Tag Archives: Sport Touring Motorcycle Reviews

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650 | First Ride Review

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650
Kawasaki’s venerable Versys 650 sport-tourer has been updated for 2022 with traction control, updated styling with an adjustable windscreen, and a new TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity. Photos by Kevin Wing.

My 2009 Kawasaki Versys 650 was one of the best utilitarian two-wheelers I’ve owned, but since I’m always putting miles on test bikes, I hardly ever rode it. When I realized I’d added only 500 miles to the odometer in five years, a deep sense of shame prompted me to sell it. After listing it on Facebook Marketplace, it was gone in a flash. Due to the high prices for used motorcycles right now, I earned a small profit – about a dollar for every mile I put on it.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650
The only colorway for the 2022 Kawasaki Versys 650 LT is Metallic Spark Black/Metallic Flat Spark Black.

Flash forward a few months and I’m wending my way through the twisty interior of San Diego County aboard a 2022 Kawasaki Versys 650. It’s the $9,999 LT version with hard saddlebags and handguards, which only comes in Metallic Spark Black/Metallic Flat Spark Black this year. The base model is available in the same color for $8,899, or in Candy Lime Green/Metallic Flat Spark Black/Metallic Spark Black for $9,099.

Check out Rider‘s 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Not surprisingly, the 2022 upgrade is a much better motorcycle than my just-sold 2009 model, but they still have a lot in common despite 13 years of separation. The seating position, performance, and overall essence of the motorcycle remain virtually unchanged, but a few key aspects go a long way toward improving the bike’s desirability.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650
The new TFT display is a welcome upgrade. The screen is bright and easy to read.

New for ’22 is a full-color 4.3-inch TFT display that is a major improvement over the previous instrument panel, and light-years beyond the one on my ’09 model. The layout of information is modern and clean, blending everything – the gear position indicator, fuel gauge, tach, speedo, clock, tripmeter, etc. –  into a centrally located format. A rider can choose between a black or white background, and the screen brightness automatically adjusts to ambient light levels.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Gear Up:
Helmet: Sena Impulse
Jacket: Spidi H2Out
Gloves: Spidi TX-2
Pants: Rev’It Campo
Boots: Alpinestars SMX-1 R

Simultaneously depressing two analog buttons on the display allows a Bluetooth connection to be established between the Versys and Kawasaki’s Rideology smartphone app. The app features a useful and handy maintenance log, general bike info, and the ability to record rides as well as share them with others.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

During the ride, when the bike and app are talking to one another, the TFT display will notify the rider when a new call or email has been received. The part of my ride recorded with the Rideology app showed that I traveled 79 miles for 1.34 hours from Orange to San Diego counties at an average speed of 54 mph. The map, however, displayed a straight line from point A to point B, not an accurate GPS mapping of the twists and turns.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

My old Versys’ windscreen was adjustable only if I were willing to remove the four bolts necessary to position it differently, which rarely, if ever, happened. The inefficiency of the process meant a rider found a likable position for the windscreen and that’s where it stayed. The new Versys features an easily adjustable windscreen that can be raised and lowered to four different settings over a 3-inch range. It’s a two-handed affair with one hand depressing the lock button while the other moves the windscreen, but it’s worth the small effort. The upper position deflects wind quite well while the low position puts the rider more in the wind stream.

The new windscreen is the cherry atop a redesigned upper fairing that shares a family resemblance with its liter-bike counterpart, the Versys 1000. The sides of the new cowling are ducted to move air around the rider while the dual headlights are now bright, low-wattage LEDs. The rear of the Versys matches the front with aggressively pointy style and a new LED taillight.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Anti-lock brakes now come standard on all Versys 650 models, as does traction control. The 649cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin powering the Versys isn’t a tire shredder – when we dyno tested a 2020 Versys 650, it sent 63 hp and 43 lb-ft of torque to the rear wheel – but it can certainly break traction given enough throttle when leaned over. TC has two settings, with the first being less intrusive and the second providing a more conservative safety net that should prove beneficial to newer riders or experienced ones caught in low-traction conditions. If desired, traction control can be switched off entirely via a switch located on the left switchpod.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Kickstand up and traveling south on Interstate 5 toward San Diego, the Versys felt like a comfortable and familiar old shoe. Exiting the slab and venturing into the twisties, it soon becomes apparent the Showa suspension’s stock settings were a tad soft for my taste. Once stopped, a few stiffening clicks of preload on top of the left fork leg, a few clicks of tensioning rebound on top of the right fork leg, and a few stiffening twists of the remote preload adjuster on the rear shock dialed things in for tackling the road ahead.

The 28-liter saddlebags are large enough to accommodate a full-face helmet, though without much room to spare. There is also a helmet lock if you need to secure your lid when the saddlebags are full of other incidentals. The ignition key unlocks the saddlebags and allow them to be removed from the motorcycle. For those requiring more storage, Kawasaki offers a matching 47-liter top case along with other accessories, such as heated grips and a GPS mount.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

The bike’s peppy midrange thrusts its 503-lb claimed curb weight forward in enthusiastically manageable fashion. Dual 2-piston calipers grip 300mm petal discs to slow the party down with equal efficiency. When leaned over, the Versys holds its line effectively and transitions to and fro confidently.

The 5.5-gallon fuel tank combined with efficient fuel consumption allows for extended mileage between fuel stops. (During our 2020 test, we averaged 46 mpg for 253 miles of range.) That’s great news for commuters or anyone wanting to incorporate longer trips into their Versys ownership. Complementing the Versys’ fuel range is an ergonomically neutral riding position that is one of the things I loved most about my old Versys as well as the new one.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Like my old Versys, the new version is a modern, solid, middleweight jack-of-all-trades that’s as steadfast as a motorcycle can be. It responds dutifully to what’s asked of it, whether that be cruising around the city, commuting to work, or taking off on long weekends or longer tours. During my Versys ownership never once did it fail to start, or run badly once started, even though it spent most of its time languishing in my garage.

My old Versys didn’t have ABS, traction control, a remote preload adjusting shock, TFT display, a slip/assist clutch, LED lights, or an easily adjustable windscreen, and it didn’t look nearly as good as the ’22 Versys. In 2009, the MSRP of a base-model Versys was $7,099, which is just over $9,700 in today’s dollars. The new bike offers much more for less money, and the touring-ready LT is a fantastic bargain.

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

2022 Kawasaki Versys 650

Base Price: $8,899
Price as Tested: $9,999 (LT model)
Website: Kawasaki.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 649cc
Bore x Stroke: 83 x 60mm
Horsepower: 63 hp @ 8,700 rpm (rear-wheel dyno, 2020 model)
Torque: 43 lb-ft @ 7,300 rpm (rear-wheel dyno, 2020 model)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 55.7 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 33.3 in.
Wet Weight: 503 lb (as tested)
Fuel Capacity: 5.5 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 46 mpg


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The post 2022 Kawasaki Versys 650 | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT | Road Test Review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Suzuki’s all-new GSX-S1000GT+ is a street-tuned sportbike that’s outfitted for touring with a fairing and windscreen, comfortable rider and passenger accommodations, and 36-liter side cases. Photos by Kevin Wing.

Suzuki is helping sport-tourers make a comeback. With the rise of adventure bikes over the past decade, sport-tourers got shoved aside, relegated to the dark corners of showroom floors. Development cycles stretched out, and model updates became few and far between. That’s a shame. Not everyone wants a motorcycle with a 19-inch front wheel, a 34-inch seat height, and a jungle gym’s worth of crash bars.

Check out Rider‘s 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

As the name implies, sport-tourers combine go-fast performance and touring prowess into a single package. What’s not to love about a superbike engine tuned for the street, a chassis built for both speed and comfort, and ergonomics that won’t make you cry uncle after an hour in the saddle? With their 17-inch wheels shod with grippy radials, sport-tourers love to lean, and modern electronic rider aids help keep things in check.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The GSX-S1000GT and GT+ are available in Metallic Reflective Blue or Glass Sparkle Black.

Enter the new-for-2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT ($13,149) and GSX-S1000GT+ ($13,799), the latter distinguished by its color-matched side cases. Color options are the Metallic Reflective Blue of our test bike or Glass Sparkle Black. The GT is built on the same platform as the GSX-S1000 naked sportbike we tested recently. But unlike the GSX-S1000F that was in Suzuki’s lineup until 2020, which was little more than a GSX-S1000 with a fairing bolted on, the GT is a true grand tourer.

