Tag Archives: Retro/Vintage Motorcycles

Royal Enfield SG650 Concept | First Look Review

Royal Enfield SG650 Concept
Unveiled at EICMA 2021, the Royal Enfield SG650 Concept blends neo and retro design elements.

In recent years, Royal Enfield has deftly toed the line between modern and retro. The all-new Meteor 350 calls back to brand’s mid-century cruisers while the Google-powered Tripper navigation pod adds contemporary convenience. Presented at EICMA 2021, the Royal Enfield SG650 Concept takes the brand’s unique balance of vintage style and modern function to new heights.

“We are a company in transition,” stated Royal Enfield Chief of Design Mark Wells. “So long a representation of the analog age and now developing new products that keep that same pure soul, yet are fully integrated into the digital present. To celebrate this, we wanted to develop a project that really gave our design team an opportunity to stretch themselves creatively.”

Royal Enfield SG650 Concept

The SG650 Concept blurs the lines between eras with its cruiser-meets-cafe-racer silhouette, cyberpunk paint scheme, and air/oil-cooled 648cc parallel-Twin. The CNC-machined aluminum gas tank and wheels capture the classic forms of the past with modern manufacturing methods. At the fore, the aluminum headlight nacelle, inverted fork, low-rise handlebars, and aluminum switches favor present-day design. Conversely, the rear end’s dual shocks, a floating single saddle, and loop frame clearly nod to the past.

Read our 2022 Royal Enfield Himalayan First Ride Review

“The design team have done an amazing job in retaining the analog soul, those classic Royal Enfield lines and design nuances – subtle nods to the past – while creatively pushing the boundary of what the Royal Enfields of tomorrow could conceptually represent in form and function,” added Wells.

Royal Enfield SG650 Concept

Though Royal Enfield outfits the SG650 with bespoke components and a flashy paint job, the new concept looks vaguely familiar. The firm leverages the same air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, parallel-Twin found in the Continental GT 650 and INT 650. Royal Enfield then shoehorns that 648cc powerplant into a chassis resembling the Meteor 350’s twin-downtube spine frame.

With the SG650 using current Royal Enfield equipment and tech, we wouldn’t be surprised if the concept finds its way into Royal Enfield’s production lineup in the near future. However, we expect the middleweight cruiser to arrive in a less avant-garde and more production-friendly guise if it reaches the market.

For more information or to find a Royal Enfield dealer near you, visit royalenfield.com.

The post Royal Enfield SG650 Concept | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Yamaha XSR900 | First Look Review

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review
The 2022 Yamaha XSR900 gets a new engine and chassis, a full suite of electronic rider aids, and fresh styling.

Yamaha knows that motorcyclists are not all the same, and one of the major dividing lines when it comes to choosing a motorcycle is styling. Some riders get excited by modern bodywork with sharp, aggressive lines, while others prefer more of a retro look, which the 2022 Yamaha XSR900 has in spades.

A couple of years after Yamaha introduced the 2014 MT-09 (originally called the FZ-09) naked sportbike, it released the XSR900. They shared an engine and chassis, but the XSR900 had throwback styling inspired by Yamaha’s ’70s-era XS750 Triple, with a round headlight, a traditional-looking fuel tank with knee cutouts, and hand-finished aluminum covers.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review
2022 Yamaha XSR900 in Legend Blue

The 2022 Yamaha XSR900 gets the updated 890cc inline-Triple that powers the latest MT-09 and Tracer 9 GT, as well as an all-new chassis, a more advanced electronics package, and a refreshed look drawn from Yamaha’s classic 1980s-era Grand Prix racing machines.

“The new generation XSR900 borrows its high performance CP3 engine, chassis, and electronics directly from Yamaha’s extensively updated 2021 MT-09 Hyper Naked to create the lightest, most agile, most performance-driven motorcycle in its class,” said Derek Brooks, Yamaha Motorcycle Product Line Manager. “But it’s the styling that really sets this new bike apart. As someone who’s very familiar with Yamaha’s racing history, it’s exciting to see the design team’s clear nod to the iconic race designs of our past, while incorporating so much tech and premium detailing. This new XSR really cuts to the heart of why we are passionate about motorcycles.”

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review

Motorcycles in Yamaha’s Sport Heritage lineup, which includes the V Star 250 and Bolt R-spec cruisers as well as the XSR700 (based on the MT-07 platform) and XSR900, are the models that pay homage to the tuning fork company’s seven decades of motorcycle design and engineering history. What Yamaha calls its “Faster Sons” design philosophy blends classic style with modern technology, resulting in neo-retro models that visually embrace elements of the past while delivering today’s performance and reliability.

From the reshaped fuel tank to the boxy tail section, the new XSR900’s styling leaps forward a decade from its predecessor. Premium touches include drilled fork caps, machined headlight stays, a forged brake pedal, hidden passenger pegs, blacked-out levers, darkened brake reservoirs, bar-end mirrors, an embossed aluminum rear underplate, and an aluminum XSR logo. And modern touches include full LED lighting and a new full-color 3.5-inch TFT display.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review
2022 Yamaha XSR900 in Raven

The Legend Blue colorway is a modern take on the classic French Sonauto Yamaha race colors – the striking blue, cyan, and yellow livery campaigned by legendary French Grand Prix champion Christian Sarron, an important page from Yamaha’s rich racing history.

