Tag Archives: Scooters

Should drivers ride light motorcycles?

A new survey has found a large majority of European riders believe drivers should be allowed to ride light motorcycles up to 125cc on a full car licence.

In Queensland, Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory, licensed drivers have been able to ride a 50cc scooter or moped for decades without having to do any sort of extra test.

However, in some states there are restrictions such as not carrying a pillion or riding on freeways or motorways.

Some European countries allow drivers to ride motorcycles up to 125cc and 15 horsepower such as the Honda Grom and Monkey bikes and the Kawasaki Z125 with little or no extra training or licensing.

Jake Dolan on the Honda Grom light motorcyclesHonda Grom

The Federation of European Motorcyclists’ Associations conducted a survey to see whether this should be extended to all of Europe and found riders largely agreed.

However, they say drivers should take some motorcycle lessons. There is no such requirement in Australia.

Training for light motorcycles

The Adventurists Monkey Bikes Monkey Runs Romania tall returned riders light motorcyclesMake sure the bike suits your needs … and your height!

Several rider representation groups have called for competency training for car drivers to be allowed to ride.

University safety researcher and Triumph Street Triple ride Ross Blackman confirms that many riders believe moped riders should be required to have a motorcycle licence.

“I’m not sure that this is supported by the stats, acknowledging that non-injury crashes are generally not reported,” he says.

“Something that muddies the waters here now is the rise of electric bicycles which, operationally, are similar to mopeds in terms of trip purpose etc.”

CARRS-Q QUT researcher dr Ross Blackman Motorbike online survey moped mopedsRoss Blackman

There have been no changes to the moped rules over the past few decades, despite most states reviewing their motorcycle licensing.

A Queensland Transport and Main Roads spokesperson says a 2012 review of moped licensing found the severity of moped crashes was lower overall compared with motorcycles.

This research determined there was no requirement for changes to licensing requirements.

Crashes involving mopeds within Queensland, 1 January 2013 to 31 May 2019.

Crash severity

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Fatal

3

0

0

0

1

2

1

Hospitalisation

78

78

41

44

65

61

22

Medical treatment

56

52

45

44

34

42

18

Minor injury

10

7

8

10

11

17

6

Total crashes

147

137

94

98

111

122

Compare that with motorcycle and scooter crashes (excluding mopeds).

Crash severity 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Fatal 42 37 54 64 50 41
Hospitalisation 930 932 968 966 935 960

However, we note that there may be significantly fewer people riding mopeds on car licences.

It is impossible to gauge exact numbers given many may only hire them.

Queensland registration statistics also don’t different mopeds from motorcycles.

Western Australia’s Department of Transport also reviewed moped licensing in 2014.

“Discontinuing moped operation on a car licence was not supported due to there being little evidence that moped riders in WA were overrepresented in crashes compared to other powered two wheelers,” a spokesperson says.

“DoT would reconsider moped operation on a car licence should data show that moped riders are overrepresented in crashes in WA, and that there was evidence to support that discontinuing the approach would result in considerable road safety benefits.”

WA registration stats show a 33% increase in moped registrations from 2011 to 2015.

“This could have been attributed to an increase in traffic congestion, lack of available parking, need for economical and convenient transport and that the holder of any valid class of driver s licence is also authorised to ride a moped,” the spokesperson says.

Pros and cons

Repsol Honda Racing Marc Marquez and Dani Pedrosa race mopedsMoped racing

We can see pros and cons in allowing drivers to ride mopeds.

On the positive side, it’s great for tourist areas where foreigners can hire a moped to get around.

It also allows drivers to experience the thrill of riding and hopefully encourage them to go for their full licence.

The licensing also allows inner-city residents to get around cheaply and conveniently without the expense of a motorcycle licence they may never need.

There is also a host of great light electric motorcycles and scooters hitting the market that qualify under the moped rules.

On the negative side, we see a lot of stupid moped riders doing some dangerous and illegal things on the roads.

An example is filtering. It is illegal to filter unless you are a fully licensed rider, for a start.

Secondly, we see moped riders filter to the front of a queue of traffic at the lights only to hold everyone up when the lights go green because of their slow acceleration.

Unfortunately, the ire drivers feel toward some idiot moped riders filters across to legal and sensible motorcyclists!

  • What do you think? Should moped licensing be extended to other states? Should there be some sort of competency course first? Leave your comments below.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

KTM, Husky defy road bike slump

KTM and, to a lesser extent Husqvarna, have defied the Australian road bike sales slump of -11.9% last year, according to official statistics from the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries released today.

Whatever KTM is doing, it seems to be working because the company, together with its acquisition Husqvarna, is also defying the worldwide downward motorcycle sales spiral.

They were the only two road bike companies in Australia to register positive growth last year: KTM was up 292 (18.3% to 1889 for the year and Husqvarna was up 64 (24.2%) to 329.

Despite a 2% drop in off-road sales, the result was enough to help KTM leapfrog Suzuki into fourth place overall for the first time.

At the other end of the scale was Honda which dropped 24.4% in road bike sales, its biggest fall in more than a decade.

Harley-Davidson topped road bikes despite dropping 643 (7.9%) to 6462, ahead of Honda, with Yamaha third.

Massive slump

The figures are the worst for road bikes since 47,752 were sold in 2016.

That’s a catastrophic slump of 16,771 sales or 33% in just four years.