Look Good, Feel Good

The GT’s bodywork is distinctive and angular, with a wedge-shaped front fairing that juts sharply forward and houses a V-shaped LED position light and a pair of mono-focus LED headlights (for low beam, only the right lamp is illuminated). Attached to the top of the fairing are mirrors perched on the ends of long stalks and a nonadjustable windscreen. Lower fairing panels keep the radiator and much of the engine hidden, and they are vented to pull hot air out and away from the cockpit.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Compared to the GSX-S1000F, the GSX-S1000GT’s handlebar is 0.9 inch wider and 0.6 inch closer to the rider.

GEAR UP:
Helmet: Scorpion EXO-R1 Air
Jacket: Scorpion Optima
Gloves: Scorpion Havoc
Pants: Scorpion Covert Pro Jeans
Boots: Sidi Gavia Gore-Tex

Two-up comfort was an important consideration in the GT’s development. All the rider and passenger touchpoints – the handlebar, footpegs, and rear grab handles – are rubber-damped to minimize vibration. Compared to the GSX-S1000F, the handlebar is 0.9 inch wider and 0.6 inch closer to the rider, allowing for more steering leverage and a nearly upright seating position. The wide, slightly dished rider’s seat sits 31.9 inches off the deck and is comfortable enough for long days in the saddle. A sporty amount of cornering clearance necessitated high placement of the footpegs, sacrificing some legroom, and they are positioned just below the rider’s hips.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The $650 upcharge for the GT+ adds lockable, removable, weather-proof, color-matched saddlebags.

Seat height for the passenger is 34.2 inches, and the 2.3-inch boost in height provides a better view over the rider’s shoulders. Large grab handles allow the passenger to hold on securely to the bike rather than just a strap on the seat or the rider’s hips. Both the front and rear seats have thick, supportive foam and are covered in a slightly grippy weather-resistant material.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Each 36-liter saddlebag is large enough to hold most full-face helmets.

To accommodate the added weight of a passenger and luggage, the GT has a trellis-style subframe that provides both strength and visual flair. The GSX-S1000GT+ comes standard with side cases that hold 36 liters (and up to 11 lbs) on each side, and they’re large enough to fit most full-face helmets. The saddlebags are easy to open, close, lock, remove, and reinstall, and they are keyed to the ignition. The only downside is that they cannot be left unlocked for quick access.

Paying the $650 premium for the GT+ is money well-spent. High-quality, lockable, removable, weatherproof saddlebags are undeniably convenient and practical. And buying the cases and necessary hardware as standalone accessories will set you back more than $1,000.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The GT is the first Suzuki to be offered with a TFT display. The default screen has an analog-style tach, digital speedo, and other info.

To further enhance the GT’s touring ability, Suzuki gave the bike a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display, all-new switchgear, and Bluetooth connectivity. The TFT has a large analog-style tachometer, a digital speedometer, and a fuel gauge on the left side, as well as an array of bike and trip info on the right. It also has a sensor that automatically switches the background from white in bright light to black in low light.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Pairing Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app provides access to contacts, phone, maps, music, and calendar.
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The mySPIN app enables turn-by-turn navigation using REVER and other apps.

Buttons on the left switchgear allow the rider to adjust settings and navigate menus. Installing the Suzuki mySPIN smartphone app and pairing via Bluetooth provides access to contacts, phone, maps, music, and calendar functions, which are displayed on the TFT screen. You’ll need a Bluetooth helmet headset to make/receive calls, listen to music, or hear turn-by-turn directions. A USB port on the dash provides on-the-go charging for devices.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The GSX-S1000GT’s new switchgear is user-friendly.

In Thrust We Trust

Like the GSX-S1000, the GT is powered by a 999cc in-line Four adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5 (2005-2008). It’s been retuned to make the engine more suitable for the street, but there’s still plenty of heat in the kitchen. On Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno, the GSX-S1000 churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm. Updates to the engine include new camshaft profiles, new valve springs, new throttle bodies, a revised airbox, and a Euro 5-compliant 4-2-1 exhaust. Together, they result in an extra 2 hp at the peak and smoother horsepower and torque curves.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably. Slaloming back and forth on a series of curves with grace and confidence requires accurate additions and subtractions of fuel and air, and the Suzuki mixes them perfectly. Using a throttle-by-wire system, turning the right grip directly activates the throttle position sensor, which sends instantaneous signals to a servo motor that precisely moves the throttle plates. Throttle response is further enhanced by a long, tapered intake tract that is narrower at the bottom where the 10-hole injectors are located.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Bending the GSX-S1000GT+ through a series of fast curves is pure pleasure.

The GT’s throttle-by-wire also enables the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes (Active, Basic, and Comfort) that adjust throttle response and power delivery, 5-level traction control, cruise control, and Suzuki’s Easy Start, Low RPM Assist, and Bi-Directional Quick Shift systems. ABS is also part of the electronics package, but with no IMU, neither it nor the TC are lean-angle adaptive. The 6-speed transmission has a cable-actuated slip/assist clutch. Gear changes using the quickshifter are fast and smooth, and clutch action is light with predictable engagement. Both the clutch and brake levers are adjustable for reach.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

Being derived from a Superbike championship-winning sportbike like the GSX-R1000, the GSX-S1000GT has a massive twin-spar cast-aluminum frame that surrounds the engine and attaches to a cast-aluminum swingarm. KYB suspension – a fully adjustable 43mm inverted fork and a link-type rear shock that’s adjustable for preload and rebound – is taut yet comfortable.

Brembo 4-piston radial-mount monoblock front calipers are mated to fully floating 310mm rotors, and they offer strong power and precise feedback. A Nissin 1-piston rear caliper squeezes a 240mm disc. The GT rolls on six-spoke, 17-inch cast-aluminum wheels shod with Dunlop Roadsmart 2 sport-touring radials that deliver reliable grip and neutral cornering behavior.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT is a finely tuned instrument of performance. Its in-line Four is uncommonly smooth with a linear powerband, its throttle-by-wire system provides a tight, direct connection between the right grip and the rear wheel, and the quickshifter is one of the slickest we’ve ever used

On the Road Again

Suzuki hosted a two-day press launch for the GSX-S1000GT+, with a test route that started and ended at its U.S. headquarters in Brea, California. Back-to-back 300-mile days gave us a chance to thoroughly evaluate the GT in a wide range of conditions, including traffic-choked freeways, wide-open highways, and tight, technical backroads. We followed that up with more miles on a test bike over several weeks on home turf.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

The qualities that impressed us about the GSX-S1000 – impeccable smoothness, predictable handling, unflappable stability, and linear power delivery – carry over to its GT sibling. Likewise, its braking and suspension components and electronic rider aids were selected to deliver sporting performance without inflating the retail price.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

Where the GT really stands out is its rider and passenger comfort, cruise control, instrumentation and connectivity, and, on the GT+, stylish and useful saddlebags. Weighing in at 521 lbs with its 5-gal. tank full, the GT+ is much lighter than open-class sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT (615 lbs), Yamaha FJR1300ES (644 lbs), and Kawasaki Concours 14 (691 lbs). It weighs more than the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT (503 lbs) but makes significantly more rear-wheel horsepower (136 vs. 108). With its cornering ABS and TC and semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT also costs $1,200 more than the GSX-S1000GT+ ($14,999 vs. $13,799).

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

If the GT has one notable shortcoming, it’s the nonadjustable windscreen. Though Suzuki says it and the bodywork were developed in a wind tunnel, airflow over the windscreen hit me square in the chest and created a lot of turbulence around my helmet. Of course, the size of the rider plays a role in aerodynamics (I’m 6 feet tall), but the lack of height adjustability means you get what you get. Suzuki makes an accessory touring windscreen ($169.95) that is 2.75 inches taller and has a more vertical pitch near the top, but one was not available during our test.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

Other available accessories include heated grips, a two-tone rider’s seat with a suede-like cover embossed with the GSX-S GT logo, axle sliders, ring-lock tankbags (small and large), tank pads and protectors, and wheel rim decals.

We’re glad to see Suzuki helping bring the sport-touring class to its former glory. The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ Specs

Base Price: $13,149 (GT)
Price as Tested: $13,799 (GT+ w/ 36L side cases)
Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
Website: suzukicycles.com
ENGINE
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse in-line Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 999cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm
Compression Ratio: 12.2:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 15,000 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ throttle-by-wire, 40mm throttle bodies x 4
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.6 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
CHASSIS
Frame: Twin-spar cast aluminum frame & swingarm
Wheelbase: 57.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm inverted fork, fully adj., 4.7 in. travel
Rear: Single linkage shock, adj. spring preload & rebound, 5.1 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 310mm floating discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.5 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast, 6.0 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 190/50-ZR17
Wet Weight: 521 lbs (as tested)
Load Capacity: 405 lbs (as tested)
GVWR: 926 lbs
PERFORMANCE
Horsepower: 136 hp @ 10,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 73 lb-ft @ 9,300 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 35.5 mpg
Estimated Range: 178 miles

The post 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited | Road Test Review

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
The Spyder RT Limited is Can-Am’s fully loaded touring model, with generous rider and passenger accommodations, ample luggage capacity, and many other comfort and convenience features.

