Tag Archives: Motorcycle Reviews

Honda Monkey: Super-Spreader of Happiness

Honda Monkey Review Pearl Glittering Blue
2020 Honda Monkey in Pear Glittering Blue (Photos by Mark Tuttle)

Happy birthday, pandemic! It’s been a long, strange year since the COVID-19 pandemic started spreading like wildfire and the world went into lockdown. With vaccinations rolling out, there’s light at the end of the tunnel. But this time last year? Not so much.

Days before the initial lockdown in California, Honda had delivered a couple of new motorcycles to us. One was a Monkey in a new color, Pearl Glittering Blue. My original plans for it were nebulous at best. Honestly, I just loved the color, and I figured the story would come to me when it was ready. As it turned out, I was right, in an unexpected way.

Honda Monkey Review Pearl Glittering Blue

The streets in my neighborhood were eerily empty. Shops and restaurants were closed, so there was nowhere to go even if you wanted to. Even the beach was off-limits. There wasn’t a lot of smiling going on, as we all tried to find our footing in this suddenly off-balance world. When I looked at the Monkey it brought back fond memories of the press launch event, held what felt like a millennium ago on Catalina Island. Wherever we rode, people mirrored our smiles. The cute little Monkey bike is impossible to frown at.

“That’s what we really need now,” I remember thinking one day last April. “A reason to smile.”

So I grabbed my open-face helmet and headed out for a ride. You’ll never ride far on a Monkey, but around town, topping out around 35 or 40, it’s the bees’ knees. I stuck to residential streets, many of them with people in the front yard, grilling or gardening. Mothers walked with kids in tow. No one was smiling. And there I was, putt-putting by on a miniature motorcycle with 12-inch balloon tires, ponytail giving a 25-mph wave, enjoying the rare sensation of the breeze on my face and grinning the grin that the little Honda Monkey provokes. And people smiled back.

Honda Monkey Review Pearl Glittering Blue

COVID-19 might be contagious, but so is happiness.

Small businesses everywhere were struggling, including the karate dojo where I trained three times a week B.C. (Before COVID). Like many others, the Sensei (head instructor) was scrambling to adapt to the “new normal,” transitioning to online Zoom classes even as he lost students to their own economic struggles. We wanted to show our support for him and for the dojo, so we organized another new normal activity: the drive-by party. Minivans and pickups filled with kids in their white karate uniforms lined up for the parade, festooned with signs that read, “We love you Sensei Shawn.”

When I rode up to join the line, wearing my white karate gi and my blue belt matching the Monkey’s paint perfectly, it was decided that I’d lead the parade. It’s Monkey magic.

Honda Monkey Review Pearl Glittering Blue COVID drive-by parade party

We motorcyclists are often seen as part of some dangerous societal fringe, but I like to remind the Average Jane or Joe that we’re just like them. We ride because it brings joy to our hearts and cleanses the mind and soul. It’s exactly what we needed in those early days of the lockdown, and what we will continue to need in the days ahead. The little Honda Monkey, as it turns out, tells that story very well. In the face of despair and darkness, it induces smiles and connection. It’s a super-spreader of happiness.

The post Honda Monkey: Super-Spreader of Happiness first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory | First Ride Review

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review
The 2021 Aprilia RSV4 and RSV4 Factory (above) were completely redesigned. (Photography by Larry Chen Photo)

Aprilia’s RSV4 is a bike that, like a fine wine, only gets better with age. Racing has always been a driving factor in the design of Aprilia’s sportbikes. The RSV4 was introduced for 2009 to compete in World Superbike, and Max Biaggi stood atop the podium nine times that season and won the championship in 2010. Four years later, the RSV4 was ridden to another WSBK championship by Sylvain Guintoli.

With racing in its DNA, it’s only natural that advancements made on the track influence design and engineering of models ridden by the general public, from advanced electronics to downforce-producing bodywork. The Aprilia RSV4 and RSV4 Factory underwent a ground-up redesign for 2021, giving us an opportunity to see how this racy red Italian wine tastes a decade on.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review
2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory in Aprilia Black (left) and 2021 Aprilia RSV4 in Dark Losail (right).

It’s been a few years since I through a leg over a RSV4, so I was interested to see how the folks back in Noale, Italy, improved an already great motorcycle. And what better place to stretch its legs than the legendary WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca in Monterey, California, home of the famous Corkscrew. Laguna Seca has a long history of Superbike racing, plus it’s a favorite track for many of us. If only the fog weren’t so cold and damp, conditions would have been perfect.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Before we get to how the bikes work, let’s take a look at what’s new. Last year, Aprilia’s two RSV4 models had engines with different displacements, with the FIM-homologated RSV4 1100 RR boasting 1,000cc (and a claimed 201 horsepower) and the RSV4 1100 Factory living up to its name with 1,077cc (and 217 horsepower). Aprilia simplified things for 2021, equipping the RSV4 and RSV4 Factory with the same 1,099cc, 65-degree V-4 engine — with an extra 22cc of displacement courtesy of a slightly longer 53.3mm stroke, up from 52.3 — that Aprilia says still cranks out an eye-watering 217 horsepower at 13,000 rpm and 92 lb-ft of torque at 10,500 rpm, even while meeting strict Euro 5 emissions regulations.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

The V-4 architecture allows the engine to be narrow while still offering the power-producing benefit of four cylinders. To keep the engine as light as possible, the crankshaft was made lighter and the external housings, oil sump and cylinder head covers are made of magnesium. To keep the engine as compact as possible, the cam chain drives the intake camshaft and a gear on the intake camshaft drives the exhaust camshaft. To maximize the engine’s rigidity, the crankcase is a monoblock design with integrated aluminum cylinder liners. And to minimize vibration, a countershaft cancels out engine imbalances. A new Magneti Marelli ECU 11MP allows more complex algorithms to be processed at a faster speed, and a new exhaust system not only satisfies Euro 5 but is lighter than its predecessor.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

