Rider, 64, dies after crashing into ditch

A 64-year-old male rider has died after crashing into a ditch near Kempsey on the NSW mid-north coast about 12.15pm yesterday (Saturday 31 August 2019).

NSW Police say he was riding his Ducati along Gowlings Hill Road towards the intersection of Dondingalong Road, Dondingalong.

“As the man attempted to negotiate the bend, he appears to have lost control, leaving the roadway, and crashing into a ditch,” police say.

“The man was thrown from the motorcycle and was seriously injured. The man was assisted by members of the public until emergency services arrived.”

He was taken to Port Macquarie Hospital where, sadly, he died.

Our condolences to the man’s family and friends.

Concern about police crash reports

NSW motorcycle police - scrooge
MBW comment

Since police will prepare a brief for the Coroner it is presumptuous of them to assume the circumstance of this crash.

There are many other possible explanations including stray livestock or wildlife, or another vehicle.

Our concern is that references to riders “losing control” creates the impression in the public’s mind that riders are reckless or careless.

Statistically, riders are the most likely motorists to be involved in a crash.

However, statistics also show that at least half of all motorcycle crashes involve another vehicle.

And it could be much higher.

If another vehicle causes a motorcyclist to crash, but then leaves the scene, it is considered a single-vehicle accident.

We have recently reported on a number of hit-and-run crashes involving motorcycles, so what about those incidents where another vehicle caused the crash, but did not hit the rider?

This sort of scenario is difficult to prove, but if police make reference to the possibility another vehicle or animal is involved, then it is a fairer assessment of a motorcycle crash where the cause is not known.

It would also provide the public with a fairer view of motorcycle crashes and may educate them to look out for vulnerable riders.

Currently, biased police reporting of motorcycle crashes such as this only serve to demonise riders in the eyes of the public.

How can we expect other motorists to look out for riders or be concerned about our vulnerability if they think we are careless or have a death wish?

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Victory in void helmet sticker fine

Police have waived a Bribie Island rider’s $400/3point infringement for having a void helmet sticker in a test case that proves riders can legally remove the external sticker.

Ian Joice, 63, says he was pulled over by police on Bowen Rd, Glass House Mountains, on 12 August 2019 at 11.38am.

He says the officer noted the external sticker had the word VOID across it from age and sun damage while the internal label was faded due to wear.

Helmet fine void sticker
Internal label

A week later he received an infringement notice in the post for “fail to wear helmet”.

So he contacted Motorbike Writer after reading our article which advised riders that is legal to remove the external sticker.

Click there to read our full article.

We contacted Queensland Police to ask why an erroneous fine was issued and how many other similar fines had been issued.

They replied:

The infringement in this matter will be withdrawn. This is an isolated incident and the officer has been given guidance regarding the matter.

Ian was greatly relieved when we passed on the news of his fine waiver.

“I have been very distressed with this situation and am greatly relieved that the notice has been withdrawn,” he says.

“I have had some black days since the notice arrived.”

Australian Motorcycle Council helmet law expert Guy Stanford says he believes police are not aware of the rules and standards that apply to helmets.

Guy Stanford - Mobile phone while riding - darrk visor helmets tinted visor youtube withdrawn void
Guy Stanford

“This is a good result from a commonsense complaint,” he says. 

“The facts were clear, the rider had been issued a fine for an offence he did not commit.

“This sort of fraud reflects badly on all police.”

Void sticker

Guy says the external sticker on a motorcycle helmet is only an indication of compliance and not a legal requirement.

In fact, the Australian Road Rules and standards do not even mention an external sticker.

They only say the helmet has to be “permanently and legibly marked”.

“So long as the mark of certification appears somewhere on the helmet that’s all you need, which means the label inside,” Guy says.

AS/NZS 1698 external stickers show VOID due to fading in the sun or if they have been removed.Helmet fine void sticker

“This is only a manufacturer’s device to recommend to riders when they should update their helmet,” Guy says.

“It has nothing to do with any legal requirement and is not mentioned in the Australian Road Rules. There is no expiry date on motorcycle helmets.”

Ian says he didn’t realise his helmet was so old and has now spent the $400 he would have spent on paying the fine to buy a new helmet.

