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Indian Announces 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Challenger Dark Horse

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Indian Motorcycle, America’s first motorcycle company, and Jack Daniel’s, America’s first registered distillery, along with Klock Werks Kustom Cycles, have partnered to create the 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse. Marking the sixth year of the partnership and limited-edition series, the latest model draws inspiration from Jack Daniel’s renowned Tennessee Rye whiskey.

RELATED: Indian Challenger, Rider’s 2020 Motorcycle of the Year

With only 107 available globally, the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse makes a one-of-a-kind statement. Its custom Rye Metallic paint with gold and green accents nod to the high-touch crafting process of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Rye whiskey, while the bike’s premium amenities and state-of-the-art technology deliver unmatched comfort and performance.

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

2022 Indian Challenger | Road Test Review

“We’re proud to continue this unique partnership with Jack Daniel’s and Klock Werks – two respected brands with whom we share the age-old American ethos of uncompromising quality and craftsmanship,” said Aaron Jax, Vice President for Indian Motorcycle. “The Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse takes our award-winning bagger to an even higher level, representing the highest levels of premium technology and craftsmanship – just as Jack Daniel’s has done with its Tennessee Rye whiskey.”

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

With custom-inspired style and technology at the forefront, key features for the 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse include the following:

Bold, Exclusive Design
The attention to detail and spirit of innovation that has made Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Rye whiskey a bold, unique success has been imparted throughout the design of the limited-edition motorcycle. Along with its custom paint, the motorcycle features a numbered Jack Daniel’s Montana Silversmiths badge, custom engraved rider and passenger floorboards, and a genuine leather, Jack Daniel’s custom-stitched seat.

Premium Amenities & Technology
Premium features aboard the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse, include a Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight and Pathfinder S LED Driving Lights, electronically adjustable rear suspension preload, Powerband Audio, a stylish flared windscreen, low-rise handlebar, and more.

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight and Pathfinder S LED Driving Lights
The adaptive headlight from Indian Motorcycle senses the bike’s lean angle and activates individual LED projector beams to provide unprecedented visibility. With 15 individual LED lenses that adjust in real-time to bike lean angle, patent pending technology, and the industry’s first adaptive high-beam feature, the Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight delivers unparalleled illumination of the road ahead – whether upright and traveling in a straight line or leaned over to carve a turn.

Fox Electronically Adjustable Rear Suspension Preload
The Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse has Fox electronically adjustable rear suspension preload which allows riders to adjust their rear suspension preload from the convenience of their infotainment system. To do this, riders will select if there’s a passenger and simply enter the approximate weight of what is being carried on the motorcycle. The electronically adjustable rear suspension preload handles the rest and sets the preload for optimal riding and handling. 

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Powerband Audio
Loud and clear. The Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse features the premier Indian Motorcycle sound system, Powerband Audio. With upgraded fairing speakers and added saddlebag speakers, Powerband Audio is up to 50% louder than stock audio.

Ride Command
Riders will also receive the luxuries of the Indian Motorcycle industry-leading seven-inch display powered by Ride Command with Apple CarPlay, which delivers an easier, more customized level of control for music, navigation preferences, and mobile device information. In addition, Ride Command provides riders with traffic and weather overlays, key vehicle information, and extensive customization capabilities.

PowerPlus Liquid-Cooled V-Twin
Featuring the liquid- cooled, 108-cubic-inch PowerPlus engine, the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse delivers a class-leading 122 horsepower and 128 lb-ft of torque.

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Riders looking to add custom style and improve sound can add a PowerPlus Stage 1 Air Intake with the Indian Motorcycle Stage 1 Oval Slip-On Muffler Kit. To unleash 10% more horsepower and 3% more torque, riders can upgrade to the Indian Motorcycle PowerPlus Stage 2 Performance Cams.

“Just as the Indian Challenger breaks the mold for American baggers, so does our Tennessee Rye for American whiskey with its unique distilling process and bold finish,” said Greg Luehrs, sponsorships and partnerships director for Jack Daniel’s. “This year’s bike perfectly embodies what our rye is all about – innovation and a relentless, uncompromising drive to craft American products of the highest quality.”

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Each Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse will come with a custom, co-branded bike mat with the corresponding motorcycle number (#001-#107).

Starting at $36,999, the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse is exclusively available through Indian Motorcycle dealerships. The order window opens on October 21, 2021, at 12:00 p.m. EST, and will close once all bikes are sold. Each Indian Motorcycle dealer will have a chance to place orders during the window and will then contact the lucky buyers when the order has been confirmed. To ensure the rider is in contention for a purchase, each customer needs to fill out the form on IndianMotorcycle.com and contact their Indian Motorcycle dealership. Each bike will be built as a model year 2022 with delivery starting October 2021.

The post Indian Announces 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Challenger Dark Horse first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review
The 2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE takes its styling cues from Kawasaki’s original naked 900, the Z1.

Kawasaki has announced a new “SE” version of its retro-styled Z900RS for 2022, which features upgraded suspension and brakes. Up front are new radial-mount monoblock Brembo M4.32 calipers and new settings for the fully adjustable inverted fork, which now sports gold legs. Out back is a new fully adjustable Öhlins S46 rear shock with a remote preload adjuster.

Also new on the 2022 Kawasaki Z900RS is a new “Yellow Ball” color scheme, with Metallic Diablo Black paint, yellow highlights on the teardrop tank and rear fender, and fetching gold wheels.

Read our Kawasaki Z900RS vs Honda CB1000R vs Suzuki Katana comparison review

At the heart of the Z900RS SE is a liquid-cooled, 948cc, 16-valve, inline-Four, which made 100 horsepower at 8,500 rpm and 67.5 lb-ft of torque at 6,700 rpm at the rear wheel in our 2020 comparison test. This lightweight and compact engine spools up quickly and delivers solid and smooth performance when pushed but is versatile enough to be ridden in traffic with ease. The high-tensile steel trellis frame has received revisions at the swingarm pivot point, which is now stronger.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

A fully adjustable 41mm inverted fork offers 10 clicks of compression adjustment, 12 clicks of rebound adjustment, and a stepless preload adjuster. At the rear, the RS is fitted with a horizontal backlink Öhlins S46 shock with a remote preload adjuster. The shock is linked to an extruded lightweight aluminum swingarm to maximize handling, with the linkage placed atop the swingarm helps to centralize the weight.