With well over 200 horsepower on tap, electronics allow the riding experience on the RSV4s to be tailored the rider’s skill level and preferences. Guided by a Bosch 6-axis IMU, the APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) suite does crazy fast calculations to optimize the bike’s dynamic behavior while offering a wide range of adjustability. Fifth-generation APRC includes: ATC (Aprilia Traction Control, 8 levels adjustable on the fly), AWC (Aprilia Wheelie Control, 5 levels adjustable on the fly), AEM (Aprilia Engine Map, 3 to choose from), AEB (Aprilia Engine Brake, a new feature with 3 levels that take lean angle into account), ALC (Aprilia Launch Control, 3 settings for track use), AQS (Aprilia Quick Shift), APL (Aprilia Pit Limiter) and ACC (Aprilia Cruise Control). Everything comes together with the six riding modes, with three for the street (Street, Sport and customizable User) and three for the track (Race and customizable Track 1 and Track 2).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

That hardworking IMU also provides input for the Bosch 9.1 MP cornering ABS, which ensures maximum safety on the road and exceptional performance on the track. Co-developed between Aprilia and Bosch, it offers three levels of intervention and works in conjunction with Aprilia RLM (Rear Lift Mitigation) to keep the rear tire on the ground during hard braking.

We’re not done yet.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Whereas the standard RSV4 features fully adjustable Sachs suspension, the RSV4 Factory is equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension, with a 43mm NIX upside-down fork, a TTX rear shock and an electronic steering damper. An array of sensors and servo motors adjust compression and rebound damping automatically as you ride, adapting to changing conditions. There are two modes — semi-active and manual — and three suspension maps for each mode, and Öhlins’ OBTi (Objective Based Tuning Interface) simplifies pushbutton adjustments. Both RSV4 models are perfectly capable of delivering effective feel and control in any situation, but the standard RSV4 requires manual changes while the Factory’s setup can be changed on the fly with the touch of a button (preload must be manually adjusted on both models).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Perhaps it goes without saying that the RSV4 is smarter than I am. I’ve done a lot of racing over the years, including the Isle of Man TT, back when control was all in the wrist and I had to rely on my own brain rather than the motorcycle’s to keep me out of trouble. But things can and do go wrong from time to time, and I have come to appreciate not only the helping hand but also the convenience and customization that modern electronics provide.

Because most changes can be made on the fly, I was able to try out various setups without having to return to the paddock. Pressing a button on the right cluster below the kill switch changes the riding mode, while a four-button setup on the left makes adjustments within each mode. A lever on the bottom of the left cluster adjusts traction control, and a switch on the top of the left cluster adjusts both cruise control and wheelie control. There wasn’t much cruising going on at Laguna Seca, but there were plenty of wheelies that needed to be tamed! And a new 5-inch full-color TFT display, which offers Road and Track screens, provides an easy-to-read mission control.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Aprilia revised the RSV4’s chassis and bodywork as well. To optimize strength, rigidity and feedback, the twin-beam aluminum frame uses both cast and pressed-and-welded elements. The cast aluminum swingarm has a new lower reinforcing brace for added stiffness and uses three welded sections instead of seven, reducing unsprung weight by 1.3 pounds. Unique among production sportbikes is the degree of adjustment possible with the RSV4’s chassis, including engine position, headstock angle, swingarm pivot and rear ride height. Chassis geometry has been tweaked slightly to improve handling, and to keep mass centralized mass, most of the RSV4’s fuel is carried under the rider’s seat.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Inspired by the Aprilia RS 660, the new RSV4 is more aerodynamic, with revised bodywork, a larger windscreen and new winglets built into the double-wall fairing that provide more wind protection for the rider, more downforce and a 7% increase in airbox pressure. Revisions to the lower cowling help improve cornering agility and reduce cross wind buffeting. A new fuel tank provides more support during braking and cornering and has a deeper chin perch for getting behind the windscreen when fully tucked in. Seat height was reduced by 9mm and the footpegs were lowered by 10mm, yet cornering clearance increased by 1.5 degrees on both sides thanks to narrower pegs. All this adds up to a more comfortable cockpit, especially for someone my size (5 feet, 10 inches).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

The RSV4 has always been a looker, and the new bodywork only enhances its go-fast, form-follows-function stance. The front lighting application is what really stuck out to me. New DRL light rails that run under and up the sides of the LED cat-eye headlights really make it pop, and cornering lights add visibility during nighttime riding. And the exhaust muffler looks the business. The Factory is available in either Lava Red or Aprilia Black (shown), while the standard RSV4 comes in Dark Losail. The Factory also rolls on light, strong, five-spoke forged and machined aluminum wheels rather the three-spoke cast aluminum wheels on the standard model.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

After a few laps on the RSV4 Factory I realized this bike is seriously fast. The smooth nature and low growling sound of the V-4 were deceptive, making me think I was going slower than I actually was. With 80% of peak torque available in the midrange, you don’t have to rev the engine into the stratosphere to get a strong pull out of corners. And it continues to pull even harder as the revs pick up heading down the straight to the next corner. The new Brembo Stylema monoblock radial front calipers paired with 330mm rotors were perfectly capable of slowing things down. Front brake action was superb, allowing me to modulate the needed pressure to control corner entry with plenty of feel and braking power.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

I started the day in Race mode, which had a rather abrupt throttle response, but switching to Street mode smoothed things right out. As the day progressed, I ended up back in the Race and Track modes because, once I found my groove, it’s never fast enough, right? Unlike the Track modes, the three road-going modes tame power delivery for everyday riding, like commuting (don’t forget the cruise control!) or riding through town on your way to the good stuff, with the APRC electronics on standby in the background.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

