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2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS | Road Test Review

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS review
Completely redesigned for 2021, the Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS has more power, less weight, and premium components and electronics. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Yes, this is a review of the 2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS, the legendary streetfighter from Hinckley that has been completely redesigned. More power, less weight, all the must-haves – you get the idea. For me, testing the Speed Triple was personal. But before I get into it, you should know the backstory. 

London, England, 1998. I can still fit everything I own into the trunk of a hatchback, and for the first time in my short life, I’m earning more money than I’m spending. When my employer relocates me to a new office in the financial district, my commute becomes a 45-minute crush on the Tube. With a modest pot of cash building in the bank, I decide now is the time to buy my first proper motorcycle. Lane splitting in Britain is legal, and I plan to join the multitude of well-healed professionals commuting through the traffic and into the city each morning. 

The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story
The legendary streetfighter from Hinckley has been completely redesigned and the 2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS has more power, less weight, and premium parts.

It’s the same year Triumph gives its naked hooligan, the Speed Triple, an aggressive redesign. Introduced in 1994, the Speed Triple had already left its mark. The new styling for ’98 includes wider, higher bars and distinct double headlights under a minimal flyscreen, a design that Tom Cruise will come to immortalize in Mission Impossible II

The engine is now the 955cc Triple from the Daytona, producing a whopping 130 horsepower. I visit the Triumph dealership in Vauxhall so often the sales staff make fun of me and pretend to close the shop, telling me, “turn off the lights when your done sitting on it.” The Speed Triple’s price tag is hanging from the handlebar: £7,999 (around $13,000), which is about ten times more than I’ve ever spent on anything. 

Alas, saving for my first proper bike is competing with the fiscal demands of London’s nightlife, and ultimately, I scale down my plans. The Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R I buy leaves £2,500 for some decent gear, but as much as I love the Ninja, I lament the hooligan and tell myself there will always be a next time. 

The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story

Fast forward to 2005. London is history, as is the Ninja. New York is now my home and the center of the universe. Business is going well, but occasional rental rides are not cutting the mustard from a thrill perspective. As if in answer to my thoughts, Triumph releases the fourth generation of the Speed Triple, with a larger 1,050cc inline-Triple and a new chassis. But it’s the massive dual underseat pipes, which help expose the single-sided swingarm, that catch my eye. 

I head down to the Triumph dealer in SoHo and climb aboard. It’s bigger than I remember, and meaner looking. I decide, right there and then, I’m going to buy it. But a test ride is “out of the question” until I get a New York driver’s license, as is insuring any bike I buy. I book the test, but somewhere along the way, a petite Italian also catches my eye, and suddenly I have a shared bank account and an eye-watering mortgage. My new fiancé doesn’t think a new motorcycle is a priority right now.  

Time marches on. With each generation, the Speed Triple gets better and better. And with each passing year, it seems farther out of reach. 

The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story
The new Speed Triple 1200 RS is one of the lightest hyper naked bikes on the market, making it extremely agile.

Now it’s 2021, and I’ve been living in Los Angeles for a few years. A few weeks after starting my new job at Rider, our EIC says he needs me to test the new Speed Triple 1200 RS. And just like that, I’m holding the keys – a keyless fob, actually – to a machine I’ve coveted for years. 

Revised from the ground up, the new Speed Triple certainly looks the part. The underseat pipes are gone, replaced with a superbike-style can, but the fox-eye headlights, which replaced the iconic round ones in 2011, are as menacing as ever. It feels more compact than I remember, with a narrower seat and gas tank. Our test bike’s color scheme is the Matte Silver Ice option. Sapphire Black is also available and both colors are understated, flying in the face of its many candy-colored rivals or even the garish colors offered on Speed Triples in the past, like Nuclear Red and Roulette Green. But it’s no sleeper. Huge Brembo brake calipers and Öhlins suspension are clear indicators of the power they’re tasked with harnessing. 

The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story
All of the 2021 Speed Triples are designated RS, and standard equipment includes fully adjustable Öhlins suspension and Brembo Stylema front brake calipers.

Triumph completely redesigned the Speed Triple’s engine, starting with an increase in displacement (1,160cc, up from 1,050) and a race-bred oversquare piston configuration. A bigger bore and a shorter stroke result in a higher redline, now 11,150 rpm. A new ignition system with twin-tip spark plugs improves combustion, and a new air intake and free-flowing exhaust system help squeeze every available horse from the Hinkley hooligan. On Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno, the Speed Triple grunted out 165.5 horsepower at 10,800 rpm and 87 lb-ft of torque at 8,500 rpm, figures that are much higher than the previous model.     

Triumph’s engineers must have been busy because, despite the performance gains, the new engine weighs 15 pounds less than before and is Euro 5 compliant. Lighter moving parts have significantly reduced engine inertia, promising a very revvy engine. A lighter slip/assist clutch assembly has fewer plates but more friction per plate, and it’s linked to a new stacked 6-speed gearbox with an up/down quickshifter. An all-new cast-aluminum chassis is both stronger and lighter, further cutting the Speed Triple’s curb weight down to just 437 pounds.

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS review dyno horsepower torque
Dyno results for the 2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS

Compared to the Speed Triple R we tested back in 2012, the 2021 RS makes 40 more horsepower and weighs 40 pounds less. Take a moment and let that sink in. 

The only Speed Triple 1200 available for 2021 is the RS model, and with that designation comes premium equipment. Fully adjustable Öhlins suspension includes an NIX30 inverted fork and a TTX36 twin-tube rear shock. Braking at the front wheel is supplied by twin Brembo Stylema radial monoblock 4-piston calipers clamping 320mm discs, and at the rear, a single Brembo 2-piston caliper. Tires are grippy Metzeler Racetec RR tires with just a hint of rain sipes. 

The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story
The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story
The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story
The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story

Brembo Stylema calipers, coupled with Metzler Racetec RR tires make for truly impressive stopping power. 

After getting acquainted, I start to get a feel for the Speed Triple’s handling as I make my way out of the city. The ride is firm, as is the seat; not a stone, but not plush either. The quickshifter works beautifully, especially at the higher rev ranges, but I can’t find neutral to save my life. By the time I reach the back roads I feel acquainted enough to really open up the throttle as I exit a familiar, sweeping corner. Thump-in-the-chest acceleration follows as the engine spins up almost instantly. I know this road intimately, but suddenly it feels shorter and I’m up to the next corner before I know it. With a firm, progressive pull on the brake lever, the stopping power from the Stylema calipers feels like I just launched a parachute. I lose my flow through the corner because now I’m too slow. 

The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story
Out on the back roads, I finally get to open up the Speed Triple’s throttle, the engine response is immediate, and acceleration out of the corners is blisteringly quick.

A few miles later and I’m coming to grips with it. The Triumph is in Road mode and I see no reason to change that. The body position is spot-on for a naked, the sporty side of neutral, and despite the firm seat and significant bend at my knee, I’m not uncomfortable. The bars are wide but steering inputs are precise. Triumph has moved the footrests inboard slightly, and when I get confident enough to test the sticky Racetecs, I find plenty of grip and ground clearance. 

Now that my brain is properly calibrated, I come to appreciate the phenomenal brakes. I can be heavy on the rear with no issues, and the front brakes are immediate without being snappy. There is barely a whiff of dive in the fork. Our test bike came straight from a track test, and the suspension was carved-from-granite stiff. We turned the clickers on the Öhlins NIX30 to remove nearly all of the compression and rebound damping, and the ride was much improved. Taut and responsive, though as a 160-pound rider I’d like to go softer still. 

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS review

The Speed Triple is a breeze to ride, despite the race-bred engine. The performance is staggering, but not unwieldy. Thanks to the abundant torque it’s happy to tootle about in the higher gears. Throttle response is sharp but manageable, and when I’m a little heavy-handed, wheelie control kicks in and levels things out (you can turn it off and wheelie away if that’s your thing). The bike feels smaller than it is, and is eminently flickable, darting into corners on demand with eye-popping acceleration on exit. Sometimes the firm ride can be unsettling on less-than-perfect roads, but through a smooth series of corners it’s like magic.

The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story
The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story

The cockpit is nicely understated, and the dash is clear and readable in bright daylight and in the dark. Snazzy graphics add a bit of flare. 

Triumph applied its standard minimalist approach to the cockpit. A low-reflection, 5-inch TFT display defaults to a view of the tach, gear position, and speed, and snazzy dash graphics rotate the default screen to the side when you access the menu. A new six-axis IMU sensor empowers a full suite of electronic rider aids, including multi-mode cornering ABS and traction control. There are five riding modes: Rain (power is restricted to 99 horsepower), Road, Sport, Track, and Custom. On the street, the Speed Triple is more than saucy enough in Road mode. All-round LED lights, backlit switchgear, keyless ignition, and cruise control are standard. 

The Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS exceeded my expectations. As I rode it more and more, I adapted to it, and I’d like to think it adapted to me. We got to know each other. I grew more confident in its handling and braking capabilities, which allowed me to explore more of its performance envelope. The mighty Triple rewarded me with one of the most thrilling riding experiences of my life. They say you should never meet your heroes, but in this case, there was no letdown. I still love the Speed Triple. And yes, it was worth the wait. 

The Triumph Speed Triple - A Love Story

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS Specs 

Base Price: $18,300
Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles 
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com

Engine

Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,160cc 
Bore x Stroke: 90.0 x 60.8mm 
Compression Ratio: 13.2:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 20,000 miles 
Fuel Delivery: Multipoint sequential EFI w/ throttle-by-wire
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.5 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6 speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain

Chassis

Frame: Aluminum twin-spar frame, bolt-on aluminum rear subframe & single-sided cast aluminum swingarm 
Wheelbase: 56.9 in
Rake/Trail: 23.9 degrees/4.1 in 
Seat Height: 32.7 in. 
Suspension, Front: 43mm USD fork, fully adj., 4.7 in. travel 
Rear: Single shock, fully adj., 4.7 in. travel 
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm floating discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS 
Rear: Single 220mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.50 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 6.00 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 190/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 437 lbs.
Load Capacity: 430 lbs.
GVWR: 867 lbs. 

Performance

Horsepower: 165.5 @ 10,800 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 86.9 lb-ft @ 8,500 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 4.1 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 29 mpg
Estimated Range: 117 miles 

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS Photo Gallery

The post 2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S | First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S liquid cooled Revolution Max MSRP $14,999

After the successful launch of the Pan America 1250, Harley-Davidson’s first-ever adventure bike that’s built on the all-new liquid-cooled Revolution Max platform, the Motor Company has announced a late addition to its 2021 lineup, the Sportster S. It will be in dealerships this fall with an MSRP of $14,999.

Visually similar to the 1250 Custom teased several years ago, the 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S represents a new era for the legendary Sportster line. Since the introduction of the XL model family in 1957, Sportsters have always been stripped-down motorcycles powered by air-cooled V-Twins.

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S liquid cooled Revolution Max MSRP $14,999
2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S liquid cooled Revolution Max MSRP $14,999

Harley-Davidson calls the new Sportster S a “sport custom motorcycle,” and at the heart of the machine is a 121-horsepower Revolution Max 1250T V-Twin, a lightweight chassis, and premium suspension.

“The Sportster S is the next all-new motorcycle built on the Revolution Max platform and sets a new performance standard for the Sportster line,” said Jochen Zeitz, chairman, president and CEO, Harley-Davidson. “This is a next generation Sportster defined by power, performance, technology and style. And it’s part of our commitment to introduce motorcycles that align with our strategy to increase desirability and to drive the legacy of Harley-Davidson.”

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S liquid cooled Revolution Max MSRP $14,999

The new Sporter S has a stocky, muscular profile and fat tires that look like balled-up fists. Its minimalist front fender evokes the front end of a classic bobber, while its tail section, high-mount exhaust, and olo seat draw inspiration from Harley-Davidson’s legendary XR750 flat tracker. The engine’s lightweight magnesium engine covers stand out with a Chocolate Satin finish.

“Every visual design element of the Sportster S model is an expression of the motorcycle’s raw power,” said Brad Richards, Harley-Davidson vice president of styling and design. “This is a wolf in wolf’s clothing.”

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S liquid cooled Revolution Max MSRP $14,999

Displacing 1,250cc just like the Pan America’s engine, the Revolution Max 1250T in the Sportster S makes less peak horsepower and is tuned for a broad spread of torque. The riding experience can be tailored to conditions or preferences with selectable ride modes (Sport, Road, and Rain, plus two Custom modes) and H-D’s Cornering Rider Safety Enhancements.

Like on the Pan America, the Revolution Max engine is a stressed member of the Sportster S chassis. It has a welded tubular-steel trellis swingarm with a braced design and stamped X-member to further stiffen the chassis.

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S liquid cooled Revolution Max MSRP $14,999

Suspension is made by Showa and is fully adjustable at both ends, with a 43mm USD cartridge fork and a piggyback-reservoir rear shock with a remote preload adjuster knob. Likewise, the Sportster S has Brembo brakes at both ends, with a single 320mm rotor up front squeezed by a radial monoblock 4-piston caliper and a 260mm rear rotor with a 2-piston caliper. Lightweight cast aluminum wheels with a staggered, five-spoke design are shod with wide Dunlop/Harley-Davidson Series GT503 tires.

Forward foot controls and a low handlebar put the rider in an aggressive posture, and seat height is 29.6 inches. Cruise control and a proximity-based security system are standard equipment. With its 3.1-gallon peanut tank full of fuel, Harley-Davidson says the Sportster S model weighs just 502 pounds.

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S liquid cooled Revolution Max MSRP $14,999

A round, 4-inch TFT screen displays all instrumentation and supports Bluetooth-enabled infotainment. All-LED lighting includes a Daymaker Signature LED headlamp. A wide range of accessories will be available.

The 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S will be offered in Vivid Black, Stone Washed White Pearl, and Midnight Crimson.

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S Photo Gallery

The post 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

BMW Announces 2022 Motorcycle Updates

2022 BMW Motorcycles
2022 BMW R 18

BMW Motorrad USA has released details of the latest updates and changes across the entire model lineup for 2022, and the introduction of the new M 1000 RR. We can expect to see the first examples arriving in US dealerships in the last quarter of 2021. The list includes details on pricing, equipment changes, and paint scheme updates for motorcycles and scooters. Also included are a comprehensive list of available upgrade packages, which have been streamlined and standardized across the range.

2022 BMW C 400 GT Scooter

2022 BMW Motorcycles
2022 BMW C 400 GT

The only scooter in BMW’s 2022 lineup, we took a first look at the C 400 GT back in March. The Euro 5-compliant, 350cc engine delivers a claimed 34 horsepower and 26 lb-ft of torque, transmitted through a Constantly Variable Transmission.

Expected Availability: In dealers now

Base MSRP: $8,495

Equipment Changes: Updates for the 2022 model include an electronic throttle and engine management system, improvements to the catalytic converter, and enhancements to the engine. The ASC (traction control) system has been updated for 2022 and promises a more sensitive response in wet and slippery conditions. Additionally, the brakes have received new calipers with improved piston response and the forward storage compartment now features a 12-volt outlet and a USB charging socket.

Color Schemes: The C 400 GT comes in Alpine White as standard. Callisto Grey Metallic ($150) and Black Storm Metallic ($250) are optional premium alternatives.

2022 BMW G 310 R and G 310 GS 

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
The 2022 BMW G 310 R

Rider covered the release of the 2021 G 310 R, which received several updates for that year, as did its sister model the G 310 GS, and changes for the new models are currently limited to color schemes. 

G 310 R

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $5,045

Color Schemes: Cosmic Black 2 replaces Cosmic Black as the standard color, and Kyanite Blue Metallic is now available at a $250 premium.

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
The 2022 BMW G 310 GS

G 310 GS

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $5,954

Color Schemes: Polar White remains the standard paint scheme, but Cosmic Black 2 replaces Cosmic Black as a $250 option.

2022 BMW F 750 GS, F 850 GS, F 850 GS Adventure

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
The 2022 BMW F 750 GS

We road-tested the 2019 BMW F 750 and F 850 GS models when they were released in November 2018. The only changes slated for 2022 are color schemes and new upgrade packages.

F 750 GS

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: TBA

Color Schemes: Light White is carried over as the standard color and Black Storm Metallic now replaces Black Storm as a $350 optional color. San Marino Blue Metallic ($260) is also carried over as an option.

Updated Upgrade Packages:
Select Package $1,000
GPS Prep
Cruise Control
Ride Modes Pro
Heated Grips
Dynamic Engine
Brake Control (new)
Luggage Rack (new)

.
Premium Upgrade Package $2,400
Select Package contents
LED Style Elements
Gear Shift Assist Pro (new)
Keyless Ride
Dynamic ESA
TPM tire pressure monitor 

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
2022 BMW F 850 GS

F 850 GS

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: TBA

Color Schemes: Racing Red remains the standard color, while New Black Storm Metallic ($350) replaces Black Storm as an optional color along with Rallye Blue ($325), carried over from last year.

