Tag Archives: Cruiser Motorcycle Reviews

BMW Teases Another R18 Big Boxer Concept, Includes Most Detailed Engine Shots Yet

BMW R18 /2 slash two concept cruiser
BMW has announced its second “concept” bike based on the upcoming 1800cc Big Boxer engine, the R18 /2. Images courtesy BMW Motorrad.

BMW is marching steadily toward its promised cruiser, anticipated sometime in 2020, with the news of its latest concept bike based around the new 1,800cc “Big Boxer” opposed twin. Buried in a press release for a new Concept R18 /2 (pronounced “slash two”) were photos showing the design and production of the /2, including the most detailed shots to date of the new engine, clearly functional and roadworthy.

First, the bike. The Concept R18 /2 appears to be a classic cruiser in design, with modern flowing lines, a small headlight cowl and a slightly bobbed rear fender. Wheels are cast, 19 inches up front and 16 at the rear, with Brembo brakes and a gorgeous Candy Apple Red paint on the bodywork.

BMW R18 /2 slash two concept cruiser
The Concept R18 /2 has a hidden rear mono shock for a classic hardtail look.

The 1,800cc air/oil-cooled boxer engine used in the /2 has a classic BMW 1960s aesthetic, finished in matte gray and black. The massive cylinders protrude past the ends of the handlebar, and dual air intakes funnel under the rider’s thighs to the airbox beneath the front of the seat. To the rear of that is a hidden single shock absorber to maintain the classic hardtail look.

We’re not quite sure why BMW wants to try breaking into the American cruiser market, given lackluster sales in the segment (and its own ill-fated R 1200 C attempt in the late ’90s/early oughts). Hopefully plans include a bagger as well…but in any case, we’re excited to see and hear more about this new R18 Big Boxer engine, clearly headed for production in the near future.

Keep scrolling for more images….

BMW R18 /2 slash two concept cruiser
BMW Concept R18 /2 cruiser, based around the 1800cc “Big Boxer” opposed twin.
BMW R18 /2 slash two concept cruiser
Massive cylinders with cooling fins protrude beyond the ends of the handlebar.
BMW R18 /2 slash two concept cruiser
We do love the Candy Apple Red paint used on the Concept R18 /2.
BMW R18 /2 slash two concept cruiser
Driveshaft is on the right side, brake disc with big Brembo caliper is on the left.
BMW R18 /2 slash two concept cruiser
Oil cooler is placed unobtrusively at the lower leading edge of the engine, between the frame downtubes.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Harley Releases Details on Liquid-Cooled Revolution Max Engine Powering Pan America and Bronx Models

Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250. Photos by Harley-Davidson.

Harley-Davidson made some waves at EICMA this week, showing off two models it teased in 2018, the Pan-America adventure-tourer and the Bronx streetfighter. Both are powered by a new liquid-cooled 60-degree V-twin engine platform called the Revolution Max — 1,250cc in the Pan America and 975cc in the Bronx. Harley also confirmed that both models will launch in late 2020.

The Revolution Max is a bold new step for a company invested so heavily in (air-cooled) tradition — although perhaps not as bold as its LiveWire electric motorcycle unveiled earlier this year and now on sale at H-D dealerships nationwide. (Read our First Ride Review here.) Harley says the Revolution Max is designed to minimize weight and maximize performance, with a narrow profile that integrates into the bike as a stressed member of the frame. It also features a counter-balancer for smooth and comfortable operation.

Harley claims performance targets of more than 145 horsepower and 90 lb-ft of torque from the Revolution Max 1250, and more than 115 horsepower and 70 lb-ft of torque from the Revolution Max 975.

A few other details about the new Pan America and Bronx were released as well, including a collaboration with Brembo to create a new radial monoblock caliper that complements Harley’s unique design, and a continuing partnership with Michelin to develop co-branded tires specifically for each model.

Thanks to a smattering of new images (scroll down to see them all), we can also glean a bit more info about the new bikes.

Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Pan America looks to have a large, full-color TFT display, electronic suspension, cruise control and a one hand-adjustable windscreen.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
The Pan America also sports a chain final drive and tubeless spoked rims.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Brembo brakes have ABS.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Pan America’s luggage looks adventure-ready.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
This dark rendering of the Revolution Max 1250 gives us a few more hints, like a skid plate and side radiator guards.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Is the world ready for a Harley ADV tourer? There’s only one way to find out….
Harley-Davidson Bronx
Harley-Davidson Bronx.
Harley-Davidson Bronx
It’s hard to tell if this is a backlit LCD or a TFT. The Bronx looks to have cruise control and an adjustable fork, though.
Harley-Davidson Bronx
Smaller version of the Revolution Max powers the Bronx. Notice the footpegs, a sporty rearset design that’s positioned right underneath the rider.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Triumph Bobber TFC | First Look Preview

2020 Triumph Bobber TFC
2020 Triumph Bobber TFC. Images courtesy Triumph.

When the original Bonneville Bobber launched back in 2017, we were smitten. True, it had some quirks — not enough front brake and a limited fuel range being the most noticeable — but overall we loved what Triumph had created: a factory bobber that delivered in both looks and performance.

Then the following year we got the Bobber Black, with dual front brake discs mounted to its fat front tire — quirk number one, check. In the meantime, Triumph released its first Triumph Factory Custom (TFC) model, the Thruxton TFC, and we swooned. Then earlier this year we got a look at the new Rocket 3 TFC and we salivated.

Now Triumph has announced its third TFC model, and guess what? It’s the Bobber.

