Tag Archives: Moto Guzzi Reviews

New and Updated 2023 Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, Piaggio, and Vespa Models

Aprilia Electrica 3

At the EICMA show in Italy, the Piaggio Group introduced the new Aprilia ELECTRICa project, as well as several updated models in the company’s brand range, including the following:

  • Aprilia RS 660 Extrema
  • V7 Stone Special Edition and V9 Bobber Special Edition
  • Piaggio 1
  • Vespa GTV, Primavera Color Vibe, and 946 10° Anniversario

The Piaggio Group said its brands have “accepted the challenge of a changing world, introducing a vast offer of vehicles capable of meeting any mobility needs.” Pricing and availability dates of the new models have yet to be provided.

2023 Aprilia ELECTRICa Project

Aprilia Electrica 3

Although the Piaggio Group has been working on electric propulsion since 1975 – including releasing the first hybrid scooter in the world, the MP3 Hybrid, in 2009 – the Aprilia ELECTRICa project is a new concept for the company. Piaggio says the lightweight electric bike is the company’s response to the changing commuting needs in the world with a nod to “the thrilling riding experience that only a bike can provide.”

The electric motor on the ELECTRICa is positioned in the center and powers a chain final drive. The bike includes keyless ignition and LCD instrumentation. The aesthetics of the ELECTRICa carry the familiar Aprilia style, especially the modern interpretation of the triple headlamp cluster typical of all Aprilias.

Aprilia Electrica 3

The bike has compact dimensions and a low saddle height, and the company says the presence of both brake controls on the handlebar makes the transition from scooters easier.

Exact specifications, pricing, and availability were not available as of publication.

2023 Aprilia RS 660 Extrema

Aprilia RS 660 EXTREMA

The 2023 Aprilia RS 660 Extrema is the sportiest and lightest RS 660 in the range, with updated and new standard equipment.

Related Story: 2021 Aprilia RS 660 | Video Review

The Aprilia RS 660 has a liquid-cooled 659cc DOHC parallel-Twin making a claimed 100 hp and 49.4 lb-ft of torque at 8,500 rpm.

The 2023 RS 660 Extrema features a  lighter street-legal exhaust system by SC Project with a carbon silencer positioned on the right side (and no longer beneath the engine). Also contributing to the overall reduction in weight are the carbon front fender and the new carbon engine undercover. Wet weight is a claimed 366 lb.

Aprilia RS 660 EXTREMA

The RS 660 Extrema sport attributes are emphasized by the single-seat tail fairing (the passenger’s seat comes with the bike). Standard electronics on the RS 660 include traction control, cornering ABS, engine brake, engine map, and wheelie control – all adjustable – as well as five ride modes (Road and Track, three fixed and two customizable). The RS 660 Extrema also has software that allows the rider to set up the standard quick shift in a reverse-shift pattern without having to replace any bike components.

Aprilia RS 660 EXTREMA

Pricing and availability of the RS 660 Extrema were not available as of publication, but we expect an MSRP north of $11,599, the list price of the 2022 Aprilia RS 660.

2023 Moto Guzzi V9 Bobber Special Edition

2023 Moto Guzzi V9 BOBBER SPECIAL EDITION

Introduced as a ready-to-ride factory bobber in 2016, the Moto Guzzi V9 Bobber has an air- and oil-cooled longitudinal 853cc 90-degree V-Twin making a claimed 65 hp and 53.8 lb-ft of torque at 5,000 rpm.

Related Story: 2017 Moto Guzzi V9 Roamer and V9 Bobber | First Ride Review

The engine sits in a twin-tube steel cradle frame. Suspension is basic, with a nonadjustable 40mm fork on the front and preload adjustable rear shocks. Stopping power comes from Brembo opposed 4-piston calipers grabbing a 320mm stainless steel floating disc up front and Brembo 2-piston calipers and a 260mm floating disc in the back. The 16-inch aluminum alloy wheels are still shod in the V9 Bobber’s characteristic oversized tires (130/90 up front, 150/80 rear).

Piaggio says the 30.9-inch seat height contributes to the bobber’s “sporty, active, and extended riding position.” The V9 Bobber has a 4.0-gal fuel tank, and the bike comes in with an overall wet weight of 463 lb.

The new Moto Guzzi V9 Bobber Special Edition boasts a special Workshop twin-tone black and grey color scheme that enhances the teardrop fuel tank shape and extends to the aluminum side panels. A billet aluminum cap is a high-end touch.

2023 Moto Guzzi V9 BOBBER SPECIAL EDITION

The matte black brings out the Moto Guzzi branding milled on the aluminum cylinder head covers, and the familiar sound of the Moto Guzzi 850 twin cylinder is highlighted by the exhaust painted matte black with an aluminum bottom. Bar-end mirrors mounted at the ends of the handlebar, along with the fork seals and the short front fender, complete the equipment.

Pricing and availability on the 2023 Moto Guzzi V9 Bobber Special Edition were not available.

2023 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Special Edition

2023 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Special Edition

The Moto Guzzi V7 Stone was updated for 2021 with a larger air-cooled 853cc longitudinal 90-degree V-Twin making a claimed 65 hp at 6,800 rpm and 54 lb-ft of torque at 5,000 rpm. Other updates included reduced effort from the single-disc dry clutch, a stiffer frame and bigger swingarm with a new bevel gear for the cardan shaft drive, revised damping and a longer stroke for the preload-adjustable rear shocks, an updated ABS module, and more.

Related Story: 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone | First Ride Review

The 2023 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Special Edition features a new Arrow exhaust system, which the company says has led to gains in performance, bumping up to 65.7 hp at 6,700 rpm and 55.3 lb-ft of torque at 4,900 rpm.

From a visual standpoint, Moto Guzzi has swapped out the matte shades typical of the Stone version for a special Shining Black color scheme, enhanced on the tank with graphics and red details that recall the style traits of the Eagle brand’s sportiest models.

This sport attitude is also highlighted by the red shock springs and contrasting red stitching of the saddle, also specific to this model. A plate on the handlebar riser identifies its special edition status, and the equipment package also includes bar-end rearview mirrors and an anodized black billet aluminum fuel cap.

Previous V7 Stone models started at $8,990. Pricing and availability of the 2023 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Special Edition were not available at publication.

2023 Piaggio 1

2023 Piaggio 1
2023 Piaggio 1

Piaggio has upgraded the electric motor that powers Piaggio 1 range to deliver better performance. The moped version (Piaggio 1) has a claimed 3.1 hp from its motor built into the rear wheel and has a top speed limited to 27 mph. The motorbike version (Piaggio 1 Active) reaches 4 hp and has a top speed of TK mph. Piaggio says acceleration has increased 14% on Piaggio 1 and almost 12% on Piaggio 1 Active.

The 2023 Piaggio 1 has a full technological package that includes 5.5-inch digital color instrumentation, full LED lighting, and keyless ignition. It also has an underseat storage compartment large enough to hold a full helmet.

2023 Piaggio 1
2023 Piaggio 1

The previous Piaggio 1+ model had a claimed range of approximately 62 miles in ECO mode and 42 miles in Sport mode, while the Piaggio 1 Active claimed 53 miles in ECO and 41 miles in Sport mode.

With both the versions, the battery is located beneath the seat and is easily removable and portable so it can be charged at home or in the office.

2023 Vespa GTV

2023 Vespa GTV
2023 Vespa GTV

It has been four years since the last version of a Vespa scooter was launched, but at the beginning of October, the Piaggio Group announced the release of the new 2023 Vespa GTS range, featuring a 4-stroke, liquid-cooled 300cc high-performance engine (HPE) offering a claimed 23.8 hp at 8,250 rpm.

Built on the Vespa GTS base, the Vespa GTV maintains the traits of its origins but combines them with a new technological equipment package and new finishes, which Vespa says results in “an extraordinary marriage of tradition and modernity, classicism and aggressiveness, which manifests itself in the most authentically sporty Vespa ever.”

2023 Vespa GTV
2023 Vespa GTV

The low headlamp is LED, and the new instrumentation maintains the circular shape but is entirely digital and displays maximum speed, average speed, instant and average mileage, range, and battery charge status, as well as all call, message, and music notifications if the vehicle is connected to a smartphone through the Vespa MIA system (available as a separate accessory).

The instrumentation is connected to the handlebar using a cantilevered bracket and enveloped by a small top fairing with sport inspiration. At the center of the front shield, the Vespa “neck-tie” has lateral slits and is enhanced by decorations with orange edging. A USB port comes as standard equipment, located in the storage compartment on the back of the shield.

2023 Vespa GTV
2023 Vespa GTV

The Vespa GTV has a single-seat two-tone saddle with a racing look, and the rear part is designed for a hard cover color-coded to match the body and reminiscent of the typical racing Vespa fairings.

The five-spoke design of the wheel rims is also new – painted matte black with an orange graphic on the channel. On the safety front, standard features include ASR electronic traction control and ABS.

