Tag Archives: Latest News/What’s New

AMA Hall of Famer and Superbike Champion Wes Cooley Passes

Wes Cooley AMA Hall of Fame Superbike Yoshimura Japan
Wes Cooley, AMA Hall of Famer and former AMA Superbike racer, passed away on Oct. 16, 2021. (Photo courtesy Yoshimura Japan)

The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame offers its condolences to the family, friends and fans of Wes Cooley, a member of the Hall of Fame Class of 2004 who was a pioneering force behind the rising popularity of AMA Superbike racing in the 1970s and early ’80s. Cooley passed away on Oct. 16 at his home in Twin Falls, Idaho, after reportedly suffering complications from diabetes. He was 65.

Wester Steven Cooley was born in Los Angeles on June 28, 1956, and was a product of the Southern California roadracing scene. When he entered his first AMA Superbike Series event at Daytona International Speedway in March of 1976 on a Kawasaki KZ1000, he was a young, hard-charging rider who differed in several ways from the old-school roadracer mentality that had been the norm in the ‘60s and ‘70s.

Along with some of his 1970s contemporaries, Cooley helped change the face of the then-new Superbike class by stepping up the level of competition, eventually winning two AMA Superbike Championships in 1979 and 1980. He gave Suzuki its first AMA Superbike title in 1979.

In addition to his Superbike exploits, Cooley also made history by becoming the first rider to win an AMA Formula One National on a four-stroke.

Not only did Cooley become a racing icon in America, he was also a legend in Japan for winning the inaugural Suzuka 8-Hour Endurance race in 1978 and again 1980.

In May of 1985 at Sears Point Raceway, Cooley sustained life-threatening injuries in an ugly crash. Cooley made a slow but steady recovery from that horrible accident, and went on to teach in the Team Hammer Advanced Riding School for a few years, eventually earning a nursing degree and working as a medical professional in Idaho. When inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004, he acknowledged that his 1985 accident is what propelled him into the medical field.

Cooley will always be remembered for changing the face of AMA Superbike racing in its formative years, but he was also a fan favorite throughout his racing career, a guy who always took the time to connect with fans.

In 2016, Cooley served as Grand Marshal for the AMA’s Vintage Motorcycle Days and drew an expansive crowd.

Cooley is survived by Melody Rose, his partner of many years, along with son Wes Jr. and daughter Alexis.

The post AMA Hall of Famer and Superbike Champion Wes Cooley Passes first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review
The 2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE takes its styling cues from Kawasaki’s original naked 900, the Z1.

Kawasaki has announced a new “SE” version of its retro-styled Z900RS for 2022, which features upgraded suspension and brakes. Up front are new radial-mount monoblock Brembo M4.32 calipers and new settings for the fully adjustable inverted fork, which now sports gold legs. Out back is a new fully adjustable Öhlins S46 rear shock with a remote preload adjuster.

Also new on the 2022 Kawasaki Z900RS is a new “Yellow Ball” color scheme, with Metallic Diablo Black paint, yellow highlights on the teardrop tank and rear fender, and fetching gold wheels.

Read our Kawasaki Z900RS vs Honda CB1000R vs Suzuki Katana comparison review

At the heart of the Z900RS SE is a liquid-cooled, 948cc, 16-valve, inline-Four, which made 100 horsepower at 8,500 rpm and 67.5 lb-ft of torque at 6,700 rpm at the rear wheel in our 2020 comparison test. This lightweight and compact engine spools up quickly and delivers solid and smooth performance when pushed but is versatile enough to be ridden in traffic with ease. The high-tensile steel trellis frame has received revisions at the swingarm pivot point, which is now stronger.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

A fully adjustable 41mm inverted fork offers 10 clicks of compression adjustment, 12 clicks of rebound adjustment, and a stepless preload adjuster. At the rear, the RS is fitted with a horizontal backlink Öhlins S46 shock with a remote preload adjuster. The shock is linked to an extruded lightweight aluminum swingarm to maximize handling, with the linkage placed atop the swingarm helps to centralize the weight.