Revised ergonomics give the new XSR900 a more aggressive profile. A lowered head pipe position, a unique subframe with lower seat height, and a lengthened swingarm are said to improve handling and give the rider a greater sense of control.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review

The updated 890cc CP3 engine delivers more power and torque, reduces weight, and revs more freely. The slip/assist clutch has new friction plates and a modified cam angle to reduce load on the clutch springs for a lighter feel at the lever, and an up/down quickshifter is now standard. The Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle (YCC-T) now uses a YZF-R1-type Accelerator Position Sensor Grip (APSG), which replicates varying degrees of resistance for a traditional throttle feel.

A new compact, lightweight aluminum frame is made using Yamaha’s Controlled Filling (CF) die-cast technology. Featuring ultra-thin 1.7mm sections, the frame is lighter and its balance of longitudinal, lateral, and torsional rigidity is improved. The lower head pipe position also helps load the front for increased feel when cornering.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review

The chassis features a new Brembo radial front master cylinder for better feel at the lever and a new front brake lever eases adjustability and improves style. New adjustable suspension is made by KYB, with a fully adjustable 41mm inverted fork and a preload- and rebound-adjustable rear shock. Like the Tracer 9 GT (which won Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year award), the XSR900 rolls on 17-inch aluminum wheels made using Yamaha’s exclusive new spinforging process, which reduces unsprung weight, and they’re shod with Bridgestone Battlax Hypersport S22 rubber.

A new 6-axis IMU enables an expanded suite of electronic rider aids, including a lean-sensitive Traction Control System, Slide Control System, front wheel Lift Control System, and Brake Control System (aka ABS). Each can be adjusted for different levels of intervention or turned off completely depending on rider preference. Cruise control is also standard.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review

Yamaha engineers carefully considered both intake and exhaust sound in developing the new XSR900, seeking to emphasize and enhance the unique soundtrack of the crossplane Triple. The all-new airbox incorporates differing cross-section and length air ducts tuned so induction noises resonate harmoniously at varying wavelengths. Two functional air intake vents located on either side of the fuel tank further boost the mid- and high-rpm induction sound traveling to the rider for a greater sense of acceleration. Likewise, a new 1.5-chambered exhaust features a left-right symmetrical tailpipe arrangement that directs sound pressure to both sides of the machine, adding to the feel of torque when opening the throttle. The low-slung exhaust design also centralizes mass and is significantly lighter than the previous generation.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review

The 2022 Yamaha XSR900 will be available in Legend Blue with gold wheels and gold fork tubes or Raven with black wheels and black fork tubes. It arrives in dealerships in April 2022 with an MSRP of $9,999.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 Specs

Base Price: $9,999
Website: yamahamotorsports.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 78.0 x 62.1mm
Displacement: 890cc
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 58.9 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Wet Weight: 425 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gals.

The post 2022 Yamaha XSR900 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Triumph Announces Four New Special Editions

2022 Triumph Thruxton RS Ton Up Special Edition review
2022 Triumph Thruxton RS Ton Up Special Edition

Triumph has an early holiday present for fans of Britain’s custom-classic and road racing culture, in the form of four limited-release Special Edition models, each available for one year only: the Street Twin EC1, Thruxton RS Ton Up, Rocket 3 GT 221, and Rocket 3 R 221.

2022 Triumph Street Twin EC1 Special Edition

2022 Triumph Street Twin EC1 Special Edition review
2022 Triumph Street Twin EC1 Special Edition

Triumph’s best-selling modern classic model, the Street Twin, gets a makeover inspired by the vibrant custom scene of London’s East End – particularly the historic streets of the EC1 district that gives the Street Twin EC1 Special Edition its name. The EC1 is set apart as a Special Edition with a unique Matte Aluminum Silver and Matte Silver Ice paint scheme with special EC1 graphics on the tank and side panels, as well as a matching fly screen.

The spunky Street Twin is unchanged otherwise, with its liquid-cooled 900cc parallel-Twin engine, Brembo 4-piston front brake caliper, ABS, Road and Rain ride modes, traction control, torque-assist clutch, and USB charging socket, all standard. The Street Twin EC1 Special Edition will be available starting in January 2022, for an MSRP of $10,350.

2022 Triumph Thruxton RS Ton Up Special Edition

2022 Triumph Thruxton RS Ton Up Special Edition review
2022 Triumph Thruxton RS Ton Up Special Edition

The legendary Ton Up boys of the 1950s and ‘60s – the original café racers – and the first ever production 100mph lap of the Isle of Man TT, achieved by Malcolm Uphill in 1969, are celebrated by the new Thruxton RS Ton Up Special Edition. With its Aegean Blue gas tank, Fusion White seat cowl and front fender, and Carnival Red accents and graphics, the Ton Up will stand out in a crowd. Also included are unique “100” and “Ton Up” graphics and an accessory Aegean Blue fairing to complete the café racer look.

Otherwise the Thruxton RS retains all of its standard features, including a character-filled liquid-cooled  1,200cc parallel-Twin, twin 310mm Brembo floating front brake discs squeezed by Brembo M50 radial monoblock calipers; fully adjustable Öhlins shocks and Showa 43mm fork; Metzeler Racetec RR tires; throttle-by-wire with Road, Rain, and Sport ride modes; ABS; traction control; torque-assist clutch; and a USB charging socket. The Thruxton RS Ton Up Special Edition will be available starting in January 2022, for an MSRP of $17,300.

