Tag Archives: KTM Reviews

2023 KTM 890 Adventure | First Look Review

2023 KTM 890 Adventure

KTM has announced that joining the recently unveiled 2023 KTM 890 Adventure R is the new KTM 890 Adventure, a bike the company called “the ultimate master of all conditions and distances.”

Related: 2023 KTM 890 Adventure R | First Look Review

The 2023 KTM 890 Adventure features a liquid-cooled 889cc LC8 parallel-Twin, a 6-speed gearbox, the PASC slip/assist clutch, Bosch EMS with throttle-by-wire, and Dell’Orto throttle bodies with an integrated knock sensor for handling varying fuel quality while off the beaten path.

For 2023, one of the most significant changes has been made to the fairing between the front of the bike and the fuel tank.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure
2023 KTM 890 Adventure in Orange

A connected fairing section offers improved protection from the elements, and it is now further reinforced to offer more security and more load-bearing capability for larger GPS devices. The KTM 890 Adventure also has wider panels on the tank and side panels. 

For suspension, the reworked WP APEX 43mm fork now comes with adjustment for rebound and compression, accessible from the top caps. The APEX shock, engineered and slotted into the bike to minimize height, has new settings orientated for the demands of adventure riding.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure

A new ABS unit is informed by the six-axis IMU to enable full braking power in a range of scenarios. The improved ABS is synced with the ride modes, allowing Offroad ABS (maximizing braking control through disengagement on the rear wheel and lowered intervention on the front) to be activated automatically in Offroad or Rally mode.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure

The KTM 890 Adventure can be clicked into Street, Offroad, Rain, and an optional Rally mode to adjust engine and traction control character, and a Demo setting allows the rider the chance to try the full gamut of optional rider aids for the first 932 miles (1,500 km) before deciding whether to purchase and keep them permanently.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure
2023 KTM 890 Adventure in Black

The 2023 KTM 890 Adventure has a new higher windscreen that offers increased protection and is inspired by the product used on the KTM 450 Rally, and the two-part seat has a new soft foam structure and a slimmer front fender for aerodynamics and rain protection.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure

The overhauled 5-inch TFT display has revised hardware (bonded mineral glass for extra scratch and glare resistance), and KTM says the redesigned software system of menus and infographics makes alterations to the behavior of the KTM 890 Adventure even simpler. The backlight changes intensity as it reacts to the environment, and a new feature for 2023 enables riders to list their ‘top 10’ calls by the last ones made or favorites list. The Turn-by-Turn+ navigation allows the rider to add extra customization to their navigation details on the go from the bike’s TFT menu without having to stop and fish around for their mobile device.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure

Sportier graphics and more dynamic looks (the plastics are color injected and using in-mold decals where possible for extra resistance, as seen on the KTM offroad bikes) comes with other practical additions such as the new aluminum engine and tank protector. Other additions include a handlebar switch with hazard warning, Pirelli Scorpion STR tires for offroad emphasis, and LED indicators.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure

The 2023 KTM Adventure has a 5.3-gal fuel tank and has a dry weight of 441 lb.

Related Story: 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R | Long-Term Ride Review

2023 KTM 1290 Super Adventure R and 1290 Super Adventure S

2023 KTM 1290 Super Adventure R
2023 KTM 1290 Super Adventure R

The 2023 KTM 890 Adventure and 890 Adventure R machines join the flagship 2023 KTM 1290 Super Adventure R and 1290 Super Adventure S, both of which were completely redesigned in 2022.

Related: 2022 KTM 1290 Super Adventure R Review

Both bikes return for 2023 and are still powered by the liquid-cooled 1,301cc LC8 V-Twin engine with a 6-speed PANKL gearbox, PASC slip/assist clutch, and Keihin EMS with throttle-by-wire. Both also have a 7-inch TFT display and Rain, Street, Sport and Offroad ride modes as standard, as well as an optional Rally mode with nine levels of adjustable traction control intervention. Offroad ABS mode allows for dirt-specific ABS application on the front wheel while disengaging the rear ABS.

2023 KTM 1290 Super Adventure S
2023 KTM 1290 Super Adventure S

Suspension on the 2023 KTM 1290 Super Adventure R is provided by a fully adjustable, long-travel WP XPLOR fork with separate compression and rebound damping and a fully adjustable WP XPLOR PDS rear shock. On the 2023 KTM 1290 Super Adventure S, WP APEX Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension adapts the damping rates in real time according to Sport, Street, Comfort, or the optional Offroad, Auto, and Advanced, and the WP APEX rear shock with 200mm of travel and new hydraulic preload adjustment (20mm) offers 10 steps of adjustment or, as an optional add on, three levels of automatic leveling in Low, Standard, and High.

2023 KTM 1290 Super Adventure S
2023 KTM 1290 Super Adventure S

The KTM LC8 and LC8c ADVENTURE range will begin shipping to authorized KTM dealers from December onward. Pricing hasn’t been announced as of publication.

For more information, visit the KTM website.

The post 2023 KTM 890 Adventure | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

White Rim Trail on KTM 690 Enduros | Favorite Ride

White Rim Trail
Taking a break at Hurrah Pass during our warm-up ride on Chicken Corners Trail.

White Rim Trail – or White Rim Road in national park parlance – is a 100-mile unpaved route that loops around the Island in the Sky mesa in Canyonlands National Park near Moab, Utah. It’s on the bucket list of many dual-sport and adventure riders, and rightfully so. The scenery is spectacular, and the trail is ridable by anyone with a modicum of off-road experience.

White Rim Trail

Scan QR code above or click here to view the route on REVER

White Rim Trail, named after the layer of White Rim Sandstone that it runs on top of, was built in the 1950s by the Atomic Energy Commission to access uranium deposits. The mines didn’t produce much ore and were abandoned, and the road became part of Canyonlands after it was established in 1964.