Updated Upgrade Packages:
Select Package $950
GPS Prep
Cruise Control
Ride Modes Pro
Heated Grips
Dynamic Engine Brake Control (new)
Luggage Rack (new) 

.
Premium Package $2,350
Select Package contents
LED Style Elements
Gear Shift Assist Pro (new)
Keyless Ride
Dynamic ESA
TPM tire pressure monitor

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
2022 BMW F 850 GS Adventure

F 850 GS Adventure

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: TBA

Color Schemes: Light White replaces Ice Gray as the standard color, Black Storm Metallic ($325) replaces Black Storm as an optional color. Kalamata Matte Metallic is also still available as a $350 option. 

Updated Upgrade Packages:
Select Package $1,350
GPS Prep
Cruise control
LED fog lights (new)
Ride Modes Pro Heated grips
Aluminum side case holders
Dynamic Engine Brake Control 

.
Premium Package $3,100
Select Package contents
LED Style Elements
Gear Shift Assist Pro (new)
Keyless Ride
Dynamic ESA
TPM tire pressure monitor 

2022 BMW F 900 R and F 900 XR

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
2022 BMW F 900 R

Rider Magazine published a road test review of the 2020 F 900 R and F 900 XR, newly released for that year. The R roadster and XR sport-adventure platforms both receive new color schemes and upgrade packages for 2022. 

F 900 R

Expected Availability: Q4 2021 

Base MSRP: $8,995

Color Schemes: Black Storm Metallic remains the standard color, while Bluestone Metallic ($300) replaces San Marino Blue as an optional color, and the classic BMW Racing white, blue and red scheme ($300) replaces Hockenheim Silver and Racing Red as the second option.

Updated Upgrade Packages:
Select Package $975
Heated Grips
TPM tire pressure monitor 
Dynamic Traction Control
Gear Shift Assist Pro
Ride Modes Pro
ABS Pro 

.
Premium Package $2,500
Select Package contents 
Dynamic ESA 
Headlight Pro 
Adaptive Headlight 
Dynamic Engine Brake Control
Keyless Ride
GPS Prep
Cruise Control
Saddle Bag Mounts

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
2022 BMW F 900 XR

F 900 XR

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $11,695

Color Schemes: Light White is carried over as the standard color for the F 900 XR. Black Storm Metallic ($250) replaces Gelvanic Gold Metallic as an optional color, and Racing Red ($250) remains the second option.

Updated Upgrade Packages:
Select Package $950
GPS Prep 
Cruise Control
Heated Grips
Saddle Bag Mounts
Dynamic Traction Control
Ride Modes Pro
ABS Pro 

.
Premium Package $2,400
Select Package contents
Dynamic ESA
Keyless Ride 
Center Stand
Headlight Pro
Adaptive Headlight
Gear Shift Assist Pro
Dynamic Engine Brake Control
TPM tire pressure monitor 

2022 BMW R nineT, R nineT Pure, R nineT Scrambler and R nineT Urban G/S

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
2022 BMW R nineT Urban G/S

Updates for the 2021 R nineT models included changes to the engine for Euro 5 compatibility, as well as new LED headlights, improved ABS, and adjustable suspension. Rider published a summary in the October issue last year. Updates for 2022 are limited to available upgrade packages, and color schemes across the R nineT range will remain the same as last year’s model except for the G/S. 

R nineT

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $15,945

Color Schemes: Black Storm Metallic is carried over as the standard color. Optional colors remain the same as last years’s model: Aluminum Matte ($1,000), Night Black / Aluminum Matte ($1,100), and Mineral White Metallic/Aurum ($1,050).

Updated Upgrade Package: Select Package $1,000
Ride Modes Pro
Heated Grips
Cruise Control
Adaptive Headlight
Headlight Pro (new)
Dynamic Engine Brake Control
Dynamic Traction Control 

R nineT Pure

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $10,995 

Color Schemes: Mineral Grey Metallic is carried over as the standard color. Optional colors remain the same as last years’s model: Aluminum, Black Storm Metallic/Racing Red ($590), Cosmic Blue Metallic/Light White ($590) and Teal Blue Metallic Matte ($250).

R nineT Scrambler 

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $13,495

Equipment Changes: New optional off-road tires. 

Color Schemes: Granite Grey Metallic remains the standard color. Optional colors include, Kalamata Metallic ($200), Black Storm Metallic/Racing Red ($590), and Cosmic Blue Metallic/Light White ($590. 

Updated Upgrade Package: Select Package $1,000
Ride Modes Pro
Heated Grips
Cruise Control
Adaptive Headlight
Headlight Pro (new)
Dynamic Engine Brake Control
Dynamic Traction Control

R nineT Urban G/S

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $13,995

Color Schemes: The 40 Years of GS Edition is no longer available and Blue Metallic is the only available color.

Updated Upgrade Package: Select Package $1,000
Ride Modes Pro
Heated Grips
Cruise Control
Adaptive Headlight
Headlight Pro (new)
Dynamic Engine Brake Control
Dynamic Traction Control
Black Cross Spoked Wheels

2022 BMW R 1250 R and R 1250 RS

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
2022 BMW R 1250 RS

Rider covered the extensive changes made to these models in 2019 with a First Look Review. Updates for 2020 are limited to upgrade packages and, as with most of the other models, these are now streamlined. Sport and Select packages have been replaced by a single Premium package.

R 1250 R

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $14,995

Color Schemes: Black Storm Metallic is carried over as standard color, as are Mineral Grey Metallic ($500), and BMW Racing white, blue and red ($600) optional schemes.

Updated Upgrade Package: Premium Package $2,525
Chrome Exhaust
Heated Grips
TPM tire pressure monitor
Gear Shift Assist Pro
Ride Modes Pro
Dynamic Engine Brake Control
ABS Pro
Dynamic Traction Control
Keyless Ride
GPS Prep
Cruise Control

R 1250 RS

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $15,695

Color Schemes: Black Storm Metallic is carried over as the standard color. Imperial Blue Metallic ($425) is also retained as an optional color, and Light White ($525) replaces Austin Yellow Metallic as the second color option.

Updated Upgrade Package: Premium Package $3,175 
Chrome Exhaust
Heated Grips
Dynamic ESA
Keyless Ride
GPS Prep
Cruise Control
Center Stand
Saddle Bag Mounts
Dynamic Traction Control
Gear Shift Assist Pro
Ride Modes Pro
ABS Pro 

2022 BMW R 1250 GS, R 1250 GS Adventure, and R 1250 RT

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
2022 BMW R 1250 RT

Rider covered the extensive changes made to these models in 2019 with a First Ride Review. Updates for 2020 are limited to upgrade packages, and as with most of the other models, these are now streamlined. Comfort, Dynamic, Sport and Touring packages have been replaced by a Select and Premium packages across the range. 

R 1250 GS

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $17,995

Color Schemes: Light White is carried over as a standard color. Black Storm Metallic Black/Achat Grey ($950), Rallye (Light White / Racing Blue / Racing Red) ($1,150) and Black Storm Metallic 40 Years of GS Edition ($2,050) are all retained as optional colors.

Updated Upgrade Packages:
Select Package $1,900
Keyless Ride
Heated Grips
Chrome Exhaust
GPS Prep
Cruise Control
Hand Protectors
Case Holders
Seat Heating
TPM tire pressure monitor 

.
Premium package $4,000
Select Package contents
Dynamic ESA
Gear Shift Assist Pro
Ride Modes Pro
Dynamic Engine Brake Control
Adaptive Headlight
Headlight Pro
Cruising Lighting

R 1250 GS Adventure

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $20,345

Color Schemes: Ice Grey is carried over as the standard color and Black Storm Metallic Black/Achat Grey ($600), Rallye (Light White / Racing Blue / Racing Red) ($800) and Black Storm Metallic 40 Years of GS Edition ($1,800 are all retained as optional colors.

Updated Upgrade Packages:
Select Package $1,875
Keyless Ride
Heated Grips
Chrome Exhaust
GPS Prep
Cruise Control
Pannier Mounts
Seat Heating
TPM tire pressure monitor 

.
Premium Package $4,325
Select Package contents
Dynamic ESA
Gear Shift Assist Pro
RideModes Pro
Dynamic Engine Brake Control
Adaptive Headlight
Headlight Pro
LED Auxiliary Lights
Cruising Light 

R 1250 RT

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $19,695

Equipment Changes: New freely-assignable Favorite function button. 

Color Schemes: Alpine White is carried over as the standard color. New Black Storm Metallic ($525) replaces Manhattan Metallic as an optional color. Mineral White Metallic ($1,995) and Racing Blue Metallic ($650) are also carried over as optional colors. 