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 GT and Rocket 3 R 221 Special Editions

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R 221 Special Edition review
2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R 221 Special Edition

The Rocket 3 GT and Rocket 3 R 221 Special Editions seek to remind the world of one thing: their superlative 221 Newton meters of torque (or 163 lb-ft for us Yanks), the highest claimed torque of any production motorcycle in the world. The 221s get their message across with a rich Red Hopper paint scheme incorporating the Rocket 3’s performance numbers emblazed on the tank: horsepower, torque, engine size, bore, and stroke.

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 GT 221 Special Edition review
2022 Triumph Rocket 3 GT 221 Special Edition

Backing it up, of course, is the massive 2,458cc inline-Triple producing all that torque and a claimed 167 horsepower, along with a fully adjustable Showa shock, adjustable 47mm Showa fork, Brembo Stylema 4-piston radial monoblock calipers, TFT instrumentation, IMU-based ABS and traction control, four ride modes (Road, Rain, Sport and Rider-configurable), hill hold control, cruise control, keyless ignition, heated grips (GT only), and a USB charging socket.

The Rocket 3 GT 221 Special Edition will be available starting in January 2022, for an MSRP of $24,600. The Rocket 3 R 221 Special Edition will be available starting in January 2022, for an MSRP of $23,900.

For more information or to find a Triumph dealer near you, visit triumphmotorcycles.com.

The post Triumph Announces Four New Special Editions first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Bonneville Gold Line Editions | First Look Review

2022 Triumph Bonneville Gold Line Edition review
For one year only, Triumph will offer special Gold Line Editions of eight 2022 Modern Classic models: Bonneville T100, Bonneville T120, Bonneville T120, Black, Bonneville Bobber, Bonneville Streetmaster, Street Scrambler, Scrambler 1200 XC, and Scrambler 1200 XE.

Earlier this year Triumph announced 2022 updates for every motorcycle in its Modern Classic lineup, including Bonneville, Scrambler 1200, Street Scrambler, and Speed Twin models. On top of the performance, technology, and aesthetic changes, Triumph will offer special Gold Line Editions of key models.

These eight limited-edition models, which are available for one year only, showcase the hand-painted gold lining skills of Triumph’s expert paint shop and provide custom-inspired schemes and premium details. They will be in dealerships in December 2021, with prices starting at $11,450.

2022 Triumph Bonneville T100 Gold Line Edition

2022 Triumph Bonneville T100 Gold Line Edition review
2022 Triumph Bonneville T100 Gold Line Edition

The Bonneville T100 Gold Line Edition features a Silver Ice fuel tank with Competition Green tank infill edged with hand-painted gold lining and an elegant ‘gold line’ logo. It also has Silver Ice fenders and side panels with Competition Green side panel stripes, a unique new white-and-gold Bonneville T100 logo and hand-painted gold lining. An accessory Silver Ice flyscreen is also available. Pricing starts at $11,450.

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Gold Line Edition

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Gold Line Edition review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Gold Line Edition

The Street Scrambler Gold Line Edition has a Matte Pacific Blue tank with a Graphite stripe, gold Triumph tank logos, and an elegant ‘gold line’ logo. It also features hand-painted gold lining alongside the tank stripe and around the brushed foil knee pads. Matte Jet Black front and rear fenders and side panel with new gold Street Scrambler logo. An accessory Matte Pacific Blue flyscreen and high-mount front fender are also available. Pricing starts at $11,950.

2022 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster Gold Line Edition

2022 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster Gold Line Edition review
2022 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster Gold Line Edition

The Bonneville Speedmaster Gold Line Edition features a Silver Ice fuel tank with a Sapphire Black twin-stripe design and brushed-foil knee pads, all edged with hand-painted gold lining and a ‘gold line’ logo. It also has a Sapphire Black headlight bowl, fenders, and side panels with unique new gold-and-silver Bonneville Speedmaster logos and hand-painted gold lining. An accessory Sapphire Black short front fender is also available. Pricing starts at $14,200.

2022 Triumph Bonneville Bobber Gold Line Edition

The Bonneville Bobber Gold Line Edition has a Carnival Red fuel tank and fenders, with gold Triumph tank logos and a ‘gold line’ logo, a Sapphire Black twin-stripe design, and brushed foil knee pads edged with hand-painted gold lining. It has Sapphire Black side panels with a unique new gold-and-silver Bonneville Bobber logo and hand-painted gold lining. An accessory Carnival Red short front fender is also available. Pricing starts at $14,200.

2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 Gold Line Edition

2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 Gold Line Edition review
2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 Gold Line Edition

The Bonneville T120 Gold Line Edition features a Silver Ice fuel tank with Competition Green tank infill edged with hand-painted gold lining and a ‘gold line’ logo. It has Silver Ice fenders and side panels with Competition Green side panel stripes, a unique new white-and-gold Bonneville T120 logo and hand-painted gold lining. An accessory Silver Ice flyscreen is also available. Pricing starts at $13,100.

2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 Black Gold Line Edition

2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 Black Gold Line Edition review
2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 Black Gold Line Edition

The Bonneville T120 Black Gold Line Edition has a Matte Sapphire Black fuel tank, front and rear fenders, headlight bowl, and side panels. It also has a Matte Silver Ice fuel tank infill edged with hand-painted gold lining and a ‘gold line’ logo, as well as Matte Silver Ice side panel stripe graphics with a unique new black-and-gold Bonneville T120 Black logo and hand-painted gold lining. An accessory Matte Sapphire Black flyscreen is also available. Pricing starts at $13,100.

