE CONTENDERS

1) BMW R 18 B/Transcontinental

2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental review
2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental (Photo by Kevin Wing)

BMW entered the traditional cruiser segment in 2021 with the standard R 18 and windshield-and-saddlebags-equipped R 18 Classic, built around the 1,802cc “Big Boxer.” The 2022 R 18 B “Bagger” and R 18 Transcontinental are touring-ready with a batwing-style fairing, infotainment system, hard saddlebags, and a passenger seat, and the TC adds a top trunk with a passenger backrest.

Read our 2022 BMW R 18 B / Transcontinental review

2) Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250/Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Yes, pigs – or more accurately, hogs – can fly. The Motor Company shook up the hyper-competitive ADV segment when it introduced the 2021 Pan America 1250/Special. Powered by a 150-horsepower V-Twin and fully equipped with all the latest bells and whistles, it proved itself to be highly capable on- and off-road, and the optional Adaptive Ride Height is its killer app.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review

3) Honda Gold Wing Tour/DCT

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Honda’s GL1800 won Rider’s MOTY when it debuted in 2001 and again when it was thoroughly overhauled in 2018. Updates for 2021 may seem minor, but they make all the difference when it comes to the two-up touring the Wing was designed for. The larger trunk holds more stuff, the improved passenger accommodations are appreciated, and the audio and styling updates add refinement.

Read our 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review

4) Honda Rebel 1100/DCT

2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT review
2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The all-new Rebel 1100 is the sort of cruiser only Honda could make. It has styling like its smaller Rebel 300/500 siblings, a powerful engine adapted from the Africa Twin CRF1100L (including an optional 6-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission), ride modes and other electronics, well-damped suspension, good cornering clearance, modest weight, and a base price of just $9,299 (add $700 for DCT).

Read our 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT review

5) Kawasaki KLR650

2022 Kawasaki KLR650 review
2022 Kawasaki KLR650 (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The KLR is dead, long live the KLR! After a two-year absence, Kawasaki’s legendary dual-sport returns for 2022 with fuel injection (at last!), optional ABS, and other updates aimed at improving reliability, comfort, stability, load capacity, and user-friendliness. It remains one of the best deals on two wheels with a base price of $6,699.

Read our 2022 Kawasaki KLR650 Adventure review

6) KTM 890 Adventure R

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R review
2021 KTM 890 Adventure R (Photo by Kevin Wing)

KTM’s street-oriented 790 Adventure and off-road-ready 790 Adventure R shared Rider’s 2019 MOTY. Just two years later, the folks in Mattighofen kicked it up a notch with a larger, more powerful engine from the 890 Duke R, chassis updates, and tweaks to the suspension, brakes, and electronics, all of which contribute to the 890 Adventure R’s all-terrain capability.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R review

7) Indian Super Chief Limited

2022 Indian Super Chief Limited review
2022 Indian Super Chief Limited (Photo by Jordan Pay)

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the original Chief, Indian revamped its entire Chief lineup, with six models that strike a balance between old-school style and new-school technology. Powered by the Thunderstroke 116 V-Twin, the all-new Super Chief Limited has a quick-release windscreen, saddlebags, a two-up seat, ABS, and a Ride Command-equipped display.

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited review

8) Royal Enfield Meteor 350

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 review
2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Yes, the Meteor 350’s air-/oil-cooled Single makes just 18 horsepower and 18 lb-ft of torque. But rarely have we encountered a motorcycle that offers so much substance for so little money. In top-spec Supernova trim, the Meteor comes with ABS, turn-by-turn navigation, a two-up seat with a passenger backrest, a windshield, and a two-tone paint scheme for just $4,599.

Read our 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 review

9) Suzuki Hayabusa

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The former winner of the late-’90s top-speed wars got its first major update since 2008. Thanks to more grunt in the midrange, the Hayabusa’s updated 187-horsepower 1,340cc inline-Four helps it accelerate faster than ever before. Refined and reworked from nose to tail, the ’Busa has more aerodynamic bodywork, a full suite of IMU-enabled electronics, and much more.

Read our 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review

10) Yamaha Ténéré 700

2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 review
2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

Designed to be equally capable on- and off-road, Yamaha’s middleweight adventure bike is powered by a liquid-cooled, 689cc CP2 parallel-Twin and has a durable tubular-steel frame, adjustable long-travel suspension, switchable ABS, and spoked wheels in 21-inch front/18-inch rear sizes. Contributor Arden Kysely liked the T7 so much, he bought our test bike from Yamaha.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700 review

And the winner is…

Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT (Photos by Joseph Agustin)

For the better part of the past decade, the adventure bike segment has been the darling of the motorcycle industry, growing while other segments have been flat or declining and siphoning off R&D resources. With some adventure bikes making 150 horsepower or more, traditional sport-tourers have been all but neglected. Stalwarts such as the Honda ST1300, Kawasaki Concours 14, and Yamaha FJR1300 haven’t been updated in years.

That’s what makes the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT such a breath of fresh air. At less than 500 pounds fully fueled, it’s much easier to handle than the 600-plus-pound S-T bikes on the market. And with a claimed 115 horsepower on tap, there are few motorcycles that will leave it behind.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

We first tested the bike that would evolve into the Tracer 9 GT when Yamaha introduced the FJ-09 for 2015. At its heart was the liquid-cooled 847cc CP3 Triple from the FZ-09 – an absolute ripper of a motor. It had an ADV-ish upright seating position and wind-blocking handguards but rolled on 17-inch wheels with sport-touring rubber, while its windscreen, centerstand, and optional 22-liter saddlebags added touring capability. The FJ-09 was light and fun to ride, but it was held back by fueling issues, poorly damped suspension, and weak brakes.

Yamaha did its homework and gave its middleweight sport-tourer an overhaul for 2019, renaming it the Tracer 900 GT in the process. Updates included better throttle response, a longer swingarm for more stability, higher-quality suspension, a new TFT color display, and a larger, one-hand-adjustable windscreen. The saddlebags were made standard as were other features, such as cruise control, heated grips, and a quickshifter.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

Two years later, Yamaha went even further. For 2021, the new Tracer 9 GT gets the larger 890cc CP3 Triple from the MT-09, which is lighter, more fuel efficient, and more powerful. An all-new lightweight aluminum frame is made using a controlled-fill diecast process that reduces mass and increases rigidity. A new aluminum swingarm is longer and stronger, and a new steel subframe increases load capacity to 425 pounds and allows an accessory top trunk to be mounted along with the larger 30-liter saddlebags. New spinforged wheels reduce unsprung weight, and they’re shod with grippy Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires.

