Kawasaki plan for two-stroke hybrid

Kawasaki has plans to develop a range-extender hybrid with a supercharged two-stroke, four-cylinder engine charging a battery that powers an electric motor driving the rear wheel.

It seems like a clever idea.

They call it a range-extender hybrid because the fossil-fuel engine doesn’t directly drive the vehicle.

It’s not an original idea, though. The cheap Chevrolet Volt and expensive Fisker Karma had similar arrangements.

Holden Volt hybrid powerChevrolet Volt

However the Volt has been discontinued and Fisker has gone broke, so it seems to suggest it was not a popular concept.

Supercharged two-stroke

Kawasaki has filed a patent in the Japanese Patent Office for a slightly different take on the range-extender hybrid with a supercharged two-stroke engine.

Two-stroke engines are very fuel efficient and powerful, but have largely been discontinued around the world because of their high emissions.

There remain only a few esoteric low-volume and expensive two-stroke motorcycles available and an Australian inventor believes there is a lot of scope left in two-strokes with his invention.

2 stroke CITS engine events fail flywheelAussie-designed two-stroke CITS engine

Kawasaki’s two-stroke cycle does not have the usual port-transfer system, but is similar to the highly efficient supercharged two-stroke diesels used on ships.

Instead of ports in the cylinder walls, it features poppet valves like a four-stroke, with double overhead camshafts. However, the cycle is two-stroke with forced injection and exhaust.

Kawasaki claims it burns cleaner because no unburnt duel escapes into the exhaust.

Given the fuel efficiency and the power such an arrangement could generate, you wouldn’t need a big engine to simply charge the battery.

It also suggests that range from the battery could be quite substantial.

And you wouldn’t need to sit around for hours charging the battery again.

When you run out of fuel, the battery would have enough charge left to get you to a servo where you could fill up wth fuel and get going again in minutes!

Another advantage would be for those stroker fans who love the sound of the high-pitched engines.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Ulka Gear jacket becomes handy backpack

Carrying your helmet around with you can be a pain, but the Ulka Gear motorcycle jacket transforms into a handy backpack that also holds your lid, gloves, goggles and more!

These Indian-made jackets come in a Hakkit Forever touring and Hakkit V2 city version, both suitable for the hot Indian climate.

Prices are quoted in Indian rupee and translate to about $A170 to $A210 plus postage.

Handy jacket

Ulka Gear is the brainchild of company founder and former national circuit racer and trainer Shahnawaz Karim.

“When hitting the open roads, the biker’s gears including helmet, jackets etc. is of paramount significance thus offering maximum functionality,” he says in the official press release.Ulka Gear GHakkit Forever handy jacket

I understand the pulse of the motorcycle bikers and aim to provide with a motorcycling experience.

“We designed a convertible jacket which has weathered the test of time and aim to become one of the most iconic items of clothing for motorcyclist.

“I am optimistic that we would emerge in times to come as India’s most efficient rider’s apparel brand and global brand to reckon with.”

Ulka Gear GHakkit Forever handy jacketHakka V2 city jacket

The handy Ulka gear jackets are available in different sizes from XS to 3XL and they say they are unisex with an adjustable waist.

Other features include CE-approved back, shoulder and elbow armour and abrasion-resistant Cordura material.

Ulka Gear GHakkit Forever handy jacketHakkit Forever touring jacket

If you are riding in the rain, the pockets are “water-resistant” which is not the same as waterproof but there is a waterproof rain cover you can wear over the jacket. U can also wear it inside for warmth.

Hakkit Forever also has a pocket on the left forearm for your mobile phone.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Harley’s electric LiveWire available in September

Harley-Davidson’s electric LiveWire has arrived in Australia for testing ahead of its media launch in August and market release in early September.

The Tesla Model 3 Australia Facebook Group has published the above photo of a LiveWire being charged in Australia.

Harley-Davidson Australia/New Zealand marketing guru Keith Waddell confirms the photo was taken “while we were testing a range of public charge stations with a pre-production unit”.

September release

Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycleHarley LiveWire

“A press release on the ANZ release is due this week however I can confirm that we will release in early September.