Vespa Primavera Color Vibe

2023 Vespa Primavera Color Vibe in Arancio Impulsivo
2023 Vespa Primavera Color Vibe in Arancio Impulsivo

The Piaggio Group says the new Vespa Primavera Color Vibe is a “tribute to the colourful and carefree Vespa universe.”

The Primavera range features air-cooled i-get (Italian Green Experience Technology) 4-stroke engines available in 50cc and 150cc versions. The new Primavera Color Vibe is characterized by a special two-tone livery: the body, available in the Arancio Impulsivo and Bianco Innocente shades, is matched with a footboard in Ottanio, a shade of turquoise.

2023 Vespa Primavera Color Vibe in Bianco Innocente
2023 Vespa Primavera Color Vibe in Bianco Innocente

A contrasting color “stain” is outlined in black and runs diagonally across the entire body through the dedicated graphics on the sides of the front shield and side panels. The decorations of the steering cover on the front shield are also in Ottanio, as well as the wheel rims, which were made exclusively for this version in a special glossy metallic finish.

2023 vespa primavera color vibe in Bianco Innocente
2023 Vespa Primavera Color Vibe in Bianco Innocente

Finally, the outfitting is completed by sporty black trim for the headlamp and taillight frames, the profile that runs along the front shield, the crest on the front fender, the front suspension spring and guard, the passenger grab handle, and the muffler cover. The saddle is black with anthracite stitching.

Vespa 946 10° Anniversario

2023 vespa 946 10 anniversario

The Vespa 946 special 10° Anniversario outfit has an exclusive dedicated color that represents a modern take on the classic Vespa green shade, a color that is described as “soft and velvety, but has a hint of acidity.” The pearlescent color appears pastel at first glance, but then gains depth with illumination.

The post New and Updated 2023 Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, Piaggio, and Vespa Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello | First Look Review

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

2021 marked Moto Guzzi’s 100-year anniversary, and the Mandello Del Lario brand celebrated the momentous occasion with special-edition models and a traveling museum exhibit. By September 2021, Guzzi shifted its focus from the rearview mirror to the road ahead, giving fans a sneak peek of the all-new 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello sport-tourer.

After keeping the details under wraps for months, Moto Guzzi finally unveiled the V100 Mandello’s full details and specs at EICMA 2021. Just as the V100 moniker suggests, the new sport-touring model houses a 1,042cc transverse V-Twin. The liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve mill not only produces 115 horsepower and 77.4 lb-ft of torque but also benefits from a new compact block architecture. Compared to the V85 TT’s air-cooled, 853cc, transverse V-Twin, the liter-size V100 powerplant is shorter by 4.1 inches.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

Guzzi puts that compact design to good use with a 58.5-inch wheelbase. A long single-sided swingarm with shaft drive steadies the Mandello at high speed while the compact chassis maintains agility in the esses. The tubular-steel frame cuts weight by utilizing the 1,042cc engine as a stressed member and the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension automatically tunes the handling characteristics to rider and the road.

On the electronics front, the throttle-by-wire system offers Travel, Sport, Rain, and Road ride modes. The system adjusts the V100’s three different engine maps, 4-level traction control, three engine braking settings, and suspension calibration to suit each situation. Equipped with a Marelli 11MP ECU and 6-axis IMU, the new Goose also touts cornering ABS, adaptive LED lighting, and cruise control.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

Despite the full electronics suite, the sport-tourer’s industry-first adaptive aerodynamics steals the spotlight. Consisting of wind deflectors mounted at the sides of the 4.6-gallon fuel tank, the innovative system adapts to the current speed and ride mode. The deflectors provide 22% more wind protection in the fully-deployed position, and along with the electronically-adjustable windscreen, amplify the cockpit’s comfort beyond the generously-padded seat, high-mounted handlebars, and 5-inch TFT dash.

The 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello’s MSRP or availability have not yet been announced. It will come in two variants, a base model and a premium model with standard Öhlins semi-active suspension, heated grips, a quickshifter, and the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia system.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

For more information or to find a Moto Guzzi dealer near you, visit motoguzzi.com.

The post 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Moto Guzzi Announces New Factory, Museum, and V100 Mandello

Moto Guzzi Announces a New Factory, Museum, and V100 Motorcycle
Moto Guzzi has announced the new V100 Mandello.

After recently celebrating its centennial and the brand’s rich history, Moto Guzzi has turned its attention to the future with the “Road to 2121.” The bold initiative announced today includes a futuristic restructuring project including a new factory and museum to be built at the current site in Mandello del Lario, Italy, where every Guzzi has been built to date.

Moto Guzzi Announces a New Factory, Museum, and V100 Motorcycle
A rendering of the new Moto Guzzi factory, designed by Greg Lynn.

Moto Guzzi has commissioned U.S. architect and designer Greg Lynn, known for his bold, ultramodern creations and the architect behind the new San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The project, which Guzzi says, “will be founded on culture, design, and mechanics, with a strong green focus,” will include open public spaces and a place for the local community and tourists to meet.

Guzzi has stated that the project will use existing onsite structures and maximize environmental sustainability and efficiency in its use of resources. While building materials will be chosen with close attention to efficient energy management, thanks to photovoltaic systems and eco-sustainable materials.

The Piaggio Group intends to establish the Moto Guzzi brand as an example, not only of mechanical integration, but also of modern design and hopes that the site will become a focal point for Guzzi bikers and young people, and international tourists interested in the venerable brand. The new factory will also extend the firm’s production capacity to keep pace with the growth in demand.

In addition to the new factory, the project will create new conference facilities to host both internal and external events, as well as a hotel and a restaurant for a complete range of amenities to welcome visitors from around the world. Work is scheduled to commence by the end of the year and should be completed in the first half of 2025.

Moto Guzzi Announces a New Factory, Museum, and V100 Motorcycle

If that wasn’t enough, Moto Guzzi pulled another card from their sleeve and announced the V100 Mandello. We know very little about this new machine, but Guzzi is promising it will have a cutting-edge engine and state-of-the-art technologies. We look forward to the new motorcycle’s scheduled release on November 23, 2021, at the EICMA international motorcycle show in Milan.

Moto Guzzi Announces a New Factory, Museum, and V100 Motorcycle

The post Moto Guzzi Announces New Factory, Museum, and V100 Mandello first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

This 2021 motorcycle buyers guide includes new or significantly updated street-legal models available in the U.S. It includes bikes in many categories, including adventure, cafe racer, cruiser, sport, sport-touring, retro, touring, and others.

Organized in alphabetical order by manufacturer, it includes photos and links to details or, when available, first rides and road test reviews of each motorcycle. Due to the pandemic and supply chain disruptions, some manufacturers skipped the 2021 model year. Stay tuned for our 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide.

RELATED: 2020 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

2021 Aprilia RS 660

2021 Aprilia RS 660
2021 Aprilia RS 660 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Aprilia‘s RS 660 is the first of three models — the RS 660 sportbike, the Tuono 660 naked bike (below), and the not-yet-released Tuareg 660 adventure bike — built on a new engine platform, a liquid-cooled 659cc parallel-Twin with a 270-degree firing order that makes a claimed 100 horsepower at 10,500 rpm and 49.4 lb-ft of torque at 8,500 rpm. The RS 660 is equipped with the IMU-enabled APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) electronics package with five ride modes, 3-level cornering ABS, 3-level traction control, wheelie control, cruise control, and engine braking management. Pricing starts at $11,299.

Read our 2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Aprilia RS 660 Video Review

2021 Aprilia RSV4 / RSV4 Factory

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory
2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

Aprilia is an Italian brand known for performance, and the RSV4 and RSV4 Factory are at the pointy end of the company’s go-fast spear. Both are powered by a 1,099cc, 65-degree V-4 that Aprilia says cranks out an eye-watering 217 horsepower at 13,000 rpm and 92 lb-ft of torque at 10,500 rpm, even while meeting strict Euro 5 emissions regulations. And both are equipped with a 6-axis IMU and the APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) suite of rider aids. Whereas the standard RSV4 features fully adjustable Sachs suspension, the RSV4 Factory is equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension, with a 43mm NIX upside-down fork, a TTX rear shock, and an electronic steering damper. The RSV4 has cast wheels and the RSV4 Factory has lighter and stronger forged wheels. MSRP for the RSV4 is $18,999 and MSRP for the RSV4 Factory is $25,999.

Read our 2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory First Ride Review

2021 Aprilia Tuono 660

2021 Aprilia Tuono 660
2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

Based on the RS 660 (above), the Aprilia Tuono 660 is a semi-naked sportbike with a more upright seating position, and more street-oriented steering geometry. Its base price is $10,499.

Read our 2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 Video Review

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Tuono V4 Factory

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4
2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

The Tuono name has always been associated with top-of-the-line street performance, and the Aprilia Tuono V4 and Tuono V4 Factory carry the cred with a 1,077cc V-4 that produces 175 horsepower and 89 lb-ft of torque at the crank (claimed). The Tuono V4 is the more street-focused of the two, with a taller windscreen, a higher handlebar, and optional saddlebags (as shown above), and it is equipped with fully adjustable Sachs suspension. The Tuono V4 Factory is equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension. Both models feature a six-axis IMU that supports the APRC electronics suite. MSRP for the Tuono V4 is $15,999 and MSRP for the Tuono V4 Factory is $19,499.