In addition to updated throttle response modes and all-new KYB semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT now has a 6-axis IMU that enables a suite of electronic rider aids adapted from the YZF-R1, including lean-angle-sensitive traction control, ABS, slide control, and lift control. It also has full LED lighting (including cornering lights) and a new dual-screen TFT display. The rider/passenger seats have been upgraded, and the rider’s ergonomics are adjustable.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

We had an opportunity to test the Tracer 9 GT just before the MOTY polls closed, and it swept the field. Thanks to steady evolution and improvement over three generations, Yamaha has demonstrated just how good a modern sport-tourer can be, especially for riders who value agility over couch-like luxury. Performance, sophistication, comfort, versatility, load/luggage capacity – the Tracer checks all the right boxes and leaves nothing on the table.

Congratulations to Yamaha for the Tracer 9 GT, Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year!

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

The post Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Over three generations, Yamaha’s…

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
Now in its third generation (and third name), the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT sport-tourer is better in every way. (Photo by Joe Agustin)

Over three generations, Yamaha’s middleweight sport-tourer has evolved steadily, and like a shapeshifter, it has morphed between three different model names. First came the 2015 FJ-09, then the 2019 Tracer 900 GT, and now the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT.

With each iteration, the FJ/Tracer has raised its game, with better performance, wider-ranging capabilities, and more features.

Here are our top 10 highlights of the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT:

1. That Triple!

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT gets the larger, lighter, more fuel efficient 890cc Triple from the MT-09.

In a world full of parallel-Twins, V-Twins and inline-Fours, an inline-Triple marches to a different drummer. It produces good low- to midrange torque as well as a top-end rush, and its sound is truly unique. The Tracer 9 GT gets the larger 890cc CP3 (Cross Plane 3-cylinder) Triple from the MT-09, which is lighter (by 3.7 pounds), more fuel efficient (by 9%), and more powerful (with 6% more peak torque).

Yamaha’s Y-CCT (Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle) throttle-by-wire setup now uses an APSG (Accelerator Position Sensor Grip) for a smoother connection between the loud handle and the rear wheel. Fueling issues that plagued the FJ-09 were mostly solved on the Tracer 900 GT, and the Tracer 9 GT feels even more refined. A 15% increase in crankshaft inertia further smooths out on/off throttle transitions.

Yamaha’s D-Mode, which adjusts throttle response and power, now has four preset modes: 1 (sharpest response, full power), 2 (standard response, full power), 3 (mild response, full power), and 4 (mildest response, reduced power). Mode 1 corresponds to what would be called “sport” mode on many motorcycles, which is often overly abrupt, but not so on the Tracer 9 GT. Throttle response is immediate without being harsh.

2. Curb weight is still around 500 pounds

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Tracer 9 GT’s lightness contributes to its agility.

Traditional sport-tourers like the Yamaha FJR1300, BMW R 1250 RT, and Kawasaki Concours 14 have curb weights well over 600 pounds. Yamaha’s claimed curb weight (without the saddlebags) is 485 pounds. When we tested the 2020 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT, it made 102 horsepower at the rear wheel. With the 43cc bump in displacement, the Tracer 9 GT probably makes 105-107 horsepower at the rear wheel.

While the Tracer 9 GT lacks the top-end rush of an open-class sport-tourer, its lighter weight makes it more responsive and agile. A new controlled-fill diecast aluminum frame is lighter and has 50% more lateral rigidity, further enhancing steering response.

3. It has the seating position of an ADV but the handling of a sport-tourer

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT could be classified as a “street adventure” bike or “crossover” because it blends ADV styling/seating with sport-touring street manners.

Greg’s Gear:
Helmet: Scorpion EXO-R1 Air
Jacket: Scorpion Optima
Gloves: Scorpion Havoc
Pants: Scorpion Covert Pro Jeans
Boots: Sidi Gavia Gore-Tex

The Tracer 9 GT has an upright seating position that’s more akin to an adventure tourer than the sportier ergonomics on many sport-tourers. Being able to sit up straight with no weight on the rider’s wrists, relaxed shoulders, and ample legroom makes it enjoyable to pile on the miles, and that’s what a sport-tourer is all about. The one-hand-adjustable windscreen and handguards provide good wind protection too.

Unlike ADV bikes, the Tracer 9 GT has no off-road pretensions. It rolls on 17-inch wheels shod with excellent Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires. Yamaha developed a new process called “spinforging” to make the 10-spoke aluminum wheels, which saves 1.5 pounds of unsprung weight and contributes to the Tracer 9 GT’s agile handling.

4. New semi-active suspension provides a magic-carpet ride

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
KYB semi-active suspension is a big upgrade on the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT. The fork uses a stroke sensor to detect position.

Semi-active suspension, where sensors on the fork, shock, and elsewhere on the bike provide input to a suspension control unit that adjusts damping in real time, has been around for a while. On the Tracer 9 GT, the KYB Actimatic Damping System (KADS) electronically adjusts compression and rebound damping in the fork and rebound damping in the rear shock, and there are two suspension modes: A-1 (sport) and A-2 (comfort). Spring preload must be adjusted manually using a tool for the fork (it’s in the toolkit) and a remote knob for the shock.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The rear shock uses an angular position sensor to detect position.

With 5.1/5.3 inches of front/rear suspension travel, the Tracer 9 GT has plenty of available stroke to absorb bumps, seams, potholes, and other pavement irregularities. By adapting to changing conditions, the KADS suspension delivers a supple, compliant ride and it quickly firms up as needed to prevent excessive chassis pitch under braking and acceleration. That keeps the tires in contact with the ground and further contributes to the Tracer 9 GT’s sure-footed handling.

5. Its R1-derived, IMU-enabled electronics are high tech

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT has a customizable IMU-enabled electronics suite derived from the R1.

The Tracer 900 GT was equipped with throttle-by-wire, multiple modes to adjust throttle response and power, multi-mode traction control, and ABS. In addition to its new semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT has a more comprehensive suite of electronic rider aids derived from the YZF-R1 sportbike. Data from a 6-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) informs traction control, slide control, lift control, and ABS, with intervention adapted to lean angle and other inputs. All of the electronics have multiple modes, and the only system that can’t be turned off is ABS, or Brake Control System (BC) in Yamaha’s parlance.

The IMU also provides input for new LED cornering lights, which illuminate the insides of cornering when lean angle exceeds 7 degrees.