Updated Upgrade Package: Premium Package $4,500
Keyless Ride
Chrome Exhaust
Central Locking
Seat Heating
Alarm
Bluetooth Connectivity (new)
12V socket
Dynamic ESA
Gear Shift Assist Pro
Ride Modes Pro
Active Cruise Control
Adaptive Headlight
Dynamic Engine Brake Control
Headlight Pro
Auxiliary Lights
TPM tire pressure monitor

2022 BMW R 18 and R 18 Classic

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
2022 BMW R 18

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: TBA

Equipment Changes: Reverse assistance and black drivetrain.

Color Schemes: Galaxy Dust Metallic/Titanium Silver 2 Metallic has been added as optional color scheme (see Upgrade Packages), and the First Edition scheme is no longer available.

Updated Upgrade Packages:
Option 719 Design Package AERO – The Option 719 Design Package AERO includes cylinder head covers, front engine cover and left and right intake snorkel covers in aluminum with a brushed, anodized finish. The cylinder head covers feature finely wrought air vents reminiscent of the “streamliners” of the 1920s and 1930s. The highlight is a badge on the front and side covers: This is made of solid copper which is chrome-plated and partially finished in white. The white paint enclosing the number sequence “719” is reminiscent of historical emblems that were typically lined with enamel during that era.

Option 719 seat – The Option 719 seat is an exclusive alternative to the standard seat found on the R 18 and R 18 Classic. In addition to the standard seat height, it offers diamond-shaped quilted embossing and an embroidered BMW logo and the 719 emblem on the side.

Option 719 Paint finish Galaxy Dust metallic/ Titanium Silver 2 metallic – Galaxy Dust metallic is a finish that changes in color spectrum from violet to turquoise blue, depending on the light. In addition, the color pigment creates a unique visual effect when exposed to sunlight. This special finish is combined with a Titanium Silver 2 metallic mirror on the fuel tank. The transition between the two-color surfaces consists of a hand-applied smoke effect familiar from the legendary R 90 S. In addition, the mirror surface is surrounded by a classic white double pin stripe.

Option 719 Wheels AERO and ICON – The two Option 719 wheels – AERO and ICON in matt silver and matt black, respectively, provide a refined and sophisticated look to the R 18 and R 18 Classic. The cast alloy wheels feature a six-spoke design. The milled ribs of the spokes are a real eye-catcher. The milled areas give the aluminum a contrast to the painted surfaces – hence the name Contrast Cut.

2022 BMW S 1000 R

BMW 2022 Model Announcement
2022 BMW S 1000 XR

Expected Availability: In dealers now

Base MSRP: $14,545

2022 BMW S 1000 XR

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $17,945

Color Schemes: Racing Red replaces Ice Grey as the standard color. New Black Storm Metallic 2 ($475) and Light White with M Package ($2,600) are optional colors.

Updated Upgrade Packages:

Select Package $650
Heated Grips
Tire pressure monitor
Luggage Grid 

M Package $2,600
Light White paint
M Endurance Chain
Sport Muffler
M Sport Seat
M Lightweight Battery
Sport Windshield
M Forged Wheels 

Premium Package $2,650
Select Package contents
GPS Prep
USB Socket
Hand Protection (new)
Center Stand (new)
Keyless Ride
Dynamic ESA Pro
Gear Shift Assist Pro
Cruise Control
Adaptive Headlight
LED Auxiliary Lights 

2022 BMW S 1000 RR 

2022 BMW Motorcycles
2022 BMW S 1000 RR

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $16,995

Color Schemes: Black Storm Metallic carries over as the standard color. Mineral Gray Metallic ($375) and Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red ($2,250 with M Package) are optional colors.

Updated Upgrade Packages:
Premium Package $2,825
Endurance Chain
Sports Muffler
Dynamic Damping Control
Ride Modes Pro
USB Socket
Heated Grips
Cruise Control
TPM tire pressure monitor 

.
M Package $2,250
Blue M Brake Calipers (new)
M Brake Calipers (new)
Black Fuel Filler Cap (new)
M GPS LapTrigger software (new)
M Sport Seat
Lightweight Battery
Forged Wheels (new) 

New 2022 BMW M 1000 RR

The new M RR uses the S 1000 RR’s water-cooled four-cylinder in-line engine with BMW ShiftCam technology for varying valve timing and valve lift that has been modified comprehensively. With a claimed peak power of 212 HP and maximum torque of 113 Nm, the M RR engine has undergone extensive technical optimization. Including new 2-ring forged pistons from Mahle, adapted combustion chambers, increased compression, longer and lighter titanium connecting rods from Pankl, slimmer and lighter rocker arms, fully machined intake ports with new duct geometry, as well as a titanium exhaust system.

In addition to a race specified engine, body styling has been heavily influenced by the track. M winglets and high windscreen promise later braking and earlier accelerating with more stability in the corners thanks to the aerodynamic downforce without increasing drag.

Other notable features include two adjustable characteristic throttle curves for optimum response characteristics, threefold adjustable engine braking, quickhifter, incorporated pit lane speed-limiter, hill start assistance, race inspired chassis design and geometry, optimized wheel load distribution and extended adjustability of the swinging arm pivot point. In addition the 6.5-inch TFT display with exclusive M logo animation and OBD interface that can be used with activation code for the M GPS data logger and M GPS laptrigger. 

Expected Availability: Q4 2021

Base MSRP: $32,495

Color Schemes: Light White with M Package is solely available color.

Upgrade Package: All US models will be equipped withe the M Competition Package.
M Brakes (new to BMW Motorrad)
M Carbon Wheels
M GPS Laptrigger
Lightweight M Battery
USB charging socket in the rear
Integrated LED light units and heated grips
Lightweight swinging arm
DLC-coated M endurance chain
Passenger package including tail-hump cover

The post BMW Announces 2022 Motorcycle Updates first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Road Test Review

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Road Test Review
The MT-07, Yamaha’s Budget Blaster. Photos by Kevin Wing.

Since its debut in 2015, Yamaha’s MT-07 has been a popular choice thanks to its punchy parallel-twin, aggressive naked styling, and lightweight accessibility. It has proven to be just as adept as a first bike, a commuter, a track bike, a play bike — heck, throw luggage on it and it can be a sport-tourer.

Rider did a comparison test of the Kawasaki Ninja 650, Suzuki SV650, and Yamaha FZ-07 (the MT-07’s original moniker) back in 2016. The three bikes share the same defining attributes — simple, fun, and inexpensive. The FZ-07 came out on top, proving to be edgier and nimbler than its rivals, providing immediate response to throttle inputs and exceptionally agile handling. 

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Road Test Review
The MT-07’s aggressive styling belies a neutral riding position and a comfortable seat at an accessible height. Yamaha has done a bang-up job on this budget blaster.

To stay ahead of the competition, Yamaha tweaked the mix, focusing on styling and rider engagement while maintaining the core character at the heart of the model’s appeal. A key part of that appeal has always been its value for money, and in its class, only the Suzuki SV650 can match its price. Perhaps not surprisingly then, most of the updates for the 2021 model are subtle. 

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Road Test Review
The middleweight MT-07 is versatile and can fill many practical roles. It really shines on winding mountain roads, where opportunities to get the most out of its punchy parallel-twin and grippy dual-compound tires bring out its lively character. Simple, nimble, friendly, and a whole lot of fun!

The most striking change is in the new headlight cluster. Yamaha has standardized the styling across the MT range, and just like the MT-09 we tested recently, the MT-07 is fitted with full LED lights arranged in what Yamaha calls a “signature Y-shape icon,” which I found to be insect-like and split the opinion of the Rider staff. The “Y” motif is carried over to the rear LED also. Overall, the MT-07 is a great-looking bike. The stance looks more aggressive than it feels, and the new bodywork provides just enough edge without being silly.

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Road Test Review
A new LED headlight cluster and LED turn signals are in line with the rest of the MT lineup.

New flared intakes add some muscle to the look, while sleek LED turnsignals bring a touch of class and are a vast improvement over the old lollipop design. Aesthetics aside, the new light cluster is a practical improvement. At night, the low beam provides a good spread of useable light. The high beam is bright and well defined but lacked width when the road became windy. There is no TFT for the new model, but the revised LCD dash is now color inverted. The dark screen with white characters is stylish and easy to read in bright daylight and at night, and Yamaha has fixed the mounting angle issues from previous models. 

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Road Test Review
A new white-on-black LCD meter has a bar-style tach and a large, easy-to-read font.