  • We suggest you keep a copy of this article and/or our previous article to show police if you are ever threatened with a similar erroneous fine.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Action Clíp from yesterday at misano with KTM Factory Racing #test #day

Action Clíp from yesterday at misano with KTM Factory Racing #test #day


Source: Dani Pedrosa on Facebook

Hang Out With These Great Hammocks For Motorcycle Camping

Hammock by lake and mountain.
Motorcycle camping isn’t complete without the comfort of a hammock to either sleep or relax in.Amazon

If you are heading to the beach, park, mountains, or campsite, it is always a great idea to bring a hammock with you. They are light, compact, comfortable, and extremely easy to bring along on a motorcycle camping trip. Find a couple of trees to affix your hammock, set it up, and you are good to go. Teardown is a breeze, then you can stow it away in your backpack or saddlebag. Regardless of whether you plan on using it to catch the nighttime Zs or just need a place to relax during the day, these are great to use for camping comfort for either the money-saver or the luxury glamper.

Wise Owl Outfitters SingleOwl Hammock

Wise Owl Outfitters SingleOwl Hammock
No knots needed, carabiners are included and the hammock straps are 9 feet long with five loops for adjusting to your desired comfort and height.Amazon

The SingleOwl Hammock from Wise Owl is made of 210-thread-count parachute nylon and has triple interlocking stitching for durability. Two 9-foot-long straps, a 5 x 5 storage bag, and two D-shaped carabiners come with the hammock purchase. What makes this hammock great is the vast variety of colors you can choose from; there’s even one for the Rasta or patriot in your life. The Single weighs 1 pound and packs down to 4 inches by 5 inches, so taking this in your backpack is very manageable. This family-run, USA-based company also provides a 100 percent satisfaction guarantee.

Lawson Blue Ridge Hammock

Lawson Blue Ridge Hammock
Unique and versatile, this option gets you high and dry in the trees with its hammock setup or down on the ground when set up as a tent. Weight capacity is listed at 275 pounds.Amazon

Okay. glampers, this one’s for you! Designed to keep the hammock flat with the spreader bar and arch pole system, this Lawson camping hammock will get you into a more ergonomically comfortable sleeping position. It can be set up as a hammock or a tent, giving you the flexibility to set up nearly anywhere. A rainfly and mosquito net are included for added protection, add-ons like the hammock straps and underquilt come at an additional price. The product packs down to 22 inches by 6 inches and weighs 4.25 pounds with poles. Sticker-shock beware for this hammock/tent combo.

Ufanore Camping Hammock

Ufanore Camping Hammock
Opened up, the hammock is 102 inches x 55 inches and can pack down to 4 inches x 6 inches x 7 inches.Amazon

Another more wallet-friendly hammock is the Ufanore camping hammock package with two steel carabiners, two nylon ropes, two tree straps, and a user manual included. The 210-thread count parachute nylon keeps you held up (500-pound weight capacity) and the durable mosquito net protects overhead. It packs down to 4 inches by 6 inches by 7 inches and weighs only 1.4 pounds. Not satisfied? You can get your money back or a replacement, risk-free.

JBM Camping Parachute Hammock

JBM Camping Parachute Hammock
Set up in as little as three minutes with the included carabiners, tree straps, and ropes.Amazon

Your wallet will love you if this hammock ends up in your shopping cart. Snuggle into the 103-inch by 55-inch lounger made of 210T nylon. This 0.97-pound package can hold up to 400 pounds for the single or 660 pounds for the double, and is recommended that you are 50 centimeters (a little more than a foot and a half) from the ground (as a safety precaution). The Single comes in 11 color options or the double comes in six.

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

Sanders, Milner and Styke victorious at Coonalpyn AORC

News 31 Aug 2019

Sanders, Milner and Styke victorious at Coonalpyn AORC

Gardiner and Brierley win Women’s and EJ classes at round eight.

Image: John Pearson.

Daniel Sanders (Husqvarna Enduro Racing Team), Daniel Milner (KTM Enduro Racing Team) and Luke Styke (Active8 Yamaha Yamalube Racing) claimed victories in their respective categories at Coonalpyn’s eighth round of the 2019 Yamaha Australian Off-Road Championship (AORC) in South Australia today.

Sanders once again topped the unofficial outright times, joined inside the top three by rival Milner and Active8 Yamaha Yamaulube Racing’s Josh Green.

