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‘The Bad Editor: Collected Columns and Untold Tales of Bad Behavior’ | A Biased Book Review

Peter Jones The Bad Editor

We all fight a battle between our opposites selves, between good and evil, between our inner demon and our inner angel. No one is all good or all bad. It’s the vast area in the middle where things get interesting.

When it came to reviewing Peter Jones’ new book, “The Bad Editor: Collected Columns and Untold Tales of Bad Behavior,” I knew I would be biased. I know Peter. I like Peter. We’ve shared lots of laughs and drinks over the years at motorcycle press launches. When I took over as editor-in-chief of Rider, Peter reached out to me and offered to help. Now he writes a monthly column in Rider called “The Moto Life.”

So I asked Denis Rouse, Rider’s founding publisher and a guy who loves reading as much as he loves riding, to review Peter’s book. Denis doesn’t know Peter. Denis is unfiltered and likes controversy. He’s also been in the trenches of the motorcycle industry. Who better to review a book called “The Bad Editor”?

But after reading the review Denis sent me, I knew we needed to zoom out, to take a wider view.

We need interesting people in this world to save us from the khaki-slacks and white-Camry dullness that will swallow us whole if we don’t pry open its jaws and kick out its teeth. Interesting people are complicated. As Whitman would say, they contradict themselves, they are vast and contain multitudes.

Peter Jones The Bad Editor
Peter Jones with his 2006 Suzuki GSX-R1000 Bob-Job.

Peter is interesting. He has a degree in fine arts and used to work in a museum. He started road racing in his 30s. He had a engine throw a rod between his legs at 199 mph on the Bonneville Salt Flats, just missing his chance to join the 200 MPH Club (and luckily escaping without grievous bodily harm). But he later joined the club, clocking 202.247 mph from a standing start on a naturally aspirated production motorcycle at Maxton AFB. Peter has written for every major motorcycle magazine and worked for Pirelli, Öhlins, Kymco and Nitron. He’s written academic papers on philosophy and an as-yet-unpublished book about risk. He’s working on a graphic novel. He’s restoring a 1962 Benelli Sprite 200. Peter also an eclectic taste in shoes. I don’t think I’ve ever seen him wear the same pair twice.

You get the idea.

Peter’s new book has a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde quality to it. The first 150 pages are devoted to 30 columns he wrote between 1996 and 2002 for Sport Rider, Motorcyclist, American Roadracing and Motorcycle Street & Strip. Many of the columns are about road racing — the mindset of racers, crashing, backmarkers, G-forces and so on.

As Denis puts it: The chapters on road racing are excellent, in particular the one in which our man describes riders of unworldly skill who walk a track before a race and engrave the geometry in their minds to achieve a subconscious sense, some say even a spiritual sense, to negotiate the course at terrifying speeds and lean angles and braking forces that bend the science of physics. Then there’s this painful chapter on expiating guilt that deals with the time Jones crashed his bike in a road race, causing the rider just behind him to do a career-ending crash, that rider being Stewart Goddard, who despite being paralyzed from the chest down as a result of an early moped accident, was doing well enough on the circuits to be an icon at the time. I’m human. I know guilt. How does Jones handle it? I remember how Graham Greene defined its opposite, innocence, as “a blind leper who has lost his bell, wandering the world, meaning no harm.”

There are also columns about lane-splitting in Los Angeles traffic, being mesmerized by a Supercross race in Las Vegas (a city he fears and loathes), “The Art of the Motorcycle” exhibit at the Guggenheim, owning a clapped-out CB350 and why you should never try to ride a motorcycle with 15 pounds’ worth of brake rotors in a bag slung over your arm, all of which are well-written, thoughtful and entertaining.

Dr. Jekyll is the good guy, the responsible one. He’s not the interesting part of the story. It’s Mr. Hyde’s 19 “Untold Tales of Bad Behavior” that people really want to read.

According to Denis: Jones stirred memories of my own from years as Rider’s publisher of which I’m not particularly proud. Like the time we drove a rental car on the beach in and out of the salt of the surf wash during Daytona Speed Week. Like when I was drinking Lone Stars with tequila shooters at the bar in Gilley’s during the Houston Motorcycle Show and became convinced by colleagues and Harley execs that I could ride the mechanical bull at gringo level without a serious get-off. And the time we were seated at an entertainment club featuring female impersonators, and one of the entertainers came to our table and, well, I won’t go on here, it’s Jones’ book not mine, but there’s related dubiousness in it that’s plenty familiar to me.