Read our 2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory First Ride Review

2021 Benelli Leoncino / Leoncino Trail

2021 Benelli Leoncino
2021 Benelli Leoncino (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The Benelli Leoncino (“little lion”) is an Italian-designed, Chinese-manufactured roadster powered by a liquid-cooled 500cc parallel-Twin also found in the TRK502X adventure bike (below). In the U.S., the Leoncino is part of a two-bike lineup, which includes the standard street-biased roadster model (shown above) and the Leoncino Trail, a scrambler variant with more suspension travel and spoked wheels with a 19-inch front and 90/10 adventure tires. The Leoncino comes with standard ABS and is priced at $6,199, while the Leoncino Trail is $7,199.

Read our 2021 Benelli Leoncino Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Benelli Leoncino Video Review

2021 Benelli TRK502X

2021 Benelli TRK502X
2021 Benelli TRK502X (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Like the Leoncino above, the Benelli TRK502X is an Italian-designed, Chinese-manufactured adventure bike powered by a liquid-cooled 500cc parallel-Twin. It has a comfortable and upright seating position, a good windscreen, 90/10 adventure tires with a 19-inch front, spoked wheels, ABS, hand and engine guards, and enough luggage capacity to go the distance (aluminum panniers and top box are standard). MSRP is $7,398.

Read our 2021 Benelli TRK502X Road Test Review

2021 BMW R 18 / R 18 First Edition

2021 BMW R 18 First Edition
2021 BMW R 18 First Edition (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The BMW R 18 is a cruiser powered by a massive 1,802cc OHV air/oil-cooled 4-valve opposed Twin that’s the largest “boxer” engine the German company has ever produced. Part of BMW’s Heritage line, the R 18 has styling inspired by the 1930s-era R 5. Despite its classic looks, the long, low cruiser is equipped with fully modern electronics, brakes, suspension, and other features. Base price is $17,495. BMW recently announced two touring versions for the 2022 model year, the R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental, both with a fairing, hard saddlebags, and an infotainment system; the Transcontinental adds a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

Read our 2021 BMW R 18 First Edition Road Test Review

2021 Ducati Monster

2021 Ducati Monster
2021 Ducati Monster (Photo by Gregor Halenda and Mike Levin)

The Ducati Monster is one of the Italian manufacturer’s most iconic and best-selling models. Gone is the trademark tubular-steel trellis frame, replaced with a front-frame design that uses the engine as a structural member of the chassis, as on the Panigale and Streetfighter V4 models. Compared to the previous Monster 821, the new model weighs 40 pounds less and is equipped with a more powerful 937cc Testastretta 11-degree L-Twin engine and top-shelf electronics. New styling and more make this an all-new Monster. Pricing starts at $11,895 for the Monster and $12,195 for the Monster+, which adds a flyscreen and passenger seat cover.

Read our 2021 Ducati Monster First Ride Review

2021 Ducati Multistrada V4

2021 Ducati Multistrada V4
2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 (Photo by Mike Levin)

Another top-selling Ducati is the Multistrada adventure bike. For 2021, it is now the Multistrada V4 and it is powered by the 1,158cc 90-degree V4 Grandturismo engine that makes 170 horsepower at 10,500 rpm and stomping 92 lb-ft torque at 8,750 rpm (claimed). Ducati Skyhook semi-active suspension and a full suite of IMU-supported electronics are standard, and S models are equipped with a radar system that enables Adaptive Cruise Control and Blind Spot Detection. New for 2021 is a 19-inch front wheel. Pricing starts at $19,995 for the Multistrada V4 and $24,095 for the Multistrada V4 S.

Read our 2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 S First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 S Video Review

2021 Ducati SuperSport 950

2021 Ducati SuperSport 950
2021 Ducati SuperSport 950

Updates to the Ducati SuperSport 950 include new styling inspired by the Panigale V4, an IMU-enabled electronics package, and improved comfort. The seat is flatter and has more padding, the handlebar is higher, and the footpegs are lower. The SuperSport 950 is powered by a 937cc Testastretta L-Twin that makes 110 horsepower at 9,000 rpm and 68.6 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm (claimed, at the crank). The SuperSport 950 is available in Ducati Red for $13,995. The SuperSport 950 S, which is equipped with fully adjustable Öhlins suspension and a passenger seat cover, is available in Ducati Red and Arctic White Silk starting at $16,195.

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival
2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival

Earlier this year Harley-Davidson announced its new Icons Collection. The first model in the collection is the stunning Electra Glide Revival, which is inspired by the 1969 Electra Glide, the first Harley-Davidson motorcycle available with an accessory “batwing” fairing. Though retro in style, the Electra Glide Revival is powered by a Milwaukee Eight 114 V-twin and is equipped with RDRS Safety Enhancements and a Boom! Box infotainment system. Global production of the Electra Glide Revival is limited to a one-time build of 1,500 serialized examples, with an MSRP of $29,199.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 114

2021 Harley-Davidson Softail Fat Boy 114
2021 Harley-Davidson Softail Fat Boy 114

With its iconic solid aluminum 18-inch Lakester wheels, for 2021 Harley-Davidson gave the Fat Boy 114 a new look with lots of chrome and bright work. Powering the Fat Boy is none other than the torquey Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-twin engine, equipped with a 6-speed gearbox and putting down a claimed 119 ft-lb of torque at just 3,000 rpm. Pricing starts at $19,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 114 First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 / Pan America 1250 Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

A competitive, state-of-the-art, 150-horsepower adventure bike built by Harley-Davidson? Yea, right, when pigs fly! Well, the Motor Company came out swinging with its Pan America 1250 and Pan America 1250 Special. Powered by the all-new Revolution Max 1250, a liquid-cooled, 1,252cc, 60-degree V-Twin with DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, and variable valve timing. The killer app is the optional Adaptive Ride Height, which lowers the higher-spec Pan America 1250 Special (which is equipped with semi-active Showa suspension) by 1 to 2 inches when the bike comes to a stop. Pricing starts at $17,319 for the Pan America 1250 and $19,999 for the Pan America 1250 Special.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special Video Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special
2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special

For Harley-Davidson Touring models like the Road Glide, Road King, and Street Glide, there are Special models that offer a slammed look and 119 lb-ft of torque from the Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-Twin. The 2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special is available with new two-tone paint options, and with a choice of a blacked-out or bright chrome styling treatments. All Special models are now equipped with the high-performance Ventilator air cleaner with a washable filter element, and a new low-profile engine guard. Pricing starts at $26,699.

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S
2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S

The (air-cooled) Sportster is dead, long live the (liquid-cooled) Sportster! Visually similar to the 1250 Custom teased several years ago, the 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S represents a new era for the legendary Sportster line. Since the introduction of the XL model family in 1957, Sportsters have always been stripped-down motorcycles powered by air-cooled V-Twins. Harley calls the new Sportster S a “sport custom motorcycle,” and at the heart of the machine is a 121-horsepower Revolution Max 1250T V-Twin, a lightweight chassis, and premium suspension. Pricing starts at $14,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114
2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114

The Street Bob, with its mini-ape handlebar, mid-mount controls, and bobber-style fenders, has become a fan favorite among those looking for a minimalist American V-twin to customize. The 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114 packs more punch, thanks to the larger, torque-rich Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine. Pricing starts at $14,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114 First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special
2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special

With a slammed look and 119 lb-ft of torque from the Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-Twin, the 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special is available with new two-tone paint options, and with a choice of a blacked-out or bright chrome styling treatments. All Special models are now equipped with the high-performance Ventilator air cleaner with a washable filter element, and a new low-profile engine guard. Pricing starts at $27,099.

Harley-Davidson Unveils Arctic Blast Limited Edition Street Glide Special

2021 Honda ADV150

2021 Honda ADV150
2021 Honda ADV150 (Photo by Joseph McKimmey)

The 2021 Honda ADV150 is an ADV-styled scooter, essentially a Honda PCX150 with longer travel Showa suspension (5.1/4.7 inches front/rear) and a larger ABS-equipped 240mm disc brake at the bow and a drum brake without ABS in the stern. Its powered by a liquid-cooled 149cc Single and has an automatic V-matic transmission. Pricing starts at $4,199.

Read our 2021 Honda ADV150 First Ride Review

2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP

2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP
2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Well-mannered motorcycles seldom make racing history, and the 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP was developed with one uncompromising goal — win superbike races at all costs. It’s powered by an inline-Four that we dyno tested at 175 horsepower at the rear wheel, and it’s equipped with Öhlins semi-active suspension, IMU-enabled electronics, and top-shelf braking hardware. And it’s street legal and available for purchase from your local Honda dealer. MSRP is $28,500.