Sanders rode dominantly in the E3 category to pick up a well-deserved victory, comfortably defeating Andy Wilksch (Motul Pirelli Sherco Team) and Jesse Lawton (Husqvarna). Alexander Bolton (KTM) and Luke Bunnik (Sherco) were fourth and fifth respectively.

The E2 category saw Milner and Green fight for the top spot, as Riley Graham (Yamaha) completed the top three in third. Jeremy Carpentier (Yamaha MX Store Ballards Off-Road Team) and former multi-time world champion Matthew Phillips (KTM) wound up in positions four and five.

The highly-competitive E1 division was topped by points leader Styke, the defending champion strengthening his points lead. Lyndon Snodgrass (KTM Enduro Racing Team) was second, followed by Michael Driscoll (Active8 Yamaha Yamalube Racing), Fraser Higlett (Husqvarna Enduro Racing Team) and Lachlan Allan (Kawasaki Castrol Off-Road Team).

Jessica Gardiner (Yamaha MX Store Ballards Off-Road Team) and Josh Brierley (Husqvarna) were victorious in the Women’s and EJ classes. Riders return to racing tomorrow for round nine of the series.

Detailed results


Source: MotoOnline.com.au

Quartararo tops the timesheets in Misano for day two of testing

News 31 Aug 2019

Quartararo tops the timesheets in Misano for day two of testing

Petrucci and Morbidelli in the top three as Miller sets fifth fastest time.

Image: Supplied.

On Friday Fabio Quartararo (Petronas Yamaha SRT) was once again top of the pile at Misano’s MotoGP test, this time ahead of the Ducati of Danilo Petrucci (Ducati Team) by nearly half a second, with Franco Morbidelli (Petronas Yamaha SRT) completing the top three after another impressive day for the Italian.

Once more it was a scorcher on the Riviera de Rimini as the sun beat down on the Misano World Circuit Marco Simoncelli for the second and final day of the two-day test. And as Petronas Yamaha SRT continued their almost-dominance at the top, Yamaha overall continued their solid showing.

For Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP, Valentino Rossi was seen leaving pitlane with what looked like a carbon covered front brake on one of his YZR-M1s. Teammate Maverick Vinales was on track with the double exhaust again today as well, seemingly doing a comparison with the ‘normal’ Yamaha exhaust.

The Spaniard was also back to using the usual tail on both of his bikes on Friday as he ended the test P6, just under a second back from Quartararo. ‘The Doctor’ had climbed into the top three in the closing stages, only to be displaced by Petrucci’s late time attack to end the day fourth at his home track.

Ducati shot up the timesheets on the second day with Petrucci. He and teammate Andrea Dovizioso were out testing with one of their two bikes having the swingarm attachment. In addition, the two Italians were both using the wheel covers on their GP19s, with test rider Michele Pirro displaying a slightly different looking Ducati belly pan. Pirro finished 15th on the timesheets, Dovizioso was 17th.

Jack Miller (Pramac Racing), meanwhile, was the lunchtime leader and he even ended his test at midday, the Australian encountering an issue with his number one bike during the morning. The number 43 was mainly working on his race pace and stability in the high-speed corners, something he says he struggled with a bit at Silverstone.

Miller also said he and the team had found a little bit of direction in that department – good news ahead of the grand prix weekend. Teammate Francesco Bagnaia was also mainly working on race setup, and the rookie had a positive-looking test onboard his GP18 as the Pramac duo finished up fifth and seventh respectively. Tito Rabat (Reale Avintia Racing) also put his Ducati in P12 after a solid day’s work.

Takaaki Nakagami (LCR Honda Idemitsu) was the fastest Honda rider at the Misano test, the Japanese rider putting in his fastest laps towards the end of Day 2 to sit P8 on the timesheets. In the Repsol Honda garage, as well as having two Repsol liveried bikes, championship leader Marc Marquez (Repsol Honda Team) had HRC test rider Stefan Bradl’s bike at his disposal on Friday as he ended the test P10.

Marquez rode a blacked-out Honda on Thursday and today it was the turn of Bradl to have a go, with Cal Crutchlow (LCR Honda Castrol) also having a black Honda on his side of the garage on day two. Five-time world champion Jorge Lorenzo (Repsol Honda Team) didn’t ride on day two as he continues to recover from injury.