6. It has cruise control, heated grips, and a quickshifter

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
Cruise control is actuated via a button and toggle on the left switchgear. A mode button on the front of the pod and the up/down toggle control menu functions.

These features were standard on the Tracer 900 GT, and all are appreciated. Cruise control works at speeds above 31 mph in 4th, 5th, and 6th gears, and set speed can be increased in 1-mph increments (with a short button press) or continuously (long press). In addition to upshifts, the quickshifter now provides clutchless downshifts with an auto-blipper. And the heated grips now offer 10 levels of adjustment.

The Tracer 9 GT has full LED lighting, a 12-volt outlet behind the instrument panel, and a centerstand, which helps with chain and tire maintenance as well as loading and unloading the saddlebags. At Yamaha’s claimed 49 mpg, its 5-gallon tank should yield a range of nearly 250 miles.

7. Larger saddlebags hold a full-face helmet in each side

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT has larger 30-liter saddlebags that will each hold a full-face helmet.

The saddlebags on the Tracer 900 GT held 22 liters each. Larger saddlebags on the Tracer 9 GT hold 30 liters each, which is large enough for a full-face helmet. The bags can be left unlocked for convenient access, locked for security, or removed to carry them into a hotel room or to lighten the load for apex strafing. The lock barrels can be a little fiddly (which has long been an issue with Yamaha luggage), but with practice they work just fine.

Yamaha also beefed up the subframe to allow an accessory top box (39 or 50 liters) to be mounted along with the saddlebags, rather than the either/or setup on the previous model.

8. I’m seeing double

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT has dual 3.5-inch TFT color displays. Info shown on the right display can be customized. Lever above the dash adjusts windscreen height.

Yamaha has given the Tracer 9 GT a unique dual-panel TFT display, with each screen measuring 3.5 inches. The speedometer, tachometer, gear indicator, and other functions are on the left panel. The right panel has a grid of four smaller displays that can be customized to show the rider’s preferred info, even if the information is also shown on the left panel.

The mostly white-on-black text is crisp and clear, but some of the text is small. The TFT panels have a glossy surface that reflects sunlight and can make the screens appear too dim (brightness is not adjustable). Depending on the position of the sun, sometimes all I could see was the reflection of my riding jacket.

9. Rider and passenger comfort are improved

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT has an upgraded rider/passenger seat. The rider’s seat height, handlebar position, and footpeg position are also adjustable.

Yamaha upgraded the rider’s seat with higher-quality cover material and added color-matched stitching. The dual-height rider’s seat can be set at 31.9 or 32.5 inches. To suit riders of different body types or preferences, the bars and footpegs can be adjusted. Rotating the bar-riser clamps allows the handlebar to be moved up 4mm and forward 9mm, and the footpeg brackets can be moved up 14mm and back 4mm. The passenger seat is now thicker and wider, and there’s a new integrated, one-piece grab handle.

10. It costs more, but it’s worth it

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT is available in Liquid Metal (left) and Redline (right) for $14,899.

The Tracer 9 GT’s many upgrades have raised the price to $14,899, which is $1,900 more than last year’s Tracer 900 GT. For those who are cross-shopping, BMW’s F 900 XR (with Select and Premium Packages but no saddlebags) is $15,045 and Kawasaki’s Versys 1000 SE LT+ costs $18,199. More expensive, yes, but still competitively priced and no important features were left off the spec sheet. And the price is the same in either color, Liquid Metal with blue wheels or Redline with black wheels.

We’ll post our full review soon, so stay tuned! Scroll down for more photos….

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Specs

Base Price: $14,899
Website: yamahamotorsports.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 890cc
Bore x Stroke: 78.0mm x 62.1mm
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 59.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.9/32.5 in.
Wet Weight: 485 lbs. (claimed, does not include side cases)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.

The post first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Moto Guzzi Announces New Factory, Museum, and V100 Mandello

Moto Guzzi Announces a New Factory, Museum, and V100 Motorcycle
Moto Guzzi has announced the new V100 Mandello.

After recently celebrating its centennial and the brand’s rich history, Moto Guzzi has turned its attention to the future with the “Road to 2121.” The bold initiative announced today includes a futuristic restructuring project including a new factory and museum to be built at the current site in Mandello del Lario, Italy, where every Guzzi has been built to date.

Moto Guzzi Announces a New Factory, Museum, and V100 Motorcycle
A rendering of the new Moto Guzzi factory, designed by Greg Lynn.

Moto Guzzi has commissioned U.S. architect and designer Greg Lynn, known for his bold, ultramodern creations and the architect behind the new San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The project, which Guzzi says, “will be founded on culture, design, and mechanics, with a strong green focus,” will include open public spaces and a place for the local community and tourists to meet.

Guzzi has stated that the project will use existing onsite structures and maximize environmental sustainability and efficiency in its use of resources. While building materials will be chosen with close attention to efficient energy management, thanks to photovoltaic systems and eco-sustainable materials.

The Piaggio Group intends to establish the Moto Guzzi brand as an example, not only of mechanical integration, but also of modern design and hopes that the site will become a focal point for Guzzi bikers and young people, and international tourists interested in the venerable brand. The new factory will also extend the firm’s production capacity to keep pace with the growth in demand.

In addition to the new factory, the project will create new conference facilities to host both internal and external events, as well as a hotel and a restaurant for a complete range of amenities to welcome visitors from around the world. Work is scheduled to commence by the end of the year and should be completed in the first half of 2025.

Moto Guzzi Announces a New Factory, Museum, and V100 Motorcycle

If that wasn’t enough, Moto Guzzi pulled another card from their sleeve and announced the V100 Mandello. We know very little about this new machine, but Guzzi is promising it will have a cutting-edge engine and state-of-the-art technologies. We look forward to the new motorcycle’s scheduled release on November 23, 2021, at the EICMA international motorcycle show in Milan.

Moto Guzzi Announces a New Factory, Museum, and V100 Motorcycle

The post Moto Guzzi Announces New Factory, Museum, and V100 Mandello first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Prototype Revealed

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 prototype review
Though its bodywork is camouflaged, there’s much we can learn from these photos of the final prototype of the new Triumph Tiger Sport 660.

Last October, Triumph unveiled the Trident 660, a middleweight naked bike designed to compete with stalwarts in the class like the Honda CB650R, Suzuki SV650, Yamaha MT-07, and Kawasaki Z650. But about a month before the official unveiling, Triumph released photos of the final prototype of the Trident 660 during testing near the company’s headquarters in Hinckley, England.