What enthusiasts often want to know is, “What really happens at motorcycle press launches?” They don’t care about the 48 hours of travel to spend 36 hours on the ground in Spain to ride a motorcycle for 100 miles. They aren’t interested in how many photo passes you had to do to get the shot, or that you had to ride a motorcycle with DOT tires on a track in the rain. They want the trench coat opened and the naked truth revealed.

Because Peter has a solid moral core, is not out to settle scores and doesn’t name names, his tales of bad behavior feel restrained. The tales lack the prurience we all crave. Peter is self-effacing, humorously pointing out his own foibles and errors in judgment, but the veil of anonymity that protects the not-so innocent left me hungry for more details, for the who, what, when, where and why of what transpired.

Where Peter is more open, though again without pointing fingers at a particular person or brand, is about the delicate balance motojournalists maintain to serve different masters: editors, publishers, readers, advertisers, manufacturers and themselves.

Back to Denis: What rings especially true in the book, and it’s a subject Jones deals with eloquently on several levels as an insider, is the pressure advertisers put to bear on the shoulders of a motorcycle journalist to retain integrity (read: honesty) in the test reporting of machines and related accessories and riding equipment. Advertising is important. The ship goes down without it. But Jones knows it sinks faster when readers no longer trust it.

Motorcycle magazines (and websites) are enthusiast publications. There is a symbiotic relationship between all parties involved, yet the rules of that relationship are not written down or set in stone. As Peter told me in our recent podcast interview, when journalists are reviewing the advertisers’ products, there’s an inherent conflict of interest. Readers want motojournalists to be honest, but only when that honesty aligns with their own biases. When a reader’s favorite motorcycle doesn’t win a comparison test, the reader will sometimes accuse the editors of the magazine of being “in the pocket” of the winning manufacturer, rather than accepting the conclusion that the motorcycle in their garage isn’t the best/fastest/coolest.

As I know from personal experience, no staff editor at a motorcycle magazine gets rich doing their job. It’s a labor of love. Sure, free helmets are involved, but try paying rent or buying groceries with a used helmet and let me know how it turns out for you.

Peter isn’t a bad guy, not in a moral sense, but he has found himself in bad situations.

Denis: The ironic capper comes in the last chapter of the book in which Jones leads several police officers in a life-threatening chase on the Blue Ridge Parkway. He was speeding way over the posted 45, in a national park no less, when he caught the pursuant attention of the law. The deal ends at a dead end, and Jones is promptly arrested, ordered to lie prone on the ground with his hands cuffed behind him, with an officer’s knee planted on his back. Off he goes to the Graybar Hotel. End of book. 

Was a felony conviction added to his resume? He says no but more detail to come in Volume II of “The Bad Editor.”

I’m just jonesing for it.

We need people like Peter Jones in the motorcycle industry. We don’t pay him enough to write his monthly column. So buy his book. Buy two and send one to a friend.

“The Bad Editor: Collected Columns and Untold Tales of Bad Behavior” is 250 pages, and is available in paperback for $18.55 or as a Kindle e-book for $7.99 on Amazon. To read sample chapters and find out more about Peter Jones, visit TheBadEditor.com.

The post ‘The Bad Editor: Collected Columns and Untold Tales of Bad Behavior’ | A Biased Book Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Riders Share Launches Rider Pass Subscription for Peer-to-Peer Motorcycle Rentals

Riders Share Ride Pass review motorcycle rental subscription service

Riders Share, the largest motorcycle sharing marketplace, has announced that bikers can now pay a monthly subscription for discounted rides across the motorcycle rental marketplace. The Rider Pass subscription pricing plan is an industry-first service for peer-to-peer rentals designed to spur growth and motorcycle ridership as the economy rebounds.

  • Rider Pass subscription service provides 35% discount for rides booked on Riders Share marketplace for a $24 monthly fee
  • Service includes free motorcycle rental delivery up to $50
  • Perfect for trying multiple bikes, for frequent travelers and for riders who can’t commit to a single motorcycle
Riders Share Ride Pass review motorcycle rental subscription service

Launched in 2018 by CEO and avid motorcyclist Guillermo Cornejo, Riders Share has powered over 100,000 registered users in its motorcycle rental community, and over 15,000 people have shared their motorcycle on the platform. The company was part of Techstars Los Angeles ’19, and is backed by Texas-based LiveOak Venture Partners and other institutional investors.