“We are looking to have an ANZ media launch closer to the end of August and are watching the COVID restrictions and related border closures.”

While Keith would not releaser the price of the LiveWire, it starts at $US29,799 (about $A42,900 and $NZ45,900 at current exchange rates) in the USA.

That would make it more expensive than all but the Harley CVO and Trike ranges, but even more expensive than the feature-laden Ultra Limited tourer at $A41,495 ride away.

Harley-Davidson Ultra Limited cure brain cancerHarley-Davidson Ultra Limited

Electrifying LiveWire

I rode the LiveWire last year in Portland, Oregon, at the world media launch.

Check my test ride here.

livewire mother earth NAWAMBW rides the LiveWire in Portland, Orgeon

It will be available in vivid black, orange fuse and yellow fuse.

The bike’s 15.5 kWh battery is capable of up to 235km of city range, 113km of highway range and 152km of combined conditions on a single charge.

LiveWire has an on-board level 1 240V charger which will take about about 12.5 hours from flat to reach full capacity at a cost of less than $4.

If you can find a Level 3 DC fast charger (CCS2), it will charge to 80 in 40 minutes, or full in an hour.

Harley-Davidson LiveWire tech specs

  • Price: $US29,799 (about $A42,900, $NZ45,900)
  • Colours: Orange, lime and black
  • Battery warranty: five-year, unlimited-km
  • Motor: H-D Revelation permanent-magnet, water-cooled electric motor
  • Power: 78kW (105hp)
  • Instant torque: 116Nm (86ft lbs)
  • Battery: Air-cooled 15.5kWh high-voltage lithium-ion battery (Rechargeable Energy Storage System)
  • Transmission: motor output shaft, 9.71:1 gear reduction, belt drive
  • Acceleration: 0 -100km/h 3 seconds; 100-130km/h 1.9 seconds
  • Top speed: 177km/h
  • Range: 235km (city), 152km (combined stop-and-go and highway range using MIC City and MIC Combined tests), 158km (World Motorcycle Test Cycle)
    Harley-Davidson electric LIveWire paradeCharging points on the LIveWire are under the “fuel” cap.
  • Charging: 120/240-volt outlet 20km (13 miles) per hour of charging; DC Fast Charge (DCFC) 0-80% in 40 minutes or 100% in 60 minutes
  • Weight: 210kg
  • Suspension (rear): fully adjustable Showa Balanced Free Rear Cushion-lite mono-shock
  • Suspension (front); Showa Separate Function Fork-Big Piston
    Sporty Harley-Davidson electric LiveWireFully adjustable Showa rear shock
  • Brakes: Dual Brembo Monoblock calipers, 300mm rotors
    Tyres: H-D/Michelin Scorcher (180mm rear and 120mm front)
  • Rider aids: Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS), Cornering Enhanced Anti-lock Braking System (C-ABS), Cornering Enhanced Traction Control System (C-TCS) and Drag-Torque Slip Control System (DSCS)
  • Technology: 4.3” colour TFT touchscreen, Daymaker LED headlamp, LED lighting, H-D Connect service connectivity and Harley- Davidson App
  • Riding modes: Seven selectable Ride Modes electronically control motor performance and level of RDRS intervention
  • Accessories: dual seat and tail, speed screen blade, decorative trim, hand and foot controls and cover with charging cord port

Sporty Harley-Davidson electric LiveWireTouchscreen instruments

More tech specs

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire

Dimensions

84.1 in. (2,135 mm)

Overall Width

32.7 in. (830 mm)

Overall Height

42.5 in. (1,080 mm)

Seat Height, Laden / Unladen

30 in. (761 mm) / 30.7 in. (780 mm)

Ground Clearance

5.1 in. (130 mm)

Rake (steering head)

4.3 in. (108 mm)

58.7 in. (1,490 mm)

Tires, Type

Michelin® Scorcher® “Sport”

Scorcher® “Sport”

Tires, Front Specification

120/70 ZR17 58W

Tires, Rear Specification

180/55 ZR17 73W

Transmission Capacity

0.34 qt (0.32 L)

Coolant Capacity

0.8 qt. (0.72 L)

Weight, As Shipped

549 lb. (249 kg)