In terms of handling, the RSV4 and RSV4 Factory are perfectly suited to a challenging track like Laguna Seca. The RSV4 has always offered positive feedback to the rider, and the latest iteration is even better, allowing me to attack corners with complete confidence. Leaned over in the middle of a corner, the bike felt planted and told me exactly what was going on. Under hard braking the RSV4 never got out of shape, and with three levels of engine braking I could explore how much to let the rear step out.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

I managed to get the RSV4 out of shape a few times on hard exits, especially coming out of Turn 2. The bike started to lift the front and I could feel the rear starting to let go, but before things went pear-shaped the wheelie control and traction control kicked in and kept me from ending the day early. The quickshifter with auto-blip downshifting is almost like cheating; just move your foot and the shift is made up or down with no clutch and no hesitation (it’s adjustable too).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Although the RSV4 Factory performed exceptionally, I struggled with the bike squatting on hard corner exits. Since the day got off to a late start due to a foggy and damp morning, we lost some valuable track time. The bike I was on seemed a little out of balance front to rear, but more preload at the rear remedied the problem. Fine-tuning is part of the process when you’re trying to squeeze every bit of performance out of a race-ready sportbike.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

For conoisseurs, Aprilia’s latest RSV4 and RSV4 Factory offer robust, full-bodied vintages suitable for different budgets and tastes. The standard RSV4 has an MSRP of $18,999, whereas the RSV4 Factory has an MSRP of $25,999, with the extra lira paying for the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension and primo forged wheels. Enjoy responsibly.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory Specs

Base Price: $25,999
Website: aprilia.com

ENGINE
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 65-degree V-4, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,099cc
Bore x Stroke: 81.0 x 53.3mm
Compression Ratio: 13.6:1
Horsepower: 217 @ 13,000 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 92 lb-ft @ 10,500 rpm (claimed)
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated wet slipper clutch
Final Drive: Chain

CHASSIS
Frame: Aluminum dual-beam with pressed & cast sheet elements, cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 56.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.6 degrees/4.1 in.
Seat Height: 33.3 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm USD fork, electronically adj., 4.9 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, electronically adj., 4.5 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 330mm floating discs w/ 4-piston opposed radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 220mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Forged aluminum, 3.5 x 17 in.
Rear: Forged aluminum, 6 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 200/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 445 lbs. (claimed, 90% fuel)
Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gals.

The post 2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival | First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival review Icons Collection

As the growing popularity of the resto-mod customization movement has shown, combining classic styling with modern engineering is a winning formula.

Harley-Davidson has announced its new Icons Collection, and the first model in the collection is the stunning 2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival.

The Icons Collection is an annual program that offers very limited-edition motorcycles designed to elevate traditional forms and celebrate Americana, either by revisiting classic Harley-Davidson design themes or by exploring ideas that represent the future of motorcycle style.

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival review Icons Collection

Only one or two models will be included in the Icons Collection each year, with a single production run that highlights their exclusivity. Production of that model will never be resumed or repeated. Each Icons Collection motorcycle will be serialized, and the purchaser will receive a certificate of authenticity.

“With The Hardwire, we made a commitment to introduce a series of motorcycles that align with our strategy to increase desirability and to drive the legacy of Harley-Davidson,” said Jochen Zeitz, chairman, president and CEO Harley-Davidson. “With that in mind, I am proud to introduce our new limited production Icons Collection, a series of extraordinary adaptations of production motorcycles which look to our storied past and bright future.”

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival review Icons Collection

The first model in the Icons Collection is the Electra Glide Revival model, a drop-dead gorgeous retro-classic motorcycle decked out with chrome and an old-school two-tone paint scheme. Global production of the Electra Glide Revival model will be limited to a one-time build of 1,500 serialized examples, with bikes available at Harley-Davidson dealers in late April, with an MSRP of $29,199.

The look of the Electra Glide Revival model is inspired by the 1969 Electra Glide, the first Harley-Davidson motorcycle available with an accessory “batwing” fairing. The fairing became an iconic Harley-Davidson styling cue, its shape an instant on-the-road identifier of many H-D models and the foundational design of the fairing featured on current models.

In 1969, the accessory fairing and saddlebags were only offered in white molded fiberglass, and the Electra Glide Revival replicates that look with a Birch White painted finish. The period-inspired tank medallion and Electra Glide script on the front fender complete the look. The Electra Glide Revival will be offered in a single color scheme inspired by the original 1969 colorway: The two-tone fuel tank in Hi-Fi Blue and Black Denim bisected with a Birch White stripe, with Hi-Fi Blue paint on the fenders and side panels.

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival review Icons Collection

“We live in a very dynamic time, each of us experiencing constant change,” said Brad Richards, Harley-Davidson vice president of styling and design. “The Electra Glide Revival model is an oasis in this daily turbulence, a way to reconnect with the fundamental Harley-Davidson DNA that created Grand American Touring.”

Design highlights of the Electra Glide Revival model include a solo saddle with a black-and-white cover and a chrome rail, mounted over an adjustable coil spring and shock absorber, also a nod to Harley-Davidson FL models from the 1960s and a functional feature that adds rider comfort. Chrome steel-laced wheels and wide whitewall tires add to the nostalgic look, as do brilliant chrome on front fender rails and saddlebag rails, front fender skirt, Ventilator air cleaner cover, fork covers, and auxiliary lights.

The Electra Glide Revival model is powered by a Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-Twin engine which delivers inspiring performance and classic Harley-Davidson look-sound-feel.