Triumph has now done the same with the first spin-off of its 660 platform, “the new Tiger Sport 660 that is set to bring triple engine performance advantages to the middleweight adventure sports category.” In the photos, the bike’s bodywork is camouflaged with black-and-white Triumph stickers that hide its exact lines, but there’s still plenty to draw from.

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 prototype review
With its fairing and windscreen, the new 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 will be ready for sport-touring.

The Trident 660 is powered by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 660cc inline Triple that makes 80 horsepower at 10,250 rpm and 47 lb-ft of torque at 6,250 rpm (claimed), with 90% of peak torque on tap as low as 3,600 rpm. The engine in the Tiger Sport 660 looks exactly the same, down to the stubby exhaust exiting below the cast aluminum swingarm on the right side. Both share a tubular-steel frame.

The engine is derived from the 2013-2016 Triumph Street Triple 675, with a narrower 74mm bore and longer 51.1mm stroke yielding the lower displacement. It incorporates 67 new components, including a new crankshaft, piston design, and cam profiles.

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 prototype review
If its inline Triple is unchanged from the Trident 660, then the Tiger Sport 660 will make 80 horsepower and 47 lb-ft of torque.

We can see that the Tiger Sport 660 has the same five-spoke, 17-inch cast aluminum wheels, Michelin Road 5 tires, Nissin triple-disc brakes with ABS, and Showa inverted fork as the Trident. On the Trident 660 the fork is non-adjustable, the Showa rear shock only offers preload adjustability, front/rear travel is 4.7/5.3 inches, and seat height is 31.7 inches. The Tiger Sport 660 doesn’t look appreciably taller, though it does have a different tailsection with integrated saddlebag mounts and a more deeply dished seat.

The most obvious difference between the Trident 660 and the Tiger Sport 660 is the latter’s front fairing and windscreen. The added wind protection, along with a possibly taller handlebar and optional hard luggage, will make the middleweight Tiger ready for sport-touring. Wet weight of the Trident is 417 pounds, and the Tiger’s fairing and windscreen are likely to add 20 pounds or so. Fuel capacity on the Trident 660 is 3.7 pounds; for sport-touring duty we expect to see a larger tank on the Tiger Sport, perhaps 4.5 gallons.

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 prototype review
Saddlebag mounts are integrated into the Tiger Sport 660’s tailsection. Factory accessory hard luggage will make the bike more versatile for travel.

Priced at $8,195, the Triumph Trident 660 is within a few hundred dollars of its Japanese competitors and offers additional features like selectable ride modes, switchable traction control, and a TFT color display.

To cover the cost of the extra bodywork, the 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is likely to be priced around $8,500-$9,000. That’s on par with what would likely be its closest competitor, the Suzuki V-Strom 650, which has a base price of $8,849 and is equipped with standard ABS and traction control (neither are switchable) but not a TFT display. With its 19-inch front wheel, the V-Strom 650 offers more off-road capability than the Tiger Sport 660. Both can be outfitted with factory accessory saddlebags.

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 prototype review
Triumph-badged King Dick Tools chest not included. Nor is spotted dick.

Interestingly, 660 is same displacement used on the Aprilia RS 660, Tuono 660, and soon-to-be-released Tuareg 660., though they have parallel-Twins and the Trident and Tiger Sport have inline Triples. Aprilia took a more high-performance approach, squeezing 100 horsepower out of its engine and equipping the RS and Tuono with higher-spec components and electronics. As a result, they are priced higher – the RS 660 starts at $11,299 and the Tuono 660 starts at $10,499. With its off-road-ready spoked wheels with a 21-inch front and nearly 10 inches of suspension travel, the Tuareg 660 will compete head-to-head with the Yamaha Ténéré 700 ($9,999).

So, about a month from now we should get full technical details about the new-for-2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660. Stay tuned!

The post Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Prototype Revealed first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

This 2021 motorcycle buyers guide includes new or significantly updated street-legal models available in the U.S. It includes bikes in many categories, including adventure, cafe racer, cruiser, sport, sport-touring, retro, touring, and others.

Organized in alphabetical order by manufacturer, it includes photos and links to details or, when available, first rides and road test reviews of each motorcycle. Due to the pandemic and supply chain disruptions, some manufacturers skipped the 2021 model year. Stay tuned for our 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide.

RELATED: 2020 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

2021 Aprilia RS 660

2021 Aprilia RS 660
2021 Aprilia RS 660 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Aprilia‘s RS 660 is the first of three models — the RS 660 sportbike, the Tuono 660 naked bike (below), and the not-yet-released Tuareg 660 adventure bike — built on a new engine platform, a liquid-cooled 659cc parallel-Twin with a 270-degree firing order that makes a claimed 100 horsepower at 10,500 rpm and 49.4 lb-ft of torque at 8,500 rpm. The RS 660 is equipped with the IMU-enabled APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) electronics package with five ride modes, 3-level cornering ABS, 3-level traction control, wheelie control, cruise control, and engine braking management. Pricing starts at $11,299.

Read our 2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Aprilia RS 660 Video Review

2021 Aprilia RSV4 / RSV4 Factory

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory
2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

Aprilia is an Italian brand known for performance, and the RSV4 and RSV4 Factory are at the pointy end of the company’s go-fast spear. Both are powered by a 1,099cc, 65-degree V-4 that Aprilia says cranks out an eye-watering 217 horsepower at 13,000 rpm and 92 lb-ft of torque at 10,500 rpm, even while meeting strict Euro 5 emissions regulations. And both are equipped with a 6-axis IMU and the APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) suite of rider aids. Whereas the standard RSV4 features fully adjustable Sachs suspension, the RSV4 Factory is equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension, with a 43mm NIX upside-down fork, a TTX rear shock, and an electronic steering damper. The RSV4 has cast wheels and the RSV4 Factory has lighter and stronger forged wheels. MSRP for the RSV4 is $18,999 and MSRP for the RSV4 Factory is $25,999.

Read our 2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory First Ride Review

2021 Aprilia Tuono 660

2021 Aprilia Tuono 660
2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

Based on the RS 660 (above), the Aprilia Tuono 660 is a semi-naked sportbike with a more upright seating position, and more street-oriented steering geometry. Its base price is $10,499.

Read our 2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 Video Review

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Tuono V4 Factory

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4
2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

The Tuono name has always been associated with top-of-the-line street performance, and the Aprilia Tuono V4 and Tuono V4 Factory carry the cred with a 1,077cc V-4 that produces 175 horsepower and 89 lb-ft of torque at the crank (claimed). The Tuono V4 is the more street-focused of the two, with a taller windscreen, a higher handlebar, and optional saddlebags (as shown above), and it is equipped with fully adjustable Sachs suspension. The Tuono V4 Factory is equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension. Both models feature a six-axis IMU that supports the APRC electronics suite. MSRP for the Tuono V4 is $15,999 and MSRP for the Tuono V4 Factory is $19,499.