Weight, In Running Order

549 lb. (249 kg)

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating

949 lb. (430 kg)

Gross Axle Weight Rating, Front

434 lb. (197 kg)

Gross Axle Weight Rating, Rear

580 lb. (263 kg)

Drivetrain

Primary Drive (*Cert)

Spiral bevel gear , 55/17 ratio

Final Drive (*Cert)

Belt, 3/1 ratio

Transmission

Single Speed

Gear Ratios (overall) 1st (*Cert) (X.XXX)

Aluminum cast

Aluminum cast

Front Fork

SHOWA® 43 mm Inverted Separate Function Forks – Big Piston (SFF-BP®), fully adjustable

Rear Shocks

SHOWA® Balance Free Rear Cushion Lite (BFRC-lite®), fully adjustable

Wheels, Type

Black, Split 5-Spoke Cast Aluminum

Wheels, Front Dia. / Width

17 in. (432 mm) / 3.5 in. (89 mm)

Wheels, Rear Dia. / Width

17 in. (432 mm) / 5.5 in. (140 mm)

Brakes, Caliper Type

Dual 4-piston monoblock radial mount front, dual-piston rear

Brakes, Rotor Type

Dual floating rotors (front), floating rotor (rear)

Brakes, Front Diameter / Thickness

11.8 in. (300 mm) / 0.2 in. (5 mm)

Brakes, Rear Diameter / Thickness

10.2 in. (260 mm) / 0.2 in. (5 mm)

Brakes, Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)

Suspension Travel, Front / Rear

4.5 in. (115 mm) / 4.5 in. (115 mm)

Performance

Lean Angle Testing Method

Lean Angle, Right / Left (deg)

Lithium Ion, 12.8V , 24 Wh, 120 A

Onboard DC to DC conversion

Lights (as per country regulation), Headlamp

All LED, low beam, high beam and signature position lamp

Lights (as per country regulation), Tail/Stop

LED with light pipe tail

Lights (as per country regulation), Front Signal Lights

Lights (as per country regulation), Indicator Lamps

High beam, turn signals, ABS, traction control, EV fault

Lights, Rear Turn Signals

LED, Amber

4.3” WQVGA 480×272 TFT Color Display with Ambient Light Sensor, 9 warning lights, Real Time Clock and Integrated Bluetooth Connectivity to a Smartphone to provide infotainment features including turn-by-turn navigation, telephone, music, and voice recognition.

Electric Power Outlet

USB C-type; output 5V at 3A

EV Specific Content: Motor

116Nm (86ft-lb)

Internal Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Water Jacket cooling

Motor Name

Revelation®

Inverter type

Pole Count

Power (hp/kW)

105HP (78kW)

6.69 in. (170 mm)

Stack Length

3.94 in. (100 mm)

EV Specific Content: RESS

Lithium Ion

15.5kWh total, 13.6kWh min usable

EV Specific Content: Charging

Charge Plug Type

SAE J1772 Combo Inlet (CCS1) / IEC 62196 Combo Inlet (CCS2)

On-board charger, charge rate

AC wall charging time (not verified)

Target – Full charge in 12.5 hrs – Capable of 12.6 miles/hour charge rate (MIC city cycle)

DC fast charging time (not verified)

Target – Full charge in 1.0 hr – Capable of 192 miles/hour charge rate (MIC city cycle)

DC to DC conversion

450W at 14.2V

EV Specific Content: Range

146 mi (235 km)

Highway (70 mph sustained)

70 mi (113 km)

95 mi (152 km)

WMTC (World Motorcycle Test Cycle)

98 mi (158 km)

Infotainment

Hands-free Mobile Phone – via Bluetooth

Voice Recognition Languages: Phone functions only

Via paired iOS or Android device

Voice Recognition Languages: Tuner/Media/ Navigation

Via paired iOS or Android device

USB Type-C

Phone/media supported

Telematics

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Are motorcycle backrests a waste of money?

Riders seeking extra comfort often add a backrest to their seat and pillions love them, but are they a good investment in comfort or simply a waste of money?