The average price for renting a motorcycle on Riders Share is set by the owners of the bike and is typically around $100 a day including insurance — much more affordable than other motorcycle rental alternatives. Now, with the Rider Pass subscription, users will receive an additional 35% off the total price in exchange for a monthly rate of $24.

Riders Share Ride Pass review motorcycle rental subscription service

“We believe subscriptions are key to continued growth in peer-to-peer rentals,” said Cornejo. “There’s an entire market of twenty million plus riders who are bikeless; our goal with subscription services is to provide an economic re-entry point to stimulate responsible ridership across the country.”

Motorcycles are notoriously underutilized in the U.S. On average, motorcycles are used four times less often than cars, which has a significant effect on the total cost of a motorcycle trip. In fact, for the large number of motorcyclists that ride under 40 days per year, each trip requires an average of $190 in ownership costs.

Riders Share Ride Pass review motorcycle rental subscription service

“Peer-to-peer rentals typically cost up to 70% less than brick-and-mortar motorcycle rentals. With our new subscription offering, we’re now able to further reduce this cost, giving people that can’t commit to motorcycle ownership a viable alternative,” said Cornejo.

Riders Share has been recognized as an industry-leader in terms of vehicle selection, marketplace members and low cost. While COVID made a significant impact on travel in general, Riders Share is beginning to see new records in transactions.

Riders Share Ride Pass review motorcycle rental subscription service

“Our mission is to encourage safe motorcycling by making it more affordable,” said Cornejo. “We felt the time was right to further diversify our pricing model and help people create new mobility habits as our cities start moving again.”

The Rider Pass subscription model is only available for riders over the age of 25 and with a FICO score over 700. Free delivery is included up to $50. The base monthly subscription price is $24 with a 12-month term, or $22 per month if prepaid in advance.

For more information, visit riders-share.com.

About Riders Share
Riders Share, is the world’s largest peer-to-peer motorcycle marketplace platform, matching underutilized motorcycles with vetted riders that want to rent them. Riders Share leverages machine learning to vet riders, provides an insurance policy for owners and offers roadside assistance. With over 100,000 registered users, Riders Share offers the largest variety of motorcycles available to rent in the world, all while providing a superior experience for renters and an extra source of income for owners.

About LiveOak Venture Partners
LiveOak Venture Partners is a venture capital fund based in Austin, Texas. With 20 years of successful venture investing in Texas, the founders of LiveOak have helped create nearly $2 billion of enterprise value. While almost all of LiveOak’s investments begin at the Seed and Series A stages, LiveOak is a full life cycle investor focused on helping create category-leading technology and technology-enabled service companies headquartered in Texas. LiveOak Venture Partners has been the lead investor in over 30 exciting high-growth Texas-based companies in the last seven years including ones such as CS Disco, Digital Pharmacist, OJO Labs, Opcity and TrustRadius.

The post Riders Share Launches Rider Pass Subscription for Peer-to-Peer Motorcycle Rentals first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

National Cycle VStream Sport Windscreen | Gear Review

National Cycle VStream Windscreen review Yamaha Tenere 700 T7
For the 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700, National Cycle’s VStream Windscreen comes in three sizes (from left): VSport ($129.95, light tint), Sport/Touring ($149.95, light tint) and Touring ($159.95, clear).

The windscreen on our long-term Yamaha Ténéré 700 not only complements the bike’s rally styling but works quite well for a stock bug catcher. Still, I felt that comfort for long highway stretches could be improved. My priorities for an upgrade were reducing wind noise and buffeting, retaining the bike’s good looks and durability. Having enjoyed a National Cycle screen on a previous motorcycle, I gave its VStream Sport model ($129.95, light tint) a go.

The shortest of three Ténéré windscreens offered, the Sport measures 12 inches from top to bottom, just an inch more than the stocker and low enough for adventuring. Calming the cockpit requires moving wind blast to the sides and away from the rider’s head. To accomplish this, the VStream is 4 inches wider than stock and incorporates side flares as part of its patented shape. I think they’re onto something, at least for a rider of my 5-foot, 8-inch stature. My freeway rides were definitely quieter, with less turbulence around my helmet; your decibels may vary. Taller riders can opt for the 15.25-inch Sport/Touring ($149.95, light tint) or 18-inch Touring ($159.95, clear) versions.