The 2020 Triumph Bobber TFC will sport more power across the powerband, with 39% lower engine inertia resulting in a 500 rpm-higher rev limit. It’s also a claimed 11 pounds lighter (although that number is subject to change as the bike is homologated for the U.S. market).

2020 Triumph Bobber TFC engine
2020 Triumph Bobber TFC. Images courtesy Triumph.

As with all TFC models, the Bobber TFC is dripping with high-end components, including fully-adjustable Öhlins suspension front and rear, Arrow exhaust, dual front brake discs with Brembo M50 monobloc calipers and MCS radial master cylinder, an additional Sport riding mode (joining the standard Road and Rain) and an LED headlight with distinctive light pattern.

It gets unique clip-ons rather than a traditional one-piece handlebar, carbon fiber bodywork, a billet top and bottom yoke with numbered plaque, a real leather seat and special TFC badging throughout.

Only 750 Bobber TFCs will be built and sold worldwide, and like all TFC models it comes with paperwork signed by Triumph CEO Nick Bloor, a personalized custom build book, a Bobber TFC bike cover, a TFC document wallet and a leather TFC branded backpack.

More details will follow the Bobber TFC’s homologation in January 2020. U.S. pricing is also TBD.

2020 Triumph Bobber TFC
2020 Triumph Bobber TFC. Images courtesy Triumph.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Honda Rebel 300 and Rebel 500 | First Look Preview

2020 Honda Rebel 500 in Matte Armored Silver.
2020 Honda Rebel 500 in Matte Armored Silver.

Two and a half years after Honda made its totally redesigned Rebel the coolest little cruiser in town, it has announced that the 2020 Rebel lineup, both the 300 and 500, will benefit from some needed updates.

First up is a reshaped and repositioned LED headlight, which on its own totally transforms the Rebel into a darker, more up-to-date cruiser. The four LED bulbs are set in a black housing, with the top two lighting up for low beam and the bottom two coming on as well for the high beam.

A smaller, less boxy taillight and small round turn signals also get the LED treatment, with the signals also getting a cool “halo” effect running light.

Suspension has been updated front and rear, and the already light-pull clutch is now an assist-and-slipper. While looking the new model over at Honda North America’s private museum in Torrance, California, just south of Los Angeles, I was able to pull the clutch lever in easily with just one finger.

2020 Honda Rebel headlight
New LED headlight looks the business, and we dig the halo LED turn signal/running lights too.

The other big news is a new LCD gauge, which now includes both a gear indicator and fuel gauge. Hooray for Honda’s design team listening to rider feedback!

Rounding out the changes for 2020 is a slightly revised seat, with firmer padding and a wider rear end for a more comfortable ride.

There is a wide range of Honda accessories available for the Rebel as well, including diamond quilted seats, saddle bags, fork gaiters and a headlight cowl.

The 2020 Honda Rebel will be available in dealerships in March 2020. The Rebel 500 and 500 ABS will be available in Matte Armored Silver, Graphite Black and Matte Blue Jeans Metallic. The Rebel 300 and 300 ABS will be available in Matte Fresco Brown, Graphite Black Metallic and Matte Blue Jeans Metallic. Pricing is TBD.

Keep scrolling for more pictures….

2020 Honda Rebel 300 in Matte Blue Jeans Metallic.
2020 Honda Rebel 300 in Matte Blue Jeans Metallic.
2020 Honda Rebel taillight
Taillight has been reshaped and is now LED.
2020 Honda Rebel LCD instrument gauge
LCD instrument now includes a gear indicator and fuel gauge.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Indian Challenger Limited | Road Test Review

2020 Indian Challenger Limited
The 2020 Indian Challenger is an all-new bagger platform featuring the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-twin. This is the top-of-the-line Challenger Limited. (Photos by Barry Hathaway)

Since its relaunch for 2014, Indian has struck a balance between honoring the past and looking to the future. Its first few models — the Chief Classic, Chief Vintage and Chieftain — had skirted fenders and an air-cooled V-twin with downward-firing exhausts that evoked nostalgia for Indians your father or grandfather used to ride. But when it brought back the Scout for 2015, it broke from cruiser tradition and gave it a high-revving, liquid-cooled V-twin. And last year Indian introduced the FTR 1200 street tracker with a high-performance engine and optional rider-assistance electronics.

2020 Indian Challenger Limited
The Indian Challenger is a bagger designed not only for style and performance but also touring. Its fairing and electric windscreen provide good wind protection, its seat and riding position are all-day comfortable and its luggage capacity is 18 gallons (68 liters).

Indian has also renewed its head-to-head competition with Harley-Davidson,
reigniting a fierce rivalry waged on racetracks, at factories and in
dealerships during the first half of the 20th century. Indian ended Harley’s
decades-long dominance of flat track with consecutive AFT Twins championships
in 2017-2019, and no doubt a sizable portion of Indian’s sales over the past
few years have come at Harley’s expense.

Indian PowerPlus 108 V-twin
Although the PowerPlus 108 V-twin is thoroughly modern with liquid cooling, single overhead camshafts and four hydraulically adjusted valves per cylinder, it takes its name from an engine Indian introduced in 1916. The name was also used by the Gilroy and Kings Mountain revivals of Indian.

Now Indian has introduced a new model for 2020 whose name
makes its intentions clear: Challenger. Its big, beating heart is the all-new
liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108, a 1,768cc (108ci) V-twin that makes a claimed 128
lb-ft of torque and 122 horsepower. Indian’s air-cooled Thunder Stroke 111/116
V-twin has powered all of its heavyweight baggers and tourers. Rather than
implement partial liquid cooling like Harley-Davidson did with its Twin-Cooled
Milwaukee-Eight V-twin and BMW did with its R-series boxer twin, Indian decided
to go all-in with liquid cooling for the PowerPlus. It didn’t have to go far
for inspiration. Indian’s middleweight Scouts are powered by a liquid-cooled,
60-degree V-twin with DOHC and 4 valves per cylinder, and the PowerPlus has the
same engine configuration and number of valves but uses a SOHC head.