BRP’s Can-Am three-wheelers have come a long way since the first model was introduced back in 2007. What started out as a single Spyder roadster powered by a 998cc V-Twin has grown into three distinct platforms that include a total of 10 models, with base prices ranging from $8,999 to $29,999.

There’s the light, sporty Ryker platform, which includes a base model available with a 600cc parallel-Twin or 900cc inline-Triple, plus 900cc Sport and Rally models. Each has a Sport or Rally ride mode that allows playful drifting on pavement or dirt.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited

Next up is the feet-forward, cruiser-touring Spyder F3 platform, with four models powered by a 1,330cc in-line Triple, including the F3, the F3-S Special Series, the F3-T with saddlebags, and the F3 Limited full-dress tourer. For luxury touring, there is the Spyder RT platform, with three models also powered by a 1,330cc Triple: the RT, the RT Limited, and the ultra-primo RT Sea-To-Sky.

The “Y” in the Spyder and Ryker names refers to the two-wheels-in-front, one-wheel-out-back configuration. Unlike trike conversions or sidecar rigs where a third wheel is grafted onto a two-wheeled motorcycle, Can-Am Spyders and Rykers were designed from the ground up as three-wheelers. With two wheels in front and three automotive-size contact patches, they are incredibly stable.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
With two widely spaced front wheels, the Spyder stays planted in curves.

We’ve tested many Spyder and Ryker models, but our last test of a Spyder RT Limited was back in 2013. Upgrades to the platform over the years made us eager to reacquaint ourselves with Can-Am’s big tourer.

Ace In The Hole

Propelling the RT Limited down the road is a liquid-cooled, 1,330cc ACE (Advanced Combustion Efficiency) inline-Triple that’s made in Austria by BRP-owned Rotax. Its 120-degree crankshaft gives it perfect primary balance, and a gear-driven counterbalancer offsets the secondary and rocking-couple vibrations. Maintenance is minimized with self-adjusting valves and belt final drive. Claimed output is 115 hp at 7,250 rpm and 96 lb-ft at 5,000 rpm, modest figures for a machine said to weigh 1,021 lbs dry (the engine alone weighs 246 lbs).

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
The spacious cockpit has comfortable seats and offers good wind protection.

GEAR UP
Helmet: Arai Regent-X
Jacket: Dainese D-Air Smart Jacket LS
Gloves: Dainese M1G C2 Gloves
Pants: Rev’It Piston Jeans
Boots: Wolverine 1000 Mile

Given that its power-to-weight ratio is about half that of many motorcycles, one might think the Spyder’s acceleration would suffer accordingly. But you’d be wrong. With ample torque on tap throughout the rev range, the big RT blasts away from stops and launches out of corners, delivering smile-inducing exhilaration. Jackrabbit starts can even break the rear tire loose briefly before the traction control kicks in.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited

Using paddle shifters on the left switchgear, the 6-speed semi-automatic transmission delivers lightning-fast upshifts. When ridden hard, each shift delivers a visceral power surge that eggs riders on. You can manually paddle shift into lower gears, or the electronically controlled transmission will do it automatically as you slow down, and it shifts into neutral at a stop. The Spyder has an electrically actuated parking brake, and when it comes time to back out of a downhill parking space, the reverse mode is a huge benefit.

The Spyder uses a throttle-by-wire system that sometimes delivers delayed responses. Both the standard and Eco ride modes exhibited a noticeable hitch in initial throttle application, and irregular power pulses plague the fuel-efficient Eco mode at lower speeds. Those issues fall to the wayside once the Spyder gets rolling, and the big Triple remains ultra-smooth throughout the rest of the rev range.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited

Out on the open road, the RT Limited gallops along with ease. In 6th gear, the Spyder maintains 70 mph at 3,600 rpm, nowhere near its 8,100-rpm redline, and its relaxed engine speed keeps vibration and harshness to a minimum. A couple taps on the paddle shifter gets the engine closer to its torque peak to make a quick pass. Or you can set the cruise control, lean back, and enjoy the ride.

Stable Is As Stable Does

In addition to its Y-architecture, one of the Spyder’s early innovations was its Vehicle Stability System (VSS), which integrates ABS, EBD (electronic brake-force distribution), TCS (Traction Control System), and SCS (Stability Control System). As far back as the original 2007 Spyder, based on inputs from an array of steering, engine speed, wheel speed, and other sensors, VSS would reduce engine power or brake individual wheels to keep the vehicle under control. Those early models were also equipped with Can-Am’s Dynamic Powering Steering.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
Using inputs from an array of sensors, the Spyder’s Vehicle Stability System applies brake pressure to the outside wheel as needed.

The Spyder’s electronic rider aids have evolved steadily over the last 15 years. The same basic systems described above are used on current models, but they are more advanced, so they respond more quickly and intervene more gradually. Also standard on the RT Limited is hill-hold control, which maintains brake pressure on inclines to make it easier to pull away from a stop.

Suspending the Spyder is a trio of Sachs shocks, with two non-adjustable Big-Bore shocks in front and a self-leveling air shock out back. Thanks to double A-arms with an anti-roll bar in front, each wheel moves independently and the vehicle stays planted over irregular pavement and off-camber turns. The shocks are calibrated to deliver a comfortable ride, and they soak up a lot of abuse without upsetting the chassis. With three separate wheel tracks, however, it can be a challenge to dodge big potholes or debris in the road.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
Even though the Spyder’s curb weight tops half a ton, its smooth, torquey 1,330cc Triple hauls the mail.

Lean In

The Spyder’s reverse-trike layout maximizes stability and traction, but the additional wheel also changes the steering dynamics. For riders accustomed to countersteering on two-wheeled motorcycles, there can be an adjustment period. For those with experience on ATVs or snowmobiles, the Spyder’s conventional steering will feel second-nature. To turn, you simply apply pressure to the outside handlebar. To hold a line, you need to maintain that pressure.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
Sporty spoked wheels are shod with grippy tires, and Brembo brakes offer serious stopping power.

To help overcome the turning resistance of the Spyder’s two big contact patches in front, the Dynamic Power Steering system provides more assistance at low speeds and less assistance at high speeds. Still, because those dinner plate-sized front contact patches grab onto more pavement than the single, small contact patch on a motorcycle, Spyders can be sensitive to small inputs at speed. Early models often felt darty, a tendency that has been reduced but not fully eliminated on newer models. As riders rack up miles, they adapt and adjust their steering inputs accordingly.

When cornering at speed, leaning one’s body into the turn helps counteract centrifugal forces. It doesn’t make the Spyder turn quicker, but it helps the rider feel more planted and in control. Whereas early Spyders had both a brake lever on the handlebar and a brake pedal – using either applied brake pressure to all three wheels – newer models use only a brake pedal. For riders used to the finer motor control of their right hand for modulating brake pressure, using only a foot pedal can take some getting used to. With those three big contact patches and triple-disc brakes, the Spyder scrubs off speed quickly and stops on a dime.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
All lighting is LED, and inboard of the front wheels are twin radiators to keep the Spyder’s big engine cool.

Lap of Luxury

The RT Limited and the RT Sea-To-Sky, the latter featuring exclusive styling upgrades, are Can-Am’s top-of-the-line touring models. Standard equipment includes an electric windscreen, an integrated passenger backrest, heated grips, and heated pilot and passenger seats. The Spyder’s side panniers, top case, and front trunk offer a prodigious total of 47 gallons (177 liters) of storage for long-distance adventures.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
The RT Limited’s rider and passenger seats are as comfortable as they come.

Can-Am’s LinQ system allows the top case to be easily removed and reinstalled. The top case can also be swapped out with various LinQ accessories, such as a rear rack, a stand-alone passenger backrest, and bags of various sizes.

For those who want additional storage, the RT Limited has a towing capacity of 400 lbs. Can-Am’s accessory catalog includes trailer hitches and other towing accessories. Can-Am no longer offers its Freedom trailer, but the RT Limited is calibrated to work with earlier versions, and it is compatible with aftermarket trailers.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
Including the Spyder’s exclusive front trunk, total luggage capacity is 47 gallons (177 liters). Towing capacity is 400 lbs.