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC Gold Line Edition

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC Gold Line Edition review
2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC Gold Line Edition

The Scrambler 1200 XC Gold Line Edition has a two-tone Carnival Red and Storm Grey fuel tank with an Aluminum Silver stripe, brushed foil knee pads, hand painted gold lining, and a ‘gold line’ logo. It also has a Jet Black side panel and headlight bowl. Pricing starts at $15,100

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE Gold Line Edition

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE Gold Line Edition review
2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE Gold Line Edition

The Scrambler 1200 XE Gold Line Edition has a two-tone Baja Orange and Silver Ice fuel tank with a Pure White stripe, brushed foil knee pads, hand painted gold lining, and a ‘gold line’ logo. It also has a Jet Black side panel and headlight bowl. Pricing starts at $16,500.

For more information, visit triumphmotorcycles.com.

The post 2022 Triumph Bonneville Gold Line Editions | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review
The 2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE takes its styling cues from Kawasaki’s original naked 900, the Z1.

Kawasaki has announced a new “SE” version of its retro-styled Z900RS for 2022, which features upgraded suspension and brakes. Up front are new radial-mount monoblock Brembo M4.32 calipers and new settings for the fully adjustable inverted fork, which now sports gold legs. Out back is a new fully adjustable Öhlins S46 rear shock with a remote preload adjuster.

Also new on the 2022 Kawasaki Z900RS is a new “Yellow Ball” color scheme, with Metallic Diablo Black paint, yellow highlights on the teardrop tank and rear fender, and fetching gold wheels.

Read our Kawasaki Z900RS vs Honda CB1000R vs Suzuki Katana comparison review

At the heart of the Z900RS SE is a liquid-cooled, 948cc, 16-valve, inline-Four, which made 100 horsepower at 8,500 rpm and 67.5 lb-ft of torque at 6,700 rpm at the rear wheel in our 2020 comparison test. This lightweight and compact engine spools up quickly and delivers solid and smooth performance when pushed but is versatile enough to be ridden in traffic with ease. The high-tensile steel trellis frame has received revisions at the swingarm pivot point, which is now stronger.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

A fully adjustable 41mm inverted fork offers 10 clicks of compression adjustment, 12 clicks of rebound adjustment, and a stepless preload adjuster. At the rear, the RS is fitted with a horizontal backlink Öhlins S46 shock with a remote preload adjuster. The shock is linked to an extruded lightweight aluminum swingarm to maximize handling, with the linkage placed atop the swingarm helps to centralize the weight.

Braking is provided by a pair of radial-mount monoblock Brembo 4-piston M4.32 front calipers squeezing 300mm petal discs with a Nissin radial-pump master cylinder. Out back, a 2-piston caliper squeezes a 250mm petal disc. ABS and stainless-steel braided lines are standard.

In keeping with the classic styling, the Z900RS SE is equipped with cast flat spoke wheels, finished in gold, to resemble traditional wire-spoked wheels. Dunlop GPR-300 tires further add to the retro credentials.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review
2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

The Z900RS SE features a large-diameter round LED headlight with a convex lens and chrome ring, adding to the retro look without compromising on lighting. LEDs have replaced all the lights except for the turnsignals. A dual-dial analog instrument cluster is coupled with a multi-function LCD screen for retro-style with modern functionality. The LCD features white letters on a black background and includes a gear position indicator.

Much like the sporty bikes of the ’70s, the Z900RS SE has a relaxed, upright riding position. A wide flat handlebar means the grips are 30mm wider, 65mm higher, and 35mm closer to the rider compared to the sportier Z900, partly thanks to the raised upper-triple clamp. The footpegs are also 20mm lower and 20mm farther forward, enhancing the relaxed riding position. Rubber-mounted bar ends help dampen vibrations in the bars, and both the clutch and brake levers are 5-way adjustable to help accommodate a wide variety of hand sizes.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

The slim fuel tank is narrow at the rear, which allows for easy knee gripping. A low seat height, combined with a slim design, adds to the rider’s ability to place both feet on the ground when stopped.

A full range of Kawasaki accessories is available to give owners the option to add to the motorcycle’s iconic, old-school feel, including a tank emblem set, black, gold, or silver oil filler caps, front axle slider, tank pad, frame slider set, center stand, passenger grab bar and more.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE Specs

Base Price: $13,449
Website: kawasaki.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 948cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 56.0 mm
Horsepower: 100 @ 8,500 rpm (2020 Z900, rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 67.5 lb-ft @ 6,700 rpm (2020 Z900, rear-wheel dyno)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 57.9 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 32.9 in.
Wet Weight: 474 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gals.

The post 2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS | First Look Review

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

Joining the larger Z900RS is the 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS, a retro-styled middleweight with a liquid-cooled, 649cc parallel-Twin and chassis derived from the Z650 naked sportbike. Its MSRP is $8,999.

Kawasaki says the engine produces 48.5 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm. It has a 180-degree crankshaft and a balancer shaft for smooth operation, and the 6-speed transmission has a slip/assist clutch. The engine also serves as stressed member of the tubular-steel trellis frame for added rigidity.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

Suspension is handled by a non-adjustable 41mm telescopic fork with 4.9 inches of travel and a preload-adjustable horizontal back-link shock with 5.1 inches of travel. A pair of 300mm front rotors are squeezed by 2-piston calipers, and a single 220mm rear rotor has a 1-piston caliper. Bosch 9.1M ABS is standard

The Z650RS rolls on 17-inch cast wheels shod with Dunlop Sportmax Roadsport 2 tires (120/70-ZR17 front, 160/60-ZR17 rear).