Read our 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP Video Review

2021 Honda CRF300L

2021 Honda CRF300L
2021 Honda CRF300L (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The 2021 Honda CRF300L (above) and CRF300L Rally (below) dual-sports share the same powerplant, a liquid-cooled 286cc Single which boasts 15% more displacement, power, and torque than its 250cc predecessor. They have a new slip/assist clutch, revised steering geometry, less weight, and a new LCD meter. The CRF300L has a base price of $5,249 (add $300 for ABS), weighs 309 pounds, has a 2.1-gallon tank, and has a 34.7-inch seat height.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally First Ride Review

2021 Honda CRF300L Rally

2021 Honda CRF300L Rally
2021 Honda CRF300L Rally (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally (above) dual-sports share the same powerplant, a liquid-cooled 286cc Single which boasts 15% more displacement, power, and torque than its 250cc predecessor. They have a new slip/assist clutch, revised steering geometry, less weight, and a new LCD meter. The CRF300L Rally, which has a windscreen, handlebar weights, rubber footpeg inserts, a larger front brake rotor, more seat padding, and a larger fuel tank (3.4 gallons vs. 2.1) than the CRF300L, has a base price of $5,999 (add $300 for ABS), weighs 333 pounds, and has a 35.2-inch seat height.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally First Ride Review

2021 Honda CRF450RL

2021 Honda CRF450RL
2021 Honda CRF450RL (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The Honda CRF450L debuted for 2019, bringing CRF450R motocross performance to a street-legal dual-sport. Its lightweight, compact, liquid-cooled 449cc single has a 12:1 compression ratio and a Unicam SOHC valve train with titanium valves. For 2021, Honda added an “R” to the model name (CRF450RL), lowered the price to $9,999 (from $10,399), revised the ECU and fuel-injection settings for better throttle response, and added new hand guards and fresh graphics.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF450RL Review

2021 Honda Gold Wing / Gold Wing DCT

2021 Honda Gold Wing
2021 Honda Gold Wing

The Gold Wing has been Honda‘s flagship touring model for more than 40 years. It entered its sixth generation for the 2018 model year, with a complete overhaul to the GL1800 platform that made it lighter, sportier, and more technologically advanced. The standard Gold Wing (above) and trunk-equipped Gold Wing Tour (below) won Rider‘s 2018 Motorcycle of the Year award. Gold Wing updates for 2021 include a suede-like seat cover, colored seat piping, audio improvements, and red rear turnsignals. Pricing starts at $23,800 for the Gold Wing and $25,100 for the Gold Wing DCT (with 7-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission).

Read our 2021 Honda Gold Wing First Look Review

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour / Gold Wing Tour DCT

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT
2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Updates for the Honda Gold Wing Tour include the same ones listed above for the standard Gold Wing: a suede-like seat cover, colored seat piping, audio improvements, and red rear turnsignals. But the Tour also got a larger top trunk (61 liters, up from 50) that now easily accepts two full-face helmets; total storage capacity is now 121 liters. The passenger seat’s backrest features a more relaxed angle, thicker foam, and a taller profile. Pricing starts at $23,800 for the Gold Wing and $25,100 for the Gold Wing DCT (with 7-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission).

Read our 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT First Ride Review

2021 Honda Rebel 1100 / Rebel 1100 DCT

2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT
2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Joining the Rebel 300 and Rebel 500 in Honda‘s cruiser lineup for 2021 is the all-new Rebel 1100, which is powered by powered by a version of the liquid-cooled 1,084cc parallel-twin used in the 2020 Africa Twin, which uses a Unicam SOHC valve train and is available with either a 6-speed manual gearbox or a 6-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission. Standard equipment includes four ride modes (Standard, Sport, Rain and User, which is customizable), Honda Selectable Torque Control (aka traction control, which has integrated wheelie control), engine brake control, and cruise control. Pricing starts at $9,299 for the Rebel 1100 and $9,999 for the Rebel 1100 DCT.

Read our 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT First Ride Review

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS
2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The latest addition to Honda‘s miniMOTO lineup is the Trail 125 ABS, which is powered by the same air-cooled 125cc Single found in the Grom, Monkey, and Super Cub C125. Like the Monkey and Super Cub, the Trail plays the retro card, pulling at heartstrings for a bike beloved by many decades ago. Just like its forefathers, the 2021 Honda Trail 125 proudly carries on the tradition of being a quaint and understated dual-sport, with a steel backbone frame, upright handlebar, square turnsignals, upswept exhaust, high-mount snorkel, and luggage rack. MSRP is $3,899.

Read our 2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS First Ride Review

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited
2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited (Photo by Kevin Wing)

For 2021, the Indian Roadmaster Limited gets the larger 116ci Thunder Stroke V-Twin versus the original 111, and it has a modern streamlined fairing, open front fender, and slammed saddlebags. As a premium touring model, the Roadmaster Limited also gets Indian’s heated and cooled ClimaCommand seats and other upgrades. Pricing starts at $30,749.

Read our 2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited Tour Test Review

2021 Kawasaki KLX300

2021 Kawasaki KLX300
2021 Kawasaki KLX300 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Like the Honda CRF300L above, Kawasaki‘s entry-level dual-sport got a displacement boost, which warranted a name change from KLX250 to KLX300. The 2021 KLX300 makes more thanks to a larger 292cc Single, which is liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, and has DOHC with four valves. It also uses more aggressive cam profiles, making it livelier than its predecessor. All of that is paired to a 6-speed gearbox and 14/40 final drive. Pricing starts at $5,599. And joining the KLX300 is a supermoto version, the KLX300SM (below).

Read our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM Video Review

2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM

2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM
2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Joining the KLX300 dual-sport (above) in Kawasaki‘s 2021 lineup is an all-new supermoto version, the KLX300SM. It has street-oriented 17-inch wire-spoke wheels and IRC Road Winner RX-01 rubber, and the suspension is stiffer with slightly abbreviated travel. The KLX300SM also has taller final-drive gearing and a larger front brake rotor. Pricing starts at $5,599.

Read our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM Video Review

2021 KTM 450 SMR

2021 KTM 450 SMR
2021 KTM 450 SMR (Photo by Casey Davis)

Speaking of supermoto, KTM‘s track-only, race-ready 450 SMR is back for 2021. Using the 450 SX-F motocross racer as its foundation, the SMR shares its 63-horsepower 450cc single-cylinder SOHC engine, lightweight steel frame, and cast-aluminum swingarm. To suit its supermoto purpose, wider triple clamps with a 16mm offset accommodate tubeless Alpina wheels (16.5-inch front and 17-inch rear) fitted with ultra-sticky Bridgestone Battlax Supermoto slicks. The WP Xact suspension is updated, reducing suspension travel to an ample 11.2 inches in the front and 10.5 inches in the rear, lowering the bike’s center of gravity and improving handling. A radially mounted Brembo M50 front caliper squeezes a 310mm Galfer floating rotor to deliver all the braking power you’ll ever need on a bike that weighs just 232 pounds wet. MSRP is $11,299.

Read our 2021 KTM 450 SMR First Ride Review

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R
2021 KTM 890 Adventure R (Photo by Kevin Wing)

We selected the KTM 790 Adventure and 790 Adventure R as Rider‘s 2019 Motorcycle of the Year. Just two years later, KTM has updated the platform. Adapted from the 890 Duke R, the engine now has more displacement, a higher compression ratio, and other improvements. And like the 890 Duke R, the Adventure R has better throttle-by-wire response, a beefed-up clutch and a shortened shift lever stroke and lighter shift-detent spring for faster shifting. Chassis updates include an aluminum head tube, a lighter swingarm, revised suspension settings, and refinements to the braking system. Pricing starts at $14,199.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R (Off) Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Video Review

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally
2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally

The limited-edition KTM 890 Adventure R Rally received the same updates as the 890 Adventure R (above), but is loaded with race-spec inspired components. Its development utilized feedback from Red Bull KTM Factory Racing team riders, Toby Price, and Sam Sunderland. Only 700 units of the 890 Adventure R Rally will be produced worldwide, with 200 slated for the North American market. Pricing starKTM 8ts at $19,999.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R and 890 Adventure R Rally First Look Review

2021 KTM 890 Duke

2021 KTM 890 Duke
2021 KTM 890 Duke (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Powering the 2021 KTM 890 Duke is the same punchy, rip-roaring 889cc parallel-Twin producing a claimed 115 horsepower and 67.9 lb-ft of torque that’s also found in the 890 Duke R and 890 Adventure (above). Shared amongst the middleweight Duke family is a chromoly-steel frame, lightweight one-piece aluminum subframe and cast aluminum swingarm. By using the 889cc engine as a stressed member, the 890 Duke flaunts a mere 372-pound dry weight. We recently completed a comparison test of the 2021 KTM Duke lineup (200, 390, 890, and 1290), which will be posted soon.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Duke First Look Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

On March 15, 2021, Moto Guzzi celebrated its 100th anniversary of continuous production at its headquarters in Mandello del Lario, Italy. One of Moto Guzzi’s most iconic models, the V7, was updated for 2021, and is available in more modern V7 Stone and classic V7 Special versions. Both have a larger 853cc V-Twin derived from engine, variations of which are found in the V9 and V85 TT. They also get reduced effort from the single-disc dry clutch, a stiffer frame, a bigger swingarm with a new bevel gear for the cardan shaft drive, revised damping and a longer stroke for the preload-adjustable rear shocks, an updated ABS module, a wider rear tire, vibration-damping footpegs, and a thicker passenger seat. MSRP for the V7 Stone is $8,990, or $9,190 for the Centenario edition (shown above).