The disastrous road bike figures should lead to the usual January sales, with MV Agusta the first with free on-road costs for any in-stock model.Slump

We don’t know MV Agusta’s sales figures because they are one of 23 minor manufacturers not included in the FCAI stats as they are not members.

The other missing brands are Benelli, Bimota, Bollini, CFMoto, Confederate, Daelim, EBR, Hyosung, Kymco, Laro, Megelli, Mercury, Norton, PGO, Royal Enfield, SWM, SYM, TGB, Ural, Viper and VMoto.

Road Bike sales

YTD 2019

YTD 2018

% CHAN

Aprilia

129

194

-33.5%

BMW

2470

2835

-12.9%

Ducati

1368

1512

-9.5%

Harley Davidson

6462

7019

-7.9%

Honda

5306

7019

-24.4%

Husqvarna

329

265

24.2%

Indian Motorcycle

803

836

-3.9%

Kawasaki

3865

4396

-12.1%

KTM

1889

1597

18.3%

Moto Guzzi

125

125

0.0%

Suzuki

2303

2686

-14.3%

Triumph

1787

2122

-15.8%

Yamaha

5145

5702

-9.8%

TOTAL

31981

36308

-11.9%

Total sales

Australia’s total motorcycle market including the ATV/SSVs, fell 6045 to slump 6.1% to 89,199 which was a 35.8% market share.

Also, for the first time in ages, fewer road bikes were sold than off-road bikes which were down only 543 to 31,981 (38.5% market share).

ATV/SSVs accounted for 20.1% of total sales, which was a 8.5% slump to 17,906 mainly due to the drought.

The only good news was scooters which again took an increased share of the total sales with 5.6%, up 125.9% to 5014, but off a low base.

However, figures could be even higher as many of the non-included companies in the figures are manufacturers of small-capacity scooters.

Total bike/scooter/ATV sales 

YTD 2019

YTD 2018

% CHAN

Aprilia

202

334

-39.5%

BMW

2675

2922

-8.5%

BRP Australia

2358

2423

-2.7%

Ducati

1368

1512

-9.5%

Harley Davidson

6462

7019

-7.9%

Honda

20819

22735

-8.4%

Husqvarna

2555

2251

13.5%

Indian Motorcycle

803

836

-3.9%

Kawasaki

8962

9376

-4.4%

KTM

7670

7497

2.3%

Moto Guzzi

125

125

0.0%

Piaggio

671

863

-22.2%

Polaris

5119

5443

-6.0%

Suzuki

6934

7557

-8.2%

Triumph

1787

2122

-15.8%

Vespa

744

884

-15.8%

Yamaha

19945

21145

-5.7%

TOTAL

89199

95044

-6.1%

Despite Honda dropping 8,4% overall, it retained the number one spot with 20,819 sales (23.3% market share).

Yamaha was second with 19,945 sales (22.4% share), followed by Kawasaki (8962, 10.0%), KTM (7670, 8.6%), and Suzuki (6934, 7.8%).

It should be noted that the figures only include FCAI members so 23 minor manufacturers are not included.

2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Breakout
Breakout 114 was the top-selling cruiser

They are mainly small-volume importers Norton, Hyosung, VMoto, Benelli, Bimota, Bollini, CFMoto, Confederate, Daelim, EBR, Kymco, Laro, Megelli, Mercury, MV Agusta, Norton, PGO, Royal Enfield, SWM, SYM, TGB, Ural and Viper.

Top 10 by Category – Cruiser

January – December 2019 compared to January – December 2018

Manufacturer

Model

Total

YTD 2019

YTD 2018

% CHAN

Harley Davidson

FXBRS

885

794

11.5%

Harley Davidson

XG500

838

944

-11.2%

Kawasaki

Vulcan S

635

670

-5.2%

Honda

CMX500

630

746

-15.5%

Harley Davidson

FLFBS

461

453

1.8%

Yamaha

XVS650/A

445

515

-13.6%

Harley Davidson

FLSB

444

312

42.3%

Indian Motorcycle

Scout

404

496

-18.5%

Harley Davidson

FXBB

354

491

-27.9%

Harley Davidson

FLSL

231

209

10.5%

Top 10 by Category – Sport Touring

January – December 2019 compared to January – December 2018

Manufacturer

Model

Total

YTD 2019

YTD 2018

% CHAN

Yamaha

YZF-R3A

835

712

17.3%

Kawasaki

Ninja 650L

249

304

-18.1%

Yamaha

MT09TRA

185

161

14.9%

Yamaha

MT07TRL

127

118

7.6%

Kawasaki

VERSYS-X 300

119

130

-8.5%

BMW

S 1000 XR

118

149

-20.8%

Kawasaki

Ninja 1000

98

148

-33.8%

Honda

CBR650FL

91

331

-72.5%

Suzuki

GSX-R125

88

83

6.0%

Yamaha

YZF-R15

72

97

-25.8%

Top 10 by Category – Touring

January – December 2019 compared to January – December 2018

Manufacturer

Model

Total

YTD 2019

YTD 2018

% CHAN

Harley Davidson

FLHXS

353

272

29.8%

Harley Davidson

FLTRXS

200

118

69.5%

Harley Davidson

FLHTK

178

143

24.5%

Harley Davidson

FLHRXS

128

119

7.6%

Harley Davidson

FLHTCUTG

111

117

-5.1%

BMW

R 1250 RT

111

5

2,120.0%

Yamaha

FJR1300

108

108

0.0%

Indian Motorcycle

Chieftain

95

73

30.1%

Harley Davidson

FLHXSE

91

95

-4.2%

Harley Davidson

FLRT

65

75

-13.3%

Yamaha MT-10 bargain hunter 4
Yamaha MT-10 is one of the few naked bikes to increase sales