Read our 2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory First Ride Review

2021 Benelli Leoncino / Leoncino Trail

2021 Benelli Leoncino
2021 Benelli Leoncino (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The Benelli Leoncino (“little lion”) is an Italian-designed, Chinese-manufactured roadster powered by a liquid-cooled 500cc parallel-Twin also found in the TRK502X adventure bike (below). In the U.S., the Leoncino is part of a two-bike lineup, which includes the standard street-biased roadster model (shown above) and the Leoncino Trail, a scrambler variant with more suspension travel and spoked wheels with a 19-inch front and 90/10 adventure tires. The Leoncino comes with standard ABS and is priced at $6,199, while the Leoncino Trail is $7,199.

Read our 2021 Benelli Leoncino Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Benelli Leoncino Video Review

2021 Benelli TRK502X

2021 Benelli TRK502X
2021 Benelli TRK502X (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Like the Leoncino above, the Benelli TRK502X is an Italian-designed, Chinese-manufactured adventure bike powered by a liquid-cooled 500cc parallel-Twin. It has a comfortable and upright seating position, a good windscreen, 90/10 adventure tires with a 19-inch front, spoked wheels, ABS, hand and engine guards, and enough luggage capacity to go the distance (aluminum panniers and top box are standard). MSRP is $7,398.

Read our 2021 Benelli TRK502X Road Test Review

2021 BMW R 18 / R 18 First Edition

2021 BMW R 18 First Edition
2021 BMW R 18 First Edition (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The BMW R 18 is a cruiser powered by a massive 1,802cc OHV air/oil-cooled 4-valve opposed Twin that’s the largest “boxer” engine the German company has ever produced. Part of BMW’s Heritage line, the R 18 has styling inspired by the 1930s-era R 5. Despite its classic looks, the long, low cruiser is equipped with fully modern electronics, brakes, suspension, and other features. Base price is $17,495. BMW recently announced two touring versions for the 2022 model year, the R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental, both with a fairing, hard saddlebags, and an infotainment system; the Transcontinental adds a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

Read our 2021 BMW R 18 First Edition Road Test Review

2021 Ducati Monster

2021 Ducati Monster
2021 Ducati Monster (Photo by Gregor Halenda and Mike Levin)

The Ducati Monster is one of the Italian manufacturer’s most iconic and best-selling models. Gone is the trademark tubular-steel trellis frame, replaced with a front-frame design that uses the engine as a structural member of the chassis, as on the Panigale and Streetfighter V4 models. Compared to the previous Monster 821, the new model weighs 40 pounds less and is equipped with a more powerful 937cc Testastretta 11-degree L-Twin engine and top-shelf electronics. New styling and more make this an all-new Monster. Pricing starts at $11,895 for the Monster and $12,195 for the Monster+, which adds a flyscreen and passenger seat cover.

Read our 2021 Ducati Monster First Ride Review

2021 Ducati Multistrada V4

2021 Ducati Multistrada V4
2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 (Photo by Mike Levin)

Another top-selling Ducati is the Multistrada adventure bike. For 2021, it is now the Multistrada V4 and it is powered by the 1,158cc 90-degree V4 Grandturismo engine that makes 170 horsepower at 10,500 rpm and stomping 92 lb-ft torque at 8,750 rpm (claimed). Ducati Skyhook semi-active suspension and a full suite of IMU-supported electronics are standard, and S models are equipped with a radar system that enables Adaptive Cruise Control and Blind Spot Detection. New for 2021 is a 19-inch front wheel. Pricing starts at $19,995 for the Multistrada V4 and $24,095 for the Multistrada V4 S.

Read our 2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 S First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 S Video Review

2021 Ducati SuperSport 950

2021 Ducati SuperSport 950
2021 Ducati SuperSport 950

Updates to the Ducati SuperSport 950 include new styling inspired by the Panigale V4, an IMU-enabled electronics package, and improved comfort. The seat is flatter and has more padding, the handlebar is higher, and the footpegs are lower. The SuperSport 950 is powered by a 937cc Testastretta L-Twin that makes 110 horsepower at 9,000 rpm and 68.6 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm (claimed, at the crank). The SuperSport 950 is available in Ducati Red for $13,995. The SuperSport 950 S, which is equipped with fully adjustable Öhlins suspension and a passenger seat cover, is available in Ducati Red and Arctic White Silk starting at $16,195.

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival
2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival

Earlier this year Harley-Davidson announced its new Icons Collection. The first model in the collection is the stunning Electra Glide Revival, which is inspired by the 1969 Electra Glide, the first Harley-Davidson motorcycle available with an accessory “batwing” fairing. Though retro in style, the Electra Glide Revival is powered by a Milwaukee Eight 114 V-twin and is equipped with RDRS Safety Enhancements and a Boom! Box infotainment system. Global production of the Electra Glide Revival is limited to a one-time build of 1,500 serialized examples, with an MSRP of $29,199.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 114

2021 Harley-Davidson Softail Fat Boy 114
2021 Harley-Davidson Softail Fat Boy 114

With its iconic solid aluminum 18-inch Lakester wheels, for 2021 Harley-Davidson gave the Fat Boy 114 a new look with lots of chrome and bright work. Powering the Fat Boy is none other than the torquey Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-twin engine, equipped with a 6-speed gearbox and putting down a claimed 119 ft-lb of torque at just 3,000 rpm. Pricing starts at $19,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 114 First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 / Pan America 1250 Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

A competitive, state-of-the-art, 150-horsepower adventure bike built by Harley-Davidson? Yea, right, when pigs fly! Well, the Motor Company came out swinging with its Pan America 1250 and Pan America 1250 Special. Powered by the all-new Revolution Max 1250, a liquid-cooled, 1,252cc, 60-degree V-Twin with DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, and variable valve timing. The killer app is the optional Adaptive Ride Height, which lowers the higher-spec Pan America 1250 Special (which is equipped with semi-active Showa suspension) by 1 to 2 inches when the bike comes to a stop. Pricing starts at $17,319 for the Pan America 1250 and $19,999 for the Pan America 1250 Special.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special Video Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special
2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special

For Harley-Davidson Touring models like the Road Glide, Road King, and Street Glide, there are Special models that offer a slammed look and 119 lb-ft of torque from the Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-Twin. The 2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special is available with new two-tone paint options, and with a choice of a blacked-out or bright chrome styling treatments. All Special models are now equipped with the high-performance Ventilator air cleaner with a washable filter element, and a new low-profile engine guard. Pricing starts at $26,699.