Both rider and passenger seats provide ample comfort and support for extended road trips, and they have separate heating controls. The broad seat pan paired with generous plush padding and a lumbar-supporting rear bolster promote comfort in the saddle and hold the rider in place during cornering. The handlebars sweep back to the rider for relaxed, easy steering, while the large rider footboards and adjustable passenger footboards allow both pilot and pillion to adjust their foot positions and stretch their legs.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
Long footboards allow riders to change foot position and knee angle, and the passenger footboards are height-adjustable.

The Spyder’s cozy confines encourage mile-munching journeys, but the infotainment system seems dated when compared to its contemporary counterparts. The 7.8-inch color LCD panel lacks the vibrance and visual detail of the TFT displays found on other luxury touring machines. It does provide a wealth of information, however, including a speedometer, a tachometer, a gear-position indicator, fuel level, ambient temperature, and other trip-related details.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
The light-on-dark instrument panel is easy to read, and the hand controls and buttons are user-friendly.

Standard equipment on the RT Limited includes the BRP Audio Premium system with six speakers (four in front, two in back), a radio, and connectivity via USB and Bluetooth. The system can be controlled via buttons on the left switchgear, and the front storage compartment has a USB port for device connectivity and charging. The audio system envelopes the rider and passenger in sound, and volume automatically rises and falls in relation to the vehicle’s speed.

Additional connectivity is available by pairing a smartphone via the BRP Connect app, which allows riders to view texts and make/receive calls or listen to music using a Bluetooth headset. BRP Connect integrates other apps as well, such as REVER, Pandora, and AccuWeather, and they can be controlled through the Spyder’s switchgear.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
The RT Limited has an SE6 semi-automatic transmission, reverse mode, and an electric parking brake.

Three Wheelin’

Starting at $27,499, the Spyder RT Limited is price competitive against luxury touring motorcycles such as the Honda Gold Wing (starting at $28,500) and Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited (starting at $28,729), but it’s significantly less expensive than Harley’s factory trike, the Tri-Glide Ultra (starting at $35,699). All offer generous rider and passenger accommodations, ample storage capacity, infotainment systems, and smooth, torque-rich engines.

From its Y-architecture and Vehicle Stability System to its “frunk” (front trunk), paddle-shifting semi-automatic transmission, and foot-pedal-only combined braking system, the Spyder is a unique powersports vehicle. Two-wheel riders may dismiss it because it doesn’t lean, but the Spyder offers an open-air riding experience for those who do not want to balance and manage a heavyweight touring motorcycle. The RT Limited offers a one-of-a-kind mix of comfort, stability, safety, and touring capability. Prepare to be impressed.

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited

2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited

Base Price: $27,499
Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles w/ roadside assistance
Website: can-am.brp.com
ENGINE
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse in-line Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,330cc
Bore x Stroke: 84.0 x 80.0mm
Compression Ratio: 12.2:1
Valve Insp. Interval: N/A (self-adjusting)
Fuel Delivery: Electronic fuel injection w/ throttle-by-wire
Lubrication System: Dry sump, 5.0 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, semi-automatic w/ reverse
Final Drive: Belt
CHASSIS
Frame: Surrounding Spar Technology steel center beam
Wheelbase: 67.5 in.
Rake/Trail: N/A
Seat Height: 29.7 in.
Suspension, Front: Double A-arm w/ anti-roll bar & dual shocks, no adj., 6.9 in. travel
Rear: Single shock w/ self-leveling air preload adj., 6.0 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 270mm discs w/ 4-piston fixed calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 270mm disc w/ 1-piston floating caliper, integrated parking brake & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 5.0 x 15 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 7.0 x 15 in.
Tires, Front: 165/55-R15
Rear: 225/50-R15
Dry Weight: 1,021 lbs
Load Capacity: 494 lbs
PERFORMANCE
Horsepower: 115 hp @ 7,250 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 96 lb-ft @ 5,000 rpm (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 7 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 32 mpg
Estimated Range: 224 miles

The post 2022 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Retrospective: 1990-2002 Honda ST1100

1990-2002 Honda ST1100

YEAR/MODEL: 2002 Honda ST1100

OWNER: Clement Salvadori

HOMETOWN: Atascadero, California

Back in the late 1980s, the European market was as important to Honda as the American one. And motorcycles were popular, as cars and car insurance were more expensive than they were here. The demand was quite different, with Yanks liking big cruisers and narrowly focused sporting machines, while those east of the Atlantic had more of a practical approach, favoring motorcycles that could be used to commute on workdays, and then go two-up on a vacation.

Each motorcycle company is constantly looking around to see what the competition is doing. The Japanese Big Four undoubtedly have their own domestic spying networks, trying to keep track of each other’s doings, but there are also the local manufacturers. In the U.S., the only indigenous competition was from Harley-Davidson, but in Europe numerous homegrown marques were taking their share of the market.

1990-2002 Honda ST1100

In the late 1980s, BMW, with its new four-cylinder K-bikes, was doing quite well in the touring market. The head of Honda Germany decided he wanted a piece of that action and got permission from Japan to design his own bike, a sport-touring model, with emphasis on touring but still agile.

Hence the ST1100, introduced in Europe in 1990 as the Pan-European, with a wind-protecting fairing, removable saddlebags, and shaft drive. Ride to work in the rain, load the bags for a trip, and never have to worry about cleaning and adjusting a chain. This was an all-new machine, with a transverse-mounted (meaning the crankshaft was at a right angle to the axles) V-4 engine, putting out close to 100 rear-wheel horses.

1990-2002 Honda ST1100

This was no lightweight, as the ST weighed about 700 pounds with the huge 7.4-gallon gas tank filled. But the blessing was that the tank was beneath the seat, keeping the weight down low, which is where many sensible touring riders like to have it. That required a fuel pump pushing the gas up to the four 34.5mm Keihins – carburetors in the coming age of fuel injection. No matter, as the carbs did an excellent and trouble-free job of keeping the engine spinning. A choke lever on the handlebar was a reminder of the carburetors.

The liquid-cooled V-4, with a bore of 73mm and a stroke of 64.8mm, had a total capacity of 1,084cc. It used double overhead camshafts, with a single timing belt running all four camshafts and four valves per cylinder. Valve adjustment was by shims, not always appreciated by home mechanics, but service intervals were set at a fairly lengthy 16,000 miles. Ignition was transistorized, with electronic advance. And the oversquare engine pulled strong all the way from 2,000 to the 8,000-rpm redline.

1990-2002 Honda ST1100

Down in the bowels of the wet-sump engine, everything was built to last, with almost four quarts of oil capacity and a cooler up front. It sat in a full-cradle steel frame (contributing to the bike’s hefty weight), which gave confidence to the rider when leaning hard into the curves at considerable speeds. Up front was a 41mm Showa cartridge fork, with Honda’s TRAC anti-dive mechanism and allowing nearly 6 inches of travel. No adjustments here. At the back, a single Showa shock, with adjustability for rebound damping and spring preload, offered nearly 5 inches of travel.

The longitudinal power ran back through a wet clutch and a cassette-style 5-speed transmission to the driveshaft. Aluminum three-spoke wheels used an 18-inch 110/80 tire on the front, a 160/70 17-incher on the back, with a shade over 61 inches between the axle centers.

The Europeans loved it – perhaps for no better reason than it was a good alternative to the BMWs, along with a bit more power. The American market got to see this bike a year or so after it was released east of the Atlantic. Several improvements were made after that first version, including raising the alternator output from 28 to 40 amps and offering a combined ABS and traction control system. The initial ABS, running from 1992 to ’95, had separate systems on the front and rear wheels, but an upgrade for ’96 used linked brakes. A mild upgrade of the windscreen arrived for the 1995 model year.

Most important for a motorcycle of this design is comfort. On this ’02 model, which belongs to yours truly, a Laminar Lip was added to the top of the windscreen to smooth airflow around my helmet, since I’m taller than average. A nice addition is over to the left of the instruments, where a hand-turned knob can alter the angle of the dual halogen lights; very simple, very useful. Fitting a tankbag on the plastic cover over the engine was simplified by a company called Bagster that makes Naugahyde covers for over 200 motorcycle models, to which a bag can be neatly clipped. That bag has logged a lot of miles, as I had it on my ’92 model, which was sold after 93,000 miles, and then on my then-new ’02 ST1100, which has 103,000 miles and counting.