Top 10 by Category – Naked

January – December 2019 compared to January – December 2018

Manufacturer

Model

Total

YTD 2019

YTD 2018

% CHAN

Honda

CB125E

1013

1113

-9.0%

Yamaha

MT07L

901

1002

-10.1%

Yamaha

MT-09

749

738

1.5%

Honda

GROM

536

715

-25.0%

Yamaha

MT03LA

463

616

-24.8%

KTM

390DUKE

336

356

-5.6%

Kawasaki

Z900RS

282

393

-28.2%

Honda

Monkey

244

266

-8.3%

Yamaha

MT10

241

220

9.5%

Yamaha

XSR700LA

235

318

-26.1%

Top 10 by Category – Super Sport

January – December 2019 compared to January – December 2018

Manufacturer

Model

Total

YTD 2019

YTD 2018

% CHAN

Kawasaki

NINJA 400

989

1089

-9.2%

Honda

CBR500R

481

618

-22.2%

Honda

CBR650R

347

0

100%

Ducati

Superbike

205

86

138.4%

Yamaha

YZF-R1

167

151

10.6%

Honda

CBR1000RR

166

121

37.2%

Suzuki

GSX-R1000

136

124

9.7%

KTM

RC390

132

254

-48.0%

Suzuki

GSX-R750

128

212

-39.6%

Ducati

959 Panigale

98

156

-37.2%

Top 10 by Category – Scooters

January – December 2019 compared to January – December 2018

Manufacturer

Model

Total

YTD 2019

YTD 2018

% CHAN

Honda

NSC110

1109

597

85.8%

Suzuki

ADDRESS

779

495

57.4%

Vespa

GTS 300

368

389

-5.4%

Honda

MW110

307

207

48.3%

Piaggio

Fly 150

298

309

-3.6%

Honda

WW150

276

295

-6.4%

Yamaha

GPD150A

224

126

77.8%

Vespa

PRIMAVERA 150

210

236

-11.0%

Yamaha

XMAX300

197

169

16.6%

Piaggio

Medley 150

121

95

27.4%

Top 10 by Category – LAMS Approved

January – December 2019 compared to January – December 2018

Manufacturer

Model

Total

YTD 2019

YTD 2018

% CHAN

Yamaha

WR450F

1206

1136

6.2%

Honda

NSC110

1109

597

85.8%

Honda

CB125E

1013

1113

-9.0%

Kawasaki

NINJA 400

989

1089

-9.2%

Yamaha

MT07L

901

1002

-10.1%

Harley Davidson

XG500

838

944

-11.2%

KTM

300EXC

837

1052

-20.4%

Yamaha

YZF-R3A

835

712

17.3%

Suzuki

ADDRESS

779

495

57.4%

KTM

500EXC

762

746

2.1%

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Balancing scooter comes when you call

This balancing act will amaze your friends when you call your motorbike or scooter and it automatically comes to you from its parking space.

That’s a vision of the future from Indian company Liger Mobility who have developed a prototype self-balancing scooter that comes when you call it.

It basically uses voice activation like Siri and it self-balances via gyroscopes controlled by microprocessors.

Self-balancing prototypes

It’s not dissimilar to self-balancing prototypes already developed by Honda, BMW and Yamaha.

Honda's self-balancing motorcycle - short season damon last
Honda’s self-balancing motorcycle

However, this scooter goes further with the ability to come when called.

Apart from the carpark scenario, we can also see that this could be convenient for ageing riders or women riding in high heels who don’t want to get them dirty.Balancing scooter Liger Mobility

However, the Bombay start-up’s claims that it will somehow be safer seem spurious.

We’re not sure of the statistics, but we couldn’t imagine too many deaths from parking incidents or falling over when coming to a stop.

The balancing act a novel display and makes a great video, but surely the extra weight and expense of gyroscopes won’t make these self-balancing scooters and motorcycles commercially viable.

Liger Mobility think it will and say it will only increase the cost of an electric or petrol-powered scooter by 10%.

That’s 10% many might prefer to spend on protective clothing!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Bid to halt motorcycle theft boom

A boom in motorcycle theft rates has prompted the National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council to invite rider groups to partner with them to raise security awareness.

Australian motor vehicle theft rose 7% in the 12 months to September 2019, largely the result of a 12% boom in motorcycle thefts, the highest of all vehicle groups.

Despite accounting for just 5% of registrations, motorcycle thefts now account for one in six stolen vehicles, according to Council figures.

Theft boom

The sobering statistics also show that almost two in three motorcycles are stolen from the home, one in six motorcycle theft victims have previously been a victim of theft and more than half of all stolen bikes are never recovered.

Council Projects and Communications Coordinator Caitlin Hrambanis says there could be several reasons for the explosion on motorcycle theft rates:

  • The ease with which they are stolen;
  • A high demand for parts; and
  • The lack of security measures by riders.

“The NMVTRC is looking to liaise with motoring groups to look to disseminate theft prevention messages,” Caitlin says.

“We are hoping to improve motorcycle security awareness among riders.”

The council wants to partner with interested motorcycle groups to improve the security message to riders.

For more details, please contact Caitlin by clicking here.