2020 Indian Challenger Limited
The 2020 Indian Challenger Limited is available in Thunder Black Pearl, Deepwater Metallic and the Ruby Metallic shown on the bike we tested. All Challenger models get the protective plastic covers on the lower front of the top-loading saddlebags.

Indian says the PowerPlus “was developed with a big-piston, big-torque mindset with an end game of maximum power delivery across the entire curve.” When we put the Challenger on Jett Tuning’s dyno, its belt-driven rear wheel cranked out 113.3 lb-ft of torque at 3,500 rpm and 107.6 horsepower at 5,600 rpm, with redline at 6,500 rpm (see chart below). That unseats the previous king of torque among V-twin tourers we’ve tested, the Yamaha Star Venture (110.9 lb-ft of torque, 75.9 horsepower), as well as the top-of-the-line Harley-Davidson CVO Limited (110.0 lb-ft of torque, 96.0 horsepower). The Challenger’s broad mountain of rear-wheel torque tops 100 lb-ft from 2,400 to 5,600 rpm, and its horsepower curve increases steadily from 2,000 rpm to its peak.

2020 Indian Challenger Limited Dyno Chart
2020 Indian Challenger Limited Dyno Chart (tested at Jett Tuning in Camarillo, California)

The PowerPlus 108 gets the job done with an oversquare bore
and stroke of 108.0 x 96.5mm, an 11.0:1 compression ratio and dual-bore 52mm
throttle bodies that take big gulps of fuel and air. It has a unit crankcase with
a semi-dry oil sump, overhead camshafts with hydraulic chain tensioners and
valves with hydraulic lash adjusters. Power is sent to the rear wheel through a
6-speed constant-mesh transmission with an overdrive top gear and a
cable-actuated wet assist clutch.

2020 Indian Challenger Limited
At 848 pounds the the Indian Challenger Limited is no lightweight, but its frame-mounted fairing, strong aluminum chassis, compliant suspension and decent cornering clearance help it hustle through corners with ease.

In the world of baggers and
tourers, there are two distinct camps: those with fork-mounted fairings, like
Indian’s Chieftain and Harley-Davidson’s Street Glide, and those with fixed or
frame-mounted fairings, like Indian’s Challenger and Harley-Davidson’s Road
Glide. By taking weight off the handlebar and fork, motorcycles with
frame-mounted fairings require less steering effort than those with fork-mounted
fairings. Our road test of the Challenger, which included hundreds of miles and
countless tight, technical corners along California’s Big Sur coast,
demonstrated just how agile and well balanced an 848-pound bagger can be.

2020 Indian Challenger Limited
The Challenger has a slim fender that shows much of the 19-inch front wheel, and perched on top is a LED-illuminated Indian warbonnet. The base-model Challenger gets all-black cast wheels; the Challenger Dark Horse and Challenger Limited get contrast-cut wheels with TPMS. The 320mm front rotors carry 4-piston Brembo monoblock radial calipers.

Hidden beneath the Challenger’s 6-gallon tank is a modular aluminum backbone frame similar to the one on the Chieftain (they share the same wheelbase and rake/trail figures), but rather than straight downtubes the Challenger’s flare out and are sculpted to wrap around the radiator like they are on the Scout’s frame. Indian’s stout aluminum chassis, which share a significant amount of DNA with the frames that contributed to the impressive handling of Victory’s big touring models, feel rock solid.

2020 Indian Challenger Limited
There’s no hiding the big radiator in front of the PowerPlus 108 V-twin, but Indian did a good job of sculpting the frame’s downtubes around it, just as it did on the Scout.

Pushing hard on Nacimiento-Fergusson Road, a 25-mile twisting goat path that climbs over the Santa Lucia Range and puts any motorcycle’s handling to the test, the Challenger never lost its cool. With a non-adjustable 43mm upside-down fork with 5.1 inches of travel, a preload-adjustable hydraulic Fox rear shock with 4.5 inches of travel and 31 degrees of cornering clearance, the footboards rarely touched down and the ride was responsive, taut and comfortable. The Challenger rolls on 19-/16-inch cast wheels shod with Metzeler Cruisetec tires, and a pair of big 320mm front rotors clamped by 4-piston Brembo monoblock radial provide ample stopping power, though they could use more initial bite. New for 2020 is what Indian calls Smart Lean Technology, which uses a Bosch IMU to enable cornering ABS and traction control (TC can be turned off but ABS cannot) as well as Drag Torque Control.

2020 Indian Challenger Limited seat
The supportive seat has a height of just 26.5 inches, yet the Challenger still provides 4.5 inches of rear suspension travel. A wrench in the toolkit makes it easy to adjust preload on the hydraulic Fox rear shock.

A big bagger like the Challenger
will spend most of its time cruising at a more modest pace on less taxing
roads, and it excels in such an environment. The PowerPlus 108 not only
delivers right-now torque for rapid acceleration, its liquid-cooled design also
means much less heat radiates into the cockpit, eliminating our biggest
complaint about the air-cooled Thunder Stroke. Even with liquid cooling, though,
the PowerPlus offers rear cylinder deactivation at stops to further reduce heat
from the exhaust header beneath the rider’s right thigh. Throttle-by-wire
enables electronic cruise control as well as three riding modes—Sport, Standard
and Rain—that adjust throttle response.