National Cycle VStream Windscreen review Yamaha Tenere 700 T7
The VStream Sport Windscreen installed on our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 long-term test bike. (Photo by the author)

National Cycle’s proprietary 3-mm-thick Quantum hardcoated polycarbonate addresses durability issues. They’ve tested it to be 10 times more abrasion resistant than the next best material, Lexan FMR, and invite doubters to attack it with steel wool. So I did, also going after the Yamaha’s Lexan screen. With some hard work, I put a few small scratches in the VStream, and with much less effort did serious damage to the stock unit. A harder surface keeps the view clean and crisp by preventing light-scattering scratches and lets me slack off on my persnickety shield cleaning routine. National Cycle’s website video of a screen taking a shotgun blast vividly displays its polycarbonate’s impact resistance (spoiler: it didn’t break), making the 3-year breakage warranty a safe bet.

Installing the VStream on the T7 was as simple as removing four 4mm hex-head screws, swapping screens and re-installing the screws. The width of the Sport takes something from the 700’s rally vibe, but what it gives back in durability and comfort make it worth the sacrifice for me. Having made windshields since 1937 and pioneered the use of polycarbonate in 1975, National Cycle knows how to build a good windscreen. And they do it in the U.S.A.

For more information, visit nationalcycle.com

The post National Cycle VStream Sport Windscreen | Gear Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Peter Jones: Ep. 11 of the Rider Magazine Insider Podcast

Peter Jones The Bad Editor
Peter Jones with his 2006 Suzuki GSX-R1000 Bob-Job.

Our guest on Episode 11 of the Rider Magazine Insider podcast is Peter Jones, a veteran motojournalist who writes “The Moto Life” column in Rider magazine. Peter recently published “The Bad Editor: Collected Columns and Untold Tales of Bad Behavior,” a book that tells the inside story of a journalist’s life in the U.S. motorcycle industry through 30 collected columns and 19 new tales of revealing bad behavior. We discuss embarrassing moments at motorcycle press launches, what it feels like to go 200 mph on a motorcycle, and much more.

Check out the episode on SoundCloud or iTunes, or you can listen on the Rider Magazine Insider podcast webpage.

To read sample chapters from “The Bad Editor: Collected Columns and Untold Tales of Bad Behavior” or to buy a copy, visit TheBadEditor.com.

Peter Jones The Bad Editor

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Adirondack Motomarathon Set for June 1-4

Motomarathon
A photo from the 2009 Pikes Peak Motomarathon in Colorado. The 2021 event will be held in upstate New York.

With the New York Adirondack Motomarathon scheduled for June 1-4 based out of North River, New York, the first organized motorcycle sport-touring event format is back in action after a COVID-19 hiatus.

After moving its headquarters from Colorado to the East Coast last year, the iconic Motomarathon Association will retain its original format developed over more than 30 years of organized group riding that compresses as many twisty and scenic roads as possible into a four-day motorcycle vacation.

Motomarathons have been run in virtually every popular riding area in America, from the Rocky Mountains to the California Coastal Ranges and Pacific Northwest, from the Ozarks to the Great Smokies, and from the Great Lakes to New England.

Routes are designed by local experts and kept secret until the evening before each day’s ride. Participants complete a series of self-recorded checkpoints, photographing their badge numbers at designated landmarks to validate their completion of the route. These checkpoints are recorded by the Motomarathon Association for event, annual and lifetime standings.

“Motomarathon is the perfect post-pandemic pastime, and the Adirondack Mountains have some of the best riding roads in the country,” said new owner John Bossolt, who takes over the reins from founder John Metzger. “Long-distance motorcycle sport touring may be one of the purest forms of individual recreation that can be shared with others, but with virtually zero contact.”

Metzger, author of two books on the subject – Meditation by Motorcycle and Motorcycling Through Midlife – continues on as an advisor.

For more information, visit Motomarathon’s website (motomarathon.com) or Facebook page.

The post Adirondack Motomarathon Set for June 1-4 first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Edelweiss Bike Travel Survey: Chance to Win Norway Tour

Edelweiss Bike Travel Norway Touring Center

Edelweiss Bike Travel is conducting an anonymous online survey about motorcycling travel and touring in 2021 and beyond. The survey takes only about 5 minutes to complete.