The flattish saddle is comfortable for long two-up days, or even longer solo days, allowing the rider to move back and forth. The saddlebags are locked onto the bike, but they can be removed with only minor fuss. However, it is far more useful to have liners in the bags; just open the bags, take out the liners, and you are on your way.

1990-2002 Honda ST1100

A convenient frill on the ST is the handle under the left side of the saddle, which folds against the bike until pulled out 90 degrees to be very useful when lifting the bike onto the centerstand. Another much appreciated addition is the concealed crash bars on the fairing, allowing for a slow fall without doing any damage.

Big smiles could be seen at Honda Germany after the ST1100 appeared. They had given the competition a good kick in the old wazoo, with the ST soon winning all sorts of awards. And it was pretty much left unchanged for the next dozen years until the ST1300 debuted in 2003.

Throw a leg over that saddle, turn the key, push the button, clutch in, click into first, and the sheer, silent rush of power is exhilarating. And 500 miles with one fuel stop in between is always a temptation.

The post Retrospective: 1990-2002 Honda ST1100 first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | Video Review

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660
Riding the 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 at the global press launch in Portugal. (Photo by Kingdom Creative)

We test the 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660, an all-new middleweight sport-tourer based on the Trident 660. With a base price of $9,295, it goes head-to-head with value-priced stalwarts like the Honda NC750X ($8,699) and Kawasaki Versys 650 ($8,899).

Although much of the Trident 660’s underpinnings carry over to the Tiger Sport 660, including the liquid-cooled, 12-valve, 660cc inline-Triple, which produces 80 horsepower at 10,250 rpm and 47 lb-ft of torque at 6,250 rpm (claimed at the crank), as well as ride modes (Road and Rain), switchable traction control, and ABS, the sport-tourer gets steeper rake, more suspension travel, a small fairing, and a one-hand-adjustable windscreen. The rider triangle is more open and the seating position is more upright.

At 454 pounds, the Tiger Sport 660 is light, agile, and user-friendly. Although clearly built to a price (for example, the only suspension adjustability is rear preload), it has good build quality and doesn’t feel cheap. Triumph’s new sport-tourer is one of those bikes that hits the sweet spot – it’s the right price, it’s the right size, it has the right amount of fun and versatility, it has the right features (except for cruise control), and it can be outfitted with hard saddlebags, a top case, heated grips, and more.

You can read our full review here, and you can see it in action in our video review:

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Specs

Base Price: $9,295
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, inline triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 660cc
Bore x Stroke: 74 x 57.7mm
Horsepower: 80 hp @ 8,750 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Torque: 47.2 lb-ft @ 6,250 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain
Wheelbase: 55.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 23.7 degrees/3.8 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Wet Weight: 454 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gals.

The post 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Road Test Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
New styling on the Tracer 9 GT includes full LED lighting and extended fairing lowers that provide additional weather protection for the rider’s legs. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Some motorcycles are fantastic right out of the gate. Others take a little time to find their way. They’re diamonds in the rough, requiring an update or two to chip away the rough edges and realize their full potential. The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT is one such bike.

Eight years ago, I traveled to San Francisco for the press launch of the all-new Yamaha FZ-09. It was a naked sportbike with an exciting, brash engine, an 847cc inline-Triple with a crossplane crankshaft that imbued it with gobs of character and torque. And at just $7,990, it was a steal. But there were downsides, like fueling issues, mediocre suspension and brakes, and a rock-hard seat.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
The Tracer 9 GT is a fully equipped sport-tourer. For 2021 and 2022 model years, it’s available in Redline (shown above) and Liquid Metal.

A year after the FZ-09 debuted, Yamaha released a sport-touring version called the FJ-09, which was equipped with an upper fairing, a windscreen, upgraded rider and passenger seats, revised suspension, and optional saddlebags. At $10,490, it was a bargain too, and certainly more practical than the FZ, but the FJ-09 still suffered from a herky-jerky throttle and suspension and brakes that fell well short of the engine’s capabilities.

Nonetheless, both the FZ-09 and FJ-09 sold well. The FZ-09 was updated for 2017, and its major shortcomings were addressed. When Yamaha decided to standardize model names globally, it became the MT-09, and for 2021 it was updated again with a larger 890cc Triple, a revised chassis, and new electronics.

The FJ-09 got its first major update for 2019, and it was offered in two variants, also with new names: the standard Tracer 900 and the premium, touring-ready Tracer 900 GT. Both models featured new styling, smoother throttle response, a longer swingarm for more stability, and a larger, one-hand-adjustable windscreen. The GT also had upgraded suspension, a TFT color display, cruise control, heated grips, and a quickshifter. All that goodness ratcheted up the price to $12,999 for the GT, but it was still a good value.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
Larger 890cc Triple makes more power.

We quickly grew fond of the Tracer 900 GT, which was agile, responsive, and well-suited for solo touring. Following the press launch, I spent a few days exploring backroads in Oregon and California. After I put nearly 2,000 miles on the bike, former Managing Editor Jenny Smith installed Yamaha’s accessory comfort seat and touring windscreen. Then she embarked on a 7-day, 5,000-mile endurance test that included the Three Flags Classic, a rally with stops in Mexico, Canada, and the U.S. We were reluctant to give back the keys.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
Like an adventure bike, the Tracer 9 GT has an upright seating position with generous legroom.

But 2021 is when the Tracer 9 GT has come of age. With a new name and now offered only in the GT version, it’s more capable, more comfortable, and more fully featured. It got the larger 890cc Triple from the MT-09, which is more powerful, more fuel efficient, and saves nearly 4 pounds of weight. On Jett Tuning’s dyno, the Tracer 9 GT made 108 horsepower at10,000 rpm and 63 lb-ft of torque at 7,200 rpm at the rear wheel. That’s a gain of 5 horsepower and 6 lb-ft of torque over the Tracer 900 GT we tested last year. During this test, we averaged 48.7 mpg, up from 44 mpg on the Tracer 900 GT. Fuel capacity increased slightly to 5 gallons on the Tracer 9 GT, and our estimated range was 243 miles, up from 211 miles on the previous model.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
One-hand-adjustable windscreen and larger handguards provide good wind protection, and heated grips are standard.

Although throttle response issues were resolved during the previous update, the Tracer 9 gets the latest version of Yamaha’s Y-CCT (Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle) throttle-by-wire, which uses an APSG (Accelerator Position Sensor Grip) for a more refined feel. A 15% increase in crankshaft inertia further smooths out on/off throttle transitions. On the road, there is a direct connection between the right grip and the rear wheel without any harshness.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
Both the windscreen and seat are adjustable for height, and the handlebar and footpegs are adjustable for reach.

Yamaha’s D-Mode, which adjusts power and throttle response, now has four preset modes: 1, 2, and 3 offer full power with progressively milder response, while 4 reduces power and has the softest response. Mode 1 corresponds to what would be called “sport” mode on many motorcycles, which is often overly abrupt, but not so on the Tracer 9 GT. Throttle response is immediate without being too aggressive. As the dyno chart shows, torque is consistent through the rev range, so there’s always grunt available when you need it.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
The Tracer has always been an agile bike, but the upgraded suspension and lighter wheels make it even better.

Wrapped around the engine is a new aluminum frame made using a controlled-fill diecast process that reduces mass and increases lateral rigidity by 50%. A 1.2-inch lower headstock and mounting the engine more vertically helps centralize mass. A new aluminum swingarm is mounted within the frame for more rigidity, and a new steel subframe increases load capacity and allows an accessory top trunk to be mounted along with the larger 30-liter saddlebags.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
Larger saddlebags will hold a full-face helmet in each side, and they can be left unlocked for easy access.

The saddlebags are large enough to hold a full-face helmet in each side. The bags can be left unlocked for convenient access, locked for security, or removed to carry into a hotel room or to lighten the load for apex strafing. The lock barrels can be a little fiddly (which has long been an issue with Yamaha luggage), but with practice they work just fine.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
New KYB semi-active suspension electronically adjusts damping based on real-time conditions.

Another upgrade for the Tracer 9 GT is semi-active suspension. The KYB Actimatic Damping System (KADS) uses input from a 6-axis IMU, the ECU, a hydraulic control unit, a stroke sensor on the fork, and an angular position sensor on the rear shock to adjust damping based on real-time conditions. The system electronically adjusts compression and rebound damping in the fork and rebound damping in the rear shock, and there are two modes, A-1 (sport) and A-2 (comfort). Spring preload must be adjusted manually using a tool for the fork (it’s in the toolkit) and a remote knob for the shock.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
The Tracer 9 GT is ideally suited for solo sport-touring, but it has a comfortable passenger seat and can be fitted with an accessory top trunk.