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Video Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special gets the same updates as the V7 Stone above. Whereas the V7 Stone has matte finishes, a single all-digital gauge, black exhausts, cast wheels, and an eagle-shaped LED set into the headlight, the V7 Special is classically styled, with spoked wheels, chrome finishes, dual analog gauges, and a traditional headlight. MSRP is $9,490.

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special and V7 Stone First Look Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT

2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT

For 2021, the Moto Guzzi V85 TT gets some updates to its air-cooled 853cc 90-degree V-Twin. The revised powerplant offers more torque at low to midrange rpm thanks to optimized lift of the pushrod-and-rockers timing cams and tweaks to the engine control electronics. New spoked rims now mount tubeless tires, reducing unsprung weight by 3.3 pounds for better handling and facilitating plug-and-go flat repairs. Two new riding modes—Sport and Custom—join the existing three (Street, Rain, Off-road) to provide more flexibility in managing throttle response, traction control and ABS to suit rider preferences. Cruise control and the color TFT instrument panel also come standard. The 2021 V85 TT Adventure ($12,990) has standard saddlebags. The 2021 V85 TT Travel ($13,390) includes a Touring windscreen, side panniers from the Urban series, auxiliary LED lights, heated hand grips, and the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia platform.

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT First Look Review

2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan

2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan
2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan

For 2021, the Royal Enfield Himalayan adventure bike, which is powered by an air-cooled 411cc Single, get several updates, including switchable ABS to help riders when riding off-road, a revised rear brake that is said to improve braking performance, a redesigned sidestand, and a new hazard light switch. MSRP is $4,999.

Read our 2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan First Look Review

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350
2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

For 2021, the Royal Enfield family gets a new addition — the Meteor 350, a light, affordable cruiser powered by an all-new air-cooled 349cc single with SOHC actuating two valves. Available in three budget-friendly trim packages, variants include the base-model Fireball ($4,399) with a black exhaust system; the Stellar ($4,499), with a chrome exhaust and a passenger backrest; and the Supernova ($4,599), which adds a windshield and a two-tone paint scheme.

Read our 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 Video Review

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS
2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Triumph‘s Speed Triple is one of the original hooligan bikes. It has evolved over the years since its introduction in 1994, and for 2021 the Speed Triple 1200 RS is the lightest, most powerful, highest-spec version yet. Its all-new 1,160cc Triple (up from 1,050cc) makes 165 horsepower at the rear wheel, and the RS is equipped with state-of-the-art electronics, fully adjustable Öhlins suspension, Brembo Stylema front calipers, and much more. Pricing starts at $18,300.

Read our 2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS Road Test Review

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport
2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport, a street-focused adventure bike powered by the same liquid-cooled 888cc in-line triple as the Tiger 900 models, but it has been detuned to 82 horsepower at 8,400 rpm and 58 lb-ft of torque at 6,700 rpm at the rear wheel, as measured on Jett Tuning‘s dyno, which is about 10 horsepower lower. To keep the price down, Triumph also reduced the number of ride modes to two (Road and Rain) and limited suspension adjustability to rear preload. But this is no bargain-bin special. It has Marzocchi suspension front and rear, and it has Brembo brakes, with Stylema front calipers and a radial front master cylinder. ABS is standard but not switchable, and traction control is also standard but is switchable.

Watch our 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport Video Review

2021 Triumph Trident 660

2021 Triumph Trident 660
2021 Triumph Trident 660

The 2021 Triumph Trident 660 is a triple-cylinder-powered roadster in the the twin-cylinder-dominated middleweight class. It’s powered by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 660cc inline-Triple making a claimed 79.9 horsepower at 10,250 rpm and 47 lb-ft of torque at 6,250 rpm, and it is equipped with ABS, switchable traction control, and selectable ride modes. MSRP is $7,995.

Read our 2021 Triumph Trident 660 First Look Review

2021 Yamaha MT-07

2021 Yamaha MT-07
2021 Yamaha MT-07 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Updates for 2021 to the Yamaha MT-07, its best-selling middleweight naked sportbike, include revisions to the 689cc liquid-cooled CP2 (Cross Plane 2-cylinder) parallel-Twin engine to meet Euro 5 regulations and to improve low-rpm throttle response. The MT-07 has a new 2-into-1 exhaust, revisions to the 6-speed gearbox to improve shifting feel, LED lighting all around, new instrumentation, revised ergonomics, and new styling that brings it closer in appearance to the larger MT-09 (below). Base price is $7,699, and three color choices are available: Storm Fluo, Matte Raven Black, and Team Yamaha Blue.

Read our 2021 Yamaha MT-07 Road Test Review

2021 Yamaha MT-09

2021 Yamaha MT-09
2021 Yamaha MT-09 (Photo by Joe Agustin)

Now in its third generation, fully 90% of the Yamaha MT-09 naked sportbike is new for 2021. Its has an entirely new 890cc CP3 (Cross Plane 3-cylinder) inline-Triple engine, a thoroughly updated and significantly stiffer chassis, state-of-the-art electronics, and a fresh look that results in the most refined MT-09 yet. The base price increased by $400 to $9,399, but the four extra Benjamins are worth it. The MT-09 is available in Storm Fluo (shown above), Matte Raven Black, and Team Yamaha Blue. There’s also an MT-09 SP ($10,999) with exclusive special-edition coloring, premium KYB and Öhlins suspension, and cruise control.

Read our 2021 Yamaha MT-09 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Yamaha MT-09 Video Review

2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700

2021 Yamaha Tenere 700
2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

After being teased for several years, Yamaha‘s highly anticipated Ténéré 700 adventure bike made its U.S. debut in the summer of 2021, bringing some excitement during a challenging pandemic year. It’s powered by the versatile 689cc liquid-cooled CP2 (Cross Plane 2-cylinder) parallel-Twin engine from the MT-07 (above), modified for adventure duty with a new airbox with a higher snorkel, a revised cooling system, an upswept exhaust, and a final gear ratio of 46/15 vs. 43/16. The rest of the bike is all-new, including the narrow double-cradle tubular-steel frame, triangulated (welded-on) subframe, double braced steering head and aluminum swingarm, adjustable long-travel suspension, switchable ABS, and more. Base price is $9,999 and its available in Ceramic Ice, Intensity White (shown above), and Matte Black.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 First Ride Review

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 Tour Test Review

Watch our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 Video Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

Now in its third generation, Yamaha’s middleweight sport-tourer — now called the Tracer 9 GT — is new from the ground up for 2021. It has a larger, more powerful engine, a new frame, and a state-of-the-art electronics package that includes semi-active suspension. With these updates comes a higher price, and MSRP is now $14,899. It’s available in Liquid Metal (shown above) and Redline.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT First Look Review

2021 Zero FXE

Zero FXE
2021 Zero FXE

New for 2021, Zero has taken the existing frame from the FX and added a redesigned body. The starkly modern, supermoto styling is very similar in appearance to the FXS – tall, slim and sporting a raised front mudguard. However, the FXE is capable of a claimed 100-mile range on a full battery charge and costs $11,795, which can be bought down to around $10,000 depending upon available EV rebates and credits. 

Compared to many of its heavier, more expensive competitors the FXE is a lightweight and thrilling runabout, and what it gives up in range it makes up for in accessibility and potential for fun. The FXE makes for a credible commuter bike, capable of taking to the highway but ideal to zip around town on.   

The post 2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone | First Ride Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
Updates for 2021 to Moto Guzzi’s V7 Stone and V7 Special include a larger engine and a revised chassis. (Photos by Larry Chen Photo)

“I would know the sound of a big Guzzi in my sleep. It concentrates its aural energies in your upper chest, ringing through your bones. It is … the sound of joy.”
— Melissa Holbrook Pierson, The Perfect Vehicle: What It Is About Motorcycles

When we find joy, we hold it close and nurture it. Woven throughout Pierson’s book, arguably one of the best ever written about motorcycling, is a romance between the author and Moto Guzzi. When searching for her first motorcycle, it was love at first sight: “a 500cc V-twin Moto Guzzi, red-and-black, a workhorse, and I thought it was beautiful.” 

Like any true love, Pierson’s passion for Moto Guzzi ran deep and transcended appearance. She fell under the spell of the Italian V-twin’s syncopated beat. She dedicated her mind, body, and spirit to learning to ride, doing her own maintenance, and enduring long hours in the saddle through stifling heat, bitter cold, and drenching rain. 