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S
2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S

The (air-cooled) Sportster is dead, long live the (liquid-cooled) Sportster! Visually similar to the 1250 Custom teased several years ago, the 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S represents a new era for the legendary Sportster line. Since the introduction of the XL model family in 1957, Sportsters have always been stripped-down motorcycles powered by air-cooled V-Twins. Harley calls the new Sportster S a “sport custom motorcycle,” and at the heart of the machine is a 121-horsepower Revolution Max 1250T V-Twin, a lightweight chassis, and premium suspension. Pricing starts at $14,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114
2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114

The Street Bob, with its mini-ape handlebar, mid-mount controls, and bobber-style fenders, has become a fan favorite among those looking for a minimalist American V-twin to customize. The 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114 packs more punch, thanks to the larger, torque-rich Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine. Pricing starts at $14,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114 First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special
2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special

With a slammed look and 119 lb-ft of torque from the Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-Twin, the 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special is available with new two-tone paint options, and with a choice of a blacked-out or bright chrome styling treatments. All Special models are now equipped with the high-performance Ventilator air cleaner with a washable filter element, and a new low-profile engine guard. Pricing starts at $27,099.

Harley-Davidson Unveils Arctic Blast Limited Edition Street Glide Special

2021 Honda ADV150

2021 Honda ADV150
2021 Honda ADV150 (Photo by Joseph McKimmey)

The 2021 Honda ADV150 is an ADV-styled scooter, essentially a Honda PCX150 with longer travel Showa suspension (5.1/4.7 inches front/rear) and a larger ABS-equipped 240mm disc brake at the bow and a drum brake without ABS in the stern. Its powered by a liquid-cooled 149cc Single and has an automatic V-matic transmission. Pricing starts at $4,199.

Read our 2021 Honda ADV150 First Ride Review

2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP

2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP
2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Well-mannered motorcycles seldom make racing history, and the 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP was developed with one uncompromising goal — win superbike races at all costs. It’s powered by an inline-Four that we dyno tested at 175 horsepower at the rear wheel, and it’s equipped with Öhlins semi-active suspension, IMU-enabled electronics, and top-shelf braking hardware. And it’s street legal and available for purchase from your local Honda dealer. MSRP is $28,500.

Read our 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP Video Review

2021 Honda CRF300L

2021 Honda CRF300L
2021 Honda CRF300L (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The 2021 Honda CRF300L (above) and CRF300L Rally (below) dual-sports share the same powerplant, a liquid-cooled 286cc Single which boasts 15% more displacement, power, and torque than its 250cc predecessor. They have a new slip/assist clutch, revised steering geometry, less weight, and a new LCD meter. The CRF300L has a base price of $5,249 (add $300 for ABS), weighs 309 pounds, has a 2.1-gallon tank, and has a 34.7-inch seat height.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally First Ride Review

2021 Honda CRF300L Rally

2021 Honda CRF300L Rally
2021 Honda CRF300L Rally (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally (above) dual-sports share the same powerplant, a liquid-cooled 286cc Single which boasts 15% more displacement, power, and torque than its 250cc predecessor. They have a new slip/assist clutch, revised steering geometry, less weight, and a new LCD meter. The CRF300L Rally, which has a windscreen, handlebar weights, rubber footpeg inserts, a larger front brake rotor, more seat padding, and a larger fuel tank (3.4 gallons vs. 2.1) than the CRF300L, has a base price of $5,999 (add $300 for ABS), weighs 333 pounds, and has a 35.2-inch seat height.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally First Ride Review

2021 Honda CRF450RL

2021 Honda CRF450RL
2021 Honda CRF450RL (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The Honda CRF450L debuted for 2019, bringing CRF450R motocross performance to a street-legal dual-sport. Its lightweight, compact, liquid-cooled 449cc single has a 12:1 compression ratio and a Unicam SOHC valve train with titanium valves. For 2021, Honda added an “R” to the model name (CRF450RL), lowered the price to $9,999 (from $10,399), revised the ECU and fuel-injection settings for better throttle response, and added new hand guards and fresh graphics.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF450RL Review

2021 Honda Gold Wing / Gold Wing DCT

2021 Honda Gold Wing
2021 Honda Gold Wing

The Gold Wing has been Honda‘s flagship touring model for more than 40 years. It entered its sixth generation for the 2018 model year, with a complete overhaul to the GL1800 platform that made it lighter, sportier, and more technologically advanced. The standard Gold Wing (above) and trunk-equipped Gold Wing Tour (below) won Rider‘s 2018 Motorcycle of the Year award. Gold Wing updates for 2021 include a suede-like seat cover, colored seat piping, audio improvements, and red rear turnsignals. Pricing starts at $23,800 for the Gold Wing and $25,100 for the Gold Wing DCT (with 7-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission).

Read our 2021 Honda Gold Wing First Look Review

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour / Gold Wing Tour DCT

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT
2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Updates for the Honda Gold Wing Tour include the same ones listed above for the standard Gold Wing: a suede-like seat cover, colored seat piping, audio improvements, and red rear turnsignals. But the Tour also got a larger top trunk (61 liters, up from 50) that now easily accepts two full-face helmets; total storage capacity is now 121 liters. The passenger seat’s backrest features a more relaxed angle, thicker foam, and a taller profile. Pricing starts at $23,800 for the Gold Wing and $25,100 for the Gold Wing DCT (with 7-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission).

Read our 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT First Ride Review

2021 Honda Rebel 1100 / Rebel 1100 DCT

2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT
2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Joining the Rebel 300 and Rebel 500 in Honda‘s cruiser lineup for 2021 is the all-new Rebel 1100, which is powered by powered by a version of the liquid-cooled 1,084cc parallel-twin used in the 2020 Africa Twin, which uses a Unicam SOHC valve train and is available with either a 6-speed manual gearbox or a 6-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission. Standard equipment includes four ride modes (Standard, Sport, Rain and User, which is customizable), Honda Selectable Torque Control (aka traction control, which has integrated wheelie control), engine brake control, and cruise control. Pricing starts at $9,299 for the Rebel 1100 and $9,999 for the Rebel 1100 DCT.