Braking is provided by a pair of radial-mount monoblock Brembo 4-piston M4.32 front calipers squeezing 300mm petal discs with a Nissin radial-pump master cylinder. Out back, a 2-piston caliper squeezes a 250mm petal disc. ABS and stainless-steel braided lines are standard.

In keeping with the classic styling, the Z900RS SE is equipped with cast flat spoke wheels, finished in gold, to resemble traditional wire-spoked wheels. Dunlop GPR-300 tires further add to the retro credentials.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review
2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

The Z900RS SE features a large-diameter round LED headlight with a convex lens and chrome ring, adding to the retro look without compromising on lighting. LEDs have replaced all the lights except for the turnsignals. A dual-dial analog instrument cluster is coupled with a multi-function LCD screen for retro-style with modern functionality. The LCD features white letters on a black background and includes a gear position indicator.

Much like the sporty bikes of the ’70s, the Z900RS SE has a relaxed, upright riding position. A wide flat handlebar means the grips are 30mm wider, 65mm higher, and 35mm closer to the rider compared to the sportier Z900, partly thanks to the raised upper-triple clamp. The footpegs are also 20mm lower and 20mm farther forward, enhancing the relaxed riding position. Rubber-mounted bar ends help dampen vibrations in the bars, and both the clutch and brake levers are 5-way adjustable to help accommodate a wide variety of hand sizes.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

The slim fuel tank is narrow at the rear, which allows for easy knee gripping. A low seat height, combined with a slim design, adds to the rider’s ability to place both feet on the ground when stopped.

A full range of Kawasaki accessories is available to give owners the option to add to the motorcycle’s iconic, old-school feel, including a tank emblem set, black, gold, or silver oil filler caps, front axle slider, tank pad, frame slider set, center stand, passenger grab bar and more.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE Specs

Base Price: $13,449
Website: kawasaki.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 948cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 56.0 mm
Horsepower: 100 @ 8,500 rpm (2020 Z900, rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 67.5 lb-ft @ 6,700 rpm (2020 Z900, rear-wheel dyno)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 57.9 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 32.9 in.
Wet Weight: 474 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gals.

The post 2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro | First Look Review

2022 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro review

Fifty years ago, Ducati introduced its first air-cooled twin-cylinder engine, on the 1971 Ducati 750 GT. The new 2022 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro pays homage to this milestone with special livery and a 1,079cc air-cooled L-Twin that makes a claimed 86 horsepower at 7,500 rpm and 66.5 lb-ft of torque at 4,750 rpm.

RELATED: 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

The Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro wears striking “Giallo Ocra” yellow paint, which was used on the 1972 450 Desmo Mono and 750 Sport. The sides of the fuel tank feature the iconic 1970s-era Ducati logo that was designed by Giugiaro, and the same font is used to spell “Scrambler” on the top of the tank. Other styling details include black spoked wheels, round mirrors, and a brown seat with special stitching.

2022 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro review

Though honoring the past, the Tribute edition has the modern features found in Ducati’s Scrambler 1100 Pro line, including three riding modes, multi-level traction control, cornering ABS, a headlight with a distinctive LED ring, and the Ducati Multimedia System. There’s a USB socket for mobile phone charging under the seat.

The 2022 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro has a steel trellis frame, an aluminum subframe, a cast aluminum swingarm, and spoked wheels (18-inch front, 17-inch rear) shod with Pirelli MT60 RS tires. Suspension includes a fully adjustable 45mm inverted Marzocchi fork and an adjustable Kayaba shock with a progressive linkage. The front brakes are radial-mount monoblock Brembo M4.32 calipers squeezing 320mm discs.

Pricing starts at $13,995.

2022 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro review

2022 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro

Base Price: $13,995
Website: ducati.com
Engine Type: Air/oil-cooled, transverse 90-degree L-Twin, desmodromic DOHC w/ 2 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,079cc
Bore x Stroke: 98.0 x 71.0mm
Horsepower: 86 horsepower @ 7,500 rpm
Torque: 66.5 lb-ft @ 4,750 rpm
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 59.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.5 degrees/4.4 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Wet Weight: 465 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 4.0 gals.

The post 2022 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki KLX230S | First Look Review

2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The 2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S, shown here in the ABS and Olive Green/Ebony color options.

The 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S is still a durable, simple dual-sport, but now you don’t have to be a giant to get your boots on the ground.

Designed to appeal to novice riders on a budget or experienced riders looking for a lightweight, dual-sport machine, Kawasaki first released the KLX230 in 2020, and in most aspects, it lived up to its design goals. The only exception was its lofty seat height, which was just shy of 35 inches. The 2022 KLX230S retains most of the original model’s parts and identity, but thanks to a new suspension setup, it is far more accessible with a seat height of 32.7 inches.

Watch our video review of the 2021 Kawasaki KLX300

The 230’s softly sprung front fork has been shortened by a total of 2.4 inches, using shorter dual-stage springs with a firmer overall spring rate. The shorter fork on the 230S still provides a respectable 6.2 inches of travel and should reduce front-end dive during firm braking. A revised rear shock, also shorter with a stiffer spring rate provides 6.6 (down from 8.8) inches of travel that Kawasaki says improves handling and bump absorption.

2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The Base and ABS models are available in Kawasaki’s classic Lime Green.

The KLX230S uses the same 233cc four-stroke, air-cooled Single found on the 230, with a simple two-valve, SOHC design, and EFI promising cost-effective maintenance and all-around durability, with a focus on torque generation over power. A close-ratio, 6-speed transmission should handle most trails but still enable the 230S to cruise at a reasonable pace on open roads.

Kawasaki designed the high-tensile steel perimeter frame around the engine, which allowed it to be mounted lower in the chassis to deliver a low center-of-gravity, coupled with a short 53.5-inch wheelbase. The KLX230S should be an easy, nimble bike to ride.

Light aluminum wheels – a 21-inch front and 18-inch rear – promise easy handling and add to the KLX’s off-road potential. Single petal disc brakes measure 240mm at the front, gripped by a 2-piston caliper, and 220mm with a 1-piston caliper at the rear. Optional, factory-fitted ABS is tuned for dual-sport riding.

The new KLX230S benefits from a new suspension setup, reducing seat height to a far more accessible 32.7 inches.