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival review Icons Collection
  • Displacement: 114 cu in (1,868 cc)
  • Torque: 118 lb-ft @ 3,250 rpm (claimed)
  • Four valve cylinder heads (two exhaust and two intake valves per head, eight total); increased airflow through the engine contributes to power output.
  • Dual spark plugs for more complete combustion of the air/fuel charge and maximized power and efficiency.
  • 6-Speed Cruise Drive transmission reduces engine RPM at highway speeds to enhance fuel economy and rider comfort.

The Electra Glide Revival offers classic style, but its design and technology is absolutely modern. The foundation of the Electra Glide Revival model is the single-spar Harley-Davidson Touring frame with a rigid backbone design to sustain the weight of luggage and to support current engine power. The entire chassis is designed for the long haul. A single knob hydraulically adjusts the pre-load of emulsion-technology rear shock absorbers for optimal ride and control. The 49mm fork with dual bending valve suspension technology deliver linear damping characteristics for a smooth ride.

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival review Icons Collection

The classic Bat Wing fairing features a tall clear windshield and a splitstream vent to help reduce rider head buffeting. Electronic cruise control holds a steady speed for comfort on long rides, while a halogen headlamp and incandescent auxiliary lamps provide outstanding illumination and maintain the nostalgic styling of the Revival model.

A Boom! Box GTS infotainment system with color touch screen powers two fairing-mount speakers and features advanced navigation and hand and voice commands (when paired with a compatible headset) plus Android Auto application and Apple CarPlay software compatibility.

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival review Icons Collection

Also standard is the suite of Harley-Davidson RDRS Safety Enhancements, a collection of technology designed to match motorcycle performance to available traction during acceleration, deceleration and braking, including:

  • Cornering Enhanced Anti-Lock Brake System (C-ABS)
  • Cornering Enhanced Electronic Linked Braking (C-ELB)
  • Cornering Enhanced Traction Control System (C-TCS)
  • Drag-torque Slip Control System (DSCS)
  • Hill Hold Control (HHC)

For more information, visit h-d.com/icons.

The post 2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler | First Look Review

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm Edition

From the 900cc Street Twin and Street Twin Gold Line to the 1,200cc T120, T120 Black, Streetmaster, Bobber and Scrambler 1200 (including the ultra-cool Steve McQueen Edition), Triumph has updated nearly every model in its Bonneville lineup for the 2022 model year.

Last but certainly not least is Triumph’s 900cc Street Scrambler (MSRP starts at $11,000; available in July) and new limited-edition Street Scrambler Sandstorm (MSRP $11,750; available in May).

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler in Urban Grey

As with other Bonneville models, the Street Scrambler’s liquid-cooled parallel-twin has been updated to meet Euro 5 emissions yet it still delivers 64 horsepower at 7,250 rpm and 59 lb-ft of torque at 3,250 rpm (claimed). Three riding modes (Road, Rain, and Off-Road), a torque-assist clutch, switchable ABS and switchable traction control are standard equipment.

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm Edition

Styling updates include a new side panel with aluminum number board, a new heel guard, new brushed aluminum headlight brackets, new adventure-oriented seat material, new throttle body finishers and new paint schemes.

Street Scrambler models are equipped with a Brembo front brake, a cartridge fork, a 19-inch front wheel, Metzeler Tourance 90/10 adventure tires, an LED taillight and a USB charging port.

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm Edition

Limited to 775 units worldwide, the Scrambler Sandstorm Edition has a unique paint scheme, premium accessories (high front fender, tail tidy, sump guard, headlight grille and rubber knee pads on the tank) fitted as standard and a certificate of authenticity personalized with the bike’s VIN.

The 2022 Street Scrambler is available in three premium paint schemes: Jet Black, Urban Grey and two-tone Matte Khaki and Matte Ironstone with distinctive new tank graphics.

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler review
The 2022 Triumph Street Scrambler’s 900cc parallel twin makes 64 horsepower and 59 lb-ft of torque (claimed).

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Specs

Base Price: $11,000 / $11,750 (Sandstorm Edition)
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel twin, SOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 900cc
Bore x Stroke: 84.6 x 80mm
Horsepower: 64 @ 7,250 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 59 lb-ft @ 3,250 rpm (claimed)
Fuel Delivery: Electronic fuel injection & throttle-by-wire
Transmission: 5-speed, cable-actuated assist-and-slipper wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Frame: Tubular steel w/ twin cradles, steel swingarm
Wheelbase: 56.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 25.6 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.1 in.
Suspension, Front: 41mm fork, non-adj., 4.7 in. travel
Rear: Dual shocks, adj. preload, 4.7 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Single 310mm disc w/ opposed 4-piston axial fixed caliper & switchable ABS
Rear: Single 255mm disc w/ 2-piston floating caliper & switchable ABS
Wheels, Front: Spoked aluminum, 2.5 x 19 in.
Rear: Spoked aluminum, 4.25 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 100/90-19 tube-type
Rear: 150/70-17 tube-type
Wet Weight: 492 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 3.2 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 54.7 mpg (claimed)

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Photo Gallery:

The post 2022 Triumph Street Scrambler | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 | First Look Review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 in Metallic Triton Blue

Just a few months after announcing the updated-for-2022 Suzuki Hayabusa, Suzuki has unveiled another updated sportbike. The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is a naked sportbike powered by an updated version of the GSX-R-derived liquid-cooled 999cc in-line four.