Click here for tips on securing your motorcycle or scooter.

Stolen bikes

The most likely targets for thieves are newer models, with almost 30% stolen aged five years or younger.

Motorcycles with an engine capacity of 150cc or less are the top theft targets such as scooters and mini bikes, closely followed by motorcycles with an engine capacity of 251-500cc.

South East Queensland is a hot spot for motorcycle theft with Brisbane, Gold Coast, Moreton Bay and Logan in the top five local authority areas for bike theft.

Motorcycle thefts by council areas 

(To the end of September)

State/Territory

Local council

2018

2019

% change

QLD

Brisbane (City)

371

514

38.5%

QLD

Gold Coast (City)

233

288

23.6%

VIC

Melbourne (City)

237

231

-2.5%

QLD

Moreton Bay (Regional Council)

117

175

49.6%

QLD

Logan (City)

158

171

8.2%

WA

Stirling (City)

130

166

27.7%

NSW

Sydney (City)

149

159

6.7%

VIC

Darebin (City)

105

139

32.4%

NSW

Newcastle (City)

111

137

23.4%

WA

Broome (Shire)

83

136

63.9%

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Parking victory for Sydney riders

A decision to charge riders for parking in some Sydney CBD areas has been reversed and riders who copped $82 parking fines have had them waived.

In October we reported on two such riders who were caught out when the jurisdiction of the parking area changed from City of Sydney council (COS) to state government.

Previously the riders were able to park free in the Rocks, Pyrmont and Darling Harbour areas including outside designated bike-only zones as long as they adhered to the time restrictions.

However, the state reclaimed the land in January, according to the council, and installed private company parking meters at the end of August 2019.

The COS website was only changed on 17 September 2019 after several motorcyclists complained, according to Property NSW.

“Disputed infringements issued before the website was updated have been waived,” they say.

After our publication of the unfair fines, they have reversed that decision.

A Department of Planning, Industry and Environment spokesperson told us:

We were recently made aware of inconsistencies between the government and the City of Sydney’s parking policies. We have now revised our parking guidelines and waived infringement notices relating to this discrepancy. Motorcycle and scooter riders no longer need to pay at any of the parking meters in our areas, however, must respect the time restrictions. Our policy is published on The Rocks website.

Day in court

Riders claim parking fines unfair
Jin and his yamaha custom

However, Jin Weng says it is no victory for him after taking a day off work without pay to fight the fine in court.

I pleaded guilty because pleading not guilty requires another hearing date and I can’t afford to take another day off work,” he says.

“Legal aid said it’s unlikely I can claim for my time even if I get a not guilty outcome, this is a shame as the courts should penalise councils and authorities for issuing fines in error otherwise there is no accountability for them to continually do this.

“It is unjust but I can see why most people just pay the fine as its multiple times the cost to challenge.

“I presented my supporting documents to the court and the judge decided on a section 10 1 (A) ruling meaning I am guilty but there is no conviction, or penalty. 

“I wouldn’t call it a victory given that I had to plea guilty to something that shouldn’t even been charged wasting half a day sitting in court.

They clearly did not want to waive my infringement by rejecting my appeal and proceeding with a court prosecution. They even took the time to submit to the courts a prosecution including the judge reading a statement from the prosecutor that I was aware of changes in the area as mentioned in my appeal.

“Will they be reimbursing me for taking a day off to go to court?”

Website update 

Riders claim parking fines unfair Sydney
Andrew and his scooter

Another fined Sydney rider, Andrew Johnstone, missed the change on the website and said the fines were unfair as there was not enough notice provided that the change had occurred.

He says the website has now been changed, but it “seems to say no and maybe”.

Click here for details. 

“Motorcyclists cannot be expected to read the website every day before parking a bike to ensure a road ownership hasn’t changed,” he said.

Andrew is still waiting for his fine to be waived.

Loss of Sydney spaces

The change in Sydney motorcycle parking follows the reduction of CBD kerbside parking last year to accommodate bus, pedestrian and cyclist infrastructure.

It prompted a petition for more motorcycle parking space.

Sydney motorcycle parking petition Emma MacIver
Emma launches petition

Petition organiser and commuter rider Emma MacIver says the city is lagging behind Melbourne and the rest of the world and Motorcycle Council of NSW parking subcommittee claimed council’s lack of consultation with riders on the issue was “disappointing”.

Emma’s petition has gained almost 2000 signatures.

Click here to sign her petition and make council pay attention!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Kymco announces 2020 Xciting S 400i | $8,990 + ORC

2020 Kymco Xciting S 400i


Kymco have announced their Xciting S 400i, ushering in their next generation maxi-scooter with high spec suspension and brakes, a powerful 400cc engine, high tech dash and large wheels.

KYMCO Xciting S i
2020 Kymco Xciting S 400i

The Xciting S 400i will sit between the flagship AK550 and the smaller capacity Downtown 350i models, offering a package closer to the AK550 with a strong sport touring focus, but priced competitively for those not after all the bells and whistles and the attached price tag.

KYMCO Xciting S i
The Kymco Xciting S 400i offers a sports-touring option under the flagship AK550

Sporty styling is matched to a single-cylinder fuel-injected powerplant producing 26.5kW or 35.5 horsepower, with the four-valve four-stroke offering fuel economy and an automatic transmission for easy commuting duties.

KYMCO Xciting S i
Styling is sporty with 35.5 horsepower on offer

Large 280mm petal rotors are found on the front of the Xciting S 400i, with a large 15-inch front wheel.