The 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S is fitted with a 1.9-gallon fuel tank and should keep this sipper on the move for as long as you might reasonably expect, although the simple instrument dash also includes a low-fuel warning lamp. The new KLX230S is available in Lime Green with an MSRP of $4,799, while the ABS is available in the Lime and in an Urban Olive Green/Ebony color option, with an MSRP of $5,099.

For more information, visit kawasaki.com

2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S, shown here in the ABS and Olive Green/Ebony color options.
2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The base and ABS models are available in Kawasaki’s classic Lime Green.

The post 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Video Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT video review
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT in Liquid Metal (Photo by Joseph Agustin)

We test the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, which won Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year award. It’s a fully featured sport-tourer powered by an 890cc inline-Triple that makes 108 horsepower at 10,000 rpm and 63 lb-ft of torque at 7,200 rpm at the rear wheel. MSRP is $14,899.

For 2021, the new Tracer 9 GT gets the larger crossplane Triple from the MT-09, which is lighter, more fuel efficient, and more powerful. An all-new aluminum frame is made using a controlled-fill diecast process that reduces mass and increases rigidity. A new aluminum swingarm is more rigid, and a new steel subframe increases load capacity and allows an accessory top trunk to be mounted along with the larger 30-liter saddlebags. New spinforged wheels reduce unsprung weight, and they’re shod with grippy Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires.

In addition to updated throttle response modes and all-new KYB semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT now has a 6-axis IMU that enables a suite of electronic rider aids adapted from the YZF-R1, including lean-angle-sensitive traction control, ABS, slide control, and lift control. It also has full LED lighting (including cornering lights) and a new dual-screen TFT display. The rider/passenger seats have been upgraded, and the rider’s ergonomics are adjustable.

Check out our video review:

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Specs

Base Price: $14,899
Website: yamahamotorsports.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 890cc
Horsepower: 108 @ 10,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 63 lb-ft @ 7,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Bore x Stroke: 78.0mm x 62.1mm
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 59.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.9/32.5 in.
Wet Weight: 503 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 48.7 mpg
Estimated Range: 243 miles

The post 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is an exciting, affordable addition to the middleweight sport-touring category.

Triumph has released an exciting new middleweight sport-tourer, the 2022 Tiger Sport 660. The new Tiger Sport will share the engine from the new Trident released earlier this year, and Triumph claims this is the first triple to make its way into the middleweight sport-touring segment.

Triumph sees the new model appealing to two groups of motorcyclists, newer riders moving up to a bigger bike, and veteran riders looking for a thrilling all-rounder. It says the new Tiger Sport has a narrow stand-over feel and the seat is on the low side at 32.8 inches, which should make it accessible to a broad range of riders in terms of height and experience.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Triumph hopes the new Tiger will attract rookie riders moving up to a first big bike and veteran riders looking for a thrilling all-rounder.

The 660cc triple-cylinder engine is designed to provide a broad torque band across a wide rev range and strong top-end horsepower.

The 660 Sport has a full-size windscreen that should be ideal for long-haul excursions, whereas the rest of the sleek design has a tall but sporty influence, including a stubby stainless-steel silencer. A slip/assist clutch should make for a slick work of the 6-speed gearbox and an up/down quickshifter is available as a factory option.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Sizable color-matched luggage and cast aluminum rack are optional.

Triumph says the 660 Sport has exceptional handling, and on paper at least, the bike appears to live up to the claim. The Sport is fitted with Showa’s lightweight 41mm separate function fork (SFF), where each fork leg performs a separate function, one side for damping and the other for spring, and at the rear, a Showa dual-rate monoshock is adjustable for preload. Claimed peak power is 80 horses at  8,750 rpm, 5% more than the V-Strom, and claimed peak torque is 47.2 lb-ft, on par with the Versys, and yet the Tiger Sport weighs 20 pounds less than either.

The Tiger Sport 660 has stats that promise sports performance, but the tall, adjustable screen, 4.7-gallon gas tank, integrated side case mounts, and pillion grab handles cater to riders looking to make longer excursions with or without a passenger. Side cases, with a combined capacity of 57 liters, and a 47-liter top box (and cast aluminum luggage rack) are available options and can be color-matched.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Integrated pillion grab-handles are fitted as standard, as are the mounts for attaching the optional side cases.

Braking is supplied by Nissin, 2-piston calipers on twin 310mm discs, with a single-piston rear caliper on a 255mm disc. Standard tires are Michelin Road 5, which promise versatility in riding conditions and styles. ABS is fitted as standard, and the brake lever is adjustable for reach.

Throttle-by-wire allows for two riding modes, Road and Rain, as well as switchable traction control. A small TFT color display is integrated into a larger LCD and shows all the key information, and allows for menu selections and connectivity. All-around LED lighting, self-canceling indicators, and key fob immobilizer are all standard.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
A small, color TFT is integrated into a larger LCD.
2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Integrated side-case mounts leave a clean look when not in use.

The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is available in three color schemes: Lucerne Blue & Sapphire Black, Graphite & Sapphire Black, or Korosi Red & Graphite (for an extra $125), which also comes with sporty graphics. The standard version has an MSRP of $9,295 and will be available in dealers starting in February 2022.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Specs

Base Price: $9,295
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, inline triple, DOHC w/ 4 vpc.
Displacement: 660cc
Bore x Stroke: 74 x 57.7mm
Horsepower: 80 hp @ 8,750 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Torque: 47.2 lb-ft @ 6,250 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain
Wheelbase: 55.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 23.7 degrees/3.8 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Wet Weight: 454 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gals.

The post 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa | Road Test Review

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
Now in its third generation, the Suzuki Hayabusa was thoroughly updated for 2022. We logged 1,700 miles on public roads and did a dyno test for this road test review. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Sometimes truth really is stranger than fiction. These days we’ve got three billionaires – Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson, and Elon Musk – trying to one-up each other in the space race. Ever the showman, Branson beat Bezos by a week in their personal quests to become space cowboys. If you want to book a galactic flight, a ticket could set you back a cool $250,000.

What a waste. You can reach hyperspace right here on Earth for less than a tenth as much. Just head down to your local Suzuki dealer and fork over $18,599 for a new Hayabusa. All you have to decide is which color you want your rocket to be.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa in Metallic Matte Sword Silver / Candy Daring Red

Our test bike is a gorgeous Metallic Matte Sword Silver with Candy Daring Red accents. The ’Busa also looks sharp in Glass Sparkle Black and Candy Burnt Gold, but you can’t go wrong with Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue either. Ah, the tyranny of choice!