Although White Rim Trail is a rough and rugged route, only street-legal (plated) motorcycles and high-clearance, four-wheel drive vehicles are permitted. Off-road-only dirtbikes, ATVs, and side-by-sides that are common on many trails around Moab are prohibited, which helps keep noise and traffic down. There’s also a daily limit of 50 day-use permits.

Since the trail is within Canyonlands, a national parks pass or entrance fee ($25 per motorcycle, good for seven days) is required. Day-use permits are free at visitor centers, but a $6 fee is required for permits purchased online at Recreation.gov. There are several campgrounds along the trail that require overnight permits for an additional fee. In the spring and fall, reservations are strongly encouraged.

White Rim Trail
White Rim Trail runs atop a layer of White Rim Sandstone below the Island in the Sky mesa.

The plan was for four of us – Bruce Gillies, Vic Anderson, Kevin Rose, and me – to ride the entire White Rim Trail in one day. We would be traveling light, with all of us riding KTM 690 Enduro Rs. As enjoyable as camping would be in such a beautiful place, it requires gear that would’ve weighed us down, and whatever was in our saddlebags or panniers would be subjected to paint-shaker conditions for hours on end. Instead, we rented a house in Moab that served as our base for two days of riding.

As a warm-up for the White Rim, we spent our first day riding Chicken Corners Trail, a 42-mile out-and-back route on Bureau of Land Management land that passes through Kane Springs Canyon, goes over Hurrah Pass, and runs along a high sandstone bench on the southern edge of the Colorado River. We got hammered by rain early on, but then the clouds parted, and we enjoyed a fun, scenic ride. The trail ends 400 feet above the river across from Dead Horse Point Overlook, the filming location for the final scene in Thelma and Louise when they drive off the cliff.

White Rim Trail
Hidden from view near the patch of green is the Colorado River, which joins with the Green River below the southern tip of White Rim Trail.

Having obtained our day-use permits online, the next day we left the house around sunrise and rode north on U.S. Route 191 past Arches National Park and then turned west on State Route 313. There’s no gas in Canyonlands, and the nearest gas station is about 30 miles away in Moab, so completing the loop requires at least 160 miles of range. We were equipped with auxiliary fuel canisters just in case.

White Rim Trail is a two-way road, so it can be ridden in either direction. Our plan was to ride it counterclockwise, saving the famous Shafer Trail for the very end. We turned west on Mineral Canyon Road (BLM 129) before entering Canyonlands and followed the long, flat, well-graded dirt road for about 12 miles.

White Rim Trail
When ridden counterclockwise, White Rim Trail passes through Bureau of Land Management land before entering Canyonlands National Park.

The road into Canyonlands climbs up onto the Island in the Sky mesa, which is where the visitor center and many RV-clogged overlooks are located. Since the White Rim is below the mesa, riding it in either direction requires going down a series of steep switchbacks to get to the trail.

White Rim Trail
Getting to White Rim Trail from atop the Island in the Sky mesa requires a steep, switchbacked descent to the rim and then a similar ascent at the end.

On a crisp morning in late May, we peered down into the red sandstone canyon carved by the Green River and descended to Horsethief Bottom. After passing the Canyonlands National Park boundary sign, we cruised along the flat trail and took in the full spectrum of colorful scenery: green vegetation along the river; layers of red, pink, yellow, white, and gray rock; and blue skies sprayed with tufts of white cirrocumulus clouds. Off in the distance was Canyonlands’ Maze district.

White Rim Trail
Riding along the Green River, with Canyonlands’ Maze district off in the distance.

Our first challenge was crossing a sand wash where Upheaval Canyon dumps into the Green River. If the Green is running high, the wash can be flooded and make the trail impassable. We blasted through on the gas and soon found ourselves at one of the two most technical sections on the trail: Hardscrabble Bottom. Since we rode the loop counterclockwise, this section was downhill, and we picked our way along without incident.

Even though it was a Saturday, we rarely saw others on the trail. We waved to a group of Jeepers at a campground, and we passed a few 4x4s and mountain bikers followed by support trucks. Otherwise, it was just the four of us enjoying the sweeping views and a fun trail with minimal dust thanks to the previous day’s rains.

White Rim Trail
Box canyons, hoodoos, buttes, and spires are common sights in the eroded landscape of Canyonlands National Park.

The second technical challenge on White Rim Trail is climbing up and over Murphy’s Hogback. Our KTMs were perfectly suited for the terrain, and we again made it through without any problems. Bigger ADV bikes would be more of a handful here but certainly capable of getting through.

Read all of Rider‘s KTM coverage here.

While some of White Rim Trail is red dirt and sand, miles of it are on bare sandstone, which makes for a bumpy ride. Long-travel suspension, good ground clearance, and a sturdy skid plate are essential.

White Rim Trail
Pausing to admire the view. Parts of White Rim Trail run right along the cliff’s edge, and there’s no fence or guardrail.

The sky had become progressively cloudier throughout the day, and by midafternoon, dark clouds blotted out the sun. At the junction with Potash Road, a ranger checked our permits before we began the final climb up the Shafer Trail switchbacks. This section of trail is accessible by anyone visiting Canyonlands, so we worked our way to the top around not only Jeeps and mountain bikes but Toyota Camrys full of Instagrammers too.

White Rim Trail
The switchbacks of Shafer Trail marked the end of our White Rim ride.

A few fat raindrops began to fall as we exited the trail. We made a hasty retreat back to the house to hoist celebratory beers and share stories about our adventure.

The post White Rim Trail on KTM 690 Enduros | Favorite Ride first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 KTM 790 Duke and 1290 Super Duke GT | First Look Review

2023 KTM 1290 SUPERDUKE GT
2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT

KTM North America Inc. has announced the 2023 Duke and Super Duke Duke range. After a brief hiatus, the 790 Duke and 1290 Super Duke GT will be back in KTM’s lineup, and they’re joined by the returning 890 Duke R and 1290 Super Duke R Evo. The 2023 KTM Duke and Super Duke range will begin shipping to authorized KTM dealers in December 2022, but pricing has not yet been announced.