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

Comfortable, upright ergonomics include a wide, flat handlebar that’s positioned 2 inches higher and 1.2 inches closer to the rider than on the standard Z650. Seat height is a comfortable 31.5 inches, and it has a narrow design to make it easier to reach the ground. The brake and clutch levers are adjustable for reach.

Like the Z900RS, the Z650RS blends retro style with modern touches. The tank, seat, round headlight, and bullet-shaped analog gauges say old-school, but the LED lighting, central multifunction LCD info panel.

The 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS is available in Candy Emerald Green with gold wheels (our favorite!) or Metallic Moondust Gray/Ebony with black wheels. MSRP is $8,999.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS Specs

Base Price: $8,999
Website: kawasaki.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 649cc
Bore x Stroke: 83.0 x 60.0mm
Torque: 48.5 lb-ft @ 6,500 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 55.3 in.
Rake/Trail: 24 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 31.5 in.
Wet Weight: 412 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 4.0 gals.

The post 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350 | First Look Review

2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350 review
The 2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350 is powered by the same air-/oil-cooled 349cc Single as the Meteor 350. Shown in Chrome Bronze (colors, specs, and pricing for the U.S. have not been finalized).

Inspired by the 1948 Model G2, the Royal Enfield Classic 500 that was launched in 2008 brought post-WW2 styling to a contemporary audience. Over a span of 12 years – until Royal Enfield ceased production of the UCE 500 single-cylinder engine in 2020 – more than three million Classic 500s were produced.

Read our 2010 Royal Enfield Bullet C5 Classic review

Following the introduction of the Meteor 350 earlier this year, the same 349ccc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox will power the new Classic 350. When we put the Meteor 350 on Jett Tuning’s dyno, it made 18 horsepower and 18 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel.

2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350 review
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350 in Gun Metal Grey

Like the Meteor, the Classic 350 was a collaborative effort by Royal Enfield’s design teams in the U.K. and India. Its engine is hung from a steel spine frame with twin downtubes, and the bike is suspended by a 41mm non-adjustable fork and twin emulsion rear shocks with adjustable preload. Brakes are from ByBre, with a 2-piston front caliper squeezing a 300mm disc and a 1-piston rear caliper squeezing a 270mm disc, and dual-channel ABS is standard.

Classic 350s released in India are offered with either spoked wheels or cast wheels, with a 19-inch front and 18-inch rear. Seat height is 31.7 inches, fuel capacity is 3.4 gallons, and claimed curb weight is 430 pounds. A handsome instrument panel includes an analog speedometer, a multi-function LCD, and Royal Enfield’s Tripper turn-by-turn navigation system.

2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350 review

The Classic 350 arrives in North America next year, but specs, colors, pricing, and availability have not been finalized. For more information, visit royalenfield.com.

The post 2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone | First Ride Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
Updates for 2021 to Moto Guzzi’s V7 Stone and V7 Special include a larger engine and a revised chassis. (Photos by Larry Chen Photo)

“I would know the sound of a big Guzzi in my sleep. It concentrates its aural energies in your upper chest, ringing through your bones. It is … the sound of joy.”
— Melissa Holbrook Pierson, The Perfect Vehicle: What It Is About Motorcycles

When we find joy, we hold it close and nurture it. Woven throughout Pierson’s book, arguably one of the best ever written about motorcycling, is a romance between the author and Moto Guzzi. When searching for her first motorcycle, it was love at first sight: “a 500cc V-twin Moto Guzzi, red-and-black, a workhorse, and I thought it was beautiful.” 

Like any true love, Pierson’s passion for Moto Guzzi ran deep and transcended appearance. She fell under the spell of the Italian V-twin’s syncopated beat. She dedicated her mind, body, and spirit to learning to ride, doing her own maintenance, and enduring long hours in the saddle through stifling heat, bitter cold, and drenching rain. 

Moto Guzzi is a storied marque that celebrates a century of continuous production this year. Every Moto Guzzi — from the 1921 Normale, a 498cc single, to the 1955 Otto cilindri, a liquid-cooled, DOHC 500cc V-8 GP racer that topped 170 mph, to present-day models — has been built in the factory in Mandello del Lario, Italy, on the shores of Lake Como. 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The Centenario paint scheme is inspired by the 1955 Otto cilindri racebike. (Photo by Sergio Piotin)

Three models — V7 Stone, V9 Bobber, and V85 TT — are available with a special Centenario color scheme for 2021 that pays tribute to the Otto cilindri. Their silver fuel tanks are inspired by the racebike’s raw alloy tank, their green side panels and front fenders are a nod to its iconic dustbin fairing, and their brown seats and golden eagle tank emblems further set them apart, though all 2021 models/colors display 100th anniversary logos on their front fenders. 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The V7 Stone is a modern take on a classic roadster, with simple lines, dark matte finishes, and cast wheels.

Greg’s Gear
Helmet: HJC RPHA 90
Jacket: Joe Rocket Classic ’92
Gloves: Joe Rocket Cafe Racer
Pants: Scorpion Covert Pro Jeans
Boots: Highway 21 Journeyman

Over its long history, Moto Guzzi has designed and built many notable models, but the V7 is a true living legend, the very soul of the brand. After two decades of building small, inexpensive motorcycles after World War II, Moto Guzzi became the first Italian manufacturer to offer a large-displacement model when, in 1967, it introduced the 700cc V7. It was the genesis of the engine configuration that came to define Moto Guzzi: the “flying” 90-degree V-twin, with its air-cooled cylinders jutting outward into the wind and its crankshaft running longitudinally. The V7 also had an automotive-style twin-plate dry clutch, a 4-speed constant mesh transmission, and shaft final drive. 