TAKING FLIGHT

Yes, the Hayabusa, along with all other street-legal production motorcycles, has its top speed electronically limited to 186 mph (300 kph). But with some ingenuity – and money – you can go faster. Much faster.

Just ask Becci Ellis. Her husband Mike built a turbocharged Hayabusa, and she rode it to a world-record speed of 264.10 mph in 2014.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
For hypersport-touring on the Hayabusa, we added a Nelson-Rigg Commuter Tank Bag and Tail Bag.

Greg’s Gear
Helmet: Fly Racing Sentinel
Gloves: Fly Racing FL-2
Jacket/Pants: Olympia Airglide 6
Boots: Sidi Gavia Gore-Tex
Tailbag: Nelson-Rigg Commuter

Or Bill Warner. He’s a tropical fish farmer from Tampa, Florida, who rode a partially streamlined and turbocharged Hayabusa to a record-breaking 272.340 mph in the standing mile at Maxton AFB in 2010.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
California’s Highway 9 winds its way through towering coast redwoods near Santa Cruz.

For mere mortals riding on public roads, the Hayabusa’s speed cap is hardly oppressive. And it’s really no big deal that claimed peak horsepower for the third-gen 2022 model is lower than that of the previous model (188 vs. 194). Peak torque is lower too. What matters is the extra grunt in the midrange, which helps the new Hayabusa accelerate faster than ever.

HYPERSPORT-TOURING

Here at Rider, we gave up quarter-mile and top-speed testing a long time ago. It was just too logistically challenging, and on a bike like the Hayabusa, it would be dangerous and felonious without renting a drag strip. In thrust we trust, and on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno the big Suzook spun up the drum to the tune of 173 horsepower at 9,800 rpm and 106 lb-ft of torque at 6,900 rpm.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review dyno test

We specialize in motorcycle travel and adventure, so after Tom Montano’s first ride mostly on the track at Utah Motor-sports Campus, we wanted to find out how well the Hayabusa works out on the road, ridden until the low-fuel light comes on.

We logged nearly 1,700 miles for this test (including three 400-mile days) on city streets, on freeways ranging from wide open to rush-hour crowded, and on some of the best riding roads the Golden State has to offer. We burned nearly 44 gallons of premium fuel and averaged 38 mpg; the Hayabusa has a 5.3-gallon tank, so that works out to just over 201 miles of range. Our fuel economy was as high as 42 mpg on mellower jaunts, but it dropped as low as 31 mpg when we pushed hard in the twisties.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
Massive intake ducts are part of the Suzuki Ram Air Direct (SRAD) system, which pressurizes the airbox.

As a 582-pound sportbike, the Hayabusa isn’t what you’d call flickable. It’s well-composed, graceful even, and will go where you point it and hold a line dutifully. But effort is required when transitioning back and forth through a tight series of curves, like those on Highway 1 along the craggy Big Sur coast, on Skyline Boulevard along the ridge of the Santa Cruz Mountains, or on Highway 58 as it snakes over the Temblor Range. You have to earn it, and the big reward is lighting the wick on a long, arcing corner exit.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
Built in 1932, Bixby Bridge is north of Big Sur on California’s Highway 1.

With a perfectly balanced 1,340cc inline Four, the Hayabusa is remarkably smooth. In fact, it requires care to avoid slip-ping into triple-digit territory without realizing it. At 100 mph in top gear, the engine is spinning at just 5,200 rpm – or so I’m told (wink wink). It redlines at 11,000 rpm. Do the math.

When straight-lining on the freeway, I often used cruise control to avoid speed creep. The Hayabusa also has an adjustable speed limiter, which can be temporarily overridden to allow a quick pass. Both are part of the comprehensive, IMU-enabled electronics suite that was included in the Suzuki’s overhaul for 2022. There are six ride modes (three are preset and three are customizable) that adjust power, throttle response, engine braking, lean-angle-sensitive traction control, wheelie control, and the quickshifter. There’s also launch control, cornering ABS, front-to-rear linked brakes, rear-lift mitigation, hill-hold control, and Suzuki’s Easy Start and Low RPM Assist systems. The only thing missing is a tire-pressure monitor.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
When going over a rise, a quick flick of the wrist is all it takes to raise the Hayabusa’s front wheel. Suzuki’s 10-level anti-lift control keeps things in check.

As with state-of-the-art electronics on many motorcycles, they sound more complicated in theory than they are in practice. You can just start the bike and ride it without having to figure anything out, and many of the safety functions operate in the background, called upon only when needed. Changing the ride mode is as simple as pushing a button, and setting and adjusting cruise control is a no-brainer. Customizing the “user” ride modes takes a few extra steps, but even that isn’t difficult. The Hayabusa has a crisp, bright, easy-to-read TFT color display in the center of the dash, and it’s flanked by four analog gauges for road speed, engine speed, fuel level, and engine temperature, the latter two being smaller and having attractive gold bezels.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
The instrument panel pairs classic analog gauges with a TFT color display. Everything you need to know is right where you expect it to be.

STRUTTING ITS STUFF

From the gauges to the chrome-plated trailing edge of the fairing, the new Hayabusa is a work of art. Opinions are often mixed regarding its bulbous, aerodynamic shape, but there’s no denying that the bike looks fast even when standing still. A pair of massive ram-air ducts surround the stacked LED headlight. Turnsignals are integrated into the bodywork to reduce drag and visual clutter. Black panels between the bottom of the tank and the massive twin-spar frame are embossed with a pattern inspired by the neck feathers of the Hayabusa’s namesake, the peregrine falcon. That falcon is represented by the large kanji character on the fairing, which is also found atop the headlight shroud and on the TFT at start-up. At sunset, the Metallic Matte Sword Silver paint reflects the light so softly that the bodywork looks airbrushed.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
Our test bike’s Metallic Matte Sword Silver paint looks stunning during the magic hour. The Hayabusa kanji symbol, also found on the headlight shroud and TFT, is iconic.

For a long weekend trip up the coast to Sonoma Raceway for the Progressive IMS Outdoors show, I installed Nelson-Rigg’s Commuter tankbag and tailbag. With its stretched-out dimensions and wide, thick seat, the Hayabusa has a reasonably comfortable cockpit. Clip-on handlebars are mounted at the same level as the triple clamp, and after a while the weight on the rider’s wrists becomes tiresome. The bubble-style windscreen projects airflow at chest level, providing some support at speed. Cruise control was a blessing, and a set of bar risers would probably be transformative during long-distance jaunts.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
View of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge from Fort Baker.