KYMCO Xciting S i
Large petal discs are featured on the 15inch front wheel

The rear also boasts a 240mm rotor and is a smaller 14-inch wheel, with Bosch 9.1 ABS run on both ends to ensure high levels of safety.

KYMCO Xciting S i
A smaller 14inch rear wheel is run, with Bosch 9.1 ABS and parking brake

The chassis has also been updated with redesigned engine and frame links, ensuring more strength and a double-clamp between the frame and fork, which is more on par with motorcycle designs. The changes ensure strong stability at high speeds, where the 400i will be performing past the expectation of smaller urban focused scooters.

KYMCO Xciting S i
An updated chassis ensures high levels of stability at speed, with motorcycle-inspired design elements

On the suspension side of things there’s a set of non-adjustable telescopic forks, while dual rear shocks offer five steps of preload adjustability, which is ideal for two-up riding or when laden up.

KYMCO Xciting S i
Rear shocks offer five-step preload adjustability

The 400i also features Kymco’s Noodoe dash, offering smartphone connectivity and navigation, as well as the option to customise the dash display, with custom displays sharable via Noodoe cloud.

KYMCO Xciting S i
The Kymco Noodoe dash offers plenty of customisation options and smartphone connectivity

Storage comes in the form of two-stage underseat, as well as two locked glove compartments, complete with a 12V charging port.

KYMCO Xciting S i
Underseat storage on the Kymco Xciting S 400i

Lighting is also LED, while an adjustable screen is standard fitment, as are heated grips for a bit of luxury.

KYMCO Xciting S i
Lighting is LED with a futuristic taillight

The Xciting S 400i features a 805mm seat height, 12.5L fuel capacity and weighs in at 195kg dry, coming with a three-year factory warranty program, offering an addition year over the standard two year warranty if you have your vehicle serviced exclusively at an authorised dealer and retain an accurate service history.

KYMCO Xciting S i
Glove compartments are electronically locked and there’s a 12V outlet

The Xciting S 400i is arriving in dealers now and will be available for $8,990 plus on road costs in Matte Deep Blue. For further get in contact with your nearest KYMCO scooter dealer or head to the KYMCO Australia website at www.kymco.com.au (link).

KYMCO Xciting S i
The 2020 Kymco Xciting S 400i is available for $8,990 plus on road costs in Matte Deep Blue

2020 Kymco Xciting S 400i features

  • 400cc single-cylinder EFi 4-valve 4-stroke engine
  • 26.5kW of power
  • KYMCO’s Noodoe smart phone interactive dashboard
  • Twin 280mm disc brakes
  • Bosch 9.1 ABS braking system
  • Preload adjustable twin rear shock absorbers
  • Adjustable sports touring screen
  • LED headlight with daytime running light and LED taillight
  • Two electric auto-locking glove boxes with 12 volt charging port
  • Two stage seat-opening design with plenty of storage
  • Five-stage heated grips
  • 805mm seat height
  • 15 inch front and 14 inch rear wheels
  • Pillion foot rests
  • Rear wheel lock/park brake
  • Three-year factory warranty
  • Available in Matte Deep Blue
KYMCO Xciting S i
Adjustable sports-touring screen
KYMCO Xciting S i
2020 Kymco Xciting S 400i seat
KYMCO Xciting S i
2020 Kymco Xciting S 400i

Source: MCNews.com.au

2020 Yamaha Tricity 300 | 300cc three-wheel scooter

2020 Yamaha Tricity 300


Yamaha launched their Tricity 125 three-wheeler back in 2014, introducing the brand’s first ‘Leaning Multi-Wheel vehicle’ and evolving into the more powerful Tricity 155 more recently. Now for 2020 Yamaha have announced the Tricity 300, a mid-range option that sits above the Tricity 155, but well below their full sports-touring three-wheel motorcycle – the Niken.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS STA
2020 Yamaha Tricity 300

The Tricity offers excellent stability thanks to a dual front-wheel setup, built around the LMW Ackerman suspension/steering system, without compromising lean angle. Combined with  the easy-going automatic nature of a scooter TriCity make for an ideal commuter.

The Tricity 300 also offers the benefit of being able to be ridden on a car licence in some countries, although this isn’t the case in Australia, however we can assume the Tricity 300 will be LAMS legal, as the XMAX 300 is, and the Tricity will no doubt weigh in a little heaiver than the XMAX.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS ACT
2020 Yamaha Tricity 300

2020 Yamaha Tricity 300 features

  • Yamaha-exclusive Leaning Multi-Wheel (LMW) technology (three-wheeler)
  • Tilt Lock Assist system
  • Blue Core – liquid-cooled 4-stroke SOHC 300 cc 4-valve single-cylinder
  • Storage for 2 full-face helmets
  • LED lights and large LCD instruments
  • Convenient Smart Key operation
  • Traction Control System (TCS)
  • 267 mm brake rotors, ABS and Unified Brake System
  • Parking brake
  • Large 14-inch wheels

Leaning Multi Wheel (LMW) technology

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS DET
Yamaha’s Tricity goes larger capacity in 2020 with a 300cc version

The LMW Ackerman suspension/steering system features a parallelogram link and cantilevered front suspension with the dual fork tubes mounted on the inner face of the front wheels. This layout gives agile and confident handling together with enhanced feelings of stability when riding on slippery or uneven surfaces.