Some big touring motorcycles come with backrest options, otherwise you can buy an aftermarket seat from brands such as American companies Sargent and Corbin which have backrest accessories.

Corbin backrests

The latter has just released their range of Edge Ovalbac backrests which they say look “perfectly at home on a cruiser or a sportbike”.

Pillion Backrests Corbin seatsCorbin backrests

It works with all Corbin seat models and is not cheap at $US283 (about $A400+), so you better make sure it’s worth it!

For seats that take two rests, the Corbin backrests can be used on the front as a rider’s rest or at the rear as a passenger rest.

The angle of the backrest adjusts and is slightly curved for a greater area of body contact.

Corbin’s backrests can be made in matching materials and colours so they don’t look like an afterthought.

And they are quick to install.

Waste of money?

Ok, so they look good and have been ergonomically designed. But are they of benefit or a waste of money?

The Ulysses Club of Australia recommends backrests, saying they support your lower back, provide more comfort and reduce fatigue on long trips.

I’ve ridden many bikes with backrests and some provide good support and feel comfortable.

However, all the rider backrests I have tried have been on cruiser motorcycles where you tend to recline into them.

I can’t see how this backrest would work for sports bike riders as Corbin suggests, even though the angle can be adjusted.

The riding position on a sports bike requires you to lean forward, so you aren’t leaning back into them.

Instead, it may become an annoyance as your back rubs against it on bumps instead of adding support.

A physiotherapist rider once told me backrests can detrimentally affect your posture if you don’t sit in them properly.

She says that without a backrest you develop your core muscles by resisting the wind and stronger core muscles help ease lower back pain anyway.

I have also found that a backrest (either for the ride or pillion) can make it difficult to throw your leg over to mount the bike.

So, if you already have trouble throwing a leg over, buy a backrest that folds down so you can mount easily.

Pillion backrests

Pillion Backrests kangaroos roadkill roo Triumph BonnevilleThe seats on my old Bonnie were NOT made of roo leather, so settle down, guys!

While I have my doubts about rider backrests, they are usually a good idea for pillions.

I say “usually” because on adventure bikes on rough roads, they can actually hurt the pillion as they rub and bash into their spine.

If you have a rider backrest as well, they limit seat space for the pillion.

Pillion Backrests Corbin seatsNot much room for a pillion!

However, my pillion-in-a-billion loves backrests. She says they are not only more comfortable, but also mean she doesn’t have to hang on to me.

They also instil a feeling of security should I suddenly decide to accelerate hard or pop a wheelie … and isn’t that always on the cards!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Harley-Davidson Introduces New Learn-to-Ride Initiatives

Harley-Davidson introduces two programs to bring riders into the fold. 

Begin Press Release: 


MORE WAYS TO LEARN-TO-RIDE AVAILABLE NOW FROM HARLEY-DAVIDSON

“Experience the Ride” and “Learn to Ride” Programs Offer New Ways to Experience Two Wheels.

MILWAUKEE (June 30, 2020) – Turn “Someday I’ll ride a motorcycle,” into “Today” with new ways to learn to ride from participating Harley-Davidson® dealers.

Inspired by new rider feedback, select Harley-Davidson dealers are offering two new programs that aim to make learning to ride more convenient and personalized.

These new programs are designed to provide flexible scheduling and a learning pace that suits the rider’s needs. Personal coaching sessions can be scheduled 1-on-1, or as a private group with up to 4 participants.

Experience the Ride

This newly developed program is designed specifically for those who have never ridden a motorcycle but are interested in trying. Under the guidance of a professional coach, participants will ride a Harley-Davidson Street® 500 motorcycle across a practice range. The entire experience takes approximately 90 minutes and is completed on a bike specially equipped for new riders.

Experience the Ride is a low commitment, no pressure way for potential riders to get behind the handlebars and experience riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle for the first time.

This program can help participants decide if learning to ride is right for them, alleviate potential anxiety before taking rider training, and help realize how motorcycles can unlock their dreams of personal freedom.

To learn more and schedule a session, visit www.hdpersonalcoachfinder.com

Learn to Ride

For those that have decided to learn to ride, select Harley-Davidson dealers are now offering an additional option beyond the Harley-Davidson Riding Academy New Rider Course.