Moto Guzzi is a storied marque that celebrates a century of continuous production this year. Every Moto Guzzi — from the 1921 Normale, a 498cc single, to the 1955 Otto cilindri, a liquid-cooled, DOHC 500cc V-8 GP racer that topped 170 mph, to present-day models — has been built in the factory in Mandello del Lario, Italy, on the shores of Lake Como. 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The Centenario paint scheme is inspired by the 1955 Otto cilindri racebike. (Photo by Sergio Piotin)

Three models — V7 Stone, V9 Bobber, and V85 TT — are available with a special Centenario color scheme for 2021 that pays tribute to the Otto cilindri. Their silver fuel tanks are inspired by the racebike’s raw alloy tank, their green side panels and front fenders are a nod to its iconic dustbin fairing, and their brown seats and golden eagle tank emblems further set them apart, though all 2021 models/colors display 100th anniversary logos on their front fenders. 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The V7 Stone is a modern take on a classic roadster, with simple lines, dark matte finishes, and cast wheels.

Greg’s Gear
Helmet: HJC RPHA 90
Jacket: Joe Rocket Classic ’92
Gloves: Joe Rocket Cafe Racer
Pants: Scorpion Covert Pro Jeans
Boots: Highway 21 Journeyman

Over its long history, Moto Guzzi has designed and built many notable models, but the V7 is a true living legend, the very soul of the brand. After two decades of building small, inexpensive motorcycles after World War II, Moto Guzzi became the first Italian manufacturer to offer a large-displacement model when, in 1967, it introduced the 700cc V7. It was the genesis of the engine configuration that came to define Moto Guzzi: the “flying” 90-degree V-twin, with its air-cooled cylinders jutting outward into the wind and its crankshaft running longitudinally. The V7 also had an automotive-style twin-plate dry clutch, a 4-speed constant mesh transmission, and shaft final drive. 

Today’s V7 maintains a strong connection to the original, from its round headlight, sculpted tank, and upright seating position to its dry clutch, shaft drive, dual shocks, and dual exhaust. The V7 Special ($9,490) is classically styled, with spoked wheels, chrome finishes, dual analog gauges, and a traditional headlight. The more modern-looking V7 Stone ($8,990) has matte finishes, a single all-digital gauge, black exhausts, cast wheels, and an eagle-shaped LED set into the headlight.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The V7 Special (left) brightens things up with gloss, chrome, and spoked wheels.

I’ve ridden a variety of Moto Guzzis over the years — the Norge sport-tourer (named after the Norge GT 500, which Giuseppe Guzzi rode to the Arctic Circle in 1928), the carbon-fiber-clad MGX-21 Flying Fortress hard bagger, the classic California 1400 Touring, and the red-framed, chrome-tanked V7 Racer, among others. Each was unique, but all shared the distinctive cah-chugga-chugga sound when their V-twins fired up and the gentle rocking to the right side when their throttles were blipped at idle. 

Riding a Moto Guzzi feels special. It’s a visceral, engaging, rhythmic experience. The V7 Stone brought me back to the simple pleasure of motorcycling — the feel of the wind against my body, the engine’s vibrations felt through various touch points, the exhilaration of thrust. Although the new V7 has a larger 853cc engine, variations of which are found in the V9 and V85 TT, output remains modest — 65 horsepower at 6,800 rpm and 54 lb-ft of torque at 5,000 rpm, measured at the crank. But that’s enough. The V7 is one of those motorcycles that gives you permission to relax, to take your time and really savor the moment. What’s the rush? 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The Centenario edition’s silver and green paint complements the V7 Stone’s black engine and exhaust.

Moto Guzzi made many useful, subtle updates to the V7 platform. Reduced effort from the single-disc dry clutch. A stiffer frame and a bigger swingarm with a new bevel gear for the cardan shaft drive. Revised damping and a longer stroke for the preload-adjustable rear shocks. An updated ABS module. A wider rear tire (now 150/70-17). Vibration-damping footpegs. A thicker passenger seat. 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The V7’s new eagle-shaped digital gauge is tasteful.

All are appreciated, but if I’m honest, I thought about none of them as I rolled through curve after curve on California’s Palms to Pines Highway, climbing higher and higher into the rugged, snow-dusted San Jacinto Mountains. For the better part of a day, I just rode the V7. I didn’t try to figure out its riding modes (it doesn’t have any), nor did I connect my smartphone to Moto Guzzi’s multimedia app. I rolled on and off the throttle. I shifted through the gears. And I smiled. A lot. 

The V7 Stone is solid, predictable, carefree. Its engine doles out torque nearly everywhere, but it feels happiest chugging along in the midrange. Throttle response is direct, the exhaust note is soothing. Thanks to its modest weight, low seat, and natural ergonomics, riding and handling are effortless. Braking, shifting, suspension — everything dutifully meets expectations. Like the Guzzi that stole Pierson’s heart, the V7 Stone is a workhorse, and it’s easy on the eyes. Well, except for its peculiar-looking taillight, which has a constellation of red LEDs that look too sci-fi for this style of bike. 

The V7 Stone Centenario carries the weight of Moto Guzzi’s century of history with confidence. The brand is an acquired taste, favored by connoisseurs rather than the masses, and it inspires a cult-like following. When I interviewed Melissa Holbrook Pierson for the Rider Magazine Insider podcast, I asked about her first encounter with a Guzzi. “It was chance,” she said. “I just happened upon the bike that was literally perfect for me.” 

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone - First Ride Review
The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone is one of three new Guzzi’s available in the commemorative Centenario paint scheme.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone

Base Price: $8,990 
Price as Tested: $9,190 (Centenario edition) 
Website: motoguzzi.com 
Engine Type: Air-cooled, longitudinal 90-degree V-twin, OHV w/ 2 valves per cyl. 
Displacement: 853cc 
Bore x Stroke: 84.0 x 77.0mm 
Horsepower: 65 hp @ 6,800 rpm (claimed, at the crank) 
Torque: 54 lb-ft @ 5,000 rpm (claimed, at the crank) 
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated dry clutch 
Final Drive: Shaft 
Wheelbase: 57.1 in. 
Rake/Trail: 28 degrees/4.1 in. 
Seat Height: 30.7 in. 
Wet Weight: 480 lbs. 
Fuel Capacity: 5.5 gals. 

The post 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone | Video Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Centenario video review
Riding the 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Centenario (photo by Larry Chen Photo)

Moto Guzzi is celebrating 100 years of continuous production this year. Its updated V7 Stone is available in a special Centenario edition for 2021 that’s a tribute to Moto Guzzi’s Otto cilindri V-8 GP racer, which went over 170 mph in 1955. The Centenario livery, with a silver tank, green fenders and side panels, a brown seat, and special badging, is also available on 2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT and V9 Bobber models for an extra $200.

For 2021, the V7 Stone ($8,990) and V7 Special ($9,490) have a larger 853cc V-twin that makes 65 horsepower at 6,800 rpm and 54 lb-ft of torque at 5,000 rpm, measured at the crank. Other updates include reduced effort from the single-disc dry clutch; a stiffer frame and a bigger swingarm with a new bevel gear for the cardan shaft drive; revised damping and a longer stroke for the preload-adjustable rear shocks; an updated ABS module; a wider rear tire (now 150/70-17); vibration-damping footpegs; a thicker passenger seat; an updated styling.

The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone is solid, predictable, carefree. Find out more by watching our video review:

To find a Moto Guzzi dealer near you, visit motoguzzi.com.

The post 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

‘A Dream Come True’ Video

A Dream Come True: Moto Guzzi V85 TT Spirit of the Eagle Rideaway Adventure
Kit (on left), Guy, and the Moto Guzzi V85 TTs in Kaniksku National Forest.

In 2020, Guy Pickrell won the Moto Guzzi “Spirit of the Eagle Rideaway” competition. He dreamed up an epic 2,600-mile, 8-day, 7-state, 6-national-park adventure route.

Moto Guzzi gave Guy and his buddy Kit Klein use of two Moto Guzzi V85 TT adventure bikes and a $2,500 travel budget. They packed their gear, had Michelin Anakee Wild tires mounted on the bikes, and they hit the road.

Starting in Seattle, they rode east to Glacier National Park, south to Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Flaming Gorge, Capitol Reef, and Grand Staircase-Escalante, and they finished in Las Vegas. Their route included paved sections like Going-to-the-Sun Road in Montana and unpaved tracks like Skyline Drive Scenic Backway in Utah.

Two buddies, two bikes, one big adventure. This is their story.

To find a Moto Guzzi dealer near you, visit motoguzzi.com.

The post ‘A Dream Come True’ Video first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special and Stone Announced

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

Today, the 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 lineup has been announced by the Italian motorcycle manufacturer. Available in two variants, the V7 Stone and V7 Special, the revised lineup boasts an updated engine, chassis upgrades and subtle visual changes.

The V7 namesake is an essential piece of Guzzi history, dating back to 1967 when the first V7 motorcycles rolled out of its factory in Mandello del Lario, Italy. The V7 was revived in 2007, with subsequent models adding Roman numerals to their names. Moto Guzzi feels that the 2021 update is so significant that they’re simply calling the new line of bikes the V7 once more.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone

The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 motorcycles will use an engine derived from the V 85 TT lineup, which features the brand’s most technologically advanced engine yet and is 25% more potent than the previous V7 powerplants. To that end, the air-cooled 853cc longitudinal 90-degree V-twin engine utilizes a tune unique to the V7 and produces a claimed 65 horsepower at 6,800 rpm and 53.8 lb-ft of torque at 5,000, with more than 80% of its peak torque available at just 3,000 rpm.