The newly tapered handlebars are over an inch wider and positioned slightly higher than before, which opens up the ergonomics slightly. The wide bars, which work flawlessly at low speeds, felt slightly cumbersome when carving through my favorite canyon. The new setup takes nothing away from the MT-07’s exceptional agility and responsiveness, allowing for precisely picked lines through corners and a tight turning radius. The low seat height and curb weight, which at 31.7 inches and just over 400 pounds respectively, are among the lowest in class, make for a thoroughly approachable motorcycle, especially for shorter riders. 

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Rider Test
The middleweight MT-07 is versatile and can fill many practical roles. It really shines on winding mountain roads, where opportunities to get the most out of its punchy parallel-twin and grippy dual-compound tires bring out its lively character. Simple, nimble, friendly, and a whole lot of fun!

There is a narrow stretch of winding road not far from my home that is so good that I often stop and re-ride it a few times. On the MT-07 it was a blast, and I was impressed with how easy it was to get a U-turn done. My brother, who lives in the U.K., is taking his motorcycle test on a restricted MT-07. It’s a favorite with schools offering the A2 test, and no doubt its low-speed maneuverability and forgiving nature are key factors behind that. 

I’m 6 feet, 2 inches tall, and when I took our MT-07 for a full day’s ride, spending a solid eight hours in the saddle, I found it had a comfortable and commanding riding position, with room to slide back on the seat just a little and get into a more aggressive attitude in the twisties. The pegs are high enough to make it a plausible carver but require considerable knee bend for taller riders like me, which felt cramped after a while. Nonetheless, I wouldn’t change much. The pegs give enough clearance to really take advantage of the strong performance offered by that punchy twin. 

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Rider Test
An empty sweeping road is the perfect environment to take advantage of the MT-07’s punchy parallel twin.

The MT’s 689cc parallel-twin has been tweaked to be Euro 5 compliant without compromising performance. We took it down to Jett Tuning for dyno testing, and output remains similar to the outgoing model: 68 horsepower and 46.5 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel. Part of what makes the MT-07 so much fun is its bias towards maximizing instantaneous torque. The motor provides all the thrill the combustion forces working below can exert but with none of the hairiness. Throttle response is strong without being too snappy. A new air-intake duct ensures smooth fueling and acceleration when rolling on and off the power, and the engine’s 270-degree firing cadence generates a nice strum when you get the revs over 5,000. It also has a little bit of crackle and pop as you come off the gas, always a crowd pleaser. 

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Road Test Review
Revisions to the engine’s intake, exhaust, and fuel injection help the MT-07 meet Euro 5 regulations and dyno testing revealed output remains similar to the outgoing model.

Riding the MT-07 up my favorite canyon, 25 glorious miles, few of which are straight, gave me an opportunity to get the new Michelin Road 5 tires warmed up and carry some speed into the corners. The characteristics of these tires suit the bike well. Designed as an all-rounder, the Road 5 has four-season credentials in its center tread, where deep grooves dissipate water, but at the tire’s shoulder, only called into use when riding spiritedly in the dry, a softer compound of sticky rubber without tread sipes provides additional grip. 

In this environment, the MT-07’s twin is happiest in the 5,000-7,000 rpm range, optimizing throttle response and engine braking. Thanks to the short wheelbase and low weight, flicking it from side to side is effortless, and the handling intuitive. After only a few miles it felt like I’d been riding this thing for years and I found myself in that wonderful riding zone, where your inputs are entirely in tune with the motorcycle and the feedback you get through the bars, pegs, and seat is clear and predictable. All that remains is the asphalt, the braking points, the exits, and the exhilarating forces working through your body, now a part of the bike. I didn’t want to stop, fearing even a brief pause might break the magic. 

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Road Test Review
Michelin Road 5 dual-compound tires complement the MT-07’s versatility.

One of the key reasons behind the MT-07’s popularity as an all-rounder is its ability to be just as forgiving to new riders as it is thrilling for riders with years of experience. The gearbox is somewhat notchy and requires more effort than some of its class rivals, but the clutch has a wide take-up zone and takes all the sweat out of pulling away from stops. The strong low-end torque even allows you to pull off in 2nd gear without embarrassing yourself with a stall. 

ABS is standard and Yamaha has made the front brake discs 14mm larger, which provided adequate stopping power but with a softer lever than premium brakes. The 41mm nonadjustable KYB fork remains unchanged, and the rear monoshock is adjustable for preload and rebound. The MT-07 was fighting above its weight when I took my wife on a pillion ride through the canyons. Handling and braking were up to the task, but the narrow rear seat and lack of grab rails ensure this will not be the first choice for riders looking for a good two-up bike. 

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Rider Test
The MT-07’s styling sets it apart from competitors in its class.

The MT-07’s past success has been dependent upon its nearly universal accessibility. The magic lies in maintaining these aspects while still being exciting, practical, comfortable, and visually appealing. Riders familiar with the older models will not be disappointed. Nothing has been compromised where it matters. The updated styling represents a bold modern design and visually sets it apart from its rivals. 

What hasn’t changed is the MT-07’s ability to repeatedly take you back to that feeling you had the very first time you stepped off a bike with pedals and pulled away on a bike with pegs, when exertion was replaced with effortless thrust. It makes me grin just thinking about it. The MT-07 remains an excellent value while still offering riders of all skills, sizes, and needs the most important thing of all — pure, unadulterated fun. 

2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Road Test Review
Thanks to the MT-07’s agility and responsiveness, pitching it from turn to turn feels almost effortless. It’s a great bike for building and maintaining confidence, and it delivers plenty of excitement at a reasonable price.

2021 Yamaha MT-07 Specs

Base Price: $7,699
Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles 
Website: yamahamotorsports.com 

Engine

Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl. 
Displacement: 689cc 
Bore x Stroke: 80.0 x 68.6mm 
Compression Ratio: 11.5:1 
Valve Insp. Interval: 26,000 miles 
Fuel Delivery: DFI w/ 38mm throttle bodies x 2 
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 2.75 qt. cap. 
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet clutch 
Final Drive: O-ring chain

Chassis

Frame: Tubular-steel perimeter w/ engine as stressed member, steel swingarm
Wheelbase: 55.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.5 degrees/3.5 in.
Seat Height: 31.7 in.
Suspension, Front: 41mm stanchions, no adj., 5.1 in. travel
Rear: Single link-type shock, adj. preload and rebound, 5.1 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 298mm discs w/ opposed 4-piston calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 245mm hydraulic disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.50 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 5.50 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 180/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 406 lbs.
Load Capacity: 377 lbs.
GVWR: 783 lbs. 

Performance

Horsepower: 67.9 hp @ 8,600 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 46.5 lb-ft @ 6,400 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 45 mpg
Estimated Range: 165 miles 

The post 2021 Yamaha MT-07 | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone | First Ride Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
Updates for 2021 to Moto Guzzi’s V7 Stone and V7 Special include a larger engine and a revised chassis. (Photos by Larry Chen Photo)

“I would know the sound of a big Guzzi in my sleep. It concentrates its aural energies in your upper chest, ringing through your bones. It is … the sound of joy.”
— Melissa Holbrook Pierson, The Perfect Vehicle: What It Is About Motorcycles

When we find joy, we hold it close and nurture it. Woven throughout Pierson’s book, arguably one of the best ever written about motorcycling, is a romance between the author and Moto Guzzi. When searching for her first motorcycle, it was love at first sight: “a 500cc V-twin Moto Guzzi, red-and-black, a workhorse, and I thought it was beautiful.” 

Like any true love, Pierson’s passion for Moto Guzzi ran deep and transcended appearance. She fell under the spell of the Italian V-twin’s syncopated beat. She dedicated her mind, body, and spirit to learning to ride, doing her own maintenance, and enduring long hours in the saddle through stifling heat, bitter cold, and drenching rain. 

Moto Guzzi is a storied marque that celebrates a century of continuous production this year. Every Moto Guzzi — from the 1921 Normale, a 498cc single, to the 1955 Otto cilindri, a liquid-cooled, DOHC 500cc V-8 GP racer that topped 170 mph, to present-day models — has been built in the factory in Mandello del Lario, Italy, on the shores of Lake Como. 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The Centenario paint scheme is inspired by the 1955 Otto cilindri racebike. (Photo by Sergio Piotin)

Three models — V7 Stone, V9 Bobber, and V85 TT — are available with a special Centenario color scheme for 2021 that pays tribute to the Otto cilindri. Their silver fuel tanks are inspired by the racebike’s raw alloy tank, their green side panels and front fenders are a nod to its iconic dustbin fairing, and their brown seats and golden eagle tank emblems further set them apart, though all 2021 models/colors display 100th anniversary logos on their front fenders. 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The V7 Stone is a modern take on a classic roadster, with simple lines, dark matte finishes, and cast wheels.