Today’s V7 maintains a strong connection to the original, from its round headlight, sculpted tank, and upright seating position to its dry clutch, shaft drive, dual shocks, and dual exhaust. The V7 Special ($9,490) is classically styled, with spoked wheels, chrome finishes, dual analog gauges, and a traditional headlight. The more modern-looking V7 Stone ($8,990) has matte finishes, a single all-digital gauge, black exhausts, cast wheels, and an eagle-shaped LED set into the headlight.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The V7 Special (left) brightens things up with gloss, chrome, and spoked wheels.

I’ve ridden a variety of Moto Guzzis over the years — the Norge sport-tourer (named after the Norge GT 500, which Giuseppe Guzzi rode to the Arctic Circle in 1928), the carbon-fiber-clad MGX-21 Flying Fortress hard bagger, the classic California 1400 Touring, and the red-framed, chrome-tanked V7 Racer, among others. Each was unique, but all shared the distinctive cah-chugga-chugga sound when their V-twins fired up and the gentle rocking to the right side when their throttles were blipped at idle. 

Riding a Moto Guzzi feels special. It’s a visceral, engaging, rhythmic experience. The V7 Stone brought me back to the simple pleasure of motorcycling — the feel of the wind against my body, the engine’s vibrations felt through various touch points, the exhilaration of thrust. Although the new V7 has a larger 853cc engine, variations of which are found in the V9 and V85 TT, output remains modest — 65 horsepower at 6,800 rpm and 54 lb-ft of torque at 5,000 rpm, measured at the crank. But that’s enough. The V7 is one of those motorcycles that gives you permission to relax, to take your time and really savor the moment. What’s the rush? 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The Centenario edition’s silver and green paint complements the V7 Stone’s black engine and exhaust.

Moto Guzzi made many useful, subtle updates to the V7 platform. Reduced effort from the single-disc dry clutch. A stiffer frame and a bigger swingarm with a new bevel gear for the cardan shaft drive. Revised damping and a longer stroke for the preload-adjustable rear shocks. An updated ABS module. A wider rear tire (now 150/70-17). Vibration-damping footpegs. A thicker passenger seat. 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The V7’s new eagle-shaped digital gauge is tasteful.

All are appreciated, but if I’m honest, I thought about none of them as I rolled through curve after curve on California’s Palms to Pines Highway, climbing higher and higher into the rugged, snow-dusted San Jacinto Mountains. For the better part of a day, I just rode the V7. I didn’t try to figure out its riding modes (it doesn’t have any), nor did I connect my smartphone to Moto Guzzi’s multimedia app. I rolled on and off the throttle. I shifted through the gears. And I smiled. A lot. 

The V7 Stone is solid, predictable, carefree. Its engine doles out torque nearly everywhere, but it feels happiest chugging along in the midrange. Throttle response is direct, the exhaust note is soothing. Thanks to its modest weight, low seat, and natural ergonomics, riding and handling are effortless. Braking, shifting, suspension — everything dutifully meets expectations. Like the Guzzi that stole Pierson’s heart, the V7 Stone is a workhorse, and it’s easy on the eyes. Well, except for its peculiar-looking taillight, which has a constellation of red LEDs that look too sci-fi for this style of bike. 

The V7 Stone Centenario carries the weight of Moto Guzzi’s century of history with confidence. The brand is an acquired taste, favored by connoisseurs rather than the masses, and it inspires a cult-like following. When I interviewed Melissa Holbrook Pierson for the Rider Magazine Insider podcast, I asked about her first encounter with a Guzzi. “It was chance,” she said. “I just happened upon the bike that was literally perfect for me.” 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone is one of three new Guzzi’s available in the commemorative Centenario paint scheme.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone

Base Price: $8,990 
Price as Tested: $9,190 (Centenario edition) 
Website: motoguzzi.com 
Engine Type: Air-cooled, longitudinal 90-degree V-twin, OHV w/ 2 valves per cyl. 
Displacement: 853cc 
Bore x Stroke: 84.0 x 77.0mm 
Horsepower: 65 hp @ 6,800 rpm (claimed, at the crank) 
Torque: 54 lb-ft @ 5,000 rpm (claimed, at the crank) 
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated dry clutch 
Final Drive: Shaft 
Wheelbase: 57.1 in. 
Rake/Trail: 28 degrees/4.1 in. 
Seat Height: 30.7 in. 
Wet Weight: 480 lbs. 
Fuel Capacity: 5.5 gals. 

The post 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

A Short Trip Back in Time: SFO Museum Hosts an Exhibition of 14 Vintage Motorcycles

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1912 Flying Merkel Twin-Cylinder Racer
1912 Flying Merkel Twin-Cylinder Racer (Photos courtesy of SFO Museum)

When you make your way to an airport, most times you’re traveling to another place. But right now through the close of summer, San Francisco International Airport (SFO) is a worthwhile destination in its own right. The SFO Museum offers an opportunity to travel back in time, through a jewel of an exhibition surrounding 14 vintage motorcycles built before 1916. This amazing display includes a rare collection of old-time engines, photographs, and local SF Bay Area motorcycling history artfully blended together into a not-to-be-missed opportunity for riders and gearheads of all types.