Braking is provided by a pair of radial-mount monoblock Brembo 4-piston M4.32 front calipers squeezing 300mm petal discs with a Nissin radial-pump master cylinder. Out back, a 2-piston caliper squeezes a 250mm petal disc. ABS and stainless-steel braided lines are standard.

In keeping with the classic styling, the Z900RS SE is equipped with cast flat spoke wheels, finished in gold, to resemble traditional wire-spoked wheels. Dunlop GPR-300 tires further add to the retro credentials.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review
2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

The Z900RS SE features a large-diameter round LED headlight with a convex lens and chrome ring, adding to the retro look without compromising on lighting. LEDs have replaced all the lights except for the turnsignals. A dual-dial analog instrument cluster is coupled with a multi-function LCD screen for retro-style with modern functionality. The LCD features white letters on a black background and includes a gear position indicator.

Much like the sporty bikes of the ’70s, the Z900RS SE has a relaxed, upright riding position. A wide flat handlebar means the grips are 30mm wider, 65mm higher, and 35mm closer to the rider compared to the sportier Z900, partly thanks to the raised upper-triple clamp. The footpegs are also 20mm lower and 20mm farther forward, enhancing the relaxed riding position. Rubber-mounted bar ends help dampen vibrations in the bars, and both the clutch and brake levers are 5-way adjustable to help accommodate a wide variety of hand sizes.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review

The slim fuel tank is narrow at the rear, which allows for easy knee gripping. A low seat height, combined with a slim design, adds to the rider’s ability to place both feet on the ground when stopped.

A full range of Kawasaki accessories is available to give owners the option to add to the motorcycle’s iconic, old-school feel, including a tank emblem set, black, gold, or silver oil filler caps, front axle slider, tank pad, frame slider set, center stand, passenger grab bar and more.

2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE Specs

Base Price: $13,449
Website: kawasaki.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 948cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 56.0 mm
Horsepower: 100 @ 8,500 rpm (2020 Z900, rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 67.5 lb-ft @ 6,700 rpm (2020 Z900, rear-wheel dyno)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 57.9 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 32.9 in.
Wet Weight: 474 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gals.

The post 2022 Kawasaki Z900RS SE | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Yamaha Funds Six All Kids Bike Programs in Georgia and California

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, has announced $30,000 in funding to All Kids Bike, covering the cost for six programs teaching kids in Georgia and California public schools’ kindergarten Physical Education (PE) classes how to ride bikes. With the grant provided through the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative (OAI), Yamaha joins the national movement helping kids transition from digital screens to going outside and learning important life skills, along with building confidence and coordination that feeds into lifelong enthusiasm for outdoor recreation.

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

“With kids in the U.S. spending an average of seven hours a day on a digital screen, it’s never been more important for companies like Yamaha to invest in the future of outdoor recreation by getting our youth off of the devices and participating in healthy and fun activities to increase their confidence, instill valuable life lessons, and simply enjoy all the outdoors has to offer,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s Motorsports Marketing Manager.

“Research shows approximately seventy-five percent of kids won’t even ride a bicycle one time this year,” said Ryan McFarland, All Kids Bike founder, who helped Yamaha employees deliver bikes to Morris Elementary in Cypress, California, last month. “We believe it’s critical for the future of our kids and our communities to change that stat, so All Kids Bike is on a mission to teach every kid in America how to ride a bike in kindergarten PE class. We share a common goal with the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative of getting people outside and enjoying nature. This is a big win for our program, but mostly for the kids at these schools.”

Listen to Ryan McFarland interview on the Rider Magazine Insider Podcast

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, (YMUS) employees from the Marietta, Georgia, and Cypress, California corporate offices, and Yamaha Motor Manufacturing Corporation of America (YMMC) personnel, in Newnan, Georgia, recently volunteered their time to build and deliver bikes and helmets to local schools. Full All Kids Bike programs, including 24 balance bikes, pedal conversion kits, helmets, and a teacher’s bike, were delivered to Elm Street Elementary in Newnan, Georgia, A.L. Burruss Elementary School in Marietta, Georgia, and Juliet Morris Elementary School in Cypress, California. Three more schools in Newnan, Marietta, and Cypress are also guaranteed funding through the Yamaha grant and will receive the same program support this year.