To allow for generous cornering clearance, the Hayabusa has high footpegs. With a seat height of 31.5 inches, legroom is limited. I’m 6 feet tall with a 34-inch inseam, so there was a sharp bend in my middle-aged knees. Stopping often to take photos of the Hayabusa in scenic locations gave me a welcome excuse to stretch my legs.

While the Hayabusa’s ergonomics are not ideal for long days in the saddle, its creamy smooth engine transmits very little vibration to the rider, and its enormous boxy mufflers keep noise to a dull roar. When hard on the gas, the four-piece band plays a lively tune, but otherwise the Suzuki sounds relaxed and understressed.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
Low clip-ons, high footpegs, and a stretched-out cockpit are better suited for sport riding than long distances.

Big, powerful engines pump out lots of heat, and the Hayabusa’s 1,340cc mill is no exception. Its massive curved radiator was redesigned to reduce air resistance and increase air flow for better cooling efficiency. Below it is a second radiator that cools engine oil. Large exhaust vents between the side fairing panels pull hot air away from the engine and around the rider. Even on triple-digit days, the only time engine heat was noticeable was at a stop or riding in slow traffic.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
While unmistakably a Hayabusa from a distance, the new model’s bodywork and mirrors were redesigned to be even more aerodynamic. Overall, it looks more cohesive.

STRONG BONES

A robust chassis is necessary to harness enormous power. With architecture inspired by Suzuki’s MotoGP GSX-RR racebikes, the Hayabusa’s twin-spar aluminum frame and swingarm use both cast and extruded sections to optimize strength and tuned flex. The 1.5-pounds-lighter subframe is made of rectangular steel tubing to provide the strength needed to support a rider and passenger.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
Panels between the tank and frame are embossed to look like the neck feathers of a peregrine falcon.

The ’Busa’s fully adjustable KYB suspension is responsive and compliant, and it can be softened for comfort or stiffened for sport or track riding. Top-spec Brembo Stylema front calipers squeeze 320mm floating discs, and they provide excellent feel at the lever and hold-your-horses power. The combined braking system adds some rear brake when the front lever is pulled, which helps stabilize the chassis. Cast 17-inch wheels are wrapped in grippy Bridgestone Battlax Hypersport S22 rubber with a neutral profile that helps the Hayabusa turn in smoothly and hold its line.

FAST IS AS FAST DOES

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
When hypersport-touring on the Hayabusa, scenery tends to blur.

As modern as it is, the Hayabusa feels like a throwback. When you see the latest model parked, you know exactly what it is. It shares an unmistakable family resemblance with the original, paradigm-shifting GSX1300R that debuted more than two decades ago. The top-speed wars are over, brought to an end through diplomacy rather than supremacy (though the Haya-busa was the king when the OEMs laid down their swords).

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
One of the best riding roads in California – Highway 58 – has no services and is usually deserted.

The Hayabusa is not a sportbike intended for racing homologation. It’s a big, bold sportbike intended for speed and style, however you choose to interpret those terms. Some will lower it, add a turbo, and go drag racing or land-speed racing. Oth-ers will extend the swingarm, fit the fattest rear tire they can find, chrome and polish surfaces, and show it off at bike nights. Hayabusas will find their way to the track. Hayabusas will be pressed into duty for commuting, Sunday morning rides, or, as we did, hypersport-touring.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
The Hayabusa moves swiftly and confidently through curves with unshakable stability. Extra effort is required when the road tightens up.

Like the Honda Grom we recently tested, the Hayabusa is a cult bike that has spawned niches and subcultures, each with its own secret handshake. Nearly 200,000 of them have been sold since it was introduced in 1999. While much of the motorcycle market has become divided into ever smaller specialties and segments, the Hayabusa has remained faithful to its roots rather than chase trends. It evolved over time, and its extensive third-generation redesign brings it up to date without reinventing the wheel.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review best sportbike
For nearly a quarter century, the Hayabusa’s fundamental purpose has been to go fast. It does so like few other motorcycles.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa Specs

Base Price: $18,599
Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
Website: suzukicycles.com

ENGINE

Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,340cc
Bore x Stroke: 81.0 x 65.0mm
Compression Ratio: 12.5:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 15,000 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ throttle-by-wire, 43mm throttle bodies x 4
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.6 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain

CHASSIS

Frame: Twin-spar cast/extruded aluminum frame & swingarm
Wheelbase: 58.3 in.
Rake/Trail: 23 degrees/3.5 in.
Seat Height: 31.5 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm inverted fork, fully adj., 4.7 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, fully adj., 5.5 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm floating discs w/ radial 4-piston monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 260mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.50 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 6.00 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 190/50-ZR17
Wet Weight: 582 lbs.

PERFORMANCE

Horsepower: 173 @ 9,800 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 106 lb-ft @ 6,900 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 5.3 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 38 mpg
Estimated Range: 201.5 miles

The post 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS | First Look Review

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

Joining the larger Z900RS is the 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS, a retro-styled middleweight with a liquid-cooled, 649cc parallel-Twin and chassis derived from the Z650 naked sportbike. Its MSRP is $8,999.

Kawasaki says the engine produces 48.5 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm. It has a 180-degree crankshaft and a balancer shaft for smooth operation, and the 6-speed transmission has a slip/assist clutch. The engine also serves as stressed member of the tubular-steel trellis frame for added rigidity.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

Suspension is handled by a non-adjustable 41mm telescopic fork with 4.9 inches of travel and a preload-adjustable horizontal back-link shock with 5.1 inches of travel. A pair of 300mm front rotors are squeezed by 2-piston calipers, and a single 220mm rear rotor has a 1-piston caliper. Bosch 9.1M ABS is standard

The Z650RS rolls on 17-inch cast wheels shod with Dunlop Sportmax Roadsport 2 tires (120/70-ZR17 front, 160/60-ZR17 rear).

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

Comfortable, upright ergonomics include a wide, flat handlebar that’s positioned 2 inches higher and 1.2 inches closer to the rider than on the standard Z650. Seat height is a comfortable 31.5 inches, and it has a narrow design to make it easier to reach the ground. The brake and clutch levers are adjustable for reach.