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles
Located in the International Terminal, Departures – Level 3, the “Early American Motorcycles” exhibit is open to the public 24 hours a day (no security screening required).

To give you the inside scoop on this gorgeous exhibit, we asked Daniel Calderon, Curator of Exhibitions at SFO Museum, to fill us in on some of the backstory.

Rider: As Curator of Exhibitions, does your job entail?

Daniel Calderon: I am one of two curators of non-aviation exhibitions at SFO Museum, which means I am responsible for developing exhibitions that draw from outside our permanent aviation collection of more than 250,000 items. These general exhibitions are based on a wide variety of subjects that are both interesting and educational, and we borrow objects from private collectors and from other museums for display. Working with these lenders and our exhibition designer, I source and select objects and accompanying images for exhibition, and then research and write the text and IDs that you see in the gallery. I also develop the content for each exhibit that we produce in a brochure, on our website and in educational programs and catalogs. 

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1912 Excelsior Auto-Cycle Model 4B
1912 Excelsior Auto-Cycle Model 4B

Rider: What are some of the more notable exhibitions SFO has offered in the past?

DC: SFO Museum has programmed a remarkable array of general, aviation and photographic exhibitions. In regard to motorcycles, we featured “Moto Bellissima: Italian Motorcycles from the 1950s and 1960s” back in 2011. More recently we have featured exhibitions on subjects as diverse as Japanese toys, African barbershop signs, California studio craft, psychedelic rock posters and custom surfboards made from rare woods. Currently, we have a fantastic exhibition on the history of women’s hairstyles, and another on instrumental rock ‘n’ roll and surf music. All of these exhibitions feature their own printed brochure and page on our website, sfomuseum.org.  

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1914 Jefferson Twin-Cylinder Racer
1914 Jefferson Twin-Cylinder Racer

Rider: What prompted you to arrange an exhibition of motorcycles?

DC: A lender visit prompted the “Early American Motorcycles” project. I was on a visit to History San Jose to look at typewriters in their collection and was struck by an early Harley-Davidson twin and an Excelsior single in their storage. Being a gearhead, that certainly stuck in my mind. On another visit to look for typewriters, this time to the Museum of American History in Palo Alto, I met board member Chris Carter, who was our second contact for motorcycles. After Chris generously offered his motorcycles for loan and connected us with Wes Allen and his collection, I knew we had the necessary momentum and asked that the motorcycle exhibition be approved by my colleagues.

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1915 Harley-Davidson Model 11-F Effie
1915 Harley-Davidson Model 11-F Effie

Rider: Do you have any personal experience with riding motorcycles?

DC: I have surprisingly little experience riding motorcycles, just a friend’s knock-around 1980s Honda street bike, another buddy’s Suzuki 125 dirt bike and my sister’s old Trail 90, which was a really fun machine. I’ve been building and working on classic cars, racing airplanes and vintage aircraft for years, so a classic motorcycle is definitely in the works at some point.

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1911 Pierce Four Cylinder
1911 Pierce Four Cylinder

Rider: How many motorcycles do you have on display, and how did you source them?

DC: We have 14 motorcycles made prior to 1916 on display, along with three early engines and a selection of rare photographs. Half of the exhibit was sourced from Chris Carter and Wes Allen. Then I found Dave Scoffone through the George Wyman Memorial Project website, and Dave generously opened up his collection as well. Looking for images, I discovered Cris Sommer-Simmons and her book “The American Motorcycle Girls.” Cris graciously lent images and her 1915 Harley-Davidson 11–F Cannonball racer “Effie,” along with an outstanding 1915 Iver Johnson twin owned by Cris and her husband Pat.

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1915 Iver Johnson Model 15-7
1915 Iver Johnson Model 15-7

Rider: What other displays and materials are you offering in addition to the motorcycles?

DC: Racer and author Don Emde and the San Francisco Motorcycle Club (SFMC) lent numerous photo images to the exhibition, some of which are truly remarkable. The backdrop for each of the two galleries was created from two rare panoramas from the SFMC and are quite dramatic in person. Twelve of the motorcycles are featured on our website, and everything is documented in an online catalog that showcases some wonderful images taken by our photographer. In fact, everything that you see in the exhibit and online was created in-house by staff at SFO Museum.

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1903 Indian Motocycle
1903 Indian Motocycle

Rider: You have created a comprehensive self-guided tour and impressive supplemental teaching materials aimed at parents and teachers of students in grades K-12. Tell us about the educational focus you build into this exhibition and others.

DC: Each year we select at least two exhibitions for our educational programs, which are designed to be led by either parents or teachers in the galleries. We also try to design the educational program as a standalone source of information that parents and children can access while at home. Given the current COVID–19 pandemic, the ability for the public to access our exhibits from home is even more important. Once things get back to normal, we hope to start offering our aviation-based education programs again in the Aviation Museum and Library at the International Terminal.

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1914 The Flying Merkel Model 470
1914 The Flying Merkel Model 470

Rider: What kind of reactions have you gathered from people who have taken in your exhibit?

DC: Many people have been surprised to see these machines at the airport given their rarity, and we have heard great things from the public so far, which is always rewarding. I hope that as flights and passenger traffic increase, more people will take the time to view the exhibition and offer their feedback.