Meanwhile at Team Suzuki Ecstar, Joan Mir finished the test in P11 as the Spaniard continued to get back up to speed following his huge Brno test crash. ‘Some new parts’, settings and grip was Mir’s main aim, and the rookie ended the test ahead of British GP winner Alex Rins, who had a low key time on the timesheets at least.

Aprilia ended the second day in the top ten. Aleix Espargaro was ninth quickest on his Aprilia Racing Team Gresini machine as the Italian brand continue working towards 2020, although the Spaniard suffered two crashes during the morning session on day two. Teammate Andrea Iannone confirmed the team were working more in the direction of next year’s package and the Italian ended the test in P14.

Some of the headlines, however, remain reserved for Red Bull KTM Factory Racing. MotoGP Legend Dani Pedrosa got a full day of testing done for Austrian factory KTM, with the three-time World Champion trying a tail unit that was similar to what Pol Espargaro and Johann Zarco used at the opening round of the season, something Pedrosa also used at the Barcelona Test earlier in the year.

KTM did confirm they tested things they think they will use in the coming races and Pedrosa finished the day as the quickest KTM rider, with Dovizioso splitting him from Espargaro on the timesheets. Espargaro also crashed in the morning. Hafizh Syahrin (Red Bull KTM Tech 3) was behind the number 44, and his teammate Miguel Oliveira remains absent to recover from his Silverstone crash.

Detailed results

Source: CycleOnline.com.au

Quartararo bounces back to top Misano Test

MotoGP Misano Test Day Two Combined

Fabio Quartararo has bounced back to dominate the Misano MotoGP test, finishing half a second clear of the field, and coming within 0.010-seconds of the outright lap record in doing so, in a result that bodes well for the up-coming race.

On Friday the rookie was once again top of the pile, this time ahead of the Ducati of Danilo Petrucci by nearly half a second, with Franco Morbidelli completing the top three after another impressive day for the Italian.

MotoGP Test Misano D Quartararo
Fabio Quartararo – Misano MotoGP Test Day 1, 2019

Once more it was a scorcher on the Riviera de Rimini as the sun beat down on the Misano World Circuit Marco Simoncelli for the second and final day of the two-day test. And as Petronas Yamaha SRT continued their almost-dominance at the top, Yamaha overall continued their solid showing.

For Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP, Valentino Rossi was seen leaving pitlane with what looked like a carbon covered front brake on one of his YZR-M1s. Teammate Maverick Viñales was on track with the double exhaust again today as well, seemingly doing a comparison with the ‘normal’ Yamaha exhaust.

Valentino Rossi

“First we tested the prototype of the 2020 bike, but after that we focused more on some new stuff that we can also use in the last part of the current season. The test overall was not so bad because we improved the rear grip, the acceleration, and I feel good, and we are competitive.”

MotoGP Test Misano D Rossi
Valentino Rossi – Misano MotoGP Test Day 1, 2019
Maverick Vinales

“We tried to work a lot for the race. We worked all the time on the set-up, especially to try to improve on the first laps of the race. Today has been a bit more positive than yesterday, so I‘m quite happy and pleased about the test. We especially improved in the hotter conditions. I‘ve been riding a lot when the temperatures were higher, trying to do a race simulation, and my pace is quite good, so I‘m actually really pleased with that.”

MotoGP Test Misano D Vinales
Maverick Vinales – Misano MotoGP Test Day 1, 2019

The Spaniard was also back to using the usual tail on both of his bikes on Friday as he ended the test P6, just under a second back from Quartararo. ‘The Doctor’ had climbed into the top three in the closing stages, only to be displaced by Petrucci’s late time attack to end the day fourth at his home track.

Ducati shot up the timesheets on the second day with Petrucci. He and teammate Andrea Dovizioso were out testing with one of their two bikes having the swingarm attachment. In addition, the two Italians were both using the wheel covers on their GP19s, with test rider Michele Pirro displaying a slightly different looking Ducati belly pan. Pirro finished 15th on the timesheets, Dovizioso was 17th.

Danilo Petrucci

“These were two very important days because in view of the different conditions of the asphalt with less grip, being able to test at the same track we will race on in two weeks’ time allowed us to understand lots of things for the race. We did a lot of interesting tests and I’m satisfied with the work we’ve done even though for sure we’ll have to improve in the race weekend. In any case I’m pleased with my pace and confident about the upcoming GP.”