2020 Indian Challenger Limited
The liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 eliminates most of the radiant heat that has been an ongoing complaint of ours about the air-cooled Thunder Stroke engine. Rear cylinder deactivation at idle is also available on the PowerPlus to reduce heat from the exhaust header under the rider’s right thigh.

As much as we appreciate the Challenger’s performance and handling, what delivers the mail in this segment is style, sound and comfort. The Challenger’s snout-forward, wide-mouth fairing was clearly inspired by the Road Glide’s sharknose fairing — both even have closable vents on either side of the headlight that bring fresh air into the cockpit — but the Indian sets itself apart with LED running lights/turn signals that bracket the headlight, an electrically adjustable windscreen with a 3-inch range and a dashboard that’s much closer to the rider. The Challenger offers good wind protection, a supportive seat with a high rear bolster, rubber-mounted footboards and enormous top-loading saddlebags with remote locking (total storage capacity, including two small fairing pockets, is 18 gallons, or 68 liters).

2020 Indian Challenger Limited
The Indian Challenger’s design was clearly inspired by its counterpart with a frame-mounted fairing, the Harley-Davidson Road Glide. Which is the better bagger?

There are three versions of the
Challenger. Standard equipment on the base model ($21,999), which is available in
Titanium Metallic only, includes ABS, keyless ignition with remote saddlebag
locks and the Ride Command infotainment system with a 7-inch customizable color
touchscreen and a 100-watt audio system. The Challenger Dark Horse ($27,499-$28,249),
which is available in several matte colors with blacked-out finishes, adds
Smart Lean Technology, navigation, a customizable route builder, connected weather
and traffic services and contrast-cut wheels with tire-pressure monitoring. The
Challenger Limited ($27,999-$28,749) we tested is available in several metallic
colors and adds color-matched fender closeouts and highway bars.

2020 Indian Challenger Limited
The cockpit of the 2020 Indian Challenger Limited includes a pair of analog gauges (speedo and tach) with inset digital displays and a 7-inch color touchscreen for the Ride Command infotainment system with 100-watt audio. Keyless ignition is standard, and the fob can be used to remotely lock/unlock the saddlebags. A small button under the right speaker unlocks the fuel cap.

Even though the larger air-cooled Thunder
Stroke 116 was also introduced for 2020, satisfying customer demands for more
torque while also edging out Harley’s Milwaukee-Eight 114 by a couple of cubic
inches, the PowerPlus 108 is the engine that will take Indian’s heavyweight
models into the future. It offers the performance, comfort and lower emissions
that only liquid cooling can provide, and in the Challenger it delivers impressive
grunt and smoothness without giving up the rumbling character that makes a
V-twin the most popular type of engine among American motorcyclists. That plus
muscular, modern style, an excellent chassis, a full range of available
technology, generous wind protection and luggage capacity and plenty of
long-haul comfort make the Challenger one heckuva bagger. We look forward to
seeing how it stacks up against the competition.

2020 Indian Challenger Limited
Cruising along a scenic stretch of California’s Highway 1 on the 2020 Indian Challenger Limited.

2020 Indian Challenger Limited Specs

Base Price: $27,999
Price as Tested: $28,749 (Ruby Metallic color)
Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
Website: indianmotorcycle.com

Engine

Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 60-degree V-twin
Displacement: 1,768cc (108ci)
Bore x Stroke: 108.0 x 96.5mm
Compression Ratio: 11.0:1
Valve Train: SOHC, 4 valves per cyl.
Valve Insp. Interval: NA (self-adjusting)
Fuel Delivery: EFI, 52mm dual bore throttle body x 2
Lubrication System: Semi-wet sump, 5-qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet assist clutch
Final Drive: Belt

Electrical

Ignition: Electronic
Charging Output: 803 watts max.
Battery: 12V 18AH

Chassis

Frame: Modular cast aluminum w/ engine as stressed member & cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 65.7 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/5.9 in.
Seat Height: 26.5 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm USD fork, no adj., 5.1-in. travel
Rear: Single shock, remote adj. for spring preload, 4.5-in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm floating discs w/ opposed 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 298mm floating disc w/ 2-piston pin-slide caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.50 x 19 in.
Rear: Cast, 5.00 x 16 in.
Tires, Front: 130/60-B19
Rear: 180/60-R16
Wet Weight: 848 lbs.
Load Capacity: 537 lbs.
GVWR: 1,385 lbs.

Performance

Fuel Capacity: 6 gals., last 1.0 gal. warning light on
MPG: 91 AKI min. (low/avg/high) 35.7/37.8/39.7
Estimated Range: 227 miles
Indicated RPM at 60 MPH: 2,500

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Indian Unveils Liquid-Cooled PowerPlus 108 V-twin

Indian PowerPlus 108 V-twin
Indian’s new liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-twin has DOHC with 4 valves per cylinder and makes a claimed 128 lb-ft of torque and 122 horsepower.

Indian has unveiled the all-new liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108,
a 1,768cc (108ci) V-twin that makes a claimed 128 lb-ft of torque and 122
horsepower and will be the beating heart of a new fixed-fairing bagger called
the Challenger.

Rider got a chance
to see and experience the PowerPlus 108 during a multi-day, hush-hush ride on
the Challenger, and we’ll post a full review when the embargo lifts on Tuesday,
October 29. For now, we can only reveal details about the new engine.

With ever-tightening emissions regulations, the era of
air-cooled engines is drawing to a close. Euro 5 standards, which go into
effect on January 1, 2020, further reduce limits for carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons
and nitrogen oxides, and adapting air-cooled engines to meet these standards
will become increasingly difficult.