Introduced for 2016 in both naked (GSX-S1000) and faired (GSX-S1000F) versions, the GSX-S used a detuned version of the engine from the K5 (2005-2008) GSX-R1000.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review

For 2022, the GSX-S1000 gets more aggressive, angular styling with stacked LED headlights and MotoGP-inspired winglets. Its new 4-2-1 exhaust system with a stubby silencer on the right side meets Euro 5 emission standards. Updated camshafts and valve springs, a new fuel injection system and a new airbox deliver increased power and a broader, smoother torque curve. A 6-speed transmission is mated to a wet, multi-plate clutch equipped with the Suzuki Clutch Assist System (SCAS) for smoother deceleration and better control when downshifting.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review

Like the Hayabusa, the 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (S.I.R.S.), which includes the Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (SDMS), Suzuki Traction Control, Ride by Wire Electronic Throttle, Bi-Directional Quick Shift, Suzuki Easy Start and Low RPM Assist systems.

The GSX-S1000’s twin-spar aluminum frame and aluminum-alloy braced swingarm are from the GSX-R1000. Fully adjustable KYB suspension, ABS-equipped radial-mount Brembo monoblock calipers, an updated seat design, new wheels shod with new Dunlop Roadsport 2 tires, revised instrumentation and switches, and a new larger fuel tank (5 gallons, up from 4.5) round out the street-oriented sportbike package.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review

The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 will be available in Metallic Triton Blue, Metallic Matte Mechanical Gray and Glass Sparkle Black. Pricing is TBD but bikes will arrive in dealerships in Fall 2021.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 Specs

Base Price: TBD
Website: suzukicycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse in-line four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 999cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm
Transmission: 6-speed, wet multi-plate assist clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 57.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Wet Weight: 472 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 Photo Gallery:

The post 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport | Video Review

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport video review
The 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport is an affordable, well-round, street-focused adventure bike with a price that starts at $11,995. (Photo by Kevin Wing)

We test the 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport, a street-focused adventure bike with an MSRP of $11,995. It’s powered by the same liquid-cooled 888cc in-line triple as the Tiger 900 models, but it has been detuned to 82 horsepower at 8,400 rpm and 58 lb-ft of torque at 6,700 rpm at the rear wheel, as measured on Jett Tuning‘s dyno, which is about 10 horsepower lower.

To keep the price down, Triumph also reduced the number of ride modes to two (Road and Rain) and limited suspension adjustability to rear preload. But this is no bargain-bin special. It has Marzocchi suspension front and rear, and it has Brembo brakes, with Stylema front calipers and a radial front master cylinder. ABS is standard but not switchable, and traction control is also standard but is switchable.

Overall we found the 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport to be a solid, all-around street bike that delivers good features and a great riding experience for the money. Check out our video review:

The post 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport | Video Review

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport video review
The 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport is an affordable, well-round, street-focused adventure bike with a price that starts at $11,995. (Photo by Kevin Wing)

We test the 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport, a street-focused adventure bike with an MSRP of $11,995. It’s powered by the same liquid-cooled 888cc in-line triple as the Tiger 900 models, but it has been detuned to 82 horsepower at 8,400 rpm and 58 lb-ft of torque at 6,700 rpm at the rear wheel, as measured on Jett Tuning‘s dyno, which is about 10 horsepower lower.

To keep the price down, Triumph also reduced the number of ride modes to two (Road and Rain) and limited suspension adjustability to rear preload. But this is no bargain-bin special. It has Marzocchi suspension front and rear, and it has Brembo brakes, with Stylema front calipers and a radial front master cylinder. ABS is standard but not switchable, and traction control is also standard but is switchable.

Overall we found the 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport to be a solid, all-around street bike that delivers good features and a great riding experience for the money. Check out our video review:

The post 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport | Video Review

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport video review
The 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport is an affordable, well-round, street-focused adventure bike with a price that starts at $11,995. (Photo by Kevin Wing)

We test the 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport, a street-focused adventure bike with an MSRP of $11,995. It’s powered by the same liquid-cooled 888cc in-line triple as the Tiger 900 models, but it has been detuned to 82 horsepower at 8,400 rpm and 58 lb-ft of torque at 6,700 rpm at the rear wheel, as measured on Jett Tuning‘s dyno, which is about 10 horsepower lower.

To keep the price down, Triumph also reduced the number of ride modes to two (Road and Rain) and limited suspension adjustability to rear preload. But this is no bargain-bin special. It has Marzocchi suspension front and rear, and it has Brembo brakes, with Stylema front calipers and a radial front master cylinder. ABS is standard but not switchable, and traction control is also standard but is switchable.

Overall we found the 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport to be a solid, all-around street bike that delivers good features and a great riding experience for the money. Check out our video review:

The post 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special | Top 10 Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
Riding the 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan American 1250 Special in California’s Mojave Desert. (Photos by Brian J. Nelson & Kevin Wing)

We just spent two days in the Sierra Nevada mountains and Mojave Desert of California testing the all-new 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special. Over the course of two days, we rode about 350 miles on highways, twisting mountain roads and off-road trails that included gravel, sand, rocks and tricky climbs and descents. In one shot, Harley-Davidson not only built its first adventure bike, it also built its first sportbike and sport-touring bike. We’ll have a full review soon, but for now we’re sharing our top 10 highlights.

1. Revolution Max 1250 V-twin

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review Revolution Max engine V-twin
Cut-away view of the Revolution Max 1250 V-twin (Photo courtesy of Harley-Davidson)

Harley-Davidson’s base-model Pan America 1250 and up-spec Pan America 1250 Special (we only rode the latter) are powered by a brand-new engine called the Revolution Max 1250. It’s a liquid-cooled 1,252cc 60-degree V-twin with DOHC, four valves per cylinder, variable valve timing, a 13.0:1 compression ratio and hydraulic valve lash adjusters. Harley-Davidson claims that it makes 150 horsepower at 9,000 rpm and 94 lb-ft of torque at 6,750 rpm and redlines at 9,500 rpm. It packs serious performance and sounds fantastic, delivering generous, tractable power throughout the rev range. And multiple riding modes adjust power output and throttle delivery.