Related Story: 2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo | Road Test Review

2023 KTM 790 Duke

2023 KTM 790 DUKE
2023 KTM 790 Duke in new gray and black motif

Introduced in 2017, the KTM 790 Duke sold more than 29,000 units, and was later upgraded to the 890 Duke. KTM says the 2023 790 Duke is a “true mid-range motorcycle” that joins the 890 Duke R to fill the gap between the 390 Duke and the 1290 Super Duke R Evo.

Related: 2019 KTM 790 Duke | First Ride Review

Related: KTM 200 Duke, 390 Duke, 890 Duke, and 1290 Super Duke R | Comparison Review

The 790 Duke will be powered by KTM’s LC8c parallel-Twin DOHC engine with 799cc of displacement and two balancer shafts for smooth power delivery and minimum vibration.

2023 KTM 790 Duke
2023 KTM 790 Duke

The 2023 KTM 790 Duke features throttle-by-wire, a PASC slip/assist clutch, three ride modes (Rain, Street, and Sport), lean-angle- sensitive Motorcycle Traction Control (MTC), cornering ABS with Supermoto mode, a full-color 5-inch TFT display, and LED lights front and back.

Optional features include Quickshifter+, Motor Slip Regulation (MSR), cruise control, tire-pressure monitoring, and Track mode, which includes traction control slip adjuster, anti-wheelie mode, launch control, and three levels of throttle response variation. The bike has a 3.7-gal tank and a dry weight of 383.6 lb.

2023 KTM 790 Duke
2023 KTM 790 Duke

In terms of looks, the 2023 KTM 790 Duke introduces two new colorways to the mix: a traditional KTM orange scheme and an all-new gray and black motif.

2023 KTM 790 DUKE
2023 KTM 790 Duke in traditional orange scheme

2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT

2023 KTM Super Duke GT
2023 KTM Super Duke GT

The KTM 1290 Super Duke GT sport-touring bike has also returned to North America for 2023. KTM says the bike was “designed to offer riders a unique Grand Touring experience but engineered to be a true Sports bike underneath the touring parts.”

Related Story: 2019 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT | First Ride Review

The 2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT has enhanced emissions control and a reworked 1,301cc LC8 V-twin engine and the same standard features of the 1290 Super Duke R Evo.

2023 KTM Super Duke GT
2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT

However, the WP APEX semi-active suspension on the 1290 Super Duke GT has been geared for the long-distance tourer, enabling the rider to set the suspension according to four different riding situations: Rider, Rider & Pillion, Rider & Luggage, or Rider, Pillion & Luggage. On top of that, the anti-dive function is fitted as standard. The larger 6.1-gal tank also contributes to the touring capabilities.

The wheels are also the same as the 1290 Super Duke R Evo and boast a weight savings of 2.2 lb of unsprung mass over the old set of rims. These all-new lightweight wheels are wrapped in new Continental ContiSportAttack 4 tires, boasting a sportier and more stable riding experience while delivering on the demand for a sportier tire to match the bike’s versatility. The 1290 Super Duke GT has a dry weight of 476 lb.

2023 KTM Super Duke GT
2023 KTM Super Duke GT

A new 7-inch TFT display has a newly designed layout, and the setup is completed by the new switchgear that KTM says not only feels premium but also allows for intuitive interaction between the rider and the dash itself.

The 2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT will also debut an all-new navigation system called Turn-by-Turn Plus, which will be available via KTMconnect and further enhance the touring experience. TBT+ allows navigation instructions to be projected directly on the TFT display.

2023 KTM Super Duke GT
2023 KTM Super Duke GT

Powered by SYGIC, TBT+ can also operate offline, allowing riders to plan their journey and adventure from remote locations, with the Navigation feature using industry-standard mapping to guide riders to their destination of choice. There’s also an advanced search feature and a diverse range of POIs including gas stations, restaurants, and rest stops. Or you can select one of your pre-saved destinations directly from the TFT dash.

2023 KTM Super Duke GT
2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke GT

The new system also allows for waypoints to be skipped without prompting a turnaround. The system will merely recalculate and find the next available route to get you back on track. Also, the last 10 destinations searched are automatically saved and available directly on the dashboard.

2023 KTM 890 Duke R

2023 KTM 890 DUKE R
2023 KTM 890 Duke R

KTM says the 790 Duke is great for introducing a new generation of riders to the world of the Duke naked bike, “and when they’re ready to take things to the next level, the 2023 KTM 890 Duke R is waiting.” The company added that the 890 Duke R is as comfortable on mountain roads as it is on the track.

Related: 2022 KTM 890 Duke R | Road Test Review

In addition to the standard features mentioned above for the 790 Duke, the 2023 KTM 890 Duke R has adjustable, track-ready WP APEX suspension, monoblock Brembo Stylema calipers grabbing 320mm front discs, and Michelin Power Cup II tires. The bike has a 3.7-gal tank and a dry weight of 377 lb.

2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2023 KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R EVO
2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

Taking it up a notch, KTM’s flagship street motorcycle, the KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo, underwent its most significant update in 2020, boasting a number of tweaks and engineering improvements, including a reworked 1,301cc LC8 engine and an all-new chassis.

In 2022, the latest incarnation of “The Beast” was launched with the same LC8 engine making a claimed 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque. The bike was dubbed the “Evo” thanks to the evolution of the second-generation WP APEX Semi Active Suspension with damping adjusted in real-time based on conditions in three preset modes: Sport, Street, and Comfort. Rear spring preload can be set via the TFT display’s menu over a 20mm range in 2mm increments.