At the end of the survey participants can enter a raffle that includes one spot on Edelweiss Bike Travel’s Norway Touring Center including motorcycle rental, or one of 5 travel vouchers worth 250 Euro each.

Click the link below to access the survey:
https://de.surveymonkey.com/r/33BYFH5

For those who are interested in Edelweiss Bike Travel motorcycle tours, which take place all around the world, check out dates, locations, pricing and more at edelweissbike.com.

Rider Magazine has teamed up with Edelweiss Bike Travel for a special “Best of Greece” tour, October 10-23, 2021. For more information, click HERE.

The post Edelweiss Bike Travel Survey: Chance to Win Norway Tour first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Progressive IMS Outdoors Tour Dates and Venues

Progressive IMS Outdoors tour schedule price venue
The first stop on the Progressive IMS Outdoors tour will be in Southern California, at FivePointAmphitheater in Irvine, California, on July 9-11, 2021.

After years of hosting in-door consumer motorcycle shows around the country, for 2021 the Progressive International Motorcycle Shows has been rebranded as Progressive IMS Outdoors and the events will be held outside, like open-air powersports festivals.

The Progressive IMS Outdoors tour will visit nine major markets around the U.S. between July and October. The three-day events are designed to attract powersports enthusiasts and potential riders of all ages and skill levels, with exciting hands-on experiences unique to each venue, including motorcycle demo rides.

The 2021 Progressive IMS Outdoors venues in calendar order are:

  • FivePointAmphitheater (Irvine, CA – July 9-11)
  • Sonoma Raceway (Sonoma, CA – July 16-18)
  • Goebbert’s Farm (Pingree Grove, IL – August 20-22)
  • Brooklyn Army Terminal (Brooklyn, NY – September 3-5)
  • Carlisle Fairgrounds (Carlisle, PA – September 10-12)
  • Texas Motor Speedway (Fort Worth, TX – October 1-3)
  • James L Ward Agriculture Center (Lebanon, TN – October 8-10)
  • SUN n’ FUN Campus (Lakeland, FL – October 15-17)
  • Georgia International Horse Park (Conyers, GA – October 29-31)

Ticket sales, attractions and event specifics will be available starting May 13 at motorcycleshows.com.

Progressive IMS Outdoors tour schedule price venue
The second stop on the Progressive IMS Outdoors tour will be in Northern California at Sonoma Raceway in Sonoma, California, on July 16-18, 2021.

As with past tours, attendees can look forward to seeing hundreds of the latest street bikes, dirt bikes, cruisers, scooters, ATVs and much more from leading manufacturers familiar to the shows such as Indian Motorcycles, Royal Enfield, Yamaha Motorcycles, Zero Motorcycles, and Harley-Davidson, which will be showcasing its new 2021 Pan America 1250, as well as first-time exhibiting manufacturers like Beta Motorcycles.

Attendees will also be able to interact with leading brands in the electric mobility space, including Giant Bicycles and FLX Bike, which will be exhibiting its exciting e-bike line as well electric skateboards from Miles Board.

The tour will also welcome back a number of returning tour-wide exhibiting brands including Arai, Cycle Gear, Enginehawk, Explorify Rentals & Tours, HJC, J&P Cycles, LiquiMoly, Michelin, National Cycle Inc., Ruroc Helmets, Yuasa and others.

Regardless of the tour stop, attendees can look forward to the latest in rider products and keen hands-on opportunities for enthusiasts of all experience levels at each venue.

The post 2021 Progressive IMS Outdoors Tour Dates and Venues first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler | First Look Review

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm Edition

From the 900cc Street Twin and Street Twin Gold Line to the 1,200cc T120, T120 Black, Streetmaster, Bobber and Scrambler 1200 (including the ultra-cool Steve McQueen Edition), Triumph has updated nearly every model in its Bonneville lineup for the 2022 model year.

Last but certainly not least is Triumph’s 900cc Street Scrambler (MSRP starts at $11,000; available in July) and new limited-edition Street Scrambler Sandstorm (MSRP $11,750; available in May).