The LMW steering mechanism contributes towards the machine’s easy and user friendly character by giving a generous 72° of steering angle, making the Tricity 300 manoeuvrable in congested traffic and tight spaces. A full 130mm of ground clearance means the machine can handle uneven surfaces and avoid being grounded out when being pushed over kerbs while parking.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS ACT
The dual-wheel setup offers increased stability and confidence in slippery commuter conditions

Having two front wheels offers the benefits of additional front-end traction and braking power thanks to a wide 470mm front wheel-track, with a balanced and planted character when steering and cornering.

The Tricity 300 will be ideally suited to both new riders and those riders coming over to three-wheels from conventional scooter or motorcycle, with a focus on the new generation of riders with no experience on two or three wheels looking for an easy entry-point.


2020 Tricity 300 chassis

The Tricity 300 features a 1590 mm wheelbase combined with optimised steering geometry and a 470 mm front wheel track, which combined with a front-rear weight distribution of around 50:50 with a rider on board – ensure a great chassis balance and lightweight feeling.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS STA
The Tricity 300 has a 1590mm wheelbase, with 450mm front wheel track

The newly designed frame is constructed with small-diameter tubing offering a balance of strength and rigidity – while plates are used around the head pipe area to help provide feel when steering and cornering.

In order to reduce any feelings of vibration to a minimum, the engine is mounted to the new lightweight frame using a linked type system.

The Tricity 300 is also equipped with matching 14-inch wheels at both the front and rear, larger than those fitted to much of the competition which increases stability even further.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS DET
14-inch wheels offer a host of benefits, including at higher speeds, with specially developed Bridgestone rubber fitted

These lightweight larger diameter wheels and specially developed wide-section Bridgestone tyres offer a number of advantages, including high levels of traction, durability and wet weather performance, together with a smooth ride and confident road holding.

The use of large diameter 267 mm discs on all three wheels give greater braking power and control on a wide variety of road surfaces.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS ACT
267mm rotors are found on each of the three wheels, with a Unified Braking System and ABS

A commuter can encounter everything from tram lines and cobbles through to poorly maintained roads and diesel spills, but with a stable three-wheel configuration and high-specification brakes, the Tricity 300 is ready to tackle the all the commuting challenges.

As well as being equipped with ABS to prevent accidental wheel lock ups on loose or slippery surfaces, the Tricity 300 also features Yamaha’s Unified Braking System that balances braking force to all three wheels.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS DET
2020 Yamaha Tricity 300

Yamaha’s Unified Braking System ensures when the rider applies only the rear brake – either through the left handlebar lever or via the foot brake – braking force is applied to the front and rear wheels.

When both the front and rear brakes are applied at the same time the braking force applied to the front wheels is a combination of input from both levers; and when the front brake lever is applied on its own, only the front brakes are activated.


Tricity 300 styling & storage

The Tricity design incorporates styling cues from Yamaha’s XMAX and TMAX sport scooters – as well as a touch of DNA from the Niken – Yamaha’s three-wheel sport tourer motorcycle.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS DET
Generous underseat storage will fit two helmets on the Tricity 300

A compact and aerodynamic front cowl is slimmer and higher than other designs in the category. Tricity 300’s short and relatively narrow nose leaves an open space between the twin front wheels to emphasise this feature.

There’s a large storage space under the seat that can accommodate two full-face helmets or one full-face helmet and an A4-sized briefcase, and the compartment is fitted with internal LED lighting.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS DET
A oarking brake is also fitted to the Tricity for ease of parking

A parking brake secures the machine when not being ridden, while the fuel tank and seat locks can be easily released with the push of a button – and there’s also a DC outlet in the front panel for charging and powering various devices.


300cc Blue Core engine

The Tricity 300 is driven by Yamaha’s latest Blue Core engine, a liquid-cooled four-stroke SOHC 300cc four-valve single-cylinder engine used by the XMAX 300 and incorporates a number of features to suit the unique requirements of the new Tricity.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS ACT
The Blue Core 300cc powerplant has been further optimised for the Tricity 300

For strong acceleration, fuel efficiency and eco-friendliness, the Tricity 300 runs with revised fuel injector mapping settings, and the 12-hole injector features an optimised spray angle that increases combustion efficiency for strong low to mid-range torque, particularly important with a heavier three-wheeler compared to the more conventional XMAX.

Horsepower losses are reduced by the use of a semi-dry sump lubrication system and the Tricity 300 is equipped with a one-piece forged crankshaft.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS STA
2020 Yamaha Tricity 300

To achieve a high level of combustion efficiency the shape of the combustion chamber and intake port is also optimised while the lightweight DiASil offset cylinder is equipped with a durable forged piston.


2020 Tricity 300 electronics & tech

Using the new Tricity 300 is convenient thanks to its Smart Key system. As long as the rider has the Smart Key with them, they can carry out all of the main operations via the main switch.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS DET
A smart key system allows control of the bike without manually inserting a key, alongside an LCD display

Along with the three-wheel layout and the enhanced control offered by the ABS and a Unified Braking system, a Traction Control System (TCS) adds another layer of safety to the Tricity 300.

The Tricity 300’s LCD instruments provide all the relevant information in a clear and easy to understand display. There’s a large digital speedometer as well as a bar-type tachometer, clock, odometer, tripmeter and more – and ln the outer edges of the panel the rider can see the indicator lights showing ABS, Tilt Lock Assist system status, TCS and ambient air temperature – with a warning light coming on at 3ºC and lower.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS ACT
Traction control is also standard fitment on the Tricity 300 offering an additional safety benefit

The Tricity 300 also features a Tilt Lock Assist system that provides extra convenience by helping the machine to remain upright when stopped.