Related: 2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo | Road Test Review

2023 KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R EVO
2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo

KTM says the 2023 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo has “the most power and torque in the family and the most advanced electronics to keep it all under control.” The bike features Motorcycle Stability Control (MSC) with cornering ABS by Bosch including Supermoto ABS, ride mode technology, and multi-stage, lean-angle sensitive Motorcycle Traction Control (MTC) using a 6 axis lean angle sensor, and cruise control. The bike has a 4.2-gal tank and a dry weight of 441 lb.

For more information, visit the KTM website.

The post 2023 KTM 790 Duke and 1290 Super Duke GT | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R and 690 SMC R | First Look Review

2023 KTM 690 SMC R
2023 KTM 690 SMC R

KTM has announced updates to the aesthetics of the KTM 690 Enduro R and KTM 690 SMC R for 2023.

See all of Rider’s KTM coverage here.

Both bikes still feature the liquid-cooled 693cc LC4 single-cylinder engine, which KTM says has “proven to be the ideal baseline for the KTM 690 range,” as well as a 6-speed gearbox with Quickshifter+, throttle-by-wire, a PASC slipper clutch, and dual balancer shafts.

The LC4 machines also still benefit from cornering ABS, Motorcycle Traction Control (MTC), and two ride modes: Street and Offroad on the 690 Enduro R and Street and Sport on the 690 SMC R.

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R
2023 KTM 690 Enduro R

On the 2023 KTM 690 SMC R, the optional Supermoto ABS mirrors this feature. When activated, ABS sensitivity is reduced on the front wheel and completely disabled on the rear, which KTM says allows for “big drifts into corners and tire-smoking powerslides out of the apex.”

2023 KTM 690 SMC R
2023 KTM 690 SMC R

An optional Offroad ABS (just add a dongle) on the 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R reduces ABS intervention on the front wheel and completely disables ABS on the rear, allowing riders to lock up the rear when they need to slide the rear into a tight turn or drag the brake down a technical descent.

The 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R has adjustable WP XPLOR suspension with separate damping circuits and 9.8 inches of travel. Stopping power is provided by Brembo brakes with wave discs, 300mm on the front and 240mm on the rear. The 2023 KTM 690 SMC R has adjustable WP APEX suspension with separate damping circuits, 9.8 inches of travel, and Brembo brakes with 320mm front and 240 rear discs.

Related Story: 2017 KTM 690 Enduro R | Long-Term Ride Review

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R
2023 KTM 690 Enduro R

From an aesthetics standpoint, the 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R takes its styling cues from the competition-Enduro range, and the KTM 690 SMC R brings an all-new blue and orange adornment to the fray.

2023 KTM 690 SMC R
2023 KTM 690 SMC R

KTM says the 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R and KTM 690 SMC R models will be available at authorized KTM dealers from November onward. Pricing is TBD.

For more information on KTM’s full model range, visit the KTM website.

The post 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R and 690 SMC R | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 KTM RC 8C | First Look Review

2023 KTM RC 8C

Following the success of the competition-only KTM RC 8C, which was released just two years ago, KTM has announced that it has “reset the dials” for 2023, overhauling the new model for what is said to be an even sharper ‘Ready to Race’ profile.

2023 KTM RC 8C

The 2023 KTM RC 8C boasts an evolved 889cc LC8c DOHC parallel-Twin molded specifically for the circuit, upgraded electronic features, more weight-saving solutions, and several high-end components aimed toward ensuring the bike’s competitiveness.

In a press statement announcing the new model, KTM cited “performance, durability and all-out capability” as the central priorities for the KTM R&D crew for the 2023 KTM RC 8C. The reported increases to maximum power and torque and the 12,000rpm rev ceiling were achieved by mods like the installation of new, lighter titanium valves and conrods, as well as two piston rings (to refine the oscillating masses), higher compression ratios, a bigger throttle body, and bolstered fuel pump/pressure.

2023 KTM RC 8C

KTM says that increasing the clutch preload, removing the top balancer, and adjusting the crankcase balancer shaft have delivered durability gains, and an additional Pankl oil cooler helps with thermal stability.

The 2023 KTM RC 8C’s dry weight has been optimized to 313 lb (142 kg) with the agility of a chrome-moly steel frame. Additional measures such as the new titanium Akrapovic exhaust system have helped the slimming, and the latest configurations of WP Pro Components suspension has enhanced the ultra-light feel. The WP Apex Pro fork and shock are now softer, contributing to increased comfort, contact, and confidence.

2023 KTM RC 8C

KTM said that regardless of whether a rider is the next Brad Binder seeking training mileage or the next Red Bull MotoGP rookie on the path to Grand Prix stardom, the refined electronics on the 2023 KTM RC 8C can match any setting of traction control, mapping, and engine braking with the rider’s level of ability (or ambition). The race bike can be primed in a number of ways, including the adjustable steering head, the offset of the CNC-machine triple clamps, the throttle response, and degree of bite from the Brembo Stylema calipers and RCS19 Corsa Corta master cylinder.

2023 KTM RC 8C

The bike also features a revamped dashboard with GPS data-logger that displays lap-record attempts, the Quickshifter+, and the use of winglets and updates to aerodynamics derived from the KTM RC16.

2023 KTM RC 8C

Only 200 editions of the 2023 KTM RC 8C will be made. Each model will come in KTM’s distinctive orange frame with razor black graphics and a special serial number stamped onto the triple clamp. Pricing starts at $39,995, and orders can be made only through the dedicated page on the KTM website.

2023 KTM RC 8C

To launch the 2023 KTM RC 8C, the company will host an “ultra-special track day” for 30 customers at the Circuit Ricardo Tormo in Valencia, Spain, on April 26, 2023. Select first-come, first-served places can be secured, with former Grand Prix riders offering track tuition and a full KTM and WP Suspension technical crew on hand to dial-in the configuration of the new bike to the 14-corner Grand Prix venue. Once in Spain, accommodation, food, and bike transportation logistics from Austria to Spain and then to local dealers is all taken care of. KTM calls it “the full factory racer experience!” For more details click HERE.