This new program, simply known as Learn to Ride, delivers the same time-tested rider training curriculum as the Riding Academy New Rider Course. However, Learn to Ride enables students to schedule private sessions with personal coaches and learn all the techniques and riding strategies required to earn a motorcycle endorsement.

For riders that always wanted to learn but couldn’t fit a multi-day course into their schedule or prefer to learn in private session, this program is what they have been waiting for. Sessions can be scheduled 1-on-1 or as a private party with up to 4 participants. This program is a great option for spouses, friends, and individuals to finally learn and fulfill their dreams of riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle.

Benefits of the Learn to Ride program include highly flexible scheduling, learning at the rider’s pace, more focused attention from the coach, ability to repeat training modules if needed, and completion of private sessions solo or with a small group of friends resulting in lower anxiety.

To learn more and schedule your personalized Learn to Ride lesson visit the www.hdpersonalcoachfinder.com website.

About Harley-Davidson Riding Academy

Harley-Davidson Riding Academy is a leader in high quality rider training. These two new options are designed to complement the existing Riding Academy programs and make learning to ride more attainable and accessible. These programs are just one more way Harley-Davidson is leading the industry in building riders.

Offered at select H-D® dealers, H-D Riding Academy provides expert guidance from Harley-Davidson certified coaches. In the classroom, students get to know the motorcycle they will be riding and learn the basics of rider safety skills. On the practice range, students learn to build skills and confidence, everything from braking, turning and skilled maneuvers. To find available courses contact a local dealer or search for classes online at www.h-d.com/LearntoRide.

About Harley-Davidson Motor Company

Since 1903, Harley-Davidson has stood for the timeless pursuit of adventure and delivered freedom for the soul with an expanding range of leading-edge, distinctive and customizable motorcycles in addition to riding experiences and exceptional motorcycle accessories, riding gear and apparel. Learn more at h-d.com.

The post Harley-Davidson Introduces New Learn-to-Ride Initiatives appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

Harley-Davidson Announces Learn-To-Ride Training Programs

Harley-Davidson has just announced a new initiative to encourage growth in the motorcycle community with its “Learn-To-Ride” programs, available at participating dealerships. The “Learn-To-Ride” programs offer 1-on-1, or small private group training in a low-stress environment under the supervision and instruction of a professional riding coach.

Harley-Davidson Learn-To-Ride New Rider Training

From Press Release:

MORE WAYS TO LEARN-TO-RIDE AVAILABLE NOW FROM HARLEY-DAVIDSON 

“Experience the Ride” and “Learn to Ride” Programs Offer New Ways to

Experience Two Wheels.

MILWAUKEE (June 30, 2020) – Turn “Someday I’ll ride a motorcycle,” into “Today” with new ways to learn to ride from participating Harley-Davidson® dealers.

Inspired by new rider feedback, select Harley-Davidson dealers are offering two new programs that aim to make learning to ride more convenient and personalized.

These new programs are designed to provide flexible scheduling and a learning pace that suits the rider’s needs. Personal coaching sessions can be scheduled 1-on-1, or as a private group with up to 4 participants.

Harley-Davidson Learn-To-Ride New Rider Training

Experience the Ride 

This newly developed program is designed specifically for those who have never ridden a motorcycle but are interested in trying. Under the guidance of a professional coach, participants will ride a Harley-Davidson Street® 500 motorcycle across a practice range. The entire experience takes approximately 90 minutes and is completed on a bike specially equipped for new riders.

Experience the Ride is a low commitment, no pressure way for potential riders to get behind the handlebars and experience riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle for the first time.

This program can help participants decide if learning to ride is right for them, alleviate potential anxiety before taking rider training, and help realize how motorcycles can unlock their dreams of personal freedom.

To learn more and schedule a session, visit www.hdpersonalcoachfinder.com

Harley-Davidson Learn-To-Ride New Rider Training

Learn to Ride

For those that have decided to learn to ride, select Harley-Davidson dealers are now offering an additional option beyond the Harley-Davidson Riding Academy New Rider Course.  