2. Semi-active Suspension with Adaptive Ride Height

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review adaptive ride height
The Adaptive Ride Height option on the Pan America 1250 Special can lower ride (and seat) height by 1 to 2 inches when the motorcycle comes to a stop.

The Pan America 1250 Special is equipped with top-shelf Showa suspension — a 47mm USD Balance Free Fork (BFF) and a Balanced Free Rear Cushion-lite (BFRC) shock, with 7.5 inches of travel front and rear. The suspension offers semi-active electronic adjustment that adjusts damping based on the selected ride mode, and it automatically adjusts preload to provide 30% sag regardless of the load. But the real game-changer is Adaptive Ride Height (a $1,000 factory option), which automatically lowers ride height by 1 to 2 inches when the motorcycle comes to a stop (the amount of ride height adjustment depends on preload). The system works seamlessly and is virtually undetectably, and it makes a huge difference in effective seat height, which is one of the biggest obstacles for some riders to overcome when considering an adventure bike.

4. Ride Modes

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review ride modes
A full-color touchscreen TFT display shows all of the ride modes and other menu options.

Like nearly every high-spec adventure bike, the Pan America 1250 Special is outfitted with a full suite of electronic rider aids. It offers multiple ride modes — Sport, Road, Rain, Off-Road, Off-Road Plus, Custom Off-Road Plus, Custom A and Custom B — which automatically adjust the engine map (power output), throttle response, engine braking, traction control, ABS, suspension damping and, optionally, Adaptive Ride Height. IMU-enabled “cornering enhanced” linked ABS and traction control are available in most modes, but the cornering function and rear ABS are disabled in certain Off-Road modes. Drag-Torque Slip Control, which is like traction control for the engine to manage rear-wheel traction during aggressive riding, as well as cruise control and hill hold control are also part of the package. Everything works well and the different modes have a big impact on the riding character of the bike.

5. Brembo, Showa and Öhlins

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
Up front, dual Brembo radial 4-piston calipers squeeze 320mm rotors.

Adventure riders who buy top-level motorcycles expect the best components and latest-and-greatest technology. On many Harley-Davidson motorcycles, component suppliers are not identified, and brake calipers may be branded with a bar-and-shield logo. But the manufacturer of certain components matters to discerning customers, so Harley-Davidson made a smart decision and spec’d the Pan America 1250 Special with Brembo brakes, Showa suspension and an Öhlins steering damper. And all of the components performed to a high level in a wide range of riding conditions.

3. Wheels and Tires

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review spoked wheels brembo brake
Shown are the accessory side-laced tubeless wheels and accessory Michelin Anakee Wild tires.

Standard equipment on both the Pan America 1250 and Pan America 1250 Special includes cast aluminum wheels with a 19-inch front and a 17-inch rear, and they’re shod with specially designed Michelin Scorcher Adventure 90/10 tires. The larger front wheel is good for rolling over obstacles off-road but it does slow down steering somewhat relative to a 17-inch front wheel. The Scorcher Adventure tires offer good grip and handling on the street and they performed well for light off-road riding. We also tested the accessory side-laced tubeless wheels and accessory Michelin Anakee Wild tires, which give up some confidence and grip on pavement, but are excellent off-road tires, even at the higher “street” temperatures we were running. Harley-Davidson did its full range of development testing on both types of wheels and tires to ensure they met performance goals in a wide range of conditions.

6. Chain Final Drive

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
For an adventure bike, chain final drive is the best choice for light weight, durability, minimal power loss and ability to be repaired in the field.

Harley-Davidson owners are accustomed to maintenance-free belt final drive, and in street-only riding conditions such a system works extremely well. But when off-road riding is involved, rocks and other debris can get wedged between the rear sprocket and the belt, causing damage that can lead to a belt failure. Although chain final drive requires some maintenance in terms of lubrication, adjustment and occasional replacement, it is the best solution in terms of weight, durability, minimal power loss and field repair. That’s why everything from dirt bikes to race bikes use chain final drive.

7. Chassis

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
Though mostly hidden behind bodywork, the Pan America 1250’s frame components attach to the Revolution Max engine.

To save weight, the Revolution Max 1250 engine is a stressed member of the chassis. Attached to the engine is a front frame element to connect the steering head, an aluminum midframe element behind the engine that is the attachment point for the cast aluminum swingarm and rear shock, and a steel tail section (subframe) that supports the weight of the rider, passenger and luggage/cargo. Overall the chassis is very stiff and robust, which contributes to the Pan America 1250 Special’s neutral, confident handling. Wheelbase is 62.2 inches, rake is 25 degrees and trail is 4.3 inches.

8. Adjustable Windscreen, Adjustable Seat Height and Adaptive Headlight

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
An adjustable windscreen and hand guards provide good wind protection, and the Daymaker Signature LED headlight and Daymaker Adaptive LED headlight illuminate the road.

Adventure touring motorcycles are built to go long distances. They have upright seating positions with wide handlebars, and they have fuel capacities to go 200-plus miles between fill-ups (the Pan America has a 5.6-gallon fuel tank and an EPA-tested 46 mpg, which translates into 258 miles of range). The Pan America 1250 Special has a windscreen that is adjustable on the fly over a 1.8-inch range. Its rider seat has two positions — low (33.5 inches) and high (34.5) inches — and there are accessory low (32.5/33.5 inches) and high (34.5/35.5 inches) seats. As described above, Adaptive Ride Height can lower the rider’s seat height by an additional 1 to 2 inches. And above the Daymaker Signature LED headlight, which uses 30 LED elements behind a diffuser lense, the Pan America 1250 Special has a Daymaker Adaptive LED headlight that illuminates a series of three lights as lean angle reaches 8, 15 and 23 degrees.