Indian PowerPlus 108 V-twin
Unlike the liquid-cooled Scout engine its based on, Indian’s new PowerPlus 108 V-twin has a nod to traditionalists with small cooling fins near the tops of its cylinders.

Indian’s air-cooled Thunder Stroke 111/116 V-twin has powered
all of its heavyweight baggers and tourers since it debuted for 2014. Rather
than implement partial liquid cooling like Harley-Davidson did with its
Twin-Cooled Milwaukee-Eight V-twin and BMW did with its R-series boxer twin,
Indian decided to go all-in with liquid cooling for the PowerPlus 108. And it
didn’t have to go far for inspiration. Indian’s middleweight Scout lineup is
powered by a liquid-cooled, 60-degree V-twin with DOHC and 4 valves per
cylinder, and the PowerPlus has the same engine and valve configuration.

Interestingly, PowerPlus revives the name given both to an 18-horsepower 1,000cc V-twin and the motorcycle it powered, which Indian produced from 1916 to 1924. The U.S. War Department ordered 20,000 PowerPlus motorcycles for service during World War I, and the PowerPlus helped Erwin “Cannonball” Baker set several endurance records. According to motorcycle historian Tod Rafferty, when the 600cc Scout was introduced in 1920, it “was basically a downsized Powerplus.” Today’s PowerPlus, on the other hand, is basically an upsized Scout.

READ: 2019 Indian FTR 1200 S First Ride Review

Indian says the PowerPlus “was developed with a big-piston,
big-torque mindset with an end game of maximum power delivery across the entire
curve.” With an oversquare bore and stroke of 108.0 x 96.5mm, the PowerPlus
108’s 1,768cc displacement is 122cc smaller than that of the 1,890cc Thunder
Stroke 116 found in most of Indian’s heavyweight lineup for 2020, but the
PowerPlus makes more claimed torque: 128 lb-ft at 3,800 rpm versus 126 lb-ft at
2,900 rpm. The PowerPlus also revs higher, redlining at 6,500 rpm versus 5,300
rpm on the Thunder Stroke.

Dual-bore 52mm throttle bodies take big gulps of fuel and
air, which is compressed at a ratio of 11.0:1. With throttle-by-wire actuation,
the PowerPlus offers three riding modes with different throttle response
settings. The unit crankcase has a semi-dry oil sump that holds five quarts. To
reduce maintenance and improve reliability, the overhead camshafts have
hydraulic chain tensioners and the valves have hydraulic lash adjusters. The
6-speed constant mesh transmission has an overdrive top gear and a cable-actuated
wet assist clutch.

Indian says the “PowerPlus was tested, refined and proven by
one of the industry’s most rigorous development and testing programs,
accumulating over one million miles of simulated testing, including
state-of-the-art dyno testing, and more than 300,000 on-road miles.” Designing
and developing an entirely new engine is a major investment, and Indian clearly
sees the PowerPlus as worth the effort.

Unfortunately, we are prohibited from providing any riding impressions about the PowerPlus or the Challenger or other information at this time. Check back on October 29 for the full story.

Check out Rider‘s 2020 Guide to New Street Motorcycles

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Indian Introduces Thunder Stroke 116, Roadmaster Dark Horse, Updates for 2020

2020 Indian Roadmaster Dark Horse
2020 Indian Roadmaster Dark Horse

Last week Indian unveiled the limited-edition Scout 100th Anniversary and new Scout Bobber Twenty as part of its mid-sized Scout cruiser lineup for 2020.

Indian’s big bikes take center stage this week, with the
introduction of a larger Thunder Stroke 116 V-twin on select models, a new
Roadmaster Dark Horse, a redesigned Springfield Dark Horse and other
enhancements to the lineup.

Check out Rider’s Guide to New 2020 Street Motorcycles

“These new features and upgrades are a result of our
consistent communication with riders, listening to their feedback and
incorporating it into our ongoing product development efforts,” said Reid
Wilson, Vice President for Indian Motorcycle. “Today’s rider wants more power
and expects cutting-edge technology. That’s exactly what we’re delivering in
2020.”

Read our 2019 Indian FTR 1200 S First Ride Review

Thunder Stroke 116 

2020 Indian Thunder Stroke 116
2020 Indian Thunder Stroke 116

For the first time in the company’s history, Indian
Motorcycle will offer a 116 cubic-inch Thunder Stroke engine in select models.
Straight from the factory, the new 116ci air-cooled V-twin features a new
high-flow cylinder head that delivers a claimed 126 lb-ft of torque. The
Thunder Stroke 116 is now standard on the Springfield Dark Horse, Chieftain,
Chieftain Dark Horse, Chieftain Limited, Chieftain Elite, Roadmaster and
Roadmaster Dark Horse.

The Chief Dark Horse, Chief Vintage, Chieftain Classic and Springfield
are powered by the standard Thunder Stroke 111.

Ride Command with Connected Services

Indian Ride Command
Indian Ride Command

For 2020, Indian Motorcycle introduces updates to its Ride
Command system with Connected Services, a completely redesigned version of its
infotainment system. Still featuring a 7-inch screen with glove-touch
technology, Ride Command now features a new quad-core processor to provide the
fastest infotainment experience available. New connected features include traffic
and weather overlays, so riders can plan their ride to avoid traffic and poor
weather conditions, as well as intuitive destination search capabilities and
improved customizable ride screens.