With 5.1/5.3 inches of front/rear suspension travel, the Tracer 9 GT has plenty of available stroke to absorb bumps, seams, potholes, and other pavement irregularities. By adapting to changing conditions, the KADS suspension delivers a supple, compliant ride and it quickly firms up as needed to prevent excessive chassis pitch under braking and acceleration. The Tracer 9 GT feels more sure-footed in corners than its predecessor, with excellent grip from its Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires. Agility has gotten a boost from new 10-spoke aluminum wheels made using Yamaha’s new “spinforging” process, which saves 1.5 pounds of unsprung weight.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
Full LED lighting includes headlights, position lights, and cornering lights.

In addition to its new semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT has a more comprehensive suite of IMU-based electronic rider aids derived from the YZF-R1 sportbike, including traction control, slide control, lift control, and ABS, with intervention adapted to lean angle and other inputs. The electronics have multiple modes, and the only system that can’t be turned off is ABS. The IMU also provides input for new LED cornering lights, which illuminate the insides of cornering when lean angle exceeds 7 degrees.

The Tracer 9 GT has an upright seating position, more like an adventure bike than the more committed ergonomics on many sport-tourers. Being able to sit up straight with no weight on the rider’s wrists, relaxed shoulders, and ample legroom makes it enjoyable to pile on the miles, and that’s what a sport-tourer is all about. The one-hand-adjustable windscreen and handguards provide good wind protection too.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
A new dual TFT display provides a wealth of info, and what is shown in the grid on the right side is customizable.

Comfort and convenience features include cruise control, heated grips, and a quickshifter. In addition to upshifts, the quickshifter now provides clutchless downshifts with an auto-blipper. And the heated grips now offer 10 levels of adjustment. The Tracer also has full LED lighting, a 12-volt outlet behind the instrument panel, and a centerstand.

Yamaha has given the Tracer a unique dual-panel TFT display, with each screen measuring 3.5 inches. The speedometer, tachometer, gear indicator, and other functions are on the left panel. The right panel has a grid of four smaller displays that can be customized to show the rider’s preferred info, even if the information is also shown on the left panel. The mostly white-on-black text is crisp and clear, but some of the text is small. The TFT panels have a glossy surface that reflects sunlight and can make the screens appear too dim (brightness is not adjustable). Depending on the position of the sun, sometimes all I could see was the reflection of my riding jacket.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
The Tracer is equipped with a centerstand for easier chain maintenance and loading/unloading the saddlebags.

Yamaha upgraded the rider’s seat with higher-quality cover material and added color-matched stitching. The dual-height rider’s seat can be set at 31.9 or 32.5 inches. To suit riders of different body types or preferences, the bars and footpegs can be adjusted. Rotating the bar-riser clamps allows the handlebar to be moved up 4mm and forward 9mm, and the footpeg brackets can be moved up 14mm and back 4mm. The passenger seat is now thicker and wider, and there’s a new integrated, one-piece grab handle.

The Tracer 9 GT’s many upgrades have raised the price to $14,899, which is $1,900 more than last year’s Tracer 900 GT. For those who are cross-shopping, BMW’s F 900 XR (with Select and Premium Packages but no saddlebags) is $15,045 and Kawasaki’s Versys 1000 SE LT+ costs $18,199. Even though the Tracer is more expensive than its predecessor, it’s priced lower than its closest competitors and no important features were left off the spec sheet.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
New “spinforged” wheels save 1.5 pounds of unsprung weight. They also have larger-diameter axles and are fitted with Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires.

Over the past several years we’ve put thousands and thousands of miles on the FJ-09, the Tracer 900 GT, and now the Tracer 9 GT. We were immediately won over by its exciting Triple and its playful maneuverability. Yamaha kept at it with a steady regimen of improvements and refinement, and the platform got better and better.

This year Yamaha hit the bullseye, and the Tracer 9 GT earned Rider‘s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year award. We’re more reluctant than ever to give the keys back.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
The Tracer’s new saddlebags feature a floating stay damper system to absorb mass transfer during cornering to keep the chassis stable.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Specs

Base Price: $14,899
Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
Website: yamahamotorsports.com

ENGINE
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 890cc
Bore x Stroke: 78.0mm x 62.1mm
Compression Ratio: 11.5:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 26,600 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ YCC-T & 41mm throttle bodies x 3
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.4 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet slip/assist clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain

CHASSIS
Frame: Cast aluminum w/ engine as stressed member & cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 59.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.9/32.5 in.
Suspension, Front: 41mm inverted fork, electronically adj. rebound & compression, manually adj. preload, 5.1 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, electronically adj. rebound, manually adj. preload (remote), 5.4 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 298mm discs w/ 4-piston radial calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 245mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.50 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast, 5.50 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 180/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 503 lbs. (including saddlebags)
Load Capacity: 407 lbs.
GVWR: 910 lbs.

PERFORMANCE
Horsepower: 108 @ 10,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 63 lb-ft @ 7,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 48.7 mpg
Estimated Range: 243 miles

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Specs

The post 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Ride Review

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660
The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is a new middleweight sport-tourer built on the Trident 660 platform. (Photos by Kingdom Creative)

When the covers were pulled off the 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660, the first question that came to mind was: Why? In an increasingly cluttered adventure bike landscape, why introduce a model without off-road capability? Why challenge the category-defining Kawasaki Versys 650? Just two months after posing those questions, Triumph marque invited us to find out firsthand at the Tiger Sport 660’s global launch in Portugal.

Adventure-inspired styling may tether the Tiger to the ADV world, but under that cladding, the Sport 660 shares a lot with Triumph’s new Trident 660 platform. From the 17-inch wheels to the Nissin braking system, from the Michelin Road 5 tires to the electronics suite, Hinckley leverages much of the Trident’s core components for the new adventure sports model. Even the liquid-cooled, 12-valve, 660cc inline-Triple remains unchanged, producing 80 horsepower at 10,250 rpm and 47.2 lb-ft of torque at 6,250 rpm (claimed, at the crank).

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660
For sport-touring duty, the 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 has a fairing and adjustable windscreen for wind protection, comfortable ergonomics, and optional saddlebags.

Despite the family resemblance, the Tiger Sport 660 is more than a naked bike in adventure clothing. Triumph still employs a tubular-steel perimeter frame but steepens the rake to 23.1 degrees. The longer and sturdier subframe accommodates optional panniers and a top box while the long-travel suspension promotes comfort and two-up touring. To the naked eye, the adventure-adjacent aesthetics set the Tiger apart, but the facelift is equal parts form and function.

Of course, the new front fairing provides more wind protection but a one-hand, height-adjustable windscreen allows riders to reduce buffeting on long road trips or amplify airflow in congested urban environs. In the lowest position, oncoming air flowed past my chest while wind danced around my helmet’s chinbar in the high setting. Results will vary for shorter and taller riders, but at 5 feet, 10 inches, the top position suited my frame best.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660
At 454 pounds wet with a 55.8-inch wheelbase and sporty steering geometry, the 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is more than willing to lean and make quick transitions.

Dustin’s Gear:
Helmet: Bell Eliminator
Jacket: Alpinestars GP Plus R v3 Jacket
Gloves: Alpinestars Mustang v2 Gloves
Pants: Pando Moto Robby Arm 01 Jeans
Boots: Dainese Persepolis Air Shoes

Triumph enhances that comfort with taller handlebars and extra distance between the seat and footpegs. Thanks to the neutral position and generously padded seat, the Sport 660 encourages all-day riding. The lengthened subframe also provides extra space in the cockpit, enabling users to scoot forward or rearward for an optimal rider triangle. Throughout the 154-mile ride aboard the Tiger, not once did my back, wrists, or knees ache, and larger riders in the group echoed those sentiments.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660
To keep the price below $10,000, the 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is equipped with suspension that offers only rear preload adjustable. Other than some fork dive under heavy braking, the Showa setup offers good compliance and feedback.

While I’d classify the ergos as relaxed, the handling lives up to the Sport moniker. The upright position places the rider’s knees flush against the fuel tank, providing an ideal anchor point before tip-in. That’s when the Tiger is at its best. Side-to-side transitions are swift and fluid. Steering is precise and direct. Couple that with grippy Michelin Road 5 tires and the Sport 660’s handling borders on telepathic.