Read our 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT First Ride Review

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS
2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The latest addition to Honda‘s miniMOTO lineup is the Trail 125 ABS, which is powered by the same air-cooled 125cc Single found in the Grom, Monkey, and Super Cub C125. Like the Monkey and Super Cub, the Trail plays the retro card, pulling at heartstrings for a bike beloved by many decades ago. Just like its forefathers, the 2021 Honda Trail 125 proudly carries on the tradition of being a quaint and understated dual-sport, with a steel backbone frame, upright handlebar, square turnsignals, upswept exhaust, high-mount snorkel, and luggage rack. MSRP is $3,899.

Read our 2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS First Ride Review

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited
2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited (Photo by Kevin Wing)

For 2021, the Indian Roadmaster Limited gets the larger 116ci Thunder Stroke V-Twin versus the original 111, and it has a modern streamlined fairing, open front fender, and slammed saddlebags. As a premium touring model, the Roadmaster Limited also gets Indian’s heated and cooled ClimaCommand seats and other upgrades. Pricing starts at $30,749.

Read our 2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited Tour Test Review

2021 Kawasaki KLX300

2021 Kawasaki KLX300
2021 Kawasaki KLX300 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Like the Honda CRF300L above, Kawasaki‘s entry-level dual-sport got a displacement boost, which warranted a name change from KLX250 to KLX300. The 2021 KLX300 makes more thanks to a larger 292cc Single, which is liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, and has DOHC with four valves. It also uses more aggressive cam profiles, making it livelier than its predecessor. All of that is paired to a 6-speed gearbox and 14/40 final drive. Pricing starts at $5,599. And joining the KLX300 is a supermoto version, the KLX300SM (below).

Read our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM Video Review

2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM

2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM
2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Joining the KLX300 dual-sport (above) in Kawasaki‘s 2021 lineup is an all-new supermoto version, the KLX300SM. It has street-oriented 17-inch wire-spoke wheels and IRC Road Winner RX-01 rubber, and the suspension is stiffer with slightly abbreviated travel. The KLX300SM also has taller final-drive gearing and a larger front brake rotor. Pricing starts at $5,599.

Read our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM Video Review

2021 KTM 450 SMR

2021 KTM 450 SMR
2021 KTM 450 SMR (Photo by Casey Davis)

Speaking of supermoto, KTM‘s track-only, race-ready 450 SMR is back for 2021. Using the 450 SX-F motocross racer as its foundation, the SMR shares its 63-horsepower 450cc single-cylinder SOHC engine, lightweight steel frame, and cast-aluminum swingarm. To suit its supermoto purpose, wider triple clamps with a 16mm offset accommodate tubeless Alpina wheels (16.5-inch front and 17-inch rear) fitted with ultra-sticky Bridgestone Battlax Supermoto slicks. The WP Xact suspension is updated, reducing suspension travel to an ample 11.2 inches in the front and 10.5 inches in the rear, lowering the bike’s center of gravity and improving handling. A radially mounted Brembo M50 front caliper squeezes a 310mm Galfer floating rotor to deliver all the braking power you’ll ever need on a bike that weighs just 232 pounds wet. MSRP is $11,299.

Read our 2021 KTM 450 SMR First Ride Review

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R
2021 KTM 890 Adventure R (Photo by Kevin Wing)

We selected the KTM 790 Adventure and 790 Adventure R as Rider‘s 2019 Motorcycle of the Year. Just two years later, KTM has updated the platform. Adapted from the 890 Duke R, the engine now has more displacement, a higher compression ratio, and other improvements. And like the 890 Duke R, the Adventure R has better throttle-by-wire response, a beefed-up clutch and a shortened shift lever stroke and lighter shift-detent spring for faster shifting. Chassis updates include an aluminum head tube, a lighter swingarm, revised suspension settings, and refinements to the braking system. Pricing starts at $14,199.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R (Off) Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Video Review

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally
2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally

The limited-edition KTM 890 Adventure R Rally received the same updates as the 890 Adventure R (above), but is loaded with race-spec inspired components. Its development utilized feedback from Red Bull KTM Factory Racing team riders, Toby Price, and Sam Sunderland. Only 700 units of the 890 Adventure R Rally will be produced worldwide, with 200 slated for the North American market. Pricing starKTM 8ts at $19,999.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R and 890 Adventure R Rally First Look Review

2021 KTM 890 Duke

2021 KTM 890 Duke
2021 KTM 890 Duke (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Powering the 2021 KTM 890 Duke is the same punchy, rip-roaring 889cc parallel-Twin producing a claimed 115 horsepower and 67.9 lb-ft of torque that’s also found in the 890 Duke R and 890 Adventure (above). Shared amongst the middleweight Duke family is a chromoly-steel frame, lightweight one-piece aluminum subframe and cast aluminum swingarm. By using the 889cc engine as a stressed member, the 890 Duke flaunts a mere 372-pound dry weight. We recently completed a comparison test of the 2021 KTM Duke lineup (200, 390, 890, and 1290), which will be posted soon.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Duke First Look Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

On March 15, 2021, Moto Guzzi celebrated its 100th anniversary of continuous production at its headquarters in Mandello del Lario, Italy. One of Moto Guzzi’s most iconic models, the V7, was updated for 2021, and is available in more modern V7 Stone and classic V7 Special versions. Both have a larger 853cc V-Twin derived from engine, variations of which are found in the V9 and V85 TT. They also get reduced effort from the single-disc dry clutch, a stiffer frame, a bigger swingarm with a new bevel gear for the cardan shaft drive, revised damping and a longer stroke for the preload-adjustable rear shocks, an updated ABS module, a wider rear tire, vibration-damping footpegs, and a thicker passenger seat. MSRP for the V7 Stone is $8,990, or $9,190 for the Centenario edition (shown above).

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Video Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special gets the same updates as the V7 Stone above. Whereas the V7 Stone has matte finishes, a single all-digital gauge, black exhausts, cast wheels, and an eagle-shaped LED set into the headlight, the V7 Special is classically styled, with spoked wheels, chrome finishes, dual analog gauges, and a traditional headlight. MSRP is $9,490.

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special and V7 Stone First Look Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT

2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT

For 2021, the Moto Guzzi V85 TT gets some updates to its air-cooled 853cc 90-degree V-Twin. The revised powerplant offers more torque at low to midrange rpm thanks to optimized lift of the pushrod-and-rockers timing cams and tweaks to the engine control electronics. New spoked rims now mount tubeless tires, reducing unsprung weight by 3.3 pounds for better handling and facilitating plug-and-go flat repairs. Two new riding modes—Sport and Custom—join the existing three (Street, Rain, Off-road) to provide more flexibility in managing throttle response, traction control and ABS to suit rider preferences. Cruise control and the color TFT instrument panel also come standard. The 2021 V85 TT Adventure ($12,990) has standard saddlebags. The 2021 V85 TT Travel ($13,390) includes a Touring windscreen, side panniers from the Urban series, auxiliary LED lights, heated hand grips, and the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia platform.