2020 Indian Roadmaster Dark Horse

2020 Indian Roadmaster Dark Horse
2020 Indian Roadmaster Dark Horse

Drawing inspiration from the Chieftain Dark Horse, the
Roadmaster Dark Horse brings a modern and aggressive attitude to Indian’s
luxury touring motorcycle. With blacked-out finishes and just enough chrome to
stand out from the 2020 lineup, the Roadmaster Dark Horse features a
streamlined fairing, slammed saddlebags, a 19-inch front wheel with an open
fender, an extended-reach rogue gunfighter seat, a blacked-out engine and matte
paint color schemes. It’s powered by the new Thunder Stroke 116, and premium
touring amenities include a touring trunk, fairing lowers, heated grips and a
mid-adjustable windscreen.

Pricing for the 2020 Roadmaster Dark Horse starts at $28,999, and it will be available in Thunder Black Smoke, White Smoke and Ruby Smoke (shown).

2020 Indian Springfield Dark Horse

2020 Indian Springfield Dark Horse
2020 Indian Springfield Dark Horse

Following positive rider feedback from the 2020 Jack
Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Springfield Dark Horse that was launched at
Daytona Bike Week, Indian is now offering a similar design package for the 2020
Springfield Dark Horse. While the Thunder Stroke 116 delivers unrivaled power,
the bike gains an enormous level of attitude with slammed saddlebags, a rogue
seat, 12-inch mini apes and premium blacked-out finishes.

Pricing for the 2020 Springfield Dark Horse starts at $22,499, and it will be available in Thunder Black Smoke (shown), Sagebrush Smoke and White Smoke.

2020 Indian Chieftain Elite

2020 Indian Chieftain Elite
2020 Indian Chieftain Elite

As it has with previous iterations, the Chieftain Elite is
an ultra-premium bagger that combines style, technology and performance. The
2020 Chieftain Elite gets the Thunder Stroke 116 and the PowerBand Audio Plus
system with integrated fairing and saddlebag speakers. The 2020 Chieftain
Elite’s premium styling includes a two-tone Thunder Black Vivid Crystal over
Wildfire Candy paint with matching motor highlights and badging, precision
machined elite wheels, pinnacle mirrors, select rider floorboards and a flare
windshield.

Pricing for the 2020 Chieftain Elite starts at $34,999, and
it will be available in Thunder Black Vivid Crystal over Wildfire Red Candy.

Other 2020 Updates & Pricing

Furthermore, the 2020 Thunder Stroke lineup features additional updates. The Chief Dark Horse and Chief Vintage will now share the same chassis as the Springfield and Springfield Dark Horse, delivering improved handling and adjustable rear suspension. The Springfield and Chief Dark Horse will come standard with a 17-inch front wheel for improved stability. And the 2020 Roadmaster receives a lighter weight and redesigned trunk rack for added style.

Pricing and color options for other 2020 Thunder Stroke
models are as follows:

  • Chief Dark Horse, starting at $18,499: Thunder Black Smoke
  • Chief Vintage, starting at $19,999: Thunder Black; Willow Green over Ivory Cream
  • Springfield, starting at $20,999: Thunder Black; Burgundy Metallic over Titanium Metallic
  • Chieftain, starting at $21,999: Thunder Black; Titanium Smoke
  • Chieftain Classic, starting at $25,499: Thunder Black; Deepwater Metallic over Dirt Track Tan
  • Chieftain Dark Horse, starting at $27,999: Thunder Black Smoke; Ruby Smoke; Titanium Smoke
  • Chieftain Limited, starting at $27,999: Thunder Black Pearl; Radar Blue; Thunder Black Pearl with graphics package
  • Roadmaster, starting at $29,999: Thunder Black; Burgundy Metallic; Pearl White over Titanium Metallic with black pinstripe; Titanium Smoke over Thunder Black Smoke with silver pinstripe

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Indian Adds New Scout Models to its 2020 Lineup

2020 Indian Scout 100th Anniversary and Scout Bobber Twenty
Indian clearly wants to emphasize the new floating solo saddles on its limited-edition Scout 100th Anniversary (left) and new Scout Bobber Twenty (right) models, which join the Scout, Scout Bobber and Scout Sixty in Indian’s 2020 lineup.

The legendary Scout, which rivaled the Chief as Indian’s most important model, was introduced for the 1920 model year. The original Scout was powered by a 600cc (37ci) side-valve 42-degree V-twin good for about 10 horsepower. And before the Roaring Twenties were over, the 101 Scout, a longer, lower version with a 22-horsepower V-twin that became popular among racers for its speed and handling, rolled off the assembly line in Springfield, Massachusetts.

Check out Rider’s Guide to New 2020 Street Motorcycles

In honor of the Scout’s 100th anniversary, for 2020 Indian
is adding two new Scout models to its lineup—the limited-edition Scout 100th
Anniversary (only 750 will be made) and the Scout Bobber Twenty.

Read our 2019 Indian FTR 1200 S First Ride Review

Returning for 2020 are the Scout, Scout Sixty and Scout Bobber, all of which get new floating rotors, calipers and master cylinders for improved braking performance. The 2020 Scout gets a two-up Sport Seat and passenger pegs, and Scout Bobbers roll on new Pirelli MT60RS tires.

New Quick Release Fairing for Indian Scout
New Quick Release Fairing for Indian Scout

Indian has also added new Scout accessories to its catalog,
including a color-matched Quick Release Fairing with a 2-inch windscreen, weather
resistant Semi-Rigid Quick Release Saddlebags, a Stage 1 Shorty Slip-on Muffler
Kit and an all-new 2-into-1 Full Exhaust System.