This system features a caliper and brake disc that are mounted onto the LMW mechanism’s upper parallelogram arm. When the Tilt Lock Assist system is activated, the caliper’s compact electric actuator pushes the pads onto the disc and locks the parallelogram linkage in place.

As soon as the Tricity 300 throttle is opened the Tilt Lock Assist system disengages automatically, enabling the rider to ride away.

Yamaha Tricity MW EU BNS DET
A Tilt Lock Assist system also helps keep the bike upright at a standstill automatically

The Tricity 300’s Tilt Lock Assist system is completely separated from the suspension functions, making it easier and more comfortable when pushing the Tricity 300 forwards or backwards when parking and also makes it easier when placing the vehicle on its main stand.

Australian availability and pricing is yet to be announced.

Source: MCNews.com.au

Why You Should Change Your Old Electric Scooter

(Sponsored post)

Scooters are not just meant for kids. If you want to avoid the hassles of parking your car or being stuck in traffic, then you should invest in buying a scooter. Electric scooters also come with a variety of features allowing you to choose one that will suit your needs. Whether you are an urban commuter or you want to take on nature travel, you must get a scooter suitable for your needs. Also, the engine noise associated with motocross tracks is a bit of a turn-off; hence, you must replace your old electric scooter with a better one.

1. Improvement in battery technology

More companies today are producing better electric scooters. This has increased competition in battery production. These recent years have been characterized by environmental-friendly and economical scooters. It is, thus, necessary for you to change your old electric scooter to allow yourself to experience the joy of these newer, improved batteries. These electric scooters have long-lasting batteries, which enables you to travel for up to 43 miles per charge. Also, battery consumption when the scooter is motionless remains minimal, so your charge will last longer.

2. Affordability

The electric cars are pricey, and biking is exhausting. Consequently, scooters are the most viable option. This means that to save some cash, you only have to change the old scooter for a newer model. Also, if you do not take a long-distance journey, scooters are better than electric bikes. They are available at affordable prices with great qualities. If the scooter is damaged, it is easier for you to get spare parts. The repairs will also not cost as much as they used to for the older models; click here for more information on repairs and pricing.

3. Speed Increase

With many electric scooter models released recently, most companies are competing to provide higher speeds and more control to the buyers. There are scooters, today, that go at an average speed of 60mph. This is why you should replace your old scooter and increase your speed. You cannot afford to miss the new upcoming powerful motors, which are equal to 400cc engine hence guaranteeing you great speed.

4. Better Appearance

You can change your scooter and get a better and fancy looking one. Most of them now come with a pillion passenger seat. They have stylish and contemporary designs. This means that they are more elegant and boost your self-esteem when you are riding around the city. The new models are equipped with a larger cargo box hence allowing you to carry more luggages.

5. Greater Control

The upcoming scooters are equipped with powerful motors, thus allowing the users to handle all acceleration of the motor. This means that you will not need a clutch and a gearbox. Besides, the scooters are environmentally friendly. This makes the new electric scooters efficient hence fun to ride.

Features To Consider When Buying a New Scooter

Ducati Super SOCO electric scooters
Ducati Super SOCO electric scooter

· Electric Motor

Before you choose a scooter for yourself, you need to consider whether you can climb mountains on the scooter. If your grounds are not smooth, then you need to choose an electric scooter with a motor that is powerful enough to allow you to climb fast without any issue. At least a 350-watt motor should do the trick.

· Range

You will have to consider how far the batteries can go on a single charge before you buy one. The range will also vary depending on whether you will be riding on flat ground or rough terrain. Temperatures will also affect the mileage of the scooter. You should put that into consideration too.

· Portability

The last thing you want is an electric scooter that is too heavy to carry around. One thing is for certain; you will not always be riding your scooter. Sometimes you will have to carry it around. While all scooters are relatively smaller, some are heavier than others. This difference could cause a huge problem for you. Whether you are buying online or from a brick and motor store, you need to consider how much weight you can handle versus how much the scooter weighs.

Conclusion

Old electric scooters put you at high risk of an accident. Also, sticking to your old machine limits you from experiencing the great power that comes with the new upcoming one. The British government is now subsidizing the production of electric scooters. Hence, they are inviting more innovation and more producers to enlarge the Market. You cannot afford to miss such new inventions, which will be revolutionary in the upcoming days.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Congestion tax call to include motorcycles

Melbourne has renewed calls for a CBD congestion tax, but now the plan is to include motorcycles and scooters.

Last week’s Melbourne future transport strategy suggested a system that would use number plate recognition for all vehicles.

No fee amounts have yet been suggested, but report author Marion Terrill says Melbourne should follow cities such as London, Stockholm and Singapore.

However, two of those cities have some exemptions for motorcycles and scooters.

Stockholm has no fees for motorcycles and scoters as London did initially.

However, since April 2019 the new London Ultra Low Emissions Zone charges £12.50 (about $A23) a day for motorcycles and scooters that do not meet Euro 3 emissions standards.London scooters England UK

Singapore has CBD road-user charges for all vehicles and plans to ban pre-2003 motorcycles throughout the city in 10 years.

Calls rejected

Melbourne Council first suggested a CBD congestion tax last year, but made no mention of motorcycles and scooters.