Greg’s Gear
Helmet: HJC RPHA 90
Jacket: Joe Rocket Classic ’92
Gloves: Joe Rocket Cafe Racer
Pants: Scorpion Covert Pro Jeans
Boots: Highway 21 Journeyman

Over its long history, Moto Guzzi has designed and built many notable models, but the V7 is a true living legend, the very soul of the brand. After two decades of building small, inexpensive motorcycles after World War II, Moto Guzzi became the first Italian manufacturer to offer a large-displacement model when, in 1967, it introduced the 700cc V7. It was the genesis of the engine configuration that came to define Moto Guzzi: the “flying” 90-degree V-twin, with its air-cooled cylinders jutting outward into the wind and its crankshaft running longitudinally. The V7 also had an automotive-style twin-plate dry clutch, a 4-speed constant mesh transmission, and shaft final drive. 

Today’s V7 maintains a strong connection to the original, from its round headlight, sculpted tank, and upright seating position to its dry clutch, shaft drive, dual shocks, and dual exhaust. The V7 Special ($9,490) is classically styled, with spoked wheels, chrome finishes, dual analog gauges, and a traditional headlight. The more modern-looking V7 Stone ($8,990) has matte finishes, a single all-digital gauge, black exhausts, cast wheels, and an eagle-shaped LED set into the headlight.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The V7 Special (left) brightens things up with gloss, chrome, and spoked wheels.

I’ve ridden a variety of Moto Guzzis over the years — the Norge sport-tourer (named after the Norge GT 500, which Giuseppe Guzzi rode to the Arctic Circle in 1928), the carbon-fiber-clad MGX-21 Flying Fortress hard bagger, the classic California 1400 Touring, and the red-framed, chrome-tanked V7 Racer, among others. Each was unique, but all shared the distinctive cah-chugga-chugga sound when their V-twins fired up and the gentle rocking to the right side when their throttles were blipped at idle. 

Riding a Moto Guzzi feels special. It’s a visceral, engaging, rhythmic experience. The V7 Stone brought me back to the simple pleasure of motorcycling — the feel of the wind against my body, the engine’s vibrations felt through various touch points, the exhilaration of thrust. Although the new V7 has a larger 853cc engine, variations of which are found in the V9 and V85 TT, output remains modest — 65 horsepower at 6,800 rpm and 54 lb-ft of torque at 5,000 rpm, measured at the crank. But that’s enough. The V7 is one of those motorcycles that gives you permission to relax, to take your time and really savor the moment. What’s the rush? 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The Centenario edition’s silver and green paint complements the V7 Stone’s black engine and exhaust.

Moto Guzzi made many useful, subtle updates to the V7 platform. Reduced effort from the single-disc dry clutch. A stiffer frame and a bigger swingarm with a new bevel gear for the cardan shaft drive. Revised damping and a longer stroke for the preload-adjustable rear shocks. An updated ABS module. A wider rear tire (now 150/70-17). Vibration-damping footpegs. A thicker passenger seat. 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The V7’s new eagle-shaped digital gauge is tasteful.

All are appreciated, but if I’m honest, I thought about none of them as I rolled through curve after curve on California’s Palms to Pines Highway, climbing higher and higher into the rugged, snow-dusted San Jacinto Mountains. For the better part of a day, I just rode the V7. I didn’t try to figure out its riding modes (it doesn’t have any), nor did I connect my smartphone to Moto Guzzi’s multimedia app. I rolled on and off the throttle. I shifted through the gears. And I smiled. A lot. 

The V7 Stone is solid, predictable, carefree. Its engine doles out torque nearly everywhere, but it feels happiest chugging along in the midrange. Throttle response is direct, the exhaust note is soothing. Thanks to its modest weight, low seat, and natural ergonomics, riding and handling are effortless. Braking, shifting, suspension — everything dutifully meets expectations. Like the Guzzi that stole Pierson’s heart, the V7 Stone is a workhorse, and it’s easy on the eyes. Well, except for its peculiar-looking taillight, which has a constellation of red LEDs that look too sci-fi for this style of bike. 

The V7 Stone Centenario carries the weight of Moto Guzzi’s century of history with confidence. The brand is an acquired taste, favored by connoisseurs rather than the masses, and it inspires a cult-like following. When I interviewed Melissa Holbrook Pierson for the Rider Magazine Insider podcast, I asked about her first encounter with a Guzzi. “It was chance,” she said. “I just happened upon the bike that was literally perfect for me.” 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone is one of three new Guzzi’s available in the commemorative Centenario paint scheme.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone

Base Price: $8,990 
Price as Tested: $9,190 (Centenario edition) 
Website: motoguzzi.com 
Engine Type: Air-cooled, longitudinal 90-degree V-twin, OHV w/ 2 valves per cyl. 
Displacement: 853cc 
Bore x Stroke: 84.0 x 77.0mm 
Horsepower: 65 hp @ 6,800 rpm (claimed, at the crank) 
Torque: 54 lb-ft @ 5,000 rpm (claimed, at the crank) 
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated dry clutch 
Final Drive: Shaft 
Wheelbase: 57.1 in. 
Rake/Trail: 28 degrees/4.1 in. 
Seat Height: 30.7 in. 
Wet Weight: 480 lbs. 
Fuel Capacity: 5.5 gals. 

The post 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa | Video Review

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa video review
We tested the 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa for two days on the street and track. (Photo by Kevin Wing)

We test the third-generation 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa, a 1,340cc, 188-horsepower sportbike received its first major update since 2008.

Compared to the previous model, peak horsepower and torque are lower — 188 horsepower at 9,700 rpm (down from 194) and 111 lb-ft at 7,000 rpm (down from 114) — but there are sizable gains in the heart of the rev range. Suzuki claims the new Hayabusa goes 0-60 mph in 3.2 seconds, a couple of tenths faster than its predecessor.

The Hayabusa has updated styling, new instrumentation, and a new IMU-based electronics package called the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System. Six riding modes (three presets, three customizable) adjust power, engine braking, traction control, and quickshifter mode. SIRS also includes linked cornering ABS, a speed limiter, launch control, slope-descent control, hill-hold control, and cruise control.

We tested the 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa for two days on the street and on the track in Utah. It’s insanely fast, makes a ton of velvety smooth power at all times, and handles well for a 582-pound sportbike. Check it out in our video review:

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit suzukicycles.com.

The post 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone | Video Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Centenario video review
Riding the 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Centenario (photo by Larry Chen Photo)

Moto Guzzi is celebrating 100 years of continuous production this year. Its updated V7 Stone is available in a special Centenario edition for 2021 that’s a tribute to Moto Guzzi’s Otto cilindri V-8 GP racer, which went over 170 mph in 1955. The Centenario livery, with a silver tank, green fenders and side panels, a brown seat, and special badging, is also available on 2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT and V9 Bobber models for an extra $200.

For 2021, the V7 Stone ($8,990) and V7 Special ($9,490) have a larger 853cc V-twin that makes 65 horsepower at 6,800 rpm and 54 lb-ft of torque at 5,000 rpm, measured at the crank. Other updates include reduced effort from the single-disc dry clutch; a stiffer frame and a bigger swingarm with a new bevel gear for the cardan shaft drive; revised damping and a longer stroke for the preload-adjustable rear shocks; an updated ABS module; a wider rear tire (now 150/70-17); vibration-damping footpegs; a thicker passenger seat; an updated styling.

The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone is solid, predictable, carefree. Find out more by watching our video review:

To find a Moto Guzzi dealer near you, visit motoguzzi.com.

The post 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Harley-Davidson Announces “From Evolution to Revolution” Global Reveal

Harley Davidson From Evolution to Revolution teaser
Harley-Davidson provided this teaser image when announcing the upcoming global reveal.

Harley-Davidson has announced a new mid-season motorcycle reveal, “From Evolution to Revolution.” The virtual launch event will be held July 13, 2021, at 10 a.m. CDT, and is open to anyone who registers.

This new model follows the arrival of the Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 with its all-new Revolution Max powertrain.

“Following the successful launch of our first adventure touring motorcycle, the Pan America, we are excited to reveal another all-new motorcycle, built on the Revolution Max platform in the sport segment, showcasing unmatched Harley-Davidson technology, performance, and style,” said Jochen Zeitz, chairman, president, and CEO Harley-Davidson.

In 2018, when H-D rolled out its “More Road to Harley-Davidson” strategic plan, it provided prototype images of the Pan America as well as the Bronx streetfighter and 1250 Custom, all to be powered by a new modular engine platform, which we now know is the Revolution Max. The Bronx was said to be a 975cc motorcycle, while the Custom was 1,250cc. The teaser image for the new motorcycle says “1250” and looks similar to the 1250 Custom.