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT First Look Review

2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan

2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan
2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan

For 2021, the Royal Enfield Himalayan adventure bike, which is powered by an air-cooled 411cc Single, get several updates, including switchable ABS to help riders when riding off-road, a revised rear brake that is said to improve braking performance, a redesigned sidestand, and a new hazard light switch. MSRP is $4,999.

Read our 2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan First Look Review

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350
2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

For 2021, the Royal Enfield family gets a new addition — the Meteor 350, a light, affordable cruiser powered by an all-new air-cooled 349cc single with SOHC actuating two valves. Available in three budget-friendly trim packages, variants include the base-model Fireball ($4,399) with a black exhaust system; the Stellar ($4,499), with a chrome exhaust and a passenger backrest; and the Supernova ($4,599), which adds a windshield and a two-tone paint scheme.

Read our 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 Video Review

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS
2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Triumph‘s Speed Triple is one of the original hooligan bikes. It has evolved over the years since its introduction in 1994, and for 2021 the Speed Triple 1200 RS is the lightest, most powerful, highest-spec version yet. Its all-new 1,160cc Triple (up from 1,050cc) makes 165 horsepower at the rear wheel, and the RS is equipped with state-of-the-art electronics, fully adjustable Öhlins suspension, Brembo Stylema front calipers, and much more. Pricing starts at $18,300.

Read our 2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS Road Test Review

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport
2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport, a street-focused adventure bike powered by the same liquid-cooled 888cc in-line triple as the Tiger 900 models, but it has been detuned to 82 horsepower at 8,400 rpm and 58 lb-ft of torque at 6,700 rpm at the rear wheel, as measured on Jett Tuning‘s dyno, which is about 10 horsepower lower. To keep the price down, Triumph also reduced the number of ride modes to two (Road and Rain) and limited suspension adjustability to rear preload. But this is no bargain-bin special. It has Marzocchi suspension front and rear, and it has Brembo brakes, with Stylema front calipers and a radial front master cylinder. ABS is standard but not switchable, and traction control is also standard but is switchable.

Watch our 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport Video Review

2021 Triumph Trident 660

2021 Triumph Trident 660
2021 Triumph Trident 660

The 2021 Triumph Trident 660 is a triple-cylinder-powered roadster in the the twin-cylinder-dominated middleweight class. It’s powered by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 660cc inline-Triple making a claimed 79.9 horsepower at 10,250 rpm and 47 lb-ft of torque at 6,250 rpm, and it is equipped with ABS, switchable traction control, and selectable ride modes. MSRP is $7,995.

Read our 2021 Triumph Trident 660 First Look Review

2021 Yamaha MT-07

2021 Yamaha MT-07
2021 Yamaha MT-07 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Updates for 2021 to the Yamaha MT-07, its best-selling middleweight naked sportbike, include revisions to the 689cc liquid-cooled CP2 (Cross Plane 2-cylinder) parallel-Twin engine to meet Euro 5 regulations and to improve low-rpm throttle response. The MT-07 has a new 2-into-1 exhaust, revisions to the 6-speed gearbox to improve shifting feel, LED lighting all around, new instrumentation, revised ergonomics, and new styling that brings it closer in appearance to the larger MT-09 (below). Base price is $7,699, and three color choices are available: Storm Fluo, Matte Raven Black, and Team Yamaha Blue.

Read our 2021 Yamaha MT-07 Road Test Review

2021 Yamaha MT-09

2021 Yamaha MT-09
2021 Yamaha MT-09 (Photo by Joe Agustin)

Now in its third generation, fully 90% of the Yamaha MT-09 naked sportbike is new for 2021. Its has an entirely new 890cc CP3 (Cross Plane 3-cylinder) inline-Triple engine, a thoroughly updated and significantly stiffer chassis, state-of-the-art electronics, and a fresh look that results in the most refined MT-09 yet. The base price increased by $400 to $9,399, but the four extra Benjamins are worth it. The MT-09 is available in Storm Fluo (shown above), Matte Raven Black, and Team Yamaha Blue. There’s also an MT-09 SP ($10,999) with exclusive special-edition coloring, premium KYB and Öhlins suspension, and cruise control.

Read our 2021 Yamaha MT-09 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Yamaha MT-09 Video Review

2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700

2021 Yamaha Tenere 700
2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

After being teased for several years, Yamaha‘s highly anticipated Ténéré 700 adventure bike made its U.S. debut in the summer of 2021, bringing some excitement during a challenging pandemic year. It’s powered by the versatile 689cc liquid-cooled CP2 (Cross Plane 2-cylinder) parallel-Twin engine from the MT-07 (above), modified for adventure duty with a new airbox with a higher snorkel, a revised cooling system, an upswept exhaust, and a final gear ratio of 46/15 vs. 43/16. The rest of the bike is all-new, including the narrow double-cradle tubular-steel frame, triangulated (welded-on) subframe, double braced steering head and aluminum swingarm, adjustable long-travel suspension, switchable ABS, and more. Base price is $9,999 and its available in Ceramic Ice, Intensity White (shown above), and Matte Black.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 First Ride Review

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 Tour Test Review

Watch our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 Video Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

Now in its third generation, Yamaha’s middleweight sport-tourer — now called the Tracer 9 GT — is new from the ground up for 2021. It has a larger, more powerful engine, a new frame, and a state-of-the-art electronics package that includes semi-active suspension. With these updates comes a higher price, and MSRP is now $14,899. It’s available in Liquid Metal (shown above) and Redline.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT First Look Review

2021 Zero FXE

Zero FXE
2021 Zero FXE

New for 2021, Zero has taken the existing frame from the FX and added a redesigned body. The starkly modern, supermoto styling is very similar in appearance to the FXS – tall, slim and sporting a raised front mudguard. However, the FXE is capable of a claimed 100-mile range on a full battery charge and costs $11,795, which can be bought down to around $10,000 depending upon available EV rebates and credits. 

Compared to many of its heavier, more expensive competitors the FXE is a lightweight and thrilling runabout, and what it gives up in range it makes up for in accessibility and potential for fun. The FXE makes for a credible commuter bike, capable of taking to the highway but ideal to zip around town on.   

The post 2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
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