The post 2023 KTM RC 8C | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 KTM 890 Adventure R | First Look Review

2023 KTM 890 Adventure R
KTM announces 2023 890 Adventure R with rally-inspired upgrades.

The 2023 KTM 890 Adventure R was launched at KTM’s 2022 Adventure Rider Rally in Idaho this month, a fitting event for a bike whose upgrades are rally-inspired in both looks and capabilities. Two years after the 890 Adventure R’s debut, the 2023 model still has a liquid-cooled 889cc transverse parallel-Twin, but the bike has been improved to enhance off-road performance and versatility. Boasting several new features and rider aids, the 2023 model allows riders the ability to fine-tune the bike to meet the exact needs of the rider. Price has not yet been announced.

Related Story: 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R | (Off) Road Test Review

2023 KTM 890 Adventure R

What’s New on the 2023 KTM 890 Adventure R?

The 890 Adventure R takes inspiration from the Dakar-winning KTM 450 Rally for upgrades that enhance this bike’s off-road capabilities and performance, as well as giving the bike a rally aesthetic. The redesigned bodywork, new fairing, lower windscreen, and cowling improve aerodynamics and ergonomics while protecting the rider and the bike from the elements.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure R
The 2023 model features new off-road capabilities.

On top of the bodywork, the 890 Adventure R also takes after the KTM 450 Rally through a retuned WP suspension package with a fully-adjustable WP XPLOR 48mm fork and a WP XPLOR rear shock with new settings. The rear shock uses KTM’s progressive damping system, which KTM says reduces fatigue on rough trails.

Related Story: 2023 KTM 450 SMR | First Look Review

2023 KTM 890 Adventure R

The 2023 model also comes with upgraded ABS control that takes readings from the 6D sensor, which informs CMU on the angle, pitch, and speed of the motorcycle to apply the right amount of braking force based on the situation. When in the Offroad mode or the optional Rally mode, the Offroad ABS is automatically applied.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure R
The LED headlight, brake light, and turn indicators increase visibility.

Speaking of riding modes, the 2023 890 Adventure R also comes with a new Demo mode. While using the Demo mode, riders get to experience all the specs and options of different ride modes and rider aids for the first approximately 932 miles (1,500 km) before deciding which features fit the rider’s needs and riding style. Ride modes for the 2023 890 Adventure R include Street, Offroad, Rain, and Rally (optional). Rider aids include Motorcycle Traction Control, Motor Slip Regulation, and the quickshifter (optional). Heated grips, a heated seat, and cruise control are also optional.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure R
With a variety of ride modes and rider aids, the 2023 KTM 890 Adventure R allows riders to choose their own riding style.

The new 5” TFT display includes USB connectors and features a new appearance with colored pictograms and graphics. New features in the display include a turn-by-turn navigation system and a phone call-out function that allows riders to set 10 favorite numbers.

If you’re looking for a versatile, off-road-ready adventure bike, the 2023 KTM 890 Adventure R might be just your thing. A variety of ride modes and rider aids allow you to fine-tune the bike to your own riding style so that when you go on your next big adventure, you know the adventure will truly be your own.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure R

For more information, visit KTM’s website.

2023 KTM 890 Adventure R Specifications

Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, 4-Stroke, DOHC

Displacement: 889 cc

Bore/Stroke: 90.7 / 68.8mm

Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated PASC assist-and-slipper clutch

Fuel System: DKK Dell’Orto, 46mm throttle body

Ignition: Bosch EMS with throttle-by-wire

Frame: Chromoly Tubular Steel, Engine as Stressed Member

Subframe: Chromoly Steel Trellis

Suspension, Front: 48mm WP XPLOR USD fork, full adj. w/ 9.4 in. travel

Rear: WP XPLOR Single shock w/ progressive damping, fully adj. w/ 9.4 in. travel 

Front/Rear Brakes: Disc Brake 320 / 260 mm

Front/Rear Wheels: 2.50 x 21 in., 4.50 x 18 in. 

Front/Rear Tires: 90/90-21; 150/70-18 Continental TKC 80

Wheelbase: 60.2 in.

Ground Clearance: 10.4 in

Seat Height: 34.6 in

Tank Capacity: 5.3 gals

Dry Weight: Approx 432 lbs

2023 KTM 890 Adventure R

The post 2023 KTM 890 Adventure R | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 KTM SX-E 3 | First Look Review

2023 KTM SX-E 3
2023 KTM SX-E 3

KTM proves it has the next generation of riders and racers in mind with the addition of the new SX-E 3 electric motorcycle. Ideal for young riders, this bike is based on the beloved SX-E 5 but sports a lower power output, smaller wheels, and a lower and adjustable seat height.

For helpful tips and tricks for beginners, visit our Learning to Ride page.

The SX-E 3 features the same high-quality technology as the SX-E 5 but in a smaller package. Both models share the same permanent magnet electric motor, but the KTM SX-E 3 has a lower output of 3.8 kW. The 60 lithium-ion battery cells gives riders two hours of casual drive time and recharges from empty in 70 minutes. Recharging requires no more than plugging in to a 110- or 230-volt socket.

2023 KTM SX-E 3 Charger
The SX-E 3 charger supplies up to 900 W and can be plugged into any 110- or 230-socket. Charge time from empty to 80% takes 35 minutes, and charging from empty to 100% takes 70 minutes.

Upfront, 35mm non-adjustable WP XACT USD forks take care of the bumps, providing 5.7 inches of wheel travel. On the rear, a WP monoshock is mounted directly to the swingarm, offering 5.2 inches of travel, and is perfectly matched to the front fork.

Related Stories: See all of Rider‘s KTM coverage here

Another feature that makes this motorcycle perfect for smaller riders is the low, adjustable seat height. Standard height is 23.6 inches, but the seat height can be lowered to 21.8 inches by lowering the bodywork/seat, mounting the rear shock in an alternative position, and lowering the front fork in the triple clamps. An adjustable seat height allows young aspiring riders to get comfortable on a bike from a younger age and develop skills that they would otherwise have to wait for.