“Being able to financially support these efforts is always great but giving Yamaha employees the opportunity to contribute their time to help build and deliver the bikes to schools in the communities where they work is much more meaningful and valuable,” Nessl said. “It’s rewarding to know we’re playing a role in getting more kids outside.”

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

The All Kids Bike program, developed to be a plug-and-play program for public schools that aligns with SHAPE America National Physical Education Standards, also includes an eight-lesson Kindergarten PE Learn-To-Ride Curriculum, teacher training and certification, and a five-year support plan.

“Yamaha has longstanding, essential ties to the Newnan community. It’s where we live, where we work, and where we play, and we’re excited to help bring this program to the kids at our local elementary schools,” said Bob Brown, Vice President, Finance and Operations Support at YMMC. “These are the first schools in Georgia to receive the All Kids Bike program, and we expect to see a positive ripple effect when more communities start to learn about it and see the outcome of its many wonderful aspects.”

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

The All Kids Bike program is now in 350 schools in 45 states, with another 50 schools currently in training that will have the program by the end of the year.

“My dad was a Yamaha dealer when I was a kid, so I grew up on Yamaha. The very first Strider Bike I built for my son 15 years ago, I painted it blue and put some Yamaha stickers on it,” said McFarland, who is also the founder and CEO of Strider Sports International, Inc., maker of the Strider Bikes utilized in the All Kids Bike program. “Now that we’ve teamed up with Yamaha’s offices and employees to bring this important program to kids in their communities, we know it will continue to grow from here and we’re already seeing interest from their neighboring schools.”

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

As the powersports industry’s leading outdoor access program, the Yamaha OAI remains an essential resource to grassroots efforts initiated by riding clubs, land stewardship organizations, educational programs, and public land managers across the country. For more than 12 years, Yamaha has been issuing quarterly grants to non-profit organizations supporting the needs of riding groups, outdoor enthusiasts, land stewardship organizations, and land managers to improve recreational facilities, expand outdoor access, and educate the public on outdoor recreation. Yamaha has contributed more than $4.5 million in aid to nearly 400 projects across the nation over the life of the program.

“Funding for our local schools is integral, and so is helping spread awareness for these national programs that support and activate local efforts where our employees and customers live,” Nessl said. “Yamaha’s Outdoor Access Initiative grant will serve kids at these six schools for years, and we hope the awareness this grant will bring to the broader outdoor recreation community will continue to generate funding for more schools.”

Submission guidelines and applications for Yamaha OAI grants are available at YamahaOAI.com.

About the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative

For more than a decade, the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative has led the Powersports industry in guaranteeing responsible access to our nation’s land for outdoor enthusiasts. Through this program, Yamaha has directly and indirectly supported thousands of miles of motorized recreation trails, maintained and rehabilitated riding and hunting areas, improved staging areas, supplied agricultural organizations with essential OHV safety education, built bridges over fish-bearing streams and partnered with local outdoor enthusiast communities across the country to improve access to public lands. Updated guidelines, application form, information and news about the Outdoor Access Initiative are available at YamahaOAI.com.

About All Kids Bike

All Kids Bike is a national movement led by the nonprofit Strider Education Foundation to place Kindergarten PE Learn-To-Ride Programs into public schools for free using donations from individuals, businesses and organizations. One of the key goals of the organization is to make riding a bicycle the fourth “R” of elementary education along with reading, writing and arithmetic. The ability to ride improves a life greatly while developing balance, mobility, safety, environmental awareness and facilitating exercise. It instills confidence in the classroom, home and community. For more information, visit allkidsbike.org.

The post Yamaha Funds Six All Kids Bike Programs in Georgia and California first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Ryan McFarland: Ep. 23 Rider Magazine Insider Podcast

Ep 23 Ryan McFarland Rider Magazine Insider Podcast
Ryan McFarland, CEO of Strider Bikes, on an adventure tour in Baja, Mexico.