9. It Rips!

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
With a 150-horsepower engine, a solid chassis and 42 degrees of available lean angle, the Pan America 1250 is at home in the canyons at a sporting pace.

Harley-Davidson has done its homework. It knows it is entering a very competitive segment with highly evolved adventure bikes from BMW, Ducati, KTM, Triumph, Yamaha and others. The Pan America 1250 is a high-profile motorcycle, not just within the adventure segment, but within the motorcycle industry at large. Can Harley-Davidson, a company known for its cruisers and touring bikes, build a competitive adventure bike? The answer is yes. On the road and off the pavement, the Pan America 1250 delivered an exhilarating, confident riding experience.

10. It Can Fly!

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
We found the perfect launch pad for the Pan America 1250 Special at Trona Pinnacles, a weird collection of rock formations that has been the backdrop for many movies.

Claimed wet weight for the Pan America 1250 Special is 559 pounds. The accessory side-laced wheels and beefier skid plate add more weight. But when we found a gully that had a tabletop hill on one side, we couldn’t resist jumping the Pan America. We aired it out time and again, and the semi-active suspension provided a plush landing with no bottoming and no harsh rebound or kickback. Nothing broke. This is a solidly engineered motorcycle that has gone through extensive durability testing, about half of which was done off-road, and it took a licking and kept on ticking. No, most customers will not jump their Pan America 1250s, but if they wanted to, they certainly could!

Greg’s Gear:
Helmet: Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular
Jacket/Pants: Fly Racing Terra Trek
Gloves: Fly Racing Coolpro
Boots: Fly Racing FR5
Knee/Shin Guards: Fly Racing 5 Pivot

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Specs

Base Price: $19,999
Website: harley-davidson.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 60-degree V-twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,252cc
Bore x Stroke: 105 x 72mm
Horsepower: 150 @ 9,000 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 94 lb-ft @ 6,750 rpm (claimed)
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated assist-and-slipper clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 62.2 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 33.5/34.5 in.
Wet Weight: 559 lbs. (claimed, no accessories/options)
Fuel Capacity: 5.6 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 46 mpg (EPA)

The post 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special | Top 10 Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special | Top 10 Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
Riding the 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan American 1250 Special in California’s Mojave Desert. (Photos by Brian J. Nelson & Kevin Wing)

We just spent two days in the Sierra Nevada mountains and Mojave Desert of California testing the all-new 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special. Over the course of two days, we rode about 350 miles on highways, twisting mountain roads and off-road trails that included gravel, sand, rocks and tricky climbs and descents. In one shot, Harley-Davidson not only built its first adventure bike, it also built its first sportbike and sport-touring bike. We’ll have a full review soon, but for now we’re sharing our top 10 highlights.

1. Revolution Max 1250 V-twin

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review Revolution Max engine V-twin
Cut-away view of the Revolution Max 1250 V-twin (Photo courtesy of Harley-Davidson)

Harley-Davidson’s base-model Pan America 1250 and up-spec Pan America 1250 Special (we only rode the latter) are powered by a brand-new engine called the Revolution Max 1250. It’s a liquid-cooled 1,252cc 60-degree V-twin with DOHC, four valves per cylinder, variable valve timing, a 13.0:1 compression ratio and hydraulic valve lash adjusters. Harley-Davidson claims that it makes 150 horsepower at 9,000 rpm and 94 lb-ft of torque at 6,750 rpm and redlines at 9,500 rpm. It packs serious performance and sounds fantastic, delivering generous, tractable power throughout the rev range. And multiple riding modes adjust power output and throttle delivery.

2. Semi-active Suspension with Adaptive Ride Height

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review adaptive ride height
The Adaptive Ride Height option on the Pan America 1250 Special can lower ride (and seat) height by 1 to 2 inches when the motorcycle comes to a stop.

The Pan America 1250 Special is equipped with top-shelf Showa suspension — a 47mm USD Balance Free Fork (BFF) and a Balanced Free Rear Cushion-lite (BFRC) shock, with 7.5 inches of travel front and rear. The suspension offers semi-active electronic adjustment that adjusts damping based on the selected ride mode, and it automatically adjusts preload to provide 30% sag regardless of the load. But the real game-changer is Adaptive Ride Height (a $1,000 factory option), which automatically lowers ride height by 1 to 2 inches when the motorcycle comes to a stop (the amount of ride height adjustment depends on preload). The system works seamlessly and is virtually undetectably, and it makes a huge difference in effective seat height, which is one of the biggest obstacles for some riders to overcome when considering an adventure bike.

4. Ride Modes

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review ride modes
A full-color touchscreen TFT display shows all of the ride modes and other menu options.

Like nearly every high-spec adventure bike, the Pan America 1250 Special is outfitted with a full suite of electronic rider aids. It offers multiple ride modes — Sport, Road, Rain, Off-Road, Off-Road Plus, Custom Off-Road Plus, Custom A and Custom B — which automatically adjust the engine map (power output), throttle response, engine braking, traction control, ABS, suspension damping and, optionally, Adaptive Ride Height. IMU-enabled “cornering enhanced” linked ABS and traction control are available in most modes, but the cornering function and rear ABS are disabled in certain Off-Road modes. Drag-Torque Slip Control, which is like traction control for the engine to manage rear-wheel traction during aggressive riding, as well as cruise control and hill hold control are also part of the package. Everything works well and the different modes have a big impact on the riding character of the bike.

5. Brembo, Showa and Öhlins

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
Up front, dual Brembo radial 4-piston calipers squeeze 320mm rotors.