Other mechanical updates include a revised tubular steel frame, most likely to accommodate the new engine, and new dual shocks. Guzzi representatives stated that suspension travel has increased in the rear. Lastly, the V7 Stone will now use a wider 150/70-17 rear tire.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

Tasteful styling changes are introduced to the 2021 V7s while maintaining a classic and authentic look. New side panels and a shorter rear mudguard has tightened up its visual profile. Comfort has been improved thanks to the revised two-tier saddle.

There are a few notable aesthetic differences between the Special and Stone models. The Special keeps things old-school with wire-spoke wheels, dual analog and LCD clocks, and a standard halogen headlight. The Stone uses an LED headlight with a DRL in the shape of the Moto Guzzi Eagle, a more modernized LCD instrument panel and cast-aluminum wheels.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone instrument panel.

The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone has an MSRP of $8,990 and is available in three colors: Nero Ruvido, Azzurro Ghiaccio and Arancione Rame. The classic feel of the 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special comes at a $500 premium, with an MSRP of $9,499 and features two colors: Blu Formale and Grigio Casual. Both models are expected to arrive in North American dealerships in March 2021.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special and 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Photo Gallery:

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Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel | Road Test Review

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel Road Test Review
Photos by Kevin Wing.

I find motorcycles are akin to the culinary world in that there is a cornucopia of flavors to analyze and ponder while parked on the couch. We all have our preferences, but some flavors are more pronounced and distinctive than others — low-fat plain yogurt just doesn’t have the complexity of a Pepperoncino pepper. When it comes to unique motorcycles, the 2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel leaves a lasting impression on the palate.

The V85 TT line rolls out of Moto Guzzi’s Mandello del Lario factory, on the shore of Italy’s swanky-villa spackled Lake Como, and offers an unexpected proposition: a vintage-styled ADV-Tourer from a heritage brand. With the Stelvio 1200 put out to pasture, a new ADV machine was needed in Guzzi’s ranks, and much like the combination of fried foods and ice cream, the V85 TT was something I needed in life.

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel Road Test Review
Rugged new panniers, a taller windscreen, LED fog lights, heated grips, and the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia pack round out the changes for the V85 TT Travel.

Introduced for 2020, the Travel is the third member of the V85 TT lineup and mechanically identical to its brothers. With a few tweaks to the recipe, the Travel is aimed at those looking to rack up mileage faster than a millennial’s college loan debt. Those tweaks include a windscreen with 60-percent more surface area, heated grips, LED fog lights, the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia package, key-matched panniers and an exclusive rugged-looking colorway called Sabbia Namib. Best yet, you get all that for a $400 upcharge above the V85 TT Adventure.

Out on the road, the larger windscreen deflects much more air and reduces buffeting noticeably when behind the Guzzi’s wide handlebar. The comfy 32.7-inch saddle remains the same, and its lower height is an advantage when you need to get your boots on the ground — something that taller, more off-road focused ADV bikes don’t accommodate as easily.

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel Road Test Review
The Travel’s tall windscreen displaces a serious amount of air, providing lots of wind protection, and bright LED fog lamps help illuminate your path when the sun goes down.

Powering the Goose is the 853cc transverse V-twin with all the Guzzi flavor fans adore, sans the gamey, unrefined top-end juddering of the past. In keeping with tradition, a pushrod valve train is used, while modern engine building influences are reflected in the lighter and stronger titanium intake valves, aluminum rods, updated roller tappet design, a new low-profile piston and a redesigned crankshaft. It’s a far cry from the V7 III powerplant that shares similar architecture — all the soul and none of the funk.

On the Jett Tuning Dyno, our 2020 V85 TT Adventure test bike (January 2020 and on ridermagazine.com) put out a modest 66.3 horsepower at 7,900 rpm and 48.6 lb-ft of torque at 5,300 rpm of supremely tractable power, with buttery low and mid-range grunt that gleefully spools up on a whim. In truth, you’re best served short shifting and exploiting the punchy mid-range power.

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel Road Test Review
853ccs of Guzzi flavor that offers smooth, predictable power delivery right off the line.

Between the well-spaced 6-speed gearbox’s ratios and tractability, it’s easy to put power down when exiting corners in the streets. This middleweight engine hits the sweet spot of useable grunt off-road, too, forgoing the wheel-spinning madness of larger displacement competitors.

A long 60.2-inch wheelbase and relaxed 28-degree rake make the Travel surefooted on tarmac, tipping in without effort and showing nod-worthy sport-touring prowess when the pace picks up. Suspenders are in the form of a 41mm KYB fork and cantilever shock, featuring spring preload and rebound damping adjustment. Initial settings are a bit soft and cranking them up will pay off, especially if you’re feeling invigorated. Once dialed in, the V85 TT can do some quickstepping in the canyons. Off-road, the 557-pound Guzzi asks big questions of the suspension — stick to groomed fire-roads or trails on the way to your campsite, and hopefully, a cast iron pan-fried dinner.

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel Road Test Review
Comfortable ergonomics are perfect for touring and the lower seat height will help riders with shorter inseams.

On those longer rides, the robust key-matched panniers are built to take a hit and also stow away your goods. It’s far more convenient than the V85 TT Adventure, which had individual keys for each piece of luggage. At night, I was certainly glad to have the three-level heated grips to stay toasty, and the LED fog lights are a noticeable help.

The 19- and 17-inch wheels laced up with beefy Michelin Anakee Adventure tires are a good pairing, allowing you to hit groomed fire roads and rocky sections with confidence, without sacrificing on-road manners the way a 21-inch front wheel would. Though the wide front tire isn’t particularly adept in sand.

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel Road Test Review
Key-matched panniers can hold a full-sized ADV lid with a little room to spare.

Radial-mount four-piston brake calipers up front grab on 320mm rotors and provide good stopping power, but require a little extra effort at the lever to get the job done quickly. A single two-piston caliper works in junction with a 260mm disc in back, with a fairly relaxed bite that prevents you from prematurely locking the rear in dirt.

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel Road Test Review
A massive 6.1-gallon fuel tank gives the bike an estimated 256-mile range.

Moto Guzzi has done something special with the V85 TT line, creating a distinguished motorcycle that can do a bit of it all; commute, tour, sow wild oats in the canyons and head off for a weekend in the backcountry. The styling and experience give it an unforgettable charm and with the V85 TT Travel’s smart accessories, this model becomes the pinch of salt in the chocolate milk, elevating the whole affair. 

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel Road Test Review
The V85 TT platform doesn’t miss a beat when in the canyons and flexes sporting potential.

Nic’s Gear:
Helmet: Fly Trekker
Jacket: Fly Terra Trek
Pants: Fly Terra Trek
gloves: Alpinestars GP-Air
Boots: Forma Adventure

2020 Moto Guzzi V 85 TT Travel Specs:

Price: $13,990
Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles
Website: motoguzzi.com

Engine
Type: Air-cooled, longitudinal 90-degree V-twin
Displacement: 853cc
Bore x Stroke: 84.0 x 77.0mm
Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
Valve Train: OHV, 2 valves per cyl.
Valve Insp. Interval: 6,200 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ 52mm throttle body
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 2.1-qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated dry clutch
Final Drive: Shaft
Electrical
Ignition: Electronic
Charging Output: 430 watts max.
Battery: 12V 12AH

Chassis
Frame: Tubular steel w/ engine as stressed member, cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 60.2 in.
Rake/Trail: 26 degrees/5.1 in.
Seat Height: 32.7 in.
Suspension, Front: 41mm USD fork, adj. for spring preload & rebound damping, 6.6-in. travel
Rear: Single shock, adj. for spring preload & rebound damping, 4.0-in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm floating discs w/ radial 4-piston calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 260mm disc w/ 2-piston floating caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Spoked tube-type, 2.50 x 19 in.
Rear: Spoked tube-type, 4.25 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 110/80-VR19
Rear: 150/70-VR17
Wet Weight: 557 lbs. 
Load Capacity: 431 lbs.
GVWR: 988 lbs.

Performance
Fuel Capacity: 6.1 gals., last 1.3 gals. warning light on
MPG: 90 AKI min. (low/avg/high) 36.5/46.3/42.1
Estimated Range: 256 miles
Indicated RPM at 60 MPH: 3,600

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel Photo Gallery:

The post 2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT | Road Test Review

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
In a parking lot full of beaked ADV-style touring bikes, the Moto Guzzi V85 TT Adventure stands out in many of the right ways: an eye-catching paint scheme, a high front fender, classic twin headlights bisected by the Moto Guzzi eagle motif and, of course, that distinctive and all-new “flying” V-twin engine. Photos by Kevin Wing.