It cited a 2017 Grattan Institute report that said tax should be introduced in Sydney and Melbourne during peak hours within five years.

However, Melbourne Council cannot legislate the changes as is is a state matter and the State Government has previously rejected such calls.

The Victorian Motorcycle Council and Australian Motorcycle Council reject any moves for motorcycles and scooters to be included in any congestion tax.

“We are the solution to the congestion issue, not the problem,” says VMC media spokesman John Eacott.

“You’re quite right that council can’t change State legislation but they are driving a discussion which has, so far, been rejected by Victorian State Government.

“Any references to motorcycles may benefit from instead using the term PTWs (powered two-wheelers) should a broader audience become engaged.

“Experience has shown that the greener elements tend to change their tune when it’s pointed out that PTW includes scooters.” 

The Motorcycle Riders Association of Victoria also says PTWs should be exempt because riders “contribute financially paying similar road fees and CTP premiums to car owners and motorcycles do less damage to infrastructure and the environment”.

John says the VMC is pleased the report notes that altering road design to include narrow lanes dedicated to small traffic such as micro and light cars and motorbikes would have a beneficial effect on congestion.

Congestion charges

Sydney traffic congestion motorcycles lane filtering planning

Calls for CBD congestion charges are not new. They have been around for years.

In March this year, Sydney University transport economist Professor David Hensher had a novel twist on the idea.

He said motorists should be able to choose to pay a 5c-per-kilometre congestion tax in return for lower rego.

Other cities have various fee systems not only to reduce traffic congestion but also air pollution:

  • Milan’s Ecopass charges all vehicles entering a designated traffic restricted zone and bans old cars and bikes that do not meet set emissions standards;
  • China and Brazil are considering congestion charges in various cities; and
  • Oregon, USA, has trialled a voluntary pay-per-mile distance charge resulting in a 22% drop in traffic in peak hours and a 91% approval by participants.

Rider concern

Riders should be concerned because these taxes and bans could spread to other congested cities.

ride to work day traffic congestion car
Singapore traffic congestion

The Singapore ban on older motorcycles seems harsh but may be warranted as the city is choked by thousands of two-stroke scooters that have since ceased production.

But powered two-wheelers should be exempt because they not only free up traffic, they can also reduce pollution as stricter European emissions standards have made them much cleaner.

Also, the coming wave of electric models will make them even more attractive for easing CBD congestion and pollution woes.

Melbourne City Council once had an exemplary motorcycle plan.

Yet the city no longer has free tolls for motorcycles, widespread free footpath parking is slowly being eroded. and now riders might be hit with a congestion tax.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Riders claim Sydney parking fines unfair

Sydney riders are claiming $82 parking fines they received are unfair as the jurisdiction of the area changed from City of Sydney council (COS) to state government without clear public notice.

Previously the riders were able to park free in the Rocks, Pyrmont and Darling Harbour areas including outside designated bike-only zones as long as they adhered to the time restrictions.

However, the state reclaimed the land in January, according to the council, and installed private company parking meters at the end of August 2019.

The COS website was only changed on 17 September 2019 after several motorcyclists complained, according to Property NSW.

“Disputed infringements issued before the website was updated have been waived,” they say.

Fines unfair, say riders

Riders claim parking fines unfair
Jin and his yamaha custom

However, riders Jin Weng and Andrew Johnstone missed the change on the website and say the fines are unfair as there was not enough notice provided that the change had occurred.

Property NSW say “signage informing motorists and riders of the change of operation was placed on the meters from the time of the transition, which was managed in collaboration with City of Sydney, and notices were distributed to residents”.

However, Jin claims the road signs are “exactly the same” and the website was updated nine months after the change of jurisdiction.

“Motorcyclists cannot be expected to read the website everyday before parking a bike to ensure a road ownership hasn’t changed,” he says.

Andrew says he was unfairly slapped with an $82 fine along with about eight others in the bike-only zone in the Rocks. 

Riders claim parking fines unfair
Andrew and his scooter

The zone ends at 6pm and then it is four-hour meter parking. 

“I got done at 7.23pm. Previously under Sydney Council Laws there was no meter fee payable. Now this has changed,” Andrew says.

“I never saw anything on the signs for parking. Maybe the signs were on the meters themselves which naturally we would never look at.

“But the website just states part of the Rocks and the link does not link to an exact map and it says to check signs. Signs are no different to any other signs across the city.”

Jin received a parking fine Cumberland St outside a City of Sydney recreation centre because new parking meters were installed by a private company on a road at the doorstep of the COS  recreation centre.

“Other areas within Sydney not under the COS jurisdiction have clear indication at the location that it is managed by a different authority such as areas in the Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain.

“Sufficient notification should have been given when the changes occurred, the signs and parking meters at Cumberland St is exactly the same as anywhere else in the city of Sydney,” Jin says.

Loss of spaces

The loss of free motorcycle parking follows the reduction of CBD kerbside parking last year to accommodate bus, pedestrian and cyclist infrastructure.

It prompted a petition for more motorcycle parking space.

Sydney motorcycle parking petition Emma MacIver
Emma launches petition

Petition organiser and commuter rider Emma MacIver says the city is lagging behind Melbourne and the rest of the world and Motorcycle Council of NSW parking subcommittee claimed council’s lack of consultation with riders on the issue was “disappointing”.

Emma’s petition has gained almost 2000 signatures.

Click here to sign her petition and make council pay attention!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com