MotoGP Test Misano D Danilo Petrucci
Danilo Petrucci – Misano MotoGP Test Day 1, 2019
Andrea Dovizioso

“Luckily I managed to do a day and a half of testing and physically I’m OK. In the last few days we did a good job at home: I was able to get back into good shape and here I managed to lap on track, even though I still feel a bit knocked about. It was very important to test here, because we found a track that was quite different to last year, with not so much grip and because there were also all the other riders. We were able to do a lot of interesting tests in view of the race, both with the material available and with the set-up. I’m not entirely satisfied with our speed but it was important to get out on track in this test; we did it so now we’ll prepare well to get ready during the race weekend.”

MotoGP Test Misano D Andrea Dovizioso
Andrea Dovizioso – Misano MotoGP Test Day 1, 2019

Jack Miller meanwhile, was the lunchtime leader and he even ended his test at midday, the Australian encountering an issue with his number one bike during the morning. The number 43 was mainly working on his race pace and stability in the high-speed corners, something he says he struggled with a bit at Silverstone.

Miller also said he and the team had found a little bit of direction in that department; good news ahead of the Grand Prix weekend. Teammate Francesco Bagnaia was also mainly working on race setup, and the rookie had a positive-looking test on board his GP18 as the Pramac duo finished up fifth and seventh respectively. Tito Rabat also put his Ducati in P12 after a solid day’s work.

Takaaki Nakagami was the fastest Honda rider at the Misano Test, the Japanese rider putting in his fastest laps towards the end of Day 2 to sit P8 on the timesheets. In the Repsol Honda garage, as well as having two Repsol liveried bikes, Championship leader Marc Marquez had HRC test rider Stefan Bradl’s bike at his disposal on Friday as he ended the test P10.

Marquez rode a blacked-out Honda on Thursday and today it was the turn of Bradl to have a go, with Cal Crutchlow also having a black Honda on his side of the garage on Day 2. Five-time World Champion Jorge Lorenzo didn’t ride on Day 2 as he continues to recover from injury.

Marc Marquez

“It was quite a busy test for us as we are already starting to work for 2020. First of all we did a bit of work for the end of the 2019 season to make sure we can finish it in a good way. Then we moved to trying some components for 2020. Overall it was a good test and we worked well and in a precise way to get the most out of our time on track. I was feeling good with the bike over these two days so we were able to understand a lot.”

MotoGP Test Misano D Marquez
Marc Marquez – Misano MotoGP Test Day 1, 2019

Meanwhile at Team Suzuki Ecstar, Joan Mir finished the test in P11 as the Spaniard continued to get back up to speed following his huge Brno Test crash. “Some new parts”, settings and grip was Mir’s main aim, and the rookie ended the test ahead of British GP winner Alex Rins, who had a low key time on the timesheets at least.

Joan Mir

“My feeling on the bike was good, and today went even better than yesterday, which actually was already above expectations. I’m not yet at 100%, so now I feel tired, but we were able to make a positive test without compromising the technical work. Now I have two weeks to rest a bit more and to train to get ready for the GP. We worked mostly on the settings of the bike; nothing special apart getting the feeling.”

MotoGP Test Misano D joan mir
Joan Mir – Misano MotoGP Test Day 1, 2019
Alex Rins

“I think it was a really positive test for us, we tried a lot of things including the different chassis which we already tried at the Montmelo Test. We also tried a swingarm and some electronic settings, as well as some new tyres that Michelin gave us. So, in general, it was positive. I’m not concerned by the lap times I’ve set during this test, there are no prizes for setting the quickest time, and there’s no point pushing to the limit when you’re trying to test new things.”

MotoGP Test Misano D alex rins
Alex Rins – Misano MotoGP Test Day 1, 2019

Aprilia ended the second day in the top ten. Aleix Espargaro was ninth quickest on his Aprilia Racing Team Gresini machine as the Italian brand continue working towards 2020, although the Spaniard suffered two crashes during the morning session on Day 2. Teammate Andrea Iannone confirmed the team were working more in the direction of next year’s package and the Italian ended the test in P14.

MotoGP Test Misano D Iannone
Andrea Iannone – Misano MotoGP Test Day 1, 2019

Some of the headlines, however, remain reserved for Red Bull KTM Factory Racing. MotoGP Legend Dani Pedrosa got a full day of testing done for Austrian factory KTM, with the three-time World Champion trying a tail unit that was similar to what Pol Espargaro and Johann Zarco used at the opening round of the season, something Pedrosa also used at the Barcelona Test earlier in the year.