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler in Urban Grey

As with other Bonneville models, the Street Scrambler’s liquid-cooled parallel-twin has been updated to meet Euro 5 emissions yet it still delivers 64 horsepower at 7,250 rpm and 59 lb-ft of torque at 3,250 rpm (claimed). Three riding modes (Road, Rain, and Off-Road), a torque-assist clutch, switchable ABS and switchable traction control are standard equipment.

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm Edition

Styling updates include a new side panel with aluminum number board, a new heel guard, new brushed aluminum headlight brackets, new adventure-oriented seat material, new throttle body finishers and new paint schemes.

Street Scrambler models are equipped with a Brembo front brake, a cartridge fork, a 19-inch front wheel, Metzeler Tourance 90/10 adventure tires, an LED taillight and a USB charging port.

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm Edition

Limited to 775 units worldwide, the Scrambler Sandstorm Edition has a unique paint scheme, premium accessories (high front fender, tail tidy, sump guard, headlight grille and rubber knee pads on the tank) fitted as standard and a certificate of authenticity personalized with the bike’s VIN.

The 2022 Street Scrambler is available in three premium paint schemes: Jet Black, Urban Grey and two-tone Matte Khaki and Matte Ironstone with distinctive new tank graphics.

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler review
The 2022 Triumph Street Scrambler’s 900cc parallel twin makes 64 horsepower and 59 lb-ft of torque (claimed).

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Specs

Base Price: $11,000 / $11,750 (Sandstorm Edition)
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel twin, SOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 900cc
Bore x Stroke: 84.6 x 80mm
Horsepower: 64 @ 7,250 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 59 lb-ft @ 3,250 rpm (claimed)
Fuel Delivery: Electronic fuel injection & throttle-by-wire
Transmission: 5-speed, cable-actuated assist-and-slipper wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Frame: Tubular steel w/ twin cradles, steel swingarm
Wheelbase: 56.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 25.6 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.1 in.
Suspension, Front: 41mm fork, non-adj., 4.7 in. travel
Rear: Dual shocks, adj. preload, 4.7 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Single 310mm disc w/ opposed 4-piston axial fixed caliper & switchable ABS
Rear: Single 255mm disc w/ 2-piston floating caliper & switchable ABS
Wheels, Front: Spoked aluminum, 2.5 x 19 in.
Rear: Spoked aluminum, 4.25 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 100/90-19 tube-type
Rear: 150/70-17 tube-type
Wet Weight: 492 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 3.2 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 54.7 mpg (claimed)

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Photo Gallery:

The post 2022 Triumph Street Scrambler | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Christian Dutcher: Ep. 10 of the Rider Magazine Insider Podcast

Rider Magazine Insider Podcast Episode 10 Christian Dutcher Director Americade Touratech DirtDaze Rally
Christian Dutcher is the Director of Americade and the Touratech DirtDaze Rally.

Our guest is Christian Dutcher, Director of Americade, the Touratech DirtDaze Rally and Rolling Thru America, a motorcycle tour company focusing on the Eastern U.S. Americade is the World’s Largest Touring Rally and takes place each year in Lake George, New York. Due to the pandemic, Americade was cancelled in 2020 and will move from June to September in 2021. We discuss what makes Americade such a special event, from the scenic rides and huge vendor area to the entertainment and family-friendly atmosphere.

Check out the episode on SoundCloudStitcher or iTunes, or you can listen on the Rider Magazine Insider podcast webpage.

The post Christian Dutcher: Ep. 10 of the Rider Magazine Insider Podcast first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Christian Dutcher: Ep. 10 of the Rider Magazine Insider Podcast

Rider Magazine Insider Podcast Episode 10 Christian Dutcher Director Americade Touratech DirtDaze Rally
Christian Dutcher is the Director of Americade and the Touratech DirtDaze Rally.

Our guest is Christian Dutcher, Director of Americade, the Touratech DirtDaze Rally and Rolling Thru America, a motorcycle tour company focusing on the Eastern U.S. Americade is the World’s Largest Touring Rally and takes place each year in Lake George, New York. Due to the pandemic, Americade was cancelled in 2020 and will move from June to September in 2021. We discuss what makes Americade such a special event, from the scenic rides and huge vendor area to the entertainment and family-friendly atmosphere.

Check out the episode on SoundCloudStitcher or iTunes, or you can listen on the Rider Magazine Insider podcast webpage.

The post Christian Dutcher: Ep. 10 of the Rider Magazine Insider Podcast first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com