Our guest for Episode 23 of the Rider Magazine Insider Podcast is Ryan McFarland, the founder and CEO of Strider Bikes, a company whose mission is to build lightweight, efficient, all-terrain bikes that develop two-wheeled balance, coordination, and confidence in children. McFarland built the first Strider Bike in his garage for his son, Bode. The company was founded in Rapid City, South Dakota, in 2007, and since then has sold more than 3 million bikes to families around the world. In 2014, the company established the Strider Rider Fund, which commits 1% of gross revenue to benevolence. In 2018, the Strider Education Foundation launched All Kids Bike, a nonprofit whose mission is to teach every child in America how to ride a bike in kindergarten PE class. As we all know, when you learn to ride a bike when you’re young, you’re more likely to graduate to a motorcycle when you get older!

You can listen to Episode 23 on iTunesSpotify, and SoundCloud, or via the Rider Magazine Insider webpage. Please subscribe, leave us a 5-star rating, and tell your friends!

Visit the Rider Magazine Insider podcast webpage to check out previous episodes:

The post Ryan McFarland: Ep. 23 Rider Magazine Insider Podcast first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki KLX230S | First Look Review

2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The 2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S, shown here in the ABS and Olive Green/Ebony color options.

The 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S is still a durable, simple dual-sport, but now you don’t have to be a giant to get your boots on the ground.

Designed to appeal to novice riders on a budget or experienced riders looking for a lightweight, dual-sport machine, Kawasaki first released the KLX230 in 2020, and in most aspects, it lived up to its design goals. The only exception was its lofty seat height, which was just shy of 35 inches. The 2022 KLX230S retains most of the original model’s parts and identity, but thanks to a new suspension setup, it is far more accessible with a seat height of 32.7 inches.

Watch our video review of the 2021 Kawasaki KLX300

The 230’s softly sprung front fork has been shortened by a total of 2.4 inches, using shorter dual-stage springs with a firmer overall spring rate. The shorter fork on the 230S still provides a respectable 6.2 inches of travel and should reduce front-end dive during firm braking. A revised rear shock, also shorter with a stiffer spring rate provides 6.6 (down from 8.8) inches of travel that Kawasaki says improves handling and bump absorption.

2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The Base and ABS models are available in Kawasaki’s classic Lime Green.

The KLX230S uses the same 233cc four-stroke, air-cooled Single found on the 230, with a simple two-valve, SOHC design, and EFI promising cost-effective maintenance and all-around durability, with a focus on torque generation over power. A close-ratio, 6-speed transmission should handle most trails but still enable the 230S to cruise at a reasonable pace on open roads.

Kawasaki designed the high-tensile steel perimeter frame around the engine, which allowed it to be mounted lower in the chassis to deliver a low center-of-gravity, coupled with a short 53.5-inch wheelbase. The KLX230S should be an easy, nimble bike to ride.

Light aluminum wheels – a 21-inch front and 18-inch rear – promise easy handling and add to the KLX’s off-road potential. Single petal disc brakes measure 240mm at the front, gripped by a 2-piston caliper, and 220mm with a 1-piston caliper at the rear. Optional, factory-fitted ABS is tuned for dual-sport riding.

The new KLX230S benefits from a new suspension setup, reducing seat height to a far more accessible 32.7 inches.

The 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S is fitted with a 1.9-gallon fuel tank and should keep this sipper on the move for as long as you might reasonably expect, although the simple instrument dash also includes a low-fuel warning lamp. The new KLX230S is available in Lime Green with an MSRP of $4,799, while the ABS is available in the Lime and in an Urban Olive Green/Ebony color option, with an MSRP of $5,099.

For more information, visit kawasaki.com

2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S, shown here in the ABS and Olive Green/Ebony color options.
2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The base and ABS models are available in Kawasaki’s classic Lime Green.