2023 KTM SX-E 3
A seat height of 23.6 inches and 10-inch wheels give smaller riders a chance to hit the dirt and experience the joy of riding.

KTM, in keeping with its dedication to providing the perfect motorcycle for young riders, has equipped the SX-E 3 with safety features also available in the SX-E 5. Perhaps the most important safety feature is the roll-over sensor which kills power to the motor when the motorcycle is tipped over. Another safety feature is the lockable ride modes panel. Riders can choose among six different ride modes with parents having the ability to lock the ride modes so riders can’t change modes mid-ride. These safety features along with zero emissions and a quieter, less intimidating noise than a gas-powered motorcycle make the SX-E 3 a true beginner’s bike.

2023 KTM SX-E 3
KTM proves with the SX-E 3 that it has the next generation of riders and racers in mind.

The 2023 KTM SX-E 3 has an MSRP of $4,999, which is $500 less than the SX-E 5.

Find out more about the 2023 SX-E 3 at KTM.com.

The post 2023 KTM SX-E 3 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Riding the Motorcycle Century

Riding the Motorcycle Century
Child of the ’60s meets Bud Ekins’ 1915 Harley-Davidson in 1978. (Photo by Robin Riggs)

Looking through a file folder named “Cars & Bikes” on my computer the other day, I noticed that in 50 years of riding, I’ve experienced nearly the entirety of motorcycle history. From 1915 Indian board-track racers to a 2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo, that’s 108 model years’ worth. And in between were tests, rides, or races on more machines from every decade. Hardly planned, this all resulted from simply loving to ride, being curious, and, most of all, saying yes at every chance. Here are some of my favorite moto memories, one apiece covering 12 decades.

1915 Harley-Davidson Model 11-F

In 1978, Cycle magazine gave me an assignment after I joined the staff: Write a feature about anything I wanted. Interested in the history of our sport, I replied that I’d like to ride a really old bike. “Call this guy,” the editor said, handing me the number of Bud Ekins, an ISDT gold medalist and the stuntman in the epic The Great Escape jump scene.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
More than a century after its manufacture, this modified 1915 Harley-Davidson 11-F completed the cross-country Motorcycle Cannonball. (Photo by SFO Museum)

In his enormous shop, Ekins reviewed the starting drill for his 1915 Harley-Davidson Model 11-F: Flood the carb, set the timing and compression release, crack the throttle, and then swing the bicycle-style pedals hard to get the V-Twin’s big crankshaft spinning. When it lit off, working the throttle, foot clutch, and tank-mounted shifter – and steering via the long tiller handlebar – were foreign to a rider used to contemporary bikes. But coordination gradually built, and after making our way to the old Grapevine north of Los Angeles, I found the 998cc engine willing and friendly, with lots of flywheel effect and ample low-rpm torque to accelerate the machine to a satisfying cruising speed of about 45 mph. And its rider to another time and place.

RELATED: Early American Motorcycles at SFO Museum

1927 Norton Model 18 TT Replica

On a lucky trip to New Zealand, McIntosh Racing founder Ken McIntosh let me race his special Norton Model 18 in the Pukekohe Classic Festival. Unlike the exotic Norton CS1 overhead-camshaft model that likewise debuted in 1927 – a big advancement at the time – the Model 18 TT Replica used a tuned version of the company’s existing 490cc pushrod Single engine. Its name was derived, fittingly, from the sterling Model 18 racebike’s multiple Isle of Man TT wins. As such, the production TT Replica had as much racing provenance as you could buy at the time.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
The author aboard New Zealander Ken McIntosh’s 1927 Norton Model 18 TT Replica, which reached 80 mph on track. (Photo by Geoff Osborne)

I found it surprisingly capable, delivering a blend of strong power (a digital bicycle speedometer showed a top track speed of80 mph) and predictable, confident handling – despite the girder-style fork and hardtail frame. However, lacking gear stops in its selector mechanism, the 3-speed gearbox required careful indexing to catch the correct gear. But once I got the process down, the bike was steady, swift, and utterly magical, like the Millennium Falcon of Singles in its time.

RELATED: Retrospective: 1974 Norton Commando 850 John Player Replica

1936 Nimbus Type C

When a friend handed me his 4-cylinder Nimbus, it had big problems. The engine was locked solid, and my buddy wanted to get it running and saleable. Built in Denmark, the Nimbus is unique for several reasons. One is its 746cc inline-Four engine. Rather than being mounted transversely like modern multis, it was positioned longitudinally in the frame, with power flowing rearward via shaft drive. Interestingly, the rocker-arm ends and valve stems were exposed and, when the engine was running, danced a jig like eight jolly leprechauns. The frame was equally curious, comprised of flat steel bars instead of tubing, and riveted together. With a hacksaw, hammer, and some steel, you could practically duplicate a Nimbus frame under the apple tree on a Calvin and Hobbes Lazy Sunday.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
Bob Sinclair, former CEO of Saab Cars USA, loved motorcycles. He’s riding a Nimbus Type C sidecar rig with a furry friend as co-pilot. (Sinclair Family Archives)

Anyway, the seized engine refused to budge – until I attempted a fabled fix by pouring boiling olive oil through the spark-plug holes to expand the cylinder walls and free up the rings. Additionally, I judiciously added heat from a propane torch to the iron block. Eventually, the engine unstuck and, with tuning, ran well. But the infusion of olive oil created a hot mist that emanated from the exposed valvetrain, covering my gear and leaving behind an olfactory wake like baking Italian bread.