Harley-Davidson Streetfighter
Prototype image of the Harley-Davidson Bronx
Harley-Davidson 1250 Custom
Prototype image of the Harley-Davidson 1250 Custom.

The reveal event will preview details of the new motorcycle and include presentations by Harley-Davidson leadership, product experts, and riders. To take part in the “From Evolution to Revolution” virtual launch event, you can register at H-D.com/JulyReveal.

The post Harley-Davidson Announces “From Evolution to Revolution” Global Reveal first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special | First Ride Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
Whether picking your way along a technical off-road trail or wearing down your chicken strips on a twisty paved road, the Pan America 1250 is well-balanced and highly capable. (Photos by Kevin Wing & Brian J. Nelson)

When you step up to the plate, when you’re facing fierce competitors and all eyes are on you, sometimes you have to swing for the fences. That’s what Harley-Davidson — a 118-year-old American motorcycle manufacturer known primarily for cruisers and baggers — has done with its new Pan America 1250 and Pan America 1250 Special adventure tourers.

Harley is a new player in the adventure touring segment, which has grown in breadth and depth over the past several decades. BMW recently introduced a 40th anniversary edition of its highly popular — and very capable — R 1250 GS. And there are big-league adventure bikes made by Ducati, Honda, KTM, Moto Guzzi, Suzuki, Triumph, and Yamaha, many of which are best-selling models with years of development and evolution under their belts.

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
Styling has tie-ins to the Fat Bob and Road Glide; side-laced wheels are optional.

During more than a decade of largely stagnant motorcycle sales since the Great Recession, large-displacement adventure and dual-sport models have been a rare source of growth. Harley wants a cut of that action. As it demonstrated with the release of the LiveWire electric motorcycle, Harley wants to expand its customer base. Two ways it can do that are to sell new models to its existing customers, and sell new models to new customers. Some existing customers own a variety of motorcycles, like Rider contributor Bruce Gillies, who owns a Road Glide Ultra, a Triumph Tiger 800XC and a KTM 690 Enduro R. Bruce is retired from the U.S. Navy and buys American-made products whenever he can. He’s also a highly skilled rider who demands a lot from his motorcycles. He’d consider buying a Pan America, but only if it meets his high expectations.

Rest assured, Bruce. The Motor Company knocked this one out of the park.

[Editor’s Note: After this story was published, Bruce traded in his Triumph for a Pan America 1250 Special with ARH, and he loves it.]

Harley designed and built an exciting, capable and innovative adventure bike in its first attempt. Given the high profile of the Pan America and the eagerness of naysayers to pounce on any weakness, Harley knew it couldn’t release an odd-duck motorcycle. It learned that lesson with the Buell Ulysses. Belt drive is out, chain drive is in, not only because a chain is light, durable in off-road situations and can be repaired in the field, but also because that’s what many adventure riders demand. A V-twin engine stays true to the brand, but it has to be liquid-cooled and offer the power and sophistication necessary to compete in this segment. The new Revolution Max 1250 V-twin makes a claimed 150 horsepower and 94 lb-ft of torque, and ride modes change output and throttle response at the touch of a button.

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
Commanding cockpit has an adjustable windscreen and hand guards. Touchscreen display is bright and easy to use.

Harley also knew it needed a hook — a killer app, if you will. And that’s Adaptive Ride Height (ARH), a $1,000 factory-installed option on the Pan America 1250 Special that automatically lowers ride height, and therefore the pilot’s seat, by 1 to 2 inches as the bike comes to a stop. The Special’s semi-active suspension automatically adjusts preload to 30% sag regardless of load, which is what accounts for the range of height adjustment. The system works seamlessly and virtually undetectably, and makes a huge difference in effective seat height. ARH is a real game-changer because seat height is one of the biggest obstacles for some riders to overcome when considering an adventure bike. Furthermore, it brings seat height within reach of more riders without compromising suspension travel or cornering clearance. (Click here to read our technical deep dive into the Pan America 1250’s Revolution Max engine and ARH.)

After years of development and benchmarking, not to mention teasing at shows and speculation by the media, the first public test of the Pan America was at its press launch. I have to hand it to the folks who planned the event — this was no bunny slope test ride. Hosted at RawHyde Adventures’ Zakar training facility a couple hours north of Los Angeles, we spent two full days flogging Pan America 1250 Specials on- and off-road in the Sierra Nevada mountains and Mojave Desert. We rode nearly 400 miles on highways, twisting mountain roads and off-road trails that included gravel, sand, rocks, tricky climbs and descents — even a few jumps.

2021 Harley-Davidson 
Pan America 1250 Special review
Top-shelf semi-active Showa suspension made for a plush landing. Damping rates can be set to Sport, Balanced, Comfort, Off-Road Soft and Off-Road Firm.

Greg’s Gear
Helmet: Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular
Jacket: Fly Racing Terra Trek
Gloves: Fly Racing Coolpro Force
Pants: Fly Racing Terra Trek
Boots: Fly Racing FR5

As the saying goes, you never get a second chance to make a first impression. After tip-toeing down the sand-and-gravel access road from Zakar to the pavement and falling into formation on Route 58 with the dozen riders in our group, I began taking mental notes. As with many full-sized adventure bikes, the Pan America was comfortable and accommodating, with plenty of legroom, an upright seating position and a relaxed reach to a wide handlebar. Before the ride began, Harley’s tech staff helped us adjust the dual-height stock seat (33.4/34.4 inches), install either the accessory low or high seat (which reduce or increase the dual heights by 1 inch, respectively) or install accessory 2-inch handlebar risers.

The whole business of seat heights becomes a little fuzzy because we were on Pan America 1250 Specials with ARH installed. At a stop, the unladen height of the stock seat in the low position is 32.7 inches rather than 33.4 inches without ARH. In its specs Harley also provides laden seat height with a 180-pound rider, which is 31.1 inches on the Special without ARH and 30.4 inches with ARH. Install the $249.95 Reach Solo Seat on an ARH-equipped Special and laden seat height can be as low as 29.4 inches. In other words, Harley went to great lengths to make sure seat height is not a barrier to owning a Pan America, though getting exactly what you want may require an investment.

2021 Harley-Davidson 
Pan America 1250 Special review
Thanks to its powerful Revolution Max 1250 V-twin and excellent chassis, the Pan America is one of the sportiest motorcycles ever to come out of Milwaukee.

After humming along the freeway for a half hour with the cruise control on and the on-the-fly adjustable windscreen parting the air smoothly, we turned onto Caliente-Bodfish Road, one of the gnarliest paved roads in the Sierra foothills, and began to wick it up. The Pan America offers eight ride modes — Sport, Road, Rain, Off-Road, Off-Road Plus and three custom modes — which adjust power output, throttle response, engine braking, traction control, ABS and suspension damping. The Revolution Max 1250 is ripper, with a sportbike-like sound, feel and responsiveness, and, thanks to variable valve timing, it delivers generous low-end torque as well as a screaming top end.

As has become increasingly common, rather than bolting the engine to the frame, the engine serves as the main structural element of the chassis. Attached directly to the engine are a front frame that incorporates the steering head, a forged aluminum mid frame that’s the attachment point for the cast aluminum swingarm and a tubular-steel trellis subframe. Overall the chassis is stiff and robust, contributing to the Pan America 1250 Special’s neutral, stable handling. And Harley used tried-and-trusted component suppliers, with a steering damper made by Öhlins, radial-mount monoblock 4-piston front calipers made by Brembo and suspension made by Showa — a 47mm USD Balance Free Fork and a Balanced Free Rear Cushion-lite shock, both with 7.5 inches of travel. Everything performed to a high level in a wide range of conditions.

2021 Harley-Davidson 
Pan America 1250 Special review
The 
Pan America 1250 Special is available in four color options: Deadwood Green (shown here), Baja Orange/Stone Washed White Pearl, Gauntlet Gray Metallic, and Vivid Black.

Standard on the Pan America are cast aluminum wheels (19-inch front, 17-inch rear) shod with specially designed Michelin Scorcher Adventure 90/10 tires, which offered good grip and handling on pavement and during light off-roading. Bikes we tested were equipped with the optional side-laced tubeless wheels (which cost $500 and weigh 14 pounds more than the cast wheels). On the second day, our bikes were fitted with accessory Michelin Anakee Wild 50/50 tires ($449.90), which give up some confidence and grip on pavement but are excellent off-road tires, even at the higher street temperatures we were running. Harley’s RDRS Safety Enhancements package includes IMU-enabled “cornering enhanced” linked ABS and traction control, with settings determined by ride mode (the cornering function and rear ABS are disabled in certain off-road modes). Drag-Torque Slip Control, which is like traction control for the engine to manage rear-wheel traction during aggressive riding, as well as cruise control and hill hold control are also part of the package.