Listen to the Rider Magazine Insider podcast interview with Daniel Calderon

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1912 Marsh-Metz Magneto Twin
c. 1912 Marsh-Metz Magneto Twin

When Daniel mentioned Chris Carter’s name, it gave me the perfect excuse to call up a longtime friend. We first met back in the 1960s at the Yamaha dealership A&A Motors in Redwood City, long before he went on to do a few things like earning a Gold Medal at the 1976 International Six Day Trials (ISDT) and founding Motion Pro, supplier of trick tools to nearly everybody.

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1912 Indian 8-Valve Racer
1912 Indian 8-Valve Racer

“Working on this airport project with Daniel has been a fun time,” Carter told me. “We both love motorcycles and we wanted to share the experience and awareness that these vintage bikes bring. Over the years, vintage bikes such as these have become more and more hidden as they’re acquired and stored away out of sight by their new owners. However, it’s a real commitment to offer up a bike for loan; between the organization and actual display time, the bike will be tied up for about a year. For me, the best part was seeing how many of these bikes on display came right out of collections in the Bay Area and Northern California. I’ve been focusing on finding vintage bikes with a pedigree, trying to preserve some of the history surrounding old racers and other bikes of note. And that’s exactly what we see right here in this exhibition.”

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1907 Curtiss Double Cylinder
1907 Curtiss Double Cylinder

In addition, SFO Museum’s exhibition and educational materials do an excellent job of sharing the long history of women in the motorcycling scene, from intrepid travelers Augusta and Adeline Van Buren, who rode from New York to Tijuana, Mexico, and back in 1916, to modern-day Motorcycle Cannonball competitor Cris Sommer-Simmons, who not only rode the Cannonball three times, but also happens to be an author, antique motorcycle collector and AMA Hall of Fame member.

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1902 California Motor Bicycle
1902 California Motor Bicycle

All educators and parents should take advantage of the free, downloadable educational materials provided in PDF format on the SFO Museum website. They are outstanding in quality and will open up young minds to the adventures of motorcycling! These materials interpret the display in a friendly and engaging manner that makes this one topic in history class an A+ experience.

“Early American Motorcycles” will be on view at SFO Museum in the International Terminal, Departures Level, until September 19, 2021. For more info, visit sfomuseum.org.

SFO Museum Early American Motorcycles 1910 Yale Single
1910 Yale Single

The post A Short Trip Back in Time: SFO Museum Hosts an Exhibition of 14 Vintage Motorcycles first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler | First Look Review

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm Edition

From the 900cc Street Twin and Street Twin Gold Line to the 1,200cc T120, T120 Black, Streetmaster, Bobber and Scrambler 1200 (including the ultra-cool Steve McQueen Edition), Triumph has updated nearly every model in its Bonneville lineup for the 2022 model year.

Last but certainly not least is Triumph’s 900cc Street Scrambler (MSRP starts at $11,000; available in July) and new limited-edition Street Scrambler Sandstorm (MSRP $11,750; available in May).

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler in Urban Grey

As with other Bonneville models, the Street Scrambler’s liquid-cooled parallel-twin has been updated to meet Euro 5 emissions yet it still delivers 64 horsepower at 7,250 rpm and 59 lb-ft of torque at 3,250 rpm (claimed). Three riding modes (Road, Rain, and Off-Road), a torque-assist clutch, switchable ABS and switchable traction control are standard equipment.

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm Edition

Styling updates include a new side panel with aluminum number board, a new heel guard, new brushed aluminum headlight brackets, new adventure-oriented seat material, new throttle body finishers and new paint schemes.

Street Scrambler models are equipped with a Brembo front brake, a cartridge fork, a 19-inch front wheel, Metzeler Tourance 90/10 adventure tires, an LED taillight and a USB charging port.

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm Edition

Limited to 775 units worldwide, the Scrambler Sandstorm Edition has a unique paint scheme, premium accessories (high front fender, tail tidy, sump guard, headlight grille and rubber knee pads on the tank) fitted as standard and a certificate of authenticity personalized with the bike’s VIN.

The 2022 Street Scrambler is available in three premium paint schemes: Jet Black, Urban Grey and two-tone Matte Khaki and Matte Ironstone with distinctive new tank graphics.

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler review
The 2022 Triumph Street Scrambler’s 900cc parallel twin makes 64 horsepower and 59 lb-ft of torque (claimed).

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Specs

Base Price: $11,000 / $11,750 (Sandstorm Edition)
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel twin, SOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 900cc
Bore x Stroke: 84.6 x 80mm
Horsepower: 64 @ 7,250 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 59 lb-ft @ 3,250 rpm (claimed)
Fuel Delivery: Electronic fuel injection & throttle-by-wire
Transmission: 5-speed, cable-actuated assist-and-slipper wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Frame: Tubular steel w/ twin cradles, steel swingarm
Wheelbase: 56.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 25.6 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.1 in.
Suspension, Front: 41mm fork, non-adj., 4.7 in. travel
Rear: Dual shocks, adj. preload, 4.7 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Single 310mm disc w/ opposed 4-piston axial fixed caliper & switchable ABS
Rear: Single 255mm disc w/ 2-piston floating caliper & switchable ABS
Wheels, Front: Spoked aluminum, 2.5 x 19 in.
Rear: Spoked aluminum, 4.25 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 100/90-19 tube-type
Rear: 150/70-17 tube-type
Wet Weight: 492 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 3.2 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 54.7 mpg (claimed)

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Photo Gallery:

The post 2022 Triumph Street Scrambler | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com