The post 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

HJC Releases First-Ever Red Bull Licensed Motorcycle Helmet

HJC RPHA 1N Red Bull Austin GP helmet

HJC Helmets and Red Bull have been working on launching the first-ever Red Bull licensed motorcycle helmet. Until now, any helmet sporting a Red Bull graphic has been exclusively available to sponsored riders, but HJC and Red Bull have partnered up to design a very special helmet, the RPHA 1 Red Bull Austin GP helmet.

For years, Circuit of the Americas has hosted a paramount MotoGP race for Red Bull, and the RPHA 1 Red Bull Austin GP helmet will pay tribute to this event with a graphic that celebrates the Grand Prix of the Americas. The sleek design accentuates the aerodynamic lines of the RPHA 1, HJC’s premium race helmet, while featuring the unmistakable Red Bull logo and COTA colors. The RPHA 1 has also been reserved for professional racers, but HJC will finally release their highly anticipated race helmet to the public in December 2021.

HJC RPHA 1N Red Bull Austin GP helmet

The RPHA 1N Red Bull Austin GP helmet was officially launched on October 3rd at the Red Bull Grand Prix of the Americas in Austin, Texas. October 3rd also marked the 50th anniversary for HJC Helmets.

HJC Helmets has released several successful licensed helmets in the past, but the RPHA 1N Red Bull Austin GP helmet is one of a kind. The largest helmet maker in the world has teamed up with one of the most popular brands in motorsport.

The relationship began with HJC supporting the Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup and becoming the official helmet partner for the series. From there, the relationship evolved and the next step of the partnership sees the release of an exclusive helmet collection that will be available to all motorcycle riders, something that has not been done before with any other brand.

MSRP for the RPHA 1N Red Bull Austin GP helmet is $949.99. For more information, visit hjchelmets.com.

The post HJC Releases First-Ever Red Bull Licensed Motorcycle Helmet first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Americade Interview with the Dutchers: Ep. 22 Rider Magazine Insider Podcast

Episode 22 Americade Dutchers Rider Magazine Insider Podcast

We conducted our latest podcast interview with a live audience at the Americade rally, held September 20-25, 2021, in Lake George, New York. Rider’s Editor-in-Chief Greg Drevenstedt interviewed the founders Bill and Gini Dutcher, and their son Christian, who is the Director of Americade, the Touratech DirtDaze Adventure Bike Rally, and Rolling Thru America. The first Americade rally, then called Aspencade East, was held in 1983 on the scenic shores of Lake George, nestled in the Adirondacks of upstate New York. The first event was a runaway success, and the event has grown steadily over the years to become the world’s largest touring rally. The Dutcher family talk about what the rally was like in the early days, and why motorcyclists from around the country return to Americade year after year. This is a special episode you don’t want to miss!

For more information about Americade, visit americade.com.

You can listen to Episode 22 on iTunesSpotify,  and SoundCloud, or via the Rider Magazine Insider webpage. Please subscribe, leave us a 5-star rating, and tell your friends!

Visit the Rider Magazine Insider podcast webpage to check out previous episodes:

The post Americade Interview with the Dutchers: Ep. 22 Rider Magazine Insider Podcast first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is an exciting, affordable addition to the middleweight sport-touring category.

Triumph has released an exciting new middleweight sport-tourer, the 2022 Tiger Sport 660. The new Tiger Sport will share the engine from the new Trident released earlier this year, and Triumph claims this is the first triple to make its way into the middleweight sport-touring segment.

Triumph sees the new model appealing to two groups of motorcyclists, newer riders moving up to a bigger bike, and veteran riders looking for a thrilling all-rounder. It says the new Tiger Sport has a narrow stand-over feel and the seat is on the low side at 32.8 inches, which should make it accessible to a broad range of riders in terms of height and experience.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Triumph hopes the new Tiger will attract rookie riders moving up to a first big bike and veteran riders looking for a thrilling all-rounder.

The 660cc triple-cylinder engine is designed to provide a broad torque band across a wide rev range and strong top-end horsepower.

The 660 Sport has a full-size windscreen that should be ideal for long-haul excursions, whereas the rest of the sleek design has a tall but sporty influence, including a stubby stainless-steel silencer. A slip/assist clutch should make for a slick work of the 6-speed gearbox and an up/down quickshifter is available as a factory option.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Sizable color-matched luggage and cast aluminum rack are optional.