Due to the 23.1-degree rake, the Sport 660 stays light on its feet, ready to dive into the next corner. On the other hand, the longer, 55.8-inch wheelbase helps maintain stability at lean. That nimble nature allows the rider to put the Tiger anywhere on the road. While the non-adjustable Showa 41mm fork and preload-adjustable Showa shock favor comfort with 5.9 inches of travel at both ends, the setup delivers sufficient support and feedback for spirit riding as well.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660
The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is available in Korosi Red/Graphite (shown), Lucerne Blue/Sapphire Black, or Graphite/Sapphire Black.

The suspension’s only blemish is the fork’s soft spring, but only heavy braking exposes that minor shortcoming. In a straight line, the dual 2-piston Nissin calipers and 310mm discs up front bring the 454-pound tiger to a rapid halt. Equally unexpected, the axial master cylinder yields surprising feel and feedback when trail braking into a bend. Dual-channel ABS also increases confidence while Rain mode (in addition to the default Road mode) and switchable traction control act as safety nets for less-than-ideal conditions or technique.

Triumph adds such rider aids to favor newer riders, but the ultra-tractable 660cc inline-Triple is innately user-friendly. With 80 ponies and 47 lb-ft of torque on tap, the retrofitted 675 triple is equal parts thrill and chill. Away from a stop, the mill delivers 90% of its torque between 3,600-9,750 rpm. The linear powerband may benefit novice riders, but it doesn’t stop experienced pilots from exploiting the power potential at the top of the rev limiter.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660
Derived from Triumph’s tried-and-true 675 Triple, the 660cc mill in the Trident 660 and Tiger Sport 660 is tuned for user-friendly power delivery.

However, most riders won’t need to push the Sport 660 to those limits, especially when engine vibrations course through the footpegs at 8,500 rpm. Luckily, in 6th gear at 70 mph, the Tiger trots along at around 5,000 rpm. That mild-mannered quality caters to tourers, but the engine remains manageable even when the pace picks up. With usable power accessible throughout the rev range, the middleweight ADV also helps compensate for rider mistakes.

On several instances during the ride, I forgot to drop a gear – or two – going into a corner. Fortunately, the readily available torque helped pull the Tiger through the exit. Despite its accommodating demeanor, the Triple also wails up to its 10,500-rpm redline. It’s that combination of performance and practicality that makes the Sport 660 such a versatile bike. Those looking for the utmost performance can add on a bi-directional quickshifter from Triumph’s accessories catalog, but the standard unit offers smooth transitions and reliable gear engagement out of the box.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660
Pulling on the tubular bar behind the windscreen allows on-the-fly height adjustment.

The Tiger Sport 660 may not feature a fire-breathing engine, trick suspension, top-tier brakes, or state-of-the-art electronics, but that doesn’t stop it from becoming one of the most balanced packages on the market. Each component contributes to the 660’s end goal. The electronics enhance safety without adding complexity. The inline-Triple produces enough power for seasoned vets without scaring beginners. The suspension and brakes complement the Tiger’s mild and wild side.

I may have doubted Triumph when it introduced the new cub in its Tiger line, but after spending a full day with the Sport 660, I’m a firm believer in its worth. Whether you label it a sport-tourer, an ADV, or none of the above, the Tiger Sport 660 is undeniably well-rounded. From commuting to canyon carving to touring, Hinckley’s latest middleweight practically does it all. That’s why Triumph believes the new adventure sports model can make an impact in an increasingly cluttered adventure bike landscape – and now, I do too.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660
Look out Versys 650, there’s some new competition in town.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Specs

Base Price: $9,295
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, inline triple, DOHC w/ 4 vpc.
Displacement: 660cc
Bore x Stroke: 74 x 57.7mm
Horsepower: 80 hp @ 8,750 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Torque: 47.2 lb-ft @ 6,250 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain
Wheelbase: 55.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 23.7 degrees/3.8 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Wet Weight: 454 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gals.

The post 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello | First Look Review

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

2021 marked Moto Guzzi’s 100-year anniversary, and the Mandello Del Lario brand celebrated the momentous occasion with special-edition models and a traveling museum exhibit. By September 2021, Guzzi shifted its focus from the rearview mirror to the road ahead, giving fans a sneak peek of the all-new 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello sport-tourer.

After keeping the details under wraps for months, Moto Guzzi finally unveiled the V100 Mandello’s full details and specs at EICMA 2021. Just as the V100 moniker suggests, the new sport-touring model houses a 1,042cc transverse V-Twin. The liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve mill not only produces 115 horsepower and 77.4 lb-ft of torque but also benefits from a new compact block architecture. Compared to the V85 TT’s air-cooled, 853cc, transverse V-Twin, the liter-size V100 powerplant is shorter by 4.1 inches.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

Guzzi puts that compact design to good use with a 58.5-inch wheelbase. A long single-sided swingarm with shaft drive steadies the Mandello at high speed while the compact chassis maintains agility in the esses. The tubular-steel frame cuts weight by utilizing the 1,042cc engine as a stressed member and the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension automatically tunes the handling characteristics to rider and the road.

On the electronics front, the throttle-by-wire system offers Travel, Sport, Rain, and Road ride modes. The system adjusts the V100’s three different engine maps, 4-level traction control, three engine braking settings, and suspension calibration to suit each situation. Equipped with a Marelli 11MP ECU and 6-axis IMU, the new Goose also touts cornering ABS, adaptive LED lighting, and cruise control.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

Despite the full electronics suite, the sport-tourer’s industry-first adaptive aerodynamics steals the spotlight. Consisting of wind deflectors mounted at the sides of the 4.6-gallon fuel tank, the innovative system adapts to the current speed and ride mode. The deflectors provide 22% more wind protection in the fully-deployed position, and along with the electronically-adjustable windscreen, amplify the cockpit’s comfort beyond the generously-padded seat, high-mounted handlebars, and 5-inch TFT dash.

The 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello’s MSRP or availability have not yet been announced. It will come in two variants, a base model and a premium model with standard Öhlins semi-active suspension, heated grips, a quickshifter, and the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia system.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

For more information or to find a Moto Guzzi dealer near you, visit motoguzzi.com.

The post 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 BMW K 1600 Lineup | First Look Review

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
BMW has updated its entire K 1600 lineup for 2022 (from left): K 1600 B, K 1600 GT, K 1600 Grand America, K 1600 GTL.

There are four models in BMW’s K 1600 lineup – the K 1600 GT sport-tourer, the K 1600 GTL luxury sport-tourer, the K 1600 B bagger, and the K 1600 Grand America. All are powered by a liquid-cooled, 1,649cc inline-Six that debuted on the 2012 BMW K 1600 GT and K 1600 GTL, which shared Rider’s 2012 Motorcycle of the Year award.

All four models have received updates for 2022, starting with revisions to the engine to meet Euro 5 regulations, including updated BMS engine control, two knock sensors, and two additional lambda probes. BMW says the six-cylinder engine still makes 160 peak horsepower, though it now arrives at 6,750 rpm, 1,000 rpm earlier than before. Peak torque has increased to 133 lb-ft, up from 129, at 5,250 rpm.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
The K 1600 lineup is powered by a 1,649cc inline-Six that makes 160 horsepower and 133 lb-ft of torque.

Standard equipment on all K 1600 models now includes engine drag torque control (MSR), which compares the rotational speeds of the front and rear wheels in the same way as the standard Dynamic Traction Control and thus determines the slip or traction capacity at the rear wheel, with input on lean angle from the new 6-axis IMU. The level of intervention depends on riding mode (Dynamic, Road, or Rain).

Also new on all K 1600 models is BMW Motorrad Dynamic ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment) “Next Generation,” with revised calibration and new automatic load level compensation. The semi-active suspension adjusts damping based on conditions based on input from front and rear sensors and the new IMU.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 review
New welcome, good-bye, and follow me home lighting is standard on all 2022 BMW K 1600 models.

Also new are “welcome,” “good-bye”, and “follow me home” light functions. When the ignition is switched on, a “welcome” light function is activated. The headlight and taillight remain on for a short time and then fade to the waiting state before the engine starts. After switching off the ignition, the front and rear lights are also automatically activated briefly for the “good-bye” function which illuminates the area around the motorcycle. After switching off the ignition, the “follow me home” function allows the rider to activate the lights by briefly pressing the high-beam headlight button to assist with maneuvering in parking spaces or opening the garage at home.