2020 Indian Scout 100th Anniversary

2020 Indian Scout 100th Anniversary
2020 Indian Scout 100th Anniversary

Taking styling cues from the original Scout, the special anniversary edition is painted Indian Motorcycle Red with Anniversary Gold trim and includes a color-matched Scout 100th Anniversary badge. Finishing touches include a Desert Tan genuine leather floating solo saddle, black wire wheels with gold pinstripes, beach bars, a luggage rack and extra chrome detailing.

Like all Scouts except the Sixty, the 100th Anniversary model is powered by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 4-valves-per-cylinder, 1,133cc (69ci) 60-degree V-twin rated at 100 horsepower, with a 6-speed transmission. Only 750 units will be built, and pricing starts at $15,999 and includes ABS.

2020 Indian Scout Bobber Twenty

2020 Indian Scout Bobber Twenty
2020 Indian Scout Bobber Twenty

The new Scout Bobber Twenty has old-school bobber styling with what Indian says are improved ergonomics. It has wire wheels, a floating solo saddle, a mix of chrome and blacked-out finishes and 10-inch ape hanger handlebars. Available in three colors—Thunder Black, Sagebrush Smoke and Burnished Metallic—pricing starts at $11,999 for non-ABS (Thunder Black only) and $12,899 for ABS.

2020 Indian Scout

2020 Indian Scout
2020 Indian Scout

The 2020 base-model Scout features upgraded brakes as well as a two-up Sport Seat and passenger pegs. Available in multiple color options—Thunder Black, White Smoke, Deepwater Metallic, Metallic Jade over Thunder Black and Indian Motorcycle Red over Ivory Cream with Gold Pinstripe—pricing starts at $11,499 for non-ABS (Thunder Black only) and $12,399 for ABS.

Read our 2019 Indian Scout Tour Test Review

2020 Indian Scout Bobber

2020 Indian Scout Bobber
2020 Indian Scout Bobber

The 2020 Scout Bobber features upgraded brakes as well as new
Pirelli MT60RS tires. Available in Thunder Black, Thunder Black Smoke,
Deepwater Metallic, Bronze Smoke and White Smoke, pricing starts at $10,999 for
non-ABS (Thunder Black only) and $11,899 for ABS.

Read our Indian vs Moto Guzzi vs Triumph Bobber Comparison Review

2020 Indian Scout Sixty

2020 Indian Scout Sixty
2020 Indian Scout Sixty

The 2020 Scout Sixty features upgraded brakes. It’s powered
by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 4-valves-per-cylinder, 999cc (60ci) 60-degree V-twin
rated at 78 horsepower, with a 5-speed transmission. Available in Thunder
Black, Burgundy Metallic and Pearl White over Titanium Metallic, pricing starts
at $8,999 for ABS (Thunder Black only) and $9,799 for ABS.

Read our 2016 Indian Scout Sixty Road Test Review

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Suzuki Announces New and Returning 2020 Motorcycles

2020 Suzuki Katana in Solid Black
2020 Suzuki Katana in Solid Black

Suzuki has announced new and returning models for its 2020 motorcycle lineup. New models include the modern interpretation of the iconic Katana sportbike, which we test rode in Japan and reviewed last spring, and the V-Strom 650XT Adventure.

All other returning models for 2020 are unchanged except for colors and pricing.

Check out Rider‘s 2020 Guide to New Street Motorcycles

2020 Suzuki Katana

2020 Suzuki Katana in Metallic Mystic Silver
2020 Suzuki Katana in Metallic Mystic Silver

Based on the GSX-S1000 naked sportbike and powered by a liquid-cooled,
DOHC, 999cc in-line four that’s a modified, street-tuned version of the
GSX-R1000 K5 (2005-2008) engine, making 147 horsepower at 10,000 rpm and 80
lb-ft of torque at 9,500 rpm (claimed), the new Katana is based on the Katana
3.0 Concept created by Italian designer Rodolfo Frascoli.

Read about the history of the original, Hans Muth-designed 1981 GSX1100S Katana and the evolution of the new model in our First Ride Review. The 2020 Suzuki Katana will be available in Metallic Mystic Silver or Solid Black. Pricing starts at is $13,499 and it will be in dealerships in November.

2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT Adventure

2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT Adventure
2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT Adventure

Replacing the V-Strom 650XT Touring for 2020 is the V-Strom 650XT Adventure, which is equipped with tubeless spoked wheels, aluminum panniers, an accessory bar, a handlebar cross-brace, mirror extensions and a centerstand. Powered by a 645cc 90-degree V-twin, it is mechanically unchanged from the 2018 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT we last tested.

The 2020 Suzuki V-Strom XT Adventure will be available in
Pearl Vigor Blue and base MSRP is $10,399.

The rest are returning models….

2020 Suzuki Burgman 200

2020 Suzuki Burgman 200
2020 Suzuki Burgman 200

For 2020, the Suzuki Burgman 200 scooter is available in
Pearl Brilliant White and base MSRP is $4,999.

2020 Suzuki Boulevard C50

2020 Suzuki Boulevard C50
2020 Suzuki Boulevard C50

For 2020, the Suzuki Boulevard C50 cruiser is available in
Candy Daring Red or Glass Sparkle Black and base MSRP is $8,299.

2020 Suzuki Boulevard C50T

2020 Suzuki Boulevard C50T
2020 Suzuki Boulevard C50T

For 2020, the Suzuki Boulevard C50T touring cruiser is
available in Metallic Oort Gray No. 3 and base MSRP is $9,599.

2020 Suzuki Boulevard M109R B.O.S.S.

2020 Suzuki Boulevard M109R B.O.S.S.
2020 Suzuki Boulevard M109R B.O.S.S.

For 2020, the Suzuki Boulevard M109R B.O.S.S. muscle cruiser
is available in Pearl Glacier White/Glass Sparkle Black or Metallic Oort
Gray/Glass Sparkle Black and base MSRP is $15,199.