1949 Vincent Black Shadow

One blissful time, years before Black Shadows cost six figures, I was lucky enough to ride one. Seemingly all engine, the Black Shadow was long and low, with its black stove-enamel cases glistening menacingly, and its sweeping exhaust headers adding a sensual element to an otherwise purely mechanical look.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
Unquestionably the superbike of its day, Vincent’s 998cc Black Shadow was simultaneously elegant and menacing, and a big 150-mph speedometer let the rider know it. This is a 1952 model. (Photo by Clement Salvadori)

Thanks to the big, heavy flywheels and twin 499cc cylinders, starting the Vincent took forethought and commitment. And once the beast was running, so did riding it. A rude surprise came as I selected 1st gear and slipped the clutch near the busy Los Angeles International Airport. Unexpectedly, the clutch grabbed hard, sending the Shadow lurching ahead. The rest of the controls seemed heavy and slow compared to the Japanese and Italian bikes I knew at the time – especially the dual front brakes. The bike was clearly fast, but glancing at the famous 150-mph speedometer, I was chagrined to find that I’d only scratched the surface of the Black Shadow’s performance at 38 mph.

1955 Matchless G80CS

Despite not being a Brit-bike fan in particular, I’ve owned five Matchlesses, including three G80CSs. Known as a “competition scrambler,” in reality the CS denotes it as a “competition” (scrambles) version of the “sprung” (rear-suspension equipped) streetbike. Power comes from a 498cc long-stroke 4-stroke pushrod Single of the approximate dimensions of a giant garden gnome. Starting a G80CS requires knowing “the drill” – retarding the ignition, pushing the big piston to top-dead-center on compression, and giving the kickstart lever a strong, smooth kick all the way through. This gets the crank turning some 540 degrees before the piston begins the compression stroke again.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
A true garage find, this 1955 Matchless G80CS hadn’t been used since 1966. Now resurrected, the long-stroke 498cc pushrod Single shoves the desert sled ahead like the rapid-fire blasts of a big tommy gun. (Photo by John L. Stein)

Once going, the engine fires the G80CS down the road with unhurried explosions. Then at 50 mph or so, the Matchless feels delightfully relaxed; vibration is low-frequency and quite tolerable, and the note emanating from the muffler is a pleasant bark –powerful but not threatening. It is here, at speeds just right for country roads, that the G80CS feels most in its element as a friendly, agreeable companion. With such a steady countenance, it’s no wonder that G80CS engines powered tons of desert sleds. I just wouldn’t want to be stuck in a sand wash on a 100-degree day with one that required more than three kicks to start.

RELATED: Retrospective: 1958-1966 Matchless G12/CS/CSR 650

1961 Ducati Diana 250

During Ducati’s infancy, the Italian firm concocted a249cc overhead-cam roadster named the Diana. Featuring a precision-built unit-construction engine like Japanese bikes, it offered an essential difference: being Italian. And that meant all sorts of wonderful learning, as I discovered when, as a teen, I bought a “basket-case” Diana. The term isn’t used much anymore, but it means something has been disassembled so thoroughly that its parts can be literally dumped into a basket. In the case of this poor ex-racer, literally everything that could be unscrewed or pried apart was. The engine was in pieces, the wheels were unspoked, the frame and fork were separated, and many parts were missing.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
The author aboard his basket-case 1961 Ducati Diana. (John L. Stein archives)

Its distress repelled my friends but inspired me. Upon acquiring it, a year of trial-and-error work included rebuilding the scattered engine, designing and welding brackets onto the frame for a centerstand and footpegs, assembling the steering, fabricating a wiring harness, and ultimately tuning and sorting. This basket-case Ducati literally taught me the fundamentals of motorcycle mechanics, by necessity. And due to the racy rear-set controls I’d crafted, the machine had no kickstarter, necessitating bump-starting everywhere, every time.

The bike was never gloriously fast, but it carried me through my first roadrace at the Ontario Motor Speedway. After selling it, I never saw it again. Rest in peace, fair Diana. And by the way, the California blue plate was 4C3670. Write if you’ve seen it!

1971 Kawasaki Mach III

Stepping from an 8-hp Honda 90 onto a friend’s Mach III, which was rated at 60 hp when new, was the biggest shock of my young motorcycling life. I knew enough to be careful, not only because of the 410-lb heft of the Kawasaki compared to the Honda’s feathery 202 lb, but because the Mach III had a reputation as a barn-burner. It was true. Turning the throttle grip induced the moaning wail from three dramatic 2-stroke cylinders, and propelled the Kawasaki ahead with a ferocity I’d never come close to feeling before.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
Rated at 60 horsepower, the Kawasaki Mach III (officially known as the H1) was the quickest-accelerating production motorcycle of its time. (Photo by John L. Stein)

In those first moments of augmented g-forces, I distinctly felt that the acceleration was trying to dislocate my hips. In reality, it was probably just taxing the gluteus muscles. But regardless, I remember thinking, “I’ll never be able to ride one of these.” That clearly wasn’t true, but the memory of the Mach III’s savage acceleration and whooping sound remains indelible. Additionally, the engine vibration was incessant – there was simply no escaping it – and in those pre-hydraulic disc days for Kawasaki, the drum brakes seemed heavy and reluctant, even to a big-bike novice. Glad I found out early that the Mach III’s mad-dog reputation was real.

1985 KTM 500 MXC

If Paul Bunyan designed a motorcycle, this KTM 2-stroke would be it. For its day, the 500 MXC was extraordinary at everything, such as extraordinarily hard to start; the kickstart shaft was a mile high and the lever arm even higher. At over6 feet tall in MX boots, I still needed a curb, boulder, or log handy to effectively use the left-side kickstarter. The motor had so much compression (12.0:1) that this Austrian Ditch Witch practically needed a starter engine to fire the main one. Once, I was stuck on a desert trail with the MXC’s engine reluctant to re-fire. Not so brilliantly, I attached a tow line to my friend’s Kawasaki KX250 and he pulled me to perhaps 25 mph on a nearby two-lane road. Before I could release the line and drop the clutch, my buddy slowed for unknown reasons. Instantly the rope drooped, caught on the KTM’s front knobby, and locked the wheel, slamming the bike and its idiot rider onto the asphalt. The crash should have broken my wrist, but an afternoon spent icing it in the cooler put things right.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
A beast to start and a blast to ride, this 1985 KTM 500 MXC 2-stroke was also comically and maddeningly tall. So was the desk-high kickstart arm. But, oh my, how the Austrian Ditch Witch could fly. (Photo by John L. Stein.)