A new full LED headlight consists of nine LEDs for the low-beam headlight and eight LEDs for the high-beam headlight. The standard “adaptive headlight” function features a low-beam LED headlight which turns into the curve according to the lean angle. The cornering function now operates through a range of ± 35 degrees (up from ± 24 degrees) for better illumination. It also adjusts up or down by 2 degrees during acceleration and braking.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
The K 1600s get a new high-definition 10.25-inch TFT color display.

Like the R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental, the new K 1600 models features a 10.25-inch high-definition TFT color display with integrated map navigation (via the BMW Motorrad Connected app) and Bluetooth connectivity. For protection against the elements, the display is equipped with a hardened glass cover with an anti-reflective and fingerprint-resistant coating. Functions such as “My vehicle,” “Navigation,” “Radio,” “Media,” “Telephone,” and “Settings” menus can be selected via displayed tiles, and features such as cruise control, riding modes, and audio are seamlessly integrated into the display. The Multi-controller wheel is used to manage some functions.

Standard on the K 1600 GTL and K 1600 Grand America and optional on the K 1600 GT and K 1600 B is BMW’s new Audio System 2.0, with antennas now integrated into the bodywork. Whereas the previous audio system was connected to the motorcycle as a primarily independent system, Audio System 2.0 is integrated into the electrical system. Menu control and setting options as well as the unique display screens are said to make the audio experience a seamless listening experience. The system offers more customization functions as well as SiriusXM satellite radio with 1-year subscription.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 review
Option 719 “Midnight” features a the paint finish in Meteoric Dust II Metallic with a “Galaxy” theme.

The new K 1600 GT, GTL, B, and Grand America are available in three color options each: a standard color, a style variant, and Option 719. Option 719 “Midnight” is particularly noteworthy, which is only available for K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America. The highlight of this variant is the paint finish in Meteoric Dust II Metallic with the “Galaxy” theme depicted using the water transfer printing method.

MSRP pricing begins at $22,545 for the K 1600 B, $23,895 for the K 1600 GT,

$26,895 for the K 1600 GTL, and $27,745 for the K 1600 Grand America. Motorcycles will be in dealerships starting in February 2022.

Below is a summary of colors, details, standard equipment, options, and accessories for each model. For more information or to find a BMW dealer near you, visit bmwmotorcycles.com.

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Standard

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GT in Black Storm Metallic
  • Black Storm Metallic body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black
  • Front fender in Black Storm Metallic
  • Radiator cowls in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic
  • Front brake calipers in black

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Sport style

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GT in Light White/Racing Blue Metallic/Racing Red
  • Light White/Racing Blue Metallic/Racing Red body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black with gray piping and decorative stitching
  • Front part of the front fender in Light White
  • Radiator cowls in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic
  • Gold-anodized front brake calipers

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Option 719

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GT in Option 719
Mineral White Metallic
  • Mineral White Metallic body color with lines
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black (Optional Option 719 seat with diamond top-stitching in saddle brown and cloud print)
  • Front part of the front fender in Mineral White Metallic
  • Radiator cowls in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Mineral White Metallic
  • Chrome slipstream deflector trim
  • Front brake calipers in black
  • Optional Option 719 classic forged rims

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Standard

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL in Black Storm Metallic
  • Black Storm Metallic body color
  • Frame in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine in platinum
  • Seat in black
  • Front fender in Black Storm Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Exclusive style

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL in Gravity Blue Metallic
  • Gravity Blue Metallic body color
  • Frame in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine in platinum
  • Seat in black
  • Front fender in Gravity Blue Metallic, rear part in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine spoiler in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Chrome slipstream deflector trim
  • Chrome strips on cases

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Option 719

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL in Option 719
Mineral White Metallic
  • Mineral White Metallic body color with lines
  • Frame in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine in platinum
  • Seat in black (Optional Option 719 seat with diamond top-stitching in saddle brown and cloud print)
  • Front fender in Mineral White Metallic with chrome bar, rear part in Monolith Metallic Matte
  • Engine spoiler in Monolith Metallic Matte
  • Tank center cover in Mineral White Metallic
  • Chrome slipstream deflector trim
  • Chrome strips on cases
  • Optional Option 719 classic forged rims

2022 BMW K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America: Standard

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 Grand America in Black Storm Metallic
  • Black Storm Metallic body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black
  • Front part of the front fender in Black Storm Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic

2022 BMW K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America: Exclusive style

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 B in Manhattan Metallic Matte
  • Manhattan Metallic Matte body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black
  • Front part of the front fender in Manhattan White Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic

2022 BMW K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America: Option 719 “Midnight”

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 review
2022 BMW K 1600 Grand America in Option 719 “Midnight” Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • Meteoric Dust II Metallic body color with water transfer printing method
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Option 719 seat in black with diamond top-stitching and model designation
  • Front part of the front fender in Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • “Midnight” badge

Standard Equipment on 2022 BMW K 1600 GT, GTL, B, and Grand America

  • Black Storm Metallic paint
  • 10.25-inch TFT screen with BMW Motorrad Connected app navigation
  • Audio System 2.0 with fairing speakers (K 1600 GTL)
  • Shaft drive
  • Slipper clutch
  • Reversing aid
  • Hill Start Control Pro
  • Dynamic Engine Brake Control
  • Adjustable windscreen
  • Cast aluminum wheels
  • Duolever front suspension
  • Paralever rear suspension
  • Integral ABS with ABS Pro
  • Dynamic Traction Control
  • Dynamic ESA “Next Generation”
  • Steering stabilizer
  • Tire pressure monitor
  • 12v power socket
  • Cooled, mobile device charging compartment
  • Electronic immobilizer
  • Heated grips and seat
  • Adaptive LED headlight, LED turn signals and rear light
  • Multi-controller
  • Programable function buttons
  • Dynamic Cruise Control
  • Ride modes
  • Luggage rack
  • Centerstand
  • Comfort footrests
  • Integrated side cases in body color
  • Top case in body color (K 1600 GTL)

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Optional equipment and accessories

  • Premium Package
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • Audio System 2.0
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Stand-alone options

  • Style: Sport Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red metallic
  • Option 719 Mineral White Metallic
  • Option 719 bench seat
  • Floor lighting
  • Option 719 forged classic wheels
  • Low seat (30.7-inch / 31.5-inch seat height, -1.2 inches)
  • 2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Optional equipment and accessories
  • Premium Package
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Stand-alone options

  • Style: Exclusive Gravity Blue Metallic
  • Option 719 Mineral White Metallic
  • Option 719 bench seat
  • Floor lighting
  • Option 719 forged classic wheels
  • High seat (31.5-inch seat height, +2.0 inches)

2022 BMW K 1600 B: Optional equipment and accessories

  • Bagger Package
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar
  • Center stand
  • Grand America Package
  • Grand America styling
  • Top case in body color
  • Audio System 2.0
  • Floorboards
  • High windshield
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar
  • Centerstand

2022 BMW K 1600 B: Stand-alone options

  • Option 719 bench seat
  • Floor lighting
  • Forged handlebar
  • Option 719 forged classic wheels
  • High seat (31.5-inch seat height, +2.0 inches)

The post 2022 BMW K 1600 Lineup | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Video Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT video review
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT in Liquid Metal (Photo by Joseph Agustin)

We test the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, which won Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year award. It’s a fully featured sport-tourer powered by an 890cc inline-Triple that makes 108 horsepower at 10,000 rpm and 63 lb-ft of torque at 7,200 rpm at the rear wheel. MSRP is $14,899.

For 2021, the new Tracer 9 GT gets the larger crossplane Triple from the MT-09, which is lighter, more fuel efficient, and more powerful. An all-new aluminum frame is made using a controlled-fill diecast process that reduces mass and increases rigidity. A new aluminum swingarm is more rigid, and a new steel subframe increases load capacity and allows an accessory top trunk to be mounted along with the larger 30-liter saddlebags. New spinforged wheels reduce unsprung weight, and they’re shod with grippy Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires.

In addition to updated throttle response modes and all-new KYB semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT now has a 6-axis IMU that enables a suite of electronic rider aids adapted from the YZF-R1, including lean-angle-sensitive traction control, ABS, slide control, and lift control. It also has full LED lighting (including cornering lights) and a new dual-screen TFT display. The rider/passenger seats have been upgraded, and the rider’s ergonomics are adjustable.

Check out our video review:

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Specs

Base Price: $14,899
Website: yamahamotorsports.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 890cc
Horsepower: 108 @ 10,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 63 lb-ft @ 7,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Bore x Stroke: 78.0mm x 62.1mm
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 59.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.9/32.5 in.
Wet Weight: 503 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 48.7 mpg
Estimated Range: 243 miles

The post 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com