This new program, simply known as Learn to Ride, delivers the same time-tested rider training curriculum as the Riding Academy New Rider Course. However, Learn to Ride enables students to schedule private sessions with personal coaches and learn all the techniques and riding strategies required to earn a motorcycle endorsement.

For riders that always wanted to learn but couldn’t fit a multi-day course into their schedule or prefer to learn in private session, this program is what they have been waiting for. Sessions can be scheduled 1-on-1 or as a private party with up to 4 participants. This program is a great option for spouses, friends, and individuals to finally learn and fulfill their dreams of riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle.  

Benefits of the Learn to Ride program include highly flexible scheduling, learning at the rider’s pace, more focused attention from the coach, ability to repeat training modules if needed, and completion of private sessions solo or with a small group of friends resulting in lower anxiety. 

To learn more and schedule your personalized Learn to Ride lesson visit the www.hdpersonalcoachfinder.com website.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

MotoAmerica Superbike, Round 2 Race 2

Hey! We may be the new coronavirus hot spot, but at least we’re racing. Which is more than can be said for the rest of the world. Sorry, we’re a bit behind schedule due to technical difficulties. Cameron Beaubier won (again) on Saturday, but on Sunday, another rider became the 59th man to win an AMA Superbike National, under beautiful skies in Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin – where there were actual spectators. There’s plenty of room for social distancing at Road America.


MotoAmerica Press Release:

Fong Gets His First Superbike Win
At Road America

Beaubier Crashes Out And The Rest Take Advantage

ELKHART LAKE, WI (June 28, 2020) – M4 ECSTAR Suzuki’s Bobby Fong won the first HONOS Superbike race of his career today, the Californian taking full advantage of Cameron Beaubier’s only miscue of the young season to become the 59th rider in history to win an AMA Superbike National.

Fong was in second, a few seconds adrift of Beaubier, when the previously unbeaten Beaubier hit a bump in turn one, lost the front end and crashed. Fong took over at the front but soon had Beaubier’s Monster Energy Attack Performance Yamaha’s teammate Jake Gagne nipping at his heels. For whichever one of those two who won, it would be a career first, and both of them rode like it. Fong, however, was able to withstand the pressure in the closing laps and led Gagne across the finish line by .509 of a second.

“I saw Cameron (Beaubier) go down and I knew immediately that there was going to be pressure on me,” Fong said. “I knew that (Jake) Gagne had extra motivation, near a race win. I didn’t know who was behind me. I just saw plus one on my board, and then I was looking at the big screen down the straightaway to see who it was. Just depending on who it was, I knew how aggressive they were and how defensive I needed to ride. I knew it was Gagne and he rides pretty well. He takes risks, takes risks to get that win. I just tried to keep a steady pace in the middle of the race and not push too hard and at least not try to put it all out there in the middle of the race. I knew he was going to be there at the end of the race. I just put the hammer down. Thankfully we got the win, but we have some work to do to actually beat Cameron. But we’re making big steps and I’m proud of the work we did this weekend.”

Gagne finished second, as he continues his solid start to the season that was briefly interrupted by a problem with his brakes that limited him to a sixth-place finish on Saturday at Road America.

“Yeah. No doubt,” Gagne said when asked if he saw an opportunity to win an HONOS Superbike race when he saw Beaubier crash. “That’s definitely what we were thinking. It was a bummer to see Cameron go down. Obviously, he’s been pushing the pace all year long. It just shows how well these things are doing. Hats off to Bobby (Fong). He really rode his heart out. I could tell. I was seeing those tires and it was greasy out there. It was tough out there. I feel like I’m happy to bring it home in second. Obviously, we know we were fighting for a win, so that’s extra motivation to get it up there. It was a fun race. There were some sections, the first section and last section, where I could close in and then there was some sections in the middle where Bobby really pulled away. So, we were kind of teeter-tottering and that makes it real tough to even try to find a place to stick it in. Bobby is really strong on the brakes in some of the sections where I wanted to make passes. I’m happy. We brought it home. Like Bobby said, it was a slick, greasy race out there. So hats off to the team, Monster Energy Attack Performance Yamaha. These guys are working really hard. Obviously, we still got to go catch Cam when we get to Road Atlanta. See if we can do some work on him. But it’s been fun battling these guys. It was a good race.”