We’ve been looking forward to getting our hands on the Moto Guzzi V85 TT, the latest bike to roll out of Italy’s oldest motorcycle manufacturer, since our first ride on one at the press launch last spring (read the review here). The V85 TT (tutto terrano, or all-terrain) appeared to be a Goldilocks ride for those looking for a friendly, accessible middleweight adventure tourer, with a 32.7-inch seat (a 31.9-inch low option is also available), narrow waist and claimed 505-pound wet weight. Its styling turns heads, too, especially in either of the two “Adventure” color combos. But the big news is its new air-cooled, 853cc, OHV two-valve-per-cylinder 90-degree “flying” V-twin engine, launched initially in the V85 TT with more models to follow. Technical details on the new engine can be found in our First Ride Review, but in summary the new powerplant is quicker-revving with a higher redline, and lighter, quieter and smoother than previous Guzzi small-blocks. Ground clearance is an ADV-friendly 8.3 inches, thanks to a redesigned gearbox and clutch housing and a tubular steel frame that uses the engine as a stressed member, eliminating the need for a lower frame cradle. Power is sent to the rear wheel via driveshaft housed on the right side of the long, asymmetric aluminum swingarm.

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
New 853cc engine vibrates significantly at idle, but smooths out immediately once underway.

The standard V85 TT ($11,990) is well equipped with hand guards, electronic cruise control, an aluminum sump guard, switchable MGCT traction control, ABS and three riding modes (Road, Rain and Off-Road). But for just $1,000 more the Adventure is a no-brainer, with striking red/white or red/yellow/white livery and standard aluminum top and side cases. (For reference, the luggage alone runs just shy of $2,000 in Moto Guzzi’s accessory catalog.) The Adventure also gets dirt-ready Michelin Anakee Adventure tires rather than the standard Metzeler Tourance Nexts; both models have 19-inch front, 17-inch rear tube-type spoked rims.

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
Our Adventure model was equipped with a full set of aluminum luggage and Michelin Anakee Adventure tires, which proved to be a bit on the noisy side.

This is a lovely time of year to ride California’s Central Coast, so we planned an overnighter to Monterey, on roads varying from the wide-open divided highway of U.S. Route 101, to meandering wine country two-lane, the sinuous curves of Big Sur and the bumpy, narrow tarmac of Carmel Valley Road. By the time we made our first pit stop in Los Olivos, northwest of Santa Barbara, the V85 TT’s new engine was already making a favorable impression. Response from the throttle-by-wire system was smooth and precise, without the abruptness that has plagued other bikes we’ve tested. We picked up on some vibration in the pegs and grips at higher cruising speeds, but it was never enough to cause discomfort, and once we ducked off U.S. 101 in favor of two-lane Foxen Canyon Road, which dances through hills and vineyards, the new engine’s character really started to shine.

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
The V85 TT hums along at freeway speeds willingly, but it’s on the smaller back roads that its character shines, like this narrow, winding descent on California’s Central Coast.

The most noticeable difference from the previous-gen V9 engine is an increase in horsepower; our V85 TT Adventure produced 66.3 peak rear-wheel horsepower at 7,900 rpm and 48.6 lb-ft of torque at 5,300 on the Jett Tuning dyno, compared with 51.3 horsepower and 47.3 lb-ft of torque from the 853cc V9 Bobber we tested in 2017. The new V85 spins up quickly and easily, which is good since you’ll want to keep it above 3,000 rpm to stay in the meat of its powerband. The six-speed gearbox is relatively smooth and less clunky than past Guzzis, though the cable-actuated dry clutch engages and disengages within a narrow portion at the end of the lever throw. Overall, we’re impressed with the new engine, and the increased horsepower as shown in the dyno figures is only part of that. Rather than holding it back, the V85 contributes to the TT’s nimble, easy to handle feel; this is a cohesive machine that works well and is really fun to ride.

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT dyno chart

Back on the road, after rotating the wide handlebar back down to its stock position (the previous tester had moved it up to facilitate standing off-road), the TT also proved to be fairly comfortable, with a long, flat, plush seat that narrows at the tank for easy reach to the ground. Footpegs are set at a happy medium between ground-clearance high and comfortable low. With a 34-inch inseam, my knees hovered just a couple of inches from the rear of each cylinder head, but heat was never a problem and I only banged them a couple of times when moving around on the bike during aggressive cornering. Our biggest complaint regarding touring comfort was the short, non-adjustable windscreen, which flowed air directly onto my shoulders and helmet; an accessory or aftermarket touring screen would be an easy fix. As an early twilight descended, we made another wish: auxiliary lights. While the twin LED headlights, bisected with a DRL in the shape of the Moto Guzzi eagle, do a nice job of lighting up the road directly in front of the TT’s front tire, their beams end abruptly in a horizontal line about two car lengths ahead. Flicking on the high beam only makes those two car lengths brighter rather than illuminating farther down the road.

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
Add a taller touring windscreen to its wide handlebar, plush seat and fairly low footpegs, and the V85 TT would make a comfortable long-distance mid-weight ADV tourer.

The V85 TT is equipped with three ride modes, Road, Rain and Off-Road, all of which offer full power but vary in terms of ABS, traction control, throttle response and engine braking settings. Road is the standard touring mode, while Rain softens throttle response, increases traction control and ABS intervention and limits top speed, and Off-Road reduces traction control and disables ABS to the rear wheel (ABS can be completely disabled in this mode as well). Traction control can be shut off independently, but always reengages after the bike is turned off/back on again. 

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
TFT display includes speedo, tach, ride mode, a clock, range to empty, ambient temperature, fuel level and selectable tripmeters/fuel consumption data.

Radial-mount four-piston Brembo front brakes are adequate, but require a hefty lever squeeze to produce much action; more aggressive initial bite would be welcome and might add to rider confidence, especially when riding fully loaded on a downhill. Suspension is fairly soft, well-suited to off-road excursions and gnarly, bumpy pavement, and both the 41mm Kayaba USD fork and single rear shock with dual-rate spring are only adjustable for preload and rebound damping. We cranked the rear shock’s preload nearly all the way to the max, but even with a lightweight rider (never ask a lady how much she weighs!) and luggage that was far from full the TT sagged considerably, eating through most of the “soft” part of the spring. That said, at a moderate pace, even over rough pavement, the TT handles nimbly and easily, and in fact is almost too willing to turn in. Once tipped into a bend, I actually found myself countersteering against the turn to prevent the TT from leaning farther, then just increasing that pressure to straighten back out. Nothing dangerous, just one of those quirks that becomes “normal” after a couple of weeks.

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
A wide handlebar makes the TT easy to flick; even wider mirrors give the rider great visibility.

Anyway, as any Guzzi owner will tell you, a bit of character is part of the charm. Somewhat fiddly switchgear that requires a small learning curve? An indicator light that blinks irritatingly whenever cruise control is on but not in use? A starter button that doubles as a ride mode selector, requiring wrist contortions, multiple thumb taps and constant attention to (hopefully) select the desired mode? Nessun problema! (No problem!) None of these are a deal-breaker, and as a mid-weight ADV tourer or commuter the V85 TT Adventure is a real bargain, and eye-catchingly stylish to boot. With the easy additions of a touring windscreen, the optional heated grips and a set of auxiliary lights, this is a machine that’s ready to go the distance.

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
With a complete set of aluminum luggage and electronics like ride modes and cruise control as standard, the V85 TT Adventure is a middleweight ADV touring bargain.

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Specs

Base Price: $11,990
Price As Tested: $12,990 (Adventure w/ paint, luggage & Michelin Anakee Adventure tires)
Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles
Website: motoguzzi-us.com

Engine

Type: Air-cooled, longitudinal 90-degree V-twin
Displacement: 853cc
Bore x Stroke: 84.0 x 77.0mm
Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
Valve Train: OHV, 2 valves per cyl.
Valve Insp. Interval: 6,200 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ 52mm throttle body
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 2.1-qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated dry clutch
Final Drive: Shaft

Electrical

Ignition: Electronic
Charging Output: 430 watts max.
Battery: 12V 12AH

Chassis

Frame: Tubular steel w/ engine as stressed member, cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 60.2 in.
Rake/Trail: 26 degrees/5.1 in.
Seat Height: 32.7 in.
Suspension, Front: 41mm USD fork, adj. for spring preload & rebound damping, 6.6-in. travel
Rear: Single shock, adj. for spring preload & rebound damping, 4.0-in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm floating discs w/ radial 4-piston calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 260mm disc w/ 2-piston floating caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Spoked tube-type, 2.50 x 19 in.
Rear: Spoked tube-type, 4.25 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 110/80-VR19
Rear: 150/70-VR17
Wet Weight: 571 lbs. (as tested)
Load Capacity: 417 lbs. (as tested)
GVWR: 988 lbs.

Performance

Fuel Capacity: 6.1 gals., last 1.3 gals. warning light on
MPG: 90 AKI min. (low/avg/high) 43.4/48.9/55.1
Estimated Range: 298 miles
Indicated RPM at 60 MPH: 3,600

2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
Offset rear shock and an asymmetrical swingarm that’s curved on the left side make room for a high, tucked-in exhaust.
2019 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
Short windscreen directs a lot of air to the rider’s head and chest. Cool Moto Guzzi Eagle DRL bisects the twin headlights.

Source: RiderMagazine.com