Triumph says the 660 Sport has exceptional handling, and on paper at least, the bike appears to live up to the claim. The Sport is fitted with Showa’s lightweight 41mm separate function fork (SFF), where each fork leg performs a separate function, one side for damping and the other for spring, and at the rear, a Showa dual-rate monoshock is adjustable for preload. Claimed peak power is 80 horses at  8,750 rpm, 5% more than the V-Strom, and claimed peak torque is 47.2 lb-ft, on par with the Versys, and yet the Tiger Sport weighs 20 pounds less than either.

The Tiger Sport 660 has stats that promise sports performance, but the tall, adjustable screen, 4.7-gallon gas tank, integrated side case mounts, and pillion grab handles cater to riders looking to make longer excursions with or without a passenger. Side cases, with a combined capacity of 57 liters, and a 47-liter top box (and cast aluminum luggage rack) are available options and can be color-matched.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Integrated pillion grab-handles are fitted as standard, as are the mounts for attaching the optional side cases.

Braking is supplied by Nissin, 2-piston calipers on twin 310mm discs, with a single-piston rear caliper on a 255mm disc. Standard tires are Michelin Road 5, which promise versatility in riding conditions and styles. ABS is fitted as standard, and the brake lever is adjustable for reach.

Throttle-by-wire allows for two riding modes, Road and Rain, as well as switchable traction control. A small TFT color display is integrated into a larger LCD and shows all the key information, and allows for menu selections and connectivity. All-around LED lighting, self-canceling indicators, and key fob immobilizer are all standard.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
A small, color TFT is integrated into a larger LCD.
2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Integrated side-case mounts leave a clean look when not in use.

The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is available in three color schemes: Lucerne Blue & Sapphire Black, Graphite & Sapphire Black, or Korosi Red & Graphite (for an extra $125), which also comes with sporty graphics. The standard version has an MSRP of $9,295 and will be available in dealers starting in February 2022.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Specs

Base Price: $9,295
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, inline triple, DOHC w/ 4 vpc.
Displacement: 660cc
Bore x Stroke: 74 x 57.7mm
Horsepower: 80 hp @ 8,750 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Torque: 47.2 lb-ft @ 6,250 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain
Wheelbase: 55.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 23.7 degrees/3.8 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Wet Weight: 454 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gals.

The post 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS | First Look Review

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

Joining the larger Z900RS is the 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS, a retro-styled middleweight with a liquid-cooled, 649cc parallel-Twin and chassis derived from the Z650 naked sportbike. Its MSRP is $8,999.

Kawasaki says the engine produces 48.5 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm. It has a 180-degree crankshaft and a balancer shaft for smooth operation, and the 6-speed transmission has a slip/assist clutch. The engine also serves as stressed member of the tubular-steel trellis frame for added rigidity.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

Suspension is handled by a non-adjustable 41mm telescopic fork with 4.9 inches of travel and a preload-adjustable horizontal back-link shock with 5.1 inches of travel. A pair of 300mm front rotors are squeezed by 2-piston calipers, and a single 220mm rear rotor has a 1-piston caliper. Bosch 9.1M ABS is standard

The Z650RS rolls on 17-inch cast wheels shod with Dunlop Sportmax Roadsport 2 tires (120/70-ZR17 front, 160/60-ZR17 rear).

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

Comfortable, upright ergonomics include a wide, flat handlebar that’s positioned 2 inches higher and 1.2 inches closer to the rider than on the standard Z650. Seat height is a comfortable 31.5 inches, and it has a narrow design to make it easier to reach the ground. The brake and clutch levers are adjustable for reach.

Like the Z900RS, the Z650RS blends retro style with modern touches. The tank, seat, round headlight, and bullet-shaped analog gauges say old-school, but the LED lighting, central multifunction LCD info panel.