Like the Z900RS, the Z650RS blends retro style with modern touches. The tank, seat, round headlight, and bullet-shaped analog gauges say old-school, but the LED lighting, central multifunction LCD info panel.

The 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS is available in Candy Emerald Green with gold wheels (our favorite!) or Metallic Moondust Gray/Ebony with black wheels. MSRP is $8,999.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS Specs

Base Price: $8,999
Website: kawasaki.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 649cc
Bore x Stroke: 83.0 x 60.0mm
Torque: 48.5 lb-ft @ 6,500 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 55.3 in.
Rake/Trail: 24 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 31.5 in.
Wet Weight: 412 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 4.0 gals.

The post 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 | First Look Review

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 review
The 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 replaces the Multistrada 950. It’s more powerful, lighter, and has a lower seat height, among other changes, and it’s offered in an up-spec S version.

Replacing the middleweight Multistrada 950 in Ducati’s adventure-bike lineup is the new-for-2022 Multistrada V2. It’s powered by a revised version of the 937cc Testastretta L-Twin, which makes a claimed 113 horsepower and 72 lb-ft of torque at the crank. Pricing for the 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 starts at $15,295 and for the up-spec 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S starts at $17,895.

Engine updates include new connecting rods, a new 8-disc hydraulically actuated slip/assist clutch, and a revised 6-speed transmission that Ducati stays delivers smoother shifting and makes it easier to find neutral. A quickshifter is optional on the Multistrada V2 and standard on the Multistrada V2 S.

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S review
2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S in Ducati Red

Rider-selectable electronics on the Multistrada V2 include four riding modes (Sport, Touring, Urban, and Enduro), the Ducati Safety Pack (Bosch cornering ABS with 3 levels, Ducati Traction C with 8 levels), and Vehicle Hold Control. The Multistrada V2 S adds semi-active electronic suspension with Ducati Skyhook Suspension (DSS) system, Ducati Quick Shift Up & Down (DQS), a full-LED headlight with Ducati Cornering Lights (DCL) system, and cruise control.

The Multistrada V2 has fully (manually) adjustable suspension, with a 48mm inverted KYB fork and a Sachs shock with a remote preload adjuster. Suspension travel is 6.7 inches front and rear on both the V2 and V2 S.

Ducati’s trademark tubular-steel trellis frame holds the Mulistrada V2 together, and it’s paired with a cast aluminum two-sided swingarm. The cast aluminum wheels, with a 19-inch front and 17-inch rear, are derived from the Multistrada V4 save 3.7 pounds of unsprung weight, and they’re shod with Pirelli Scorpion Trail II adventure tires.

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S review
2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S in Street Grey

The seat was revised to provide a flat area for easier fore and aft movement while also reducing seat height from 33.1 inches to 32.7 inches. Accessory high (33.5 inches) and low (31.9 inches) seats are available, and the low seat plus accessory low suspension kit reduces seat height to 31.1 inches. New footpegs borrowed from the Multistrada V4 are 10mm lower than those on the Multistrada 950 for extra legroom.

Changes to the engine, front brake discs, mirrors, and wheels on the Multistrada V2 reduce weight by 11 pounds compared to the outgoing Multistrada 950. Claimed wet weight is 489 pounds for the Multistrada V2 and 496 pounds for the Mulistrada V2 S.

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S review
The 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S has a 5-inch TFT color display.

The Multistrada V2 has LCD instrumentation while the Multistrada V2 S has a 5-inch TFT color display with a hands-free Bluetooth system. The V2 S also has backlist handlebar switches.

The 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 is available in Ducati Red with a gloss black frame and black rims, with a base price of $15,295. The 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S is available in Ducati Red with a black frame and black wheel rims with red tags, or in Street Grey with a black frame and “GP Red” wheel rims, with a base price of $17,895.

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S review
2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S in Ducati Red

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 / Multistrada V2 S Specs

Base Price: $15,295 (V2) / $17,895 (V2 S)
Website: ducati.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 90-degree L-twin, desmodromic DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 94.0 x 67.5mm
Displacement: 937cc
Horsepower: 113 hp @ 9,000 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Torque: 71 lb-ft @ 7,750 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet slip/assist clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 62.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.2 in.
Seat Height: 32.7 in.
Wet Weight: 489 lbs. / 496 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 5.3 gals.

The post 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 KTM 200 Duke, 390 Duke, 890 Duke, and 1290 Super Duke R | Comparison Review

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
KTM’s line of naked bikes has steadily evolved over the past 25 years. We assembled the latest lineup of Dukes (left to right: 200 Duke, 390 Duke, 890 Duke, and 1290 Super Duke R) for a side-by-side evaluation. Photos by Kevin Wing.

KTM rose to prominence with its competition-winning two-stroke dirtbikes, but in 1994 the Austrian manufacturer made its first foray into the four-stroke streetbike market with the 620 Duke. The original Duke arrived on the scene just as supermoto replicas were booming in popularity. The tall, powerful machines with wide bars, much like enduro bikes but running on 17-inch road tires, were a blast to ride. Packing 50 horses, the light and lithe 620 Duke was the most powerful thumper on the street at the time, earning it a hooligan reputation.  

KTM has come a long way since then, but the early Duke DNA – wide bars, a tall stance, and exhilarating power – carries over to the current lineup. Every model – 200 Duke, 390 Duke, 890 Duke (an R model is also available), and 1290 Super Duke R (shown left to right above) – is a naked bike with an upright seating position and a wide, flat seat, and most are versatile enough for urban riding, canyon carving, and even sport-touring. With styling by Kiska, they share bold, angular bodywork and typically favor KTM’s trademark orange on powdercoated frames and bodywork. The split headlight on the three largest Dukes also split the opinion of our test riders. 

What are the four Dukes like, and what sort of buyers will they appeal to? We rode them back-to-back to find out.

200 Duke: Scrappy Underdog 

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
Both the smaller Dukes possess thrilling riding characteristics that belie their diminutive displacements. The 200 has a highway-ready top speed and lightning-quick handling.

Though powered by a 200cc Single that made just 22 horsepower and 13 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel on Jett Tuning’s dyno, the 200 Duke is more substantial than the numbers suggest and didn’t appear out of place among its larger siblings. It has the same physical dimensions and 3.5-gallon tank as the 390, but weighs 20 pounds less and its seat is an inch lower. Like all of the Dukes, the 200 has a chromoly tubular-steel trellis frame, and our test bike had a black main frame, a white subframe, and orange wheels.  