Reactions to the Pan America’s styling have been mixed. Lacking the prominent beak or high front fender that is popular on many ADV bikes, it stands apart from the crowd, with a headlight design influenced by the Fat Bob and front bodywork inspired by the Road Glide’s sharknose fairing. Above the Daymaker Signature LED headlight, which uses 30 LED elements behind a diffuser lens, the Special has a Daymaker Adaptive LED headlight that illuminates a series of three lights as lean angle reaches 8, 15 and 23 degrees.

2021 Harley-Davidson 
Pan America 1250 Special review
Trona Pinnacles, which served as a backdrop in “Star Trek V” and “Planet of the Apes” among other films, was an ideal off-road test site. Michelin Anakee Wild tires added grip.

Harley offers a standard version of the Pan America 1250 that starts at $17,319, but many buyers will probably opt for the Pan America 1250 Special we tested. Starting at $19,999, the Special adds semi-active suspension with automatic preload adjustment (and the availability of ARH as a factory option), the adaptive headlight, the steering damper, a tire-pressure monitoring system, a centerstand, an aluminum skid plate, engine protection bars, hand guards, heated grips and a dual-height rear brake pedal.

In one shot, Harley-Davidson not only built its first adventure bike, it also built its first sportbike and sport-touring bike. We hammered the Pan Americas for two days, and they never gave up or reacted in an unexpected way or felt out of their depth. Whatever the metric — power, performance, handling, durability, technology, weight, price — the Pan America 1250 Special can compete head-to-head with well-established players in the ADV segment. Is it the best overall, or in any particular category? Well, that remains to be seen — two days and 400 miles, none of which were ridden back-to-back with competitors in the class, is not enough to draw firm conclusions. But this is one rookie that shows great promise.

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
Adventure touring, sport touring, on-road, off-road, tall or short rider, solo or with a passenger, with options, luggage and accessories or bone stock — whatever you’re into, the Pan America can be spec’d to satisfy your needs.

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special Specs

Base Price: $19,999
Price as Tested: $22,299 (ARH, side-laced wheels, Anakee Wild tires, skid plate)
Website: harley-davidson.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 60-degree V-twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,252cc
Bore x Stroke: 105 x 72mm
Horsepower: 150 @ 9,000 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Torque: 94 lb-ft @ 6,750 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated assist-and-slipper wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 62.2 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 32.7/33.7 in. (unladen w/ ARH)
Wet Weight: 559 lbs. (claimed, stock)
Fuel Capacity: 5.6 gals.

The post 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Tech Talk: Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 in Deadwood Green (photo by Kevin Wing)

In July 2018, Harley-Davidson announced a five-year growth strategy called “More Roads to Harley-Davidson,” a plan to add new products, provide broader access, strengthen its dealer network and amplify the brand. Expansion beyond Harley’s typical cruiser, bagger and touring models would include the LiveWire electric motorcycle, which debuted for 2020, and “middleweight adventure touring, streetfighter and high-performance custom models.”

The “More Roads” strategy offered the first look at the Pan America adventure tourer, with few details beyond its displacement and what could be gleaned from a photo of the prototype. At the 2019 EICMA show in Milan, Harley unveiled the Pan America and the Bronx streetfighter, both to be powered by a liquid-cooled 60-degree V-twin engine platform called the Revolution Max — 1,250cc in the Pan America and 975cc in the Bronx — and launched in 2020.

In February 2020, amid financial troubles, Harley-Davidson announced a revised five-year strategy called “Hardwire” that would, among other changes, “selectively focus on opportunities in profitable segments.” Plans to expand the company’s product portfolio were scaled back. The Pan America made the cut, the Bronx did not. Then the pandemic hit, which pushed the Pan America’s launch from late 2020 to early 2021. Details about the Pan America 1250 and up-spec Pan America 1250 Special were finally announced last February, and we got an opportunity to test ride the Special over two days in April.

Revolution Max 1250

Harley-Davidson Revolution Max 1250
Cutaway of the Revolution Max 1250 that powers the Pan America (photo courtesy of Harley-Davidson)

According to Harley, its all-new, modular Revolution Max engine will be offered in four displacements ranging from 500cc to 1,250cc. In addition to powering the Pan America, it will likely replace the aging, air-cooled mill in the Sportster and may replace the liquid-cooled Revolution X in whatever entry-level models fill the gap for the discontinued Street 500 and Street 750.

In the Pan America 1250, the Revolution Max displaces 1,252cc, has a 13.0:1 compression ratio and makes a claimed 150 horsepower at 9,000 rpm and 94 lb-ft of torque at 6,750 rpm. Like the Revolution V-twin that powered the V-Rod and the Revolution X that powered the Street models, the Max’s cylinders have a 60-degree included angle. The two crankshaft connecting rod journals are offset by 30 degrees, resulting in a 90-degree firing order for smooth power delivery. Dual overhead cams use roller-finger followers to actuate four valves per cylinder and hydraulic lash adjusters eliminate periodic maintenance. Computer-controlled variable valve timing (VVT) independently advances or retards intake and exhaust timing through a potential range of 40 degrees of crankshaft rotation, with the goal of broadening the powerband to deliver ample low-end torque as well as high-rpm horsepower. Dual spark plugs optimize ignition and a robust, dry-sump oiling system is designed to withstand the demands of adventure riding.

Harley-Davidson Revolution Max 1250

Because the Revolution Max is a stressed member of the Pan America’s chassis, it needed to be strong and light. Harley used finite element analysis and optimization techniques to reduce material mass in cast and molded components. Complex casting techniques allowed oil and coolant passages to be integrated into the engine in such a way that minimized wall thicknesses. Single-piece aluminum cylinders have nickel silicon carbide-surface galvanic coating, pistons are made of forged aluminum and the rocker, camshaft and primary covers are made of magnesium. An engine that vibrates less endures less stress over its life cycle, allowing components to be made lighter. A spiral-shaped, chain-driven balancer in the crankcase minimizes primary vibration, while a small balancer located in front of the cylinder head between the camshafts minimizes secondary vibration.

Revolution Max engines are built in Harley’s Pilgrim Road facility near Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and complete Pan Americas are assembled in York, Pennsylvania.

Adaptive Ride Height

Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Adaptive Ride Height ARH
Adaptive Ride Height is a factory option on the Pan America 1250 Special, and it offers several modes. (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

To be competitive in the adventure touring segment, the Pan America 1250 and Pan America 1250 Special are equipped with state-of-the-art electronics like riding modes and Harley’s RDRS Safety Enhancements. The Special is equipped with added features, including Showa semi-active suspension that adjusts damping rates on the selected ride mode and automatically adjusts spring preload to provide 30% sag regardless of the load.

But the real innovation is the Adaptive Ride Height (ARH), a factory option available only on the Special. Using an array of sensors and algorithms, ARH automatically lowers the motorcycle’s ride height by 1 to 2 inches when the motorcycle comes to a stop (the amount of ride height adjustment depends on preload). Lowering the ride height lowers the rider’s seat, which accommodates a wider range of riders and adapts to a wider range of conditions than other full-sized adventure bikes, even those with semi-active suspension.

Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Adaptive Ride Height ARH
The Pan America 1250 Special’s semi-active suspension is made by Showa. (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

In standard ride modes, the default setting for ARH is Auto, but in custom ride modes ARH can be turned off or set to Auto with Short Delay or Auto with Long Delay, and those settings will be retained in that mode after the ignition is turned off. In Auto mode, ARH will not lower the motorcycle in an condition where speed is greater than 15.5 mph, but lowering could begin to occur at 15.5 mph if the rider is braking very hard. Speed, brake lever pressure and deceleration rate are all used to determine when to lower the motorcycle. ARH targets the bike to be lowered when the rider would typically be moving their feet off the pegs to put them on the ground, which typically happens at speeds much slower than 15.5 mph under casual braking.

In technical off-road conditions at low speeds, especially if there is a lot of stopping and starting involved, it may not be optimal to have the motorcycle repeatedly lower and raise itself. In Short Delay mode ARH will not lower the ride height at all until 0.5 second after the motorcycle comes to a stop. Long Delay mode waits until 2 seconds after coming to a stop before lowering the bike.

Since ARH is a factory-installed option, it cannot be added to a Pan America 1250 Special after purchase. The beauty of ARH is that it offers a lower seat height without reducing suspension travel or otherwise compromising the motorcycle’s performance or capabilities.

The post Tech Talk: Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com