The 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS is available in Candy Emerald Green with gold wheels (our favorite!) or Metallic Moondust Gray/Ebony with black wheels. MSRP is $8,999.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS review

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS Specs

Base Price: $8,999
Website: kawasaki.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 649cc
Bore x Stroke: 83.0 x 60.0mm
Torque: 48.5 lb-ft @ 6,500 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 55.3 in.
Rake/Trail: 24 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 31.5 in.
Wet Weight: 412 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 4.0 gals.

The post 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS ABS | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 | First Look Review

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 review
The 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 replaces the Multistrada 950. It’s more powerful, lighter, and has a lower seat height, among other changes, and it’s offered in an up-spec S version.

Replacing the middleweight Multistrada 950 in Ducati’s adventure-bike lineup is the new-for-2022 Multistrada V2. It’s powered by a revised version of the 937cc Testastretta L-Twin, which makes a claimed 113 horsepower and 72 lb-ft of torque at the crank. Pricing for the 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 starts at $15,295 and for the up-spec 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S starts at $17,895.

Engine updates include new connecting rods, a new 8-disc hydraulically actuated slip/assist clutch, and a revised 6-speed transmission that Ducati stays delivers smoother shifting and makes it easier to find neutral. A quickshifter is optional on the Multistrada V2 and standard on the Multistrada V2 S.

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S review
2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S in Ducati Red

Rider-selectable electronics on the Multistrada V2 include four riding modes (Sport, Touring, Urban, and Enduro), the Ducati Safety Pack (Bosch cornering ABS with 3 levels, Ducati Traction C with 8 levels), and Vehicle Hold Control. The Multistrada V2 S adds semi-active electronic suspension with Ducati Skyhook Suspension (DSS) system, Ducati Quick Shift Up & Down (DQS), a full-LED headlight with Ducati Cornering Lights (DCL) system, and cruise control.

The Multistrada V2 has fully (manually) adjustable suspension, with a 48mm inverted KYB fork and a Sachs shock with a remote preload adjuster. Suspension travel is 6.7 inches front and rear on both the V2 and V2 S.

Ducati’s trademark tubular-steel trellis frame holds the Mulistrada V2 together, and it’s paired with a cast aluminum two-sided swingarm. The cast aluminum wheels, with a 19-inch front and 17-inch rear, are derived from the Multistrada V4 save 3.7 pounds of unsprung weight, and they’re shod with Pirelli Scorpion Trail II adventure tires.

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S review
2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S in Street Grey

The seat was revised to provide a flat area for easier fore and aft movement while also reducing seat height from 33.1 inches to 32.7 inches. Accessory high (33.5 inches) and low (31.9 inches) seats are available, and the low seat plus accessory low suspension kit reduces seat height to 31.1 inches. New footpegs borrowed from the Multistrada V4 are 10mm lower than those on the Multistrada 950 for extra legroom.

Changes to the engine, front brake discs, mirrors, and wheels on the Multistrada V2 reduce weight by 11 pounds compared to the outgoing Multistrada 950. Claimed wet weight is 489 pounds for the Multistrada V2 and 496 pounds for the Mulistrada V2 S.

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S review
The 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S has a 5-inch TFT color display.

The Multistrada V2 has LCD instrumentation while the Multistrada V2 S has a 5-inch TFT color display with a hands-free Bluetooth system. The V2 S also has backlist handlebar switches.

The 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 is available in Ducati Red with a gloss black frame and black rims, with a base price of $15,295. The 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S is available in Ducati Red with a black frame and black wheel rims with red tags, or in Street Grey with a black frame and “GP Red” wheel rims, with a base price of $17,895.

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S review
2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 S in Ducati Red

2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 / Multistrada V2 S Specs

Base Price: $15,295 (V2) / $17,895 (V2 S)
Website: ducati.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 90-degree L-twin, desmodromic DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 94.0 x 67.5mm
Displacement: 937cc
Horsepower: 113 hp @ 9,000 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Torque: 71 lb-ft @ 7,750 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet slip/assist clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 62.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.2 in.
Seat Height: 32.7 in.
Wet Weight: 489 lbs. / 496 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 5.3 gals.

The post 2022 Ducati Multistrada V2 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com