KATO Fastening/KWR Ducati’s Kyle Wyman waited 1022 days between podiums, ending his drought in yesterday’s HONOS Superbike race. Then he only waited a day to do it all gain, the New Yorker getting his second podium in a row after holding off the ever-persistent Mathew Scholtz on the Westby Racing Yamaha.

“It feels great,” Wyman said. “I saw Cam go down and inherited… Actually, I don’t even know if I was in third at that point. I had to pass Toni (Elias) into Canada Corner I think on lap three or so. He was really strong in the first few laps. I think our only weakness really at this point, I think the middle of the race these guys, every time they tipped into turn eight was the same time every lap from lap four to lap eight or nine, so we need to get our first laps’ pace down and try to get closer there. Mathew (Scholtz) put on a really good fight. He was plus .6 for four laps in a row, and then plus .9 for the last three laps. It was tough to just stay focused and not make any mistakes. But Ducati’s on the podium.”

Scholtz, meanwhile, had an eventful race and was in a battle with Wyman and M4 ECSTAR Suzuki’s Toni Elias when he clashed with Elias in the chicane, causing the luckless Spaniard to crash. Elias was able to remount to finish seventh.

Fifth place went to Scheibe BMW’s Josh Herrin, the Georgian some three seconds ahead of FLY Racing ADR Motorsports’ David Anthony, the Australian continuing his consistent start to the season. With Elias seventh, Altus Motorsports’ Cameron Petersen raced to eighth, well clear of RideHVMC’s Corey Alexander. Thrashed Bike Racing LLC’s Max Flinders rounded out the top 10.

Beaubier now leads the championship by just nine points over Gagne, 75-66, with Fong jumping up to third with 58 points, just two points ahead of Wyman’s 56. Herrin rounds out the top five in the series with 46 points.

Superbike Race 2

  1. Bobby Fong (Suzuki)
  2. Jake Gagne (Yamaha)
  3. Kyle Wyman (Ducati)
  4. Mathew Scholtz (Yamaha)
  5. Josh Herrin (BMW)
  6. David Anthony (Suzuki)
  7. Toni Elias (Suzuki)
  8. Cameron Petersen (Suzuki)
  9. Corey Alexander (Kawasaki)
  10. Max Flinders (Yamaha)

Kyle Wyman finished on the podium for the second straight day on Sunday, the KWR Ducati rider finishing third again. Photo by Brian J. Nelson

 

(From left to right) Gagne, Fong and Wyman celebrate on the podium at Road America. Photo by Brian J. Nelson

For the complete 2020 MotoAmerica Series schedule, click HERE

To purchase tickets for any of the 2020 series round, click HERE

For information on how to watch the 2020 MotoAmerica Series, click HERE

 

The post MotoAmerica Superbike, Round 2 Race 2 appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

What’s the secret to defining a GOAT?

“Possibly the most stand out is Sam Hill. He had a completely different style of riding, he could ride these really tight lines, and super aggressive on his run. And he could just find time out of nowhere,” says Minnaar, talking about who riders who have made him have to readapt his way of riding. “It forced me to try and ride, instead of adapting my riding style to try and ride how he rode, which is what most people try and do, it made me focus more on my own style of riding and work harder on trying to ride the way I feel is quicker for my type of style and body type versus his.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

BMW first to offer active cruise control

BMW Motorrad may be set to become the first motorcycle company to offer adaptive cruise control on a production motorcycle.

The technology has been available for several years in many luxury cars.

It basically keeps the vehicle at a predetermined distance from the vehicle in front, including other motorcycles.

For those who have used it, they find it quite convenient and safe, allowing the driver to concentrate on traffic.

However, it can also be frustrating as other drivers jump into the space in front.

We expect BMW will introduce it first on their big K 1600 tourers as shown in the above video and supplied photos, followed by other models down the line.BMW active cruise control

It will not only require more sophisticated computer technology in the cruise control, but also sensors to measure distance to vehicles in front.

That means more cost and a small amount of extra weight.

It’s just another step toward autonomous vehicles.