Adventure riders who buy top-level motorcycles expect the best components and latest-and-greatest technology. On many Harley-Davidson motorcycles, component suppliers are not identified, and brake calipers may be branded with a bar-and-shield logo. But the manufacturer of certain components matters to discerning customers, so Harley-Davidson made a smart decision and spec’d the Pan America 1250 Special with Brembo brakes, Showa suspension and an Öhlins steering damper. And all of the components performed to a high level in a wide range of riding conditions.

3. Wheels and Tires

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review spoked wheels brembo brake
Shown are the accessory side-laced tubeless wheels and accessory Michelin Anakee Wild tires.

Standard equipment on both the Pan America 1250 and Pan America 1250 Special includes cast aluminum wheels with a 19-inch front and a 17-inch rear, and they’re shod with specially designed Michelin Scorcher Adventure 90/10 tires. The larger front wheel is good for rolling over obstacles off-road but it does slow down steering somewhat relative to a 17-inch front wheel. The Scorcher Adventure tires offer good grip and handling on the street and they performed well for light off-road riding. We also tested the accessory side-laced tubeless wheels and accessory Michelin Anakee Wild tires, which give up some confidence and grip on pavement, but are excellent off-road tires, even at the higher “street” temperatures we were running. Harley-Davidson did its full range of development testing on both types of wheels and tires to ensure they met performance goals in a wide range of conditions.

6. Chain Final Drive

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
For an adventure bike, chain final drive is the best choice for light weight, durability, minimal power loss and ability to be repaired in the field.

Harley-Davidson owners are accustomed to maintenance-free belt final drive, and in street-only riding conditions such a system works extremely well. But when off-road riding is involved, rocks and other debris can get wedged between the rear sprocket and the belt, causing damage that can lead to a belt failure. Although chain final drive requires some maintenance in terms of lubrication, adjustment and occasional replacement, it is the best solution in terms of weight, durability, minimal power loss and field repair. That’s why everything from dirt bikes to race bikes use chain final drive.

7. Chassis

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
Though mostly hidden behind bodywork, the Pan America 1250’s frame components attach to the Revolution Max engine.

To save weight, the Revolution Max 1250 engine is a stressed member of the chassis. Attached to the engine is a front frame element to connect the steering head, an aluminum midframe element behind the engine that is the attachment point for the cast aluminum swingarm and rear shock, and a steel tail section (subframe) that supports the weight of the rider, passenger and luggage/cargo. Overall the chassis is very stiff and robust, which contributes to the Pan America 1250 Special’s neutral, confident handling. Wheelbase is 62.2 inches, rake is 25 degrees and trail is 4.3 inches.

8. Adjustable Windscreen, Adjustable Seat Height and Adaptive Headlight

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
An adjustable windscreen and hand guards provide good wind protection, and the Daymaker Signature LED headlight and Daymaker Adaptive LED headlight illuminate the road.

Adventure touring motorcycles are built to go long distances. They have upright seating positions with wide handlebars, and they have fuel capacities to go 200-plus miles between fill-ups (the Pan America has a 5.6-gallon fuel tank and an EPA-tested 46 mpg, which translates into 258 miles of range). The Pan America 1250 Special has a windscreen that is adjustable on the fly over a 1.8-inch range. Its rider seat has two positions — low (33.5 inches) and high (34.5) inches — and there are accessory low (32.5/33.5 inches) and high (34.5/35.5 inches) seats. As described above, Adaptive Ride Height can lower the rider’s seat height by an additional 1 to 2 inches. And above the Daymaker Signature LED headlight, which uses 30 LED elements behind a diffuser lense, the Pan America 1250 Special has a Daymaker Adaptive LED headlight that illuminates a series of three lights as lean angle reaches 8, 15 and 23 degrees.

9. It Rips!

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
With a 150-horsepower engine, a solid chassis and 42 degrees of available lean angle, the Pan America 1250 is at home in the canyons at a sporting pace.

Harley-Davidson has done its homework. It knows it is entering a very competitive segment with highly evolved adventure bikes from BMW, Ducati, KTM, Triumph, Yamaha and others. The Pan America 1250 is a high-profile motorcycle, not just within the adventure segment, but within the motorcycle industry at large. Can Harley-Davidson, a company known for its cruisers and touring bikes, build a competitive adventure bike? The answer is yes. On the road and off the pavement, the Pan America 1250 delivered an exhilarating, confident riding experience.

10. It Can Fly!

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
We found the perfect launch pad for the Pan America 1250 Special at Trona Pinnacles, a weird collection of rock formations that has been the backdrop for many movies.

Claimed wet weight for the Pan America 1250 Special is 559 pounds. The accessory side-laced wheels and beefier skid plate add more weight. But when we found a gully that had a tabletop hill on one side, we couldn’t resist jumping the Pan America. We aired it out time and again, and the semi-active suspension provided a plush landing with no bottoming and no harsh rebound or kickback. Nothing broke. This is a solidly engineered motorcycle that has gone through extensive durability testing, about half of which was done off-road, and it took a licking and kept on ticking. No, most customers will not jump their Pan America 1250s, but if they wanted to, they certainly could!

Greg’s Gear:
Helmet: Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular
Jacket/Pants: Fly Racing Terra Trek
Gloves: Fly Racing Coolpro
Boots: Fly Racing FR5
Knee/Shin Guards: Fly Racing 5 Pivot

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Specs

Base Price: $19,999
Website: harley-davidson.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 60-degree V-twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,252cc
Bore x Stroke: 105 x 72mm
Horsepower: 150 @ 9,000 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 94 lb-ft @ 6,750 rpm (claimed)
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated assist-and-slipper clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 62.2 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 33.5/34.5 in.
Wet Weight: 559 lbs. (claimed, no accessories/options)
Fuel Capacity: 5.6 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 46 mpg (EPA)

The post 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special | Top 10 Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com