When running, though, the MXC was spectacular. Capable of interstate speeds down sand washes and across open terrain, the liquid-cooled 485cc engine was a maniacal off-road overlord. The suspension included a WP inverted fork and linked monoshock with an insane 13.5 inches of travel out back. I bought the 500 MXC used for $500, and I had to practically give it away later. But now, I wish I had kept it, because it was fully street-plated – ideal for Grom hunting in the hills today.

1998 Yamaha YZF-R1

On a deserted, bucolic section of Pacific coastal backroads, I loosened the new Yamaha R1’s reins, kicked it in the ribs, and let it gallop. And gallop it did, at a breathtaking rate up to and beyond 130 mph. That’s not all that fast in the overall world of high performance, but on a little two-lane road edged by prickly cattle fences and thick oaks, it ignited all my senses. What had been a mild-mannered tomcat moments before turned into a marlin on meth, but it wasn’t the velocity that was alarming.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
Superbike tech leapt ahead with Yamaha’s YZF-R1. Its performance rang every alarm bell in the author’s head. (Photos by Yamaha)

No, the point seared into my amygdala was how hard the R1 was still accelerating at 130 mph. Rocketing past this speed with a ratio or two still remaining in the 6-speed gearbox sounded every alarm bell in my head, so I backed down. Simply, the R1 rearranged my understanding of performance. But simultaneously, it made every superbike of the 1970s, including the King Kong 1973 Kawasaki Z1 – the elite on the street in its era – seem lame by comparison.

2008 Yamaha YZ250F

After 25 years away from motocross, in 2008 I bought a new YZ250F and went to the track. Oh, my word. The dream bikes of my competitive youth – Huskys, Maicos, Ossas, and their ilk – faded to complete irrelevance after one lap at Pala Raceway on the modern 4-stroke. Naturally it was light, fast, and responsive, but the party drug was its fully tunable suspension. By comparison, everything else I’d ridden in the dirt seemed like a pogo stick. Together, the awesome suspension and aluminum perimeter frame turned motocross into an entirely different sport, and I loved it anew.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
Contemporary technology turned riding motocross from torture in the sport’s early years to the best workout – like simultaneously using every machine in the gym at maximum effort. Training and racing this 2008 Yamaha YZ250F produced heartrates just shy of running a 10k race. (John L. Stein Archives)

In retrospect, the glorious old MX bikes were dodgy because real skill was required to keep them from bucking their riders into the ditch. But, surprisingly, I found motocross aboard this new machine still merited hazard pay, for two reasons: 1) Thanks to the bike’s excellent manners, I found myself going much faster; and 2) Tracks had evolved to include lots of jumps, sometimes big ones. Doubles, step-ups, table-tops – I later paced one off at Milestone MX and realized the YZ was soaring more than 70 feet through the air.

2017 Yamaha TW200

There’s something about flying low and slow that’s just innately fun. Just ask the Super Cub pilots, lowrider guys, or Honda Monkey owners. After a day in the Mojave, plowing through sand, sliding on dry lake beds, and dodging rocks and creosote bushes, Yamaha’s TW200 proved equally enamoring. Yes, it’s molasses-slow, inhaling hard through the airbox for enough oxygen to power it along. And it’s built to a price, with an old-school carburetor and middling suspension and brakes.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
For flying low and slow on a dry lake bed, the fat-tire Yamaha TW200 is righteous. Learn to dirt-track early in life, and the skills last forever. (Photo by Bill Masho)

Nonetheless, its fat, high-profile tires somehow make it way more than alright, kind of like riding a marshmallow soaked in Red Bull. Curbs? Loading docks? Roots, ruts, and bumps? Scarcely matters at 16 mph when you’re laughing your head off. Top speed noted that day was a bit over 70 mph – good enough for freeway work, but just barely. So, actually, no. But throttling the TW all over the desert and on city streets reminded me just how joyous being on two wheels is.

RELATED: Small Bikes Rule! Honda CRF250L Rally, Suzuki GSX250R and Yamaha TW200 Reviews

2020 Kawasaki Z H2

Building from its supercharged Ninja H2 hyperbike, Kawasaki launched the naked Z H2 for 2020. Lucky to attend the press launch for the bike that year, I got to experience this 197-hp missile on a road course, freeways, backroads, and even a banked NASCAR oval. The latter was, despite its daunting concrete walls, an apropos vessel to exploit the bike’s reported power. Weighing 527 lbs wet, the Z H2 has a 2.7:1 power-to-weight ratio – nearly twice as potent as the 2023 Corvette Z06.

Riding the Motorcycle Century
Exploiting Kawasaki’s 197-horsepower Z H2 definitely required a racetrack. (Photo by Kawasaki)

Supercharged engines are known for their low-end grunt, and the Z H2 motor was happy to pull at any rpm and in any gear. But it fully awakened above 8,000 rpm, as the aerospace-grade supercharger began delivering useful boost. From here on, the job description read: Hang on and steer. Free to pin it on the road course and oval, I did. And not for bravado’s sake – I really wanted to discover the payoff of having so much power. As it turns out, a supercharged liter bike dramatically shrinks time and space, making it a total blast on the track – and absolute overkill on the road. Watch where you aim this one.

Based in Southern California, John L. Stein is an internationally known automotive and motorcycle journalist. He was a charter editor of Automobile Magazine, Road Test Editor at Cycle, and served as the Editor of Corvette Quarterly. He has written for Autoweek, Car and Driver, Motor Trend, Cycle World, Motorcyclist, Outside, and other publications in the U.S. and abroad.

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