MotoGP Test Misano D Pedrosa
Dani Pedrosa – Misano MotoGP Test Day 1, 2019

KTM did confirm they tested things they think they will use in the coming races and Pedrosa finished the day as the quickest KTM rider, with Dovizioso splitting him from Espargaro on the timesheets. Espargaro also crashed in the morning. Hafizh Syahrin was behind the number 44, and his teammate Miguel Oliveira remains absent to recover from his Silverstone crash.

MotoGP Test Misano D Pol Espargaro
Pol Espargaro – Misano MotoGP Test Day 2, 2019 – Image by Lukas Leitner

Jorge Lorenzo’s test was cut short after experiencing some pain while on the bike during running on Thursday morning. Lorenzo and the team elected to limit his testing to give Lorenzo the maximum amount of time possible to recover physically ahead of the Misano race, September 15. Before ending his test, Lorenzo was able to complete 31 laps as he assessed the Honda RC213V around the 4.2km long Misano World Circuit Marco Simoncelli.

Jorge Lorenzo

“Unfortunately I didn’t feel great and I had quite a lot of pain on the bike, even more than in Silverstone. We were able to make 20 laps in Silverstone and everyone was very pleased, but it took a lot of effort from me physically and I had some more inflammation and pain after the race. It improved a bit, but I am still hurting too much on the bike so we decided together with the team to finish the test early and to arrive at the Misano race in the best condition possible. Even with the limited running we were able to try some new parts like the chassis.”

MotoGP Test Misano D Lorenzo
Jorge Lorenzo – Misano MotoGP Test Day 1, 2019

That’s a wrap for testing at Misano, with plenty of talking points to take us into the next race at the same track!


Source: MCNews.com.au

Pacesetter: Quartararo 0.010 off lap record at Misano Test

Once more the sun was shining at the Misano World Circuit Marco Simoncelli as the riders got the second and final day of the two-day Misano Test underway. Jack Miller (Pramac Racing) was the lunchtime leader but he ended his test at midday, the Australian encountering an issue with his number one bike during the morning. The Ducati man was mainly working on his race pace and stability in the high-speed corners, something he says he struggled with a bit at Silverstone last weekend. Miller said he and the team had found a little bit of direction is this department, which is good news ahead of the Grand Prix weekend. Teammate Francesco Bagnaia was also mainly working on race setup as the rookie had a positive looking test on board his GP18, the duo finishing 5th and 7th respectively.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

Sign Up To Train With Valentino Rossi At The VR46 Ranch Experience

Spend a day in the VR46 Ranch Experience by Dainese. This kind of opportunity doesn’t come along very often. So, if you’ve ever fantasized about hanging with The Doctor, now is your chance – all for just $890. September 28th is just around the corner. So, act fast.

Begin Press Release:


DAINESE GETS YOU TO THE RANCH WITH VALENTINO ROSSI

Vicenza, 30 August 2019. Valentino Rossi’s Ranch, the legendary place where tomorrow’s champions train, will open its doors just for one day, giving the possibility to participate to the Champions Training Camp with Luca Marini and Franco Morbidelli. A one-of-a-kind opportunity, exclusively offered by Dainese, to live a unique experience among motorbikes, history and dirt tracks together with the Doctor and his staff.

After the success of the Riding Masters in Misano and Franciacorta, the Weekend Master Mugello and the Expedition Master Iceland, Dainese adds a new chapter to the Experience project: the VR46 Ranch Experience, an unforgettable day in Tavullia, the heart of the land of engines.

The Dainese VR46 Ranch Experience will start on the evening of 27th September. The meeting point is directly at the hotel where participants will spend the night before the day at the Ranch.

The true Experience will begin on 28th September, with the visit at the Marco Simoncelli Museum in Coriano, a place that gathers emotions and memorabilia of the 2008 250cc World Champion. Through a gallery of unpublished photos, original motorcycling gear and motorbikes, visitors will have the chance to travel again through the career of the rider who still holds a special place in people’s hearts. The second stop of the day will be at the Headquarters of VR46, the company founded by Valentino Rossi, one of the greatest riders in the history, now also a successful entrepreneur.