Suspension is proficiently handled by a non-adjustable WP Apex inverted fork and a preload-adjustable rear shock. Single-disc brakes front and rear include Bybre (an abbreviation of “by Brembo,” a subsidiary focused on smaller machines) calipers, and ABS is standard and can be disabled at the rear wheel. The monochrome LCD instrument panel looks dated, and the one on our test bike needed to be unplugged and reset to fix a glitch. The 200 is the only Duke with a non-LED headlight and the only one that doesn’t have the split design.  

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
The 200 Duke’s exhaust exits from a box below the swingarm pivot, distinguishing it from the traditional mufflers on the larger Dukes.

It’s only natural to label the 200 as an entry-level bike, and it’s well-suited for that role with unintimidating power and brakes that aren’t grabby and won’t easily lock up. With a flat torque curve and six gears, the 200 is more than capable of cruising at over 70 mph on the freeway, with a top speed approaching 85 mph. The chassis and suspension are well matched, and the 200 is light and exceptionally agile, making it exciting on curvy roads. At full tilt, the brakes could do with more muscle, and aggressive or larger riders will yearn for more power, especially going uphill. Our testing team was unanimous in concluding that the 200 exceeded expectations, especially on the fun scale.  

The 200 is a perfect first motorcycle, and it offers more performance than entry-level bikes like the Honda Grom (see test on page 58) and the Royal Enfield Meteor 350. But new riders may outgrow the 200 quickly and trade up to – or even start off with – the 390.  

390 Duke: Fierce Featherweight 

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
In the right hands, the 390 will readily embarrass larger, more powerful machines on tight, technical roads.

The 390 is a considerable step up from the 200, and the extra $1,700 is worth the investment. Despite its small size, the 390 is a rider’s motorcycle. Its 373cc Single pumps out 42 horsepower and 27 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel. The suspension and brakes have a similar specification as the 200, but the fork and shock have about an inch more travel and feel better damped, and with its larger front rotor (320mm vs. 300) the 390’s brakes feel stronger and more precise. An LED headlight, a color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity, and adjustable levers are welcome upgrades over the 200. 

The 390 Duke is a blast to ride and punches well above its weight class. Tipping the scales at  just 359 pounds wet and offering outstanding maneuverability and usable performance, the 390 will appeal to a broad spectrum of riders and was universally loved by our testers. Despite its power deficit, the 390 was able to keep up with the larger Dukes on tight, twisty sections of road, only falling behind when the pavement straightened out.  

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
As with the 200, the 390 has a single-disc brakes on both wheels, but with a larger 320mm rotor. ABS is standard and can be switched off at the rear wheel (Supermoto mode).

New riders, including those who want to go fast, will have years of enjoyment ahead of them on the 390 Duke. This is the sleeper bike, the one that might get overlooked by seasoned riders but packs a ton of fun into a small, affordable package. It can be a carefree, fuel-efficient commuter during the week, and on weekends it’s just a throttle twist away from being a canyon-carving dragon slayer.  

890 Duke: Super Middleweight 

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
The 890 channels the hooligan attitude of the original 620 Duke.

Nicknamed the “Scalpel,” the 890 Duke hews closest to the original Duke formula: light, agile, and capable of hair-on-fire thrills. Its 889cc parallel-Twin is good for 111 horsepower and 67 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel in a bike that weighs just 405 pounds wet. Compared to the 390, you get 164% more power and just 13% more weight, but you’ll pay nearly twice as much in the bargain.  

That’s a big jump in price, but everything is better. The WP Apex suspension, with a non-adjustable inverted fork and a preload-adjustable rear shock, offers better damping and more travel. (The 890 Duke R is equipped with higher-spec adjustable suspension.) The triple-disc brakes with multi-mode cornering ABS are precise and reassuring. It also has riding modes, multi-level traction control, and wheelie control, allowing our testers to tailor the riding experience as desired. Our test bike was fitted with the dealer-installed Tech Pack ($750), which includes the Track Pack (Track mode, 9-level TC, anti-wheelie off, and launch control), Motor Slip Regulation, and up/down Quickshifter+. 

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
The 890 embodies the essential qualities of KTM’s naked bike philosophy: raw power coupled with sharp handling and equally sharp styling.

None of us were immune to the 890’s charms. We praised its dart-like handling, eager yet smooth power delivery, strong, progressive brakes, and sure-footed chassis. The Twin’s 270-degree firing order delivers a broad spread of torque for blasting out of corners and adds a pleasing crackle on downshifts. The 890 is a standout machine that encourages you to test its handling and your nerve, and it consistently rewards the rider with confidence-inspiring feel and agility or a gentle prod where lesser machines fall short.  

The 890 is no show pony. It is a mustang, wild at heart, straining at the bit, and embodies the essence of the Duke series: immediate power and razor-sharp cornering stripped down to the barest of essentials. When it comes to performance and handling, nothing is superfluous in the 890, and nothing is wanting. Experienced riders with even the slightest inclination toward spirited riding will never tire of putting the 890 Duke through its paces, and yet it remains friendly and forgiving enough for jaunts around the city or sport-touring with some soft luggage. Just point it at the twistiest road you can find and open the throttle.  

1290 Super Duke R: When Too Much is Not Enough

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
The 1290 Duke turns the knob up to 11 and makes itself heard in the sporty streetfighter category.

Introduced in 2014, the 1290 Super Duke R – known as “The Beast” – is the pointy end of KTM’s streetbike spear. Updated last year, it’s more powerful and lighter than ever, with its 1,301cc V-Twin churning out an asphalt-buckling 166 horsepower and 94 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel.  

Fully adjustable WP Apex suspension is tuned to handle the Super Duke’s immense power, and it delivers a firm but confident ride. Brembo Stylema front brake calipers feel like they came off an airliner, such is their awesome strength, and while some in the test group felt they had too much initial bite, others raved about them. Riding modes and a full suite of six-axis IMU-enabled electronic riding aids allow The Beast to be tamed or unleashed, and our test bike was equipped with the dealer-installed Tech Pack ($750). The LED headlight incorporates an air intake, but overall styling remains much the same – angular, aggressive, looking for a fight. Creature comforts include self-canceling turnsignals, cruise control, and keyless ignition, steering lock, and gas cap. 