BMW Motorrad is also working on self-riding technology with its ConnectedRide R 1200 GS Adventure fitted with autonomous computer tech.

Self-riding BMW technology ConnectrideSelf-riding BMW prototype

KTM and Ducati have also been working on similar systems, but it appears BMW may beat them to market.

Active Cruise Control

Here is the official BMW Motorrad press release:

Relaxed cruising with active cruise control, without having to manually adapt to the driving speed of the vehicle in front – already available in cars now for many years, but not the standard in motorcycles to date. However, with the Active Cruise Control (ACC), BMW Motorrad will soon offer this type of rider assistance system, thus providing motorcyclists with a completely new, comfortable riding experience.

The new BMW Motorrad Active Cruise Control (ACC). Cruise control with distance control for maximum comfort and best possible safety when riding a motorcycle.

ACC is a novel rider assistance system that was developed in cooperation with the partner, Bosch. The many years of experience with passenger car driver assistance systems of both companies could be applied selectively here and used for motorcycle applications. The new ACC provides maximum comfort for the demanding touring motorcyclist by automatically regulating the speed set by the rider and the distance to the vehicle driving in front. The system automatically regulates the vehicle speed when the distance to the vehicle in front is reduced and keeps the distance defined by the rider. This distance can be varied in three stages. Both the riding speed as well as the distance to the vehicle in front can be set conveniently using a button. The individual settings are displayed on the TFT instrument cluster. The new BMW Motorrad ACC has two selectable control characteristics: comfortable or dynamic, in which the acceleration and deceleration behaviour is changed accordingly. The distance control can also be deactivated in order to be able to use the Dynamic Cruise Control (DCC).BMW active cruise control

When cornering, the speed is automatically reduced by the ACC if required and a comfortable lean angle is aimed at. With an increasing lean angle, however, the braking and acceleration dynamics are limited in order to maintain a stable rideability and not to unsettle the rider by abrupt braking or acceleration. The BMW Motorrad ACC is a rider assistance system that leaves the responsibility with the rider and allows him to intervene at all times. That is also because the new ACC only responds to moving vehicles. Stationary vehicles – like at the end of a traffic jam or at traffic lights – are are not considered. In such cases, the rider has to do the braking.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Victorian riders closed off from states

South Australia and Queensland are opening their borders to all Australians except Victorian riders, tourists and visitors due to the ongoing coronavirus outbreak.

The former is still deciding on NSW and the ACT, but is expected to announce a decision later this week. However, its border with Victoria remains closed.

Meanwhile, Queensland has announced borders will reopen from 10 July 2020 to visitors from all states and territories other than Victoria.

That means riders in Queensland can leave and return, but should avoid travelling to Victoria.

It also means riders from all other states and territories can enter Queensland so long as they have not been to Victoria in the past 14 days.

If you lie, the penalty is a $4000 fine.

Anyone who has travelled from Victoria and enters Queensland from this Friday (3 July), including Queenslanders, will have to quarantine at their own expense for 14 days.

Victorian lockdown

For Victorian riders, it could be a long road trip!

Meanwhile, they can still ride into NSW and the ACT, unless they are in the 10 postcodes undergoing a second lockdown from tomorrow night: 3012, 3021, 3032, 3038, 3042, 3046, 3047, 3055, 3060, 3064.

Riders in those postcodes can only leave their homes for work, to provide care, to get exercise or to buy groceries.

The border decisions and postcode lockdowns come in the wake of Victoria detecting 139 new cases in the past two days including a further 64 on Tuesday.

We have contacted several departments and Queensland Police to find out if the concrete barriers at border crossings such as the Lions Rd (pictured) and on the Numinbah Rd will be removed on 10 July.

Queensland Police Service said they are “working through arrangements to facilitate upcoming changes to border restrictions in Queensland”.

“Police will implement revised processes at border checkpoints to enable a more seamless crossing for those travelling from states other than Victoria.

“More details regarding the upcoming changes to border restrictions and police processing will be made available in due course.”

Meanwhile, for Queenslanders and interstate visitors to access the state, they must obtain an entry pass.

It only takes seconds to obtain the pass. Print it out and follow the instructions.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com