Participants will have the chance to have lunch at the Ranch, the fabulous track located in the Marches hills. Afterwards, Luca Marini and Franco Morbidelli will hold the Champions Training Camp, a dedicated session on the secrets and tips of professional riders’ training.

The climax of the day will be reached in the afternoon, when the champions of the VR46 Riders Academy, led by their mentor Valentino Rossi, will switch the engines on and get on the track for their training. Guests will attend the flat track session from the trackside and listen to the Doctor’s advice and feedbacks within riders, witnessing all the steps of a professional training afternoon.

Further information available at the website dedicated page:

www.dainese.com/corporate/dainese-experience/weekends-masters/vr46-ranch-experience/

The post Sign Up To Train With Valentino Rossi At The VR46 Ranch Experience appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

Fly Racing 9800 Roller Bag by Ogio | Gear Review

Fly Racing 9800 Roller Bag by Ogio.
Fly Racing 9800 Roller Bag by Ogio.

OK, so you finally pulled the trigger on that fly-and-ride motorcycle trip of a lifetime, and it’s time to get packed. Sure, a good-sized suitcase will do the trick, but with 50-pound checked bag weight limits in the unfriendly skies, it can be tricky to fit your riding gear, unmentionables and other clothing in the typical Samsonite. There’s generally too much space or not enough, and no suitably shaped spot for your full-face helmet.

If motojournalists agree on anything, it’s the utility of the Ogio 9800 Roller Bag for such occasions, or even just driving to a track day or other riding event. If, for example, you had the misfortune to be on the same flight as a bunch of us on the way to a riding press intro, at baggage claim there’s a good chance your suitcase would be buried under an avalanche of Ogio 9800s, endlessly going ’round and ’round the carousel until we eventually come down from the bar.

When you lose patience and begin hucking 9800s to get to your bag, you will notice that the attractive one tested here, designed exclusively for Fly Racing, opens like a clamshell with a sturdy, padlockable double zipper on three sides and has grab handles all around. The base, which Ogio calls its Structural Load Equalizing Deck (SLED), is thick, hard plastic with integrated ribs for strength and to help it slide over stairs, truck tailgates, etc.

underside of the 9800
The underside of the 9800 is made up of the SLED, built to slide over tail gates, conveyor belts and truck beds.

The SLED also supports the bag’s oversized heavy-duty wheels, which have extra clearance and in-line sealed bearings for easy maneuverability and smooth rolling. You may even be tempted to try popping out the telescoping handle or unbuckling the adjustable compression/reinforcement straps, but I don’t recommend it since at this point a bunch of tired, liquored-up journalists are probably standing nearby wondering why you’re manhandling their luggage.

With a few exceptions, though, we tend to be a friendly lot, so one of us would probably demonstrate the other fine points of the Fly Racing 9800 by Ogio, such as its large main compartment with adjustable divider, which fastens into position with hook-and-loop. The divider creates a nice separate space for your helmet at one end of the bag, and Ogio has padded the entire thing – sides, lid and divider – with integrated foam for protection from drops, bumps and malevolent baggage handlers.

9800 interior
The 9800 carries not only your gear, but enough clothing for a week-long moto adventure.

In 25 years of hauling a 9800 around the world I have never suffered helmet damage while in the bag (rimshot!). Opposite the helmet compartment there’s another large one for your boots, pants, jacket, rainsuit, back protector, etc. And an overseas tour’s worth of clothing fits into the separate dual-zippered compartment in the 9800 lid, which has both exterior and interior zippered stash pockets for maps, magazines, spare glasses, an economy-sized bottle of ibuprofen and a stack of “Get Out of Jail Free” cards from the board game Monopoly, which are almost always good for a laugh in tense situations.

The Fly Racing 9800 Roller Bag by Ogio retails for $279.95 and officially measures 34 x 16.5 x 15.25 inches fully loaded, which does slightly exceed the 62-inch maximum linear checked bag dimension on most airlines. But it really depends upon how full it is and where you measure. I’ve only had it tagged oversize once, by a small airline in Greece, which apparently had 1/4-scale conveyor belts designed by nymphs. Weight is 14 pounds empty and capacity is 7,500 cubic inches, more than enough for all of your gear, with some room leftover for souvenirs to placate your spouse upon returning home. 

For more information, see your dealer or visit flyracing.com.

Source: RiderMagazine.com