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
The 1290 Duke is imposing, but is undeniably nimble.

The Super Duke elicited the most controversy when it came to the post-riding discussions. Like a silver-backed gorilla, it packs serious punch, but if you treat the 1290 with respect, it will respond in kind. The ocean of torque allows for lazy meandering along open roads, as well as controlled spurts of acceleration and braking demanded by dense traffic. But should you decide to be aggressive with the Super Duke, be sure to have your senses, skills, and reactions at peak readiness, as it comes by its Beast moniker honestly.  

The bike feels tall and, with its humpback tank, a little imposing, but its 441-pound curb weight is quite manageable. Although the steering is heavier than on the 890 due to its lazier rake and slightly longer wheelbase, the 1290 is nonetheless nimble and responsive. For a couple of our testers, the difference was partly psychological. Whereas the 890 felt in alignment with their skill set, the 1290’s capabilities felt beyond them. Part of the excitement of riding a motorcycle is the ability to give it full throttle, but doing so on the 1290 is short-lived at best and more appropriate for wide-open roads or even the racetrack.  

When considering potential owners for this exceptional machine, it is best suited for those with a high level of riding skills and experience. Some buyers just want the best, or the most, or both, and the 1290 Super Duke R will deliver on those promises. This horse will carry like a Clydesdale and run like a thoroughbred. Beyond that, the KTM 1290 Super Duke R defies reason, in the sense that it offers almost too much of everything, which you could argue is precisely what a Super Duke should do. For most riders, however, the 890 is probably a better fit and will be more enjoyable to ride. Like Dirty Harry said, riders must know their limitations.  

All in the Family  

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
Their styling may be polarizing, but KTM’s ability to maximize performance and minimize weight ensures that the current crop of Dukes are worthy successors to the name.

Within the KTM Duke range, from the $3,999 200 Duke to the $18,699 1290 Super Duke R, there is a bike for nearly every rider, from those just starting out to those at the top of their game, from commuters to weekend warriors to track-day junkies. While only the 200 and 390 are likely to be cross-shopped by potential buyers, we found the 390 and 890 to be the most broadly appealing of the four. For experienced riders, the 200 may be too little, and for some, the 1290 may be out of reach, but every bike here earned the respect of our testing team.

2021 KTM Duke Lineup Specs

2021 KTM 200 Duke Specs

Base Price: $3,999
Warranty: 2 yrs., 24,000 miles
Website: ktm.com  

Engine
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse Single, DOHC w/ 4 valves
Displacement: 200cc Bore x Stroke: 72.0 x 49.0mm
Compression Ratio: 11.5:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 9,300 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI, 38mm throttle body 
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 1.6 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain  

Chassis
Frame: Chromoly steel trellis & cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 53.4 in. ± 0.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.7 in.
Seat Height: 31.6 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm inv. fork, no adj., 4.6 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, adj. preload, 5.0 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Single 300mm disc w/ radial 4-piston caliper & ABS
Rear: Single 230mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.00 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 4.00 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 110/70-ZR17
Rear: 150/60-ZR17 Wet Weight: 339 lbs.  

Performance
Horsepower: 22 hp @ 10,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 13 lb-ft @ 7,900 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 3.5 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 68 mpg
Estimated Range: 238 miles 

2021 KTM 390 Duke Specs

Base Price: $5,699
Warranty: 2 yrs., 24,000 miles
Website: ktm.com  

Engine
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse Single, DOHC w/ 4 valves
Displacement: 373ccBore x Stroke: 89.0 x 60.0mm
Compression Ratio: 12.6:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 9,300 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI, 46mm throttle body
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 1.8 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-act. slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain  

Chassis
Frame: Chromoly steel trellis & cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 53.4 in. ± 0.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.7 in.
Seat Height: 32.7 in
Suspension, Front: 43mm inv. fork, no adj., 5.6 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, adj. preload, 5.9 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Single 320mm disc w/ radial 4-piston caliper & ABS
Rear: Single 230mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.00 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 4.00 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 110/70-ZR17
Rear: 150/60-ZR17 Wet Weight: 359 lbs.  

Performance
Horsepower: 42 hp @ 8,800 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 27 lb-ft @ 7,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 3.5 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 56 mpg
Estimated Range: 196 miles 

2021 890 Duke Specs

Base Price: $10,999
Warranty: 2 yrs., 24,000 miles
Website: ktm.com  

Engine
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 889cc
Bore x Stroke: 90.7 x 68.8mm
Compression Ratio: 13.5:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 18,600 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI, 46mm throttle body x 2
Lubrication System: Semi-dry sump, 3.0 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain  

Chassis
Frame: Chromoly steel trellis & cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 58.3 in. ± 0.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.3 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm inv. fork, no adj., 5.5 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, adj. preload, 5.9 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 300mm discs, w/ radial 4-piston monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.50 × 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 5.50 × 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 180/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 405 lbs.  

Performance
Horsepower: 111 hp @ 9,500 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 67 lb-ft @ 7,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 44 mpg
Estimated Range: 163 miles  

2021 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Specs

Base Price: $18,699
Warranty: 1 yr., 12,000 miles
Website: ktm.com  

Engine
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 75-degree V-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,301cc
Bore x Stroke: 108.0 x 71.0mm
Compression Ratio: 13.5:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 18,600 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI, 56mm throttle body x 2
Lubrication System: Dry sump, 3.7 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain  

Chassis
Frame: Chromoly steel trellis & c/a single-sided swingarm
Wheelbase: 58.9 in. ± 0.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 25.2 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Suspension, Front: 48mm inv. fork, fully adj., 4.9 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, fully adj., 6.1 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm discs w/ radial 4-piston monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.50 × 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 6.00 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 190/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 441 lbs.  

Performance
Horsepower: 166 hp @ 10,100 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 94.1 lb-ft @ 8,300 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 4.2 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 38 mpg
Estimated Range: 196 miles  

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review

The LCD on the 200 (top left) falls short of the full-color TFTs on the larger Dukes, which provide clear, readable information, with a tach, speedo, gear position, and more. In low light, the displays change from a white background (shown on the 390) to black (shown on the 890) or orange (only on the 1290). 

The post 2021 KTM 200 Duke, 390 Duke, 890 Duke, and 1290 Super Duke R | Comparison Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com