2020 Suzuki DR-Z400S

2020 Suzuki DR-Z400S
2020 Suzuki DR-Z400S

For 2020, the Suzuki DR-Z400S dual-sport is available in Solid
Black and base MSRP is $6,799.

2020 Suzuki DR-Z400SM

2020 Suzuki DR-Z400SM
2020 Suzuki DR-Z400SM

For 2020, the Suzuki DR-Z400SM supermoto is available in Solid
Iron Gray or Solid Special White No. 2 and base MSRP is $7,399.

2020 Suzuki DR200S

2020 Suzuki DR200S
2020 Suzuki DR200S

For 2020, the Suzuki DR200S dual-sport is available in Solid
Iron Gray and base MSRP is $4,649.

2020 Suzuki GSX-R600

2020 Suzuki GSX-R600
2020 Suzuki GSX-R600

For 2020, the Suzuki GSX-R600 sportbike is available in Pearl
Glacier White or Glass Sparkle Black and base MSRP is $11,399.

2020 Suzuki GSX-R750

2020 Suzuki GSX-R750
2020 Suzuki GSX-R750

For 2020, the Suzuki GSX-R750 sportbike is available in Pearl
Glacier White/Glass Sparkle Black or Metallic Mat Black No. 2/Glass Sparkle
Black and base MSRP is $12,499.

2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000

2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000
2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000

For 2020, the Suzuki GSX-R1000 sportbike is available in Metallic
Mat Black No. 2/Glass Sparkle Black or Pearl Glacier White/Glass Sparkle Black and
MSRP is $15,599.

Read our 2017 Suzuki GSX-R1000 First Ride Review

2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000R

2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000R
2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000R

For 2020, the Suzuki GSX-R1000R track-ready sportbike is
available in Metallic Triton Blue or Glass Sparkle Black/Pearl Mira Red and base
MSRP is $17,699.

2020 Suzuki GSX-S750

2020 Suzuki GSX-S750
2020 Suzuki GSX-S750

For 2020, the Suzuki GSX-S750 naked sportbike is available
in Metallic Mat Black No. 2 and base MSRP is $8,499.

Read our 2018 Suzuki GSX-S750 Road Test Review

2020 Suzuki GSX-S750Z ABS

2020 Suzuki GSX-S750Z ABS
2020 Suzuki GSX-S750Z ABS

For 2020, the Suzuki GSX-S750Z ABS naked sportbike is
available in Pearl Glacier White/Glass Sparkle Black with red accents and
wheels and base MSRP is $8,899.

2020 Suzuki GSX250R

2020 Suzuki GSX250R
2020 Suzuki GSX250R

For 2020, the Suzuki GSX250R entry-level sportbike is
available in Metallic Diamond Red or Pearl Glacier White/Pearl Nebular Black
and base MSRP is $4,599.

2020 Suzuki GSX250R ABS

2020 Suzuki GSX250R ABS
2020 Suzuki GSX250R ABS

For 2020, the Suzuki GSX250R ABS entry-level sportbike is
available in Metallic Crystal Blue/Pearl Nebular Black and base MSRP is $4,899.

2020 Suzuki Hayabusa

2020 Suzuki Hayabusa
2020 Suzuki Hayabusa

For 2020, the Suzuki GSX1300R Hayabusa sportbike is available in Candy Daring Red or Metallic Thunder Gray and base MSRP is $14,799.

2020 Suzuki SV650

2020 Suzuki SV650
2020 Suzuki SV650

For 2020, the Suzuki SV650 standard is available in Metallic
Mystic Silver with blue frame and wheels and base MSRP is $7,099.

Read our 2017 Suzuki SV650 First Ride Review

2020 Suzuki SV650 ABS

2020 Suzuki SV650 ABS
2020 Suzuki SV650 ABS

For 2020, the Suzuki SV650 ABS standard is available in Glass
Sparkle Black and base MSRP is $7,499.

2020 Suzuki SV650X

2020 Suzuki SV650X
2020 Suzuki SV650X

For 2020, the Suzuki SV650X café racer is available in Glass
Sparkle Black and base MSRP is $8,399.

2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650

2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650
2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650

For 2020, the Suzuki V-Strom 650 adventure bike is available
in Solid Iron Gray and base MSRP is $8,799.

Read our 2017 Suzuki V-Strom 650 Road Test Review

2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT

2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT
2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT

For 2020, the Suzuki V-Strom 650 adventure bike is available
in Glass Sparkle Black with gold accents and rims and base MSRP is $9,299.

Read our 2018 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT vs V-Strom 1000XT Comparison Review

Source: RiderMagazine.com

New Harley-Davidson Models for 2020

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire
New or updated Harley-Davidson models for 2020 include the LiveWire electric bike (above), Low Rider S, Road Glide Limited, a restyled Heritage Classic and three CVO models. (Photos courtesy of Harley-Davidson)

The biggest news to come out of Milwaukee for the 2020 model year is the all-new LiveWire electric motorcycle, which we’ve already ridden and reviewed. Harley-Davidson has announced the wider availability of technological features that debuted on the LiveWire, as well as several new or updated models, including the Low Rider S, Road Glide Limited, Heritage Classic and three CVO models.

H-D Connect

H-D Connect
H-D Connect sends vehicle information and security alerts to your smartphone through the Harley-Davidson app.

First seen on the LiveWire, H-D Connect is a subscription-based
cellular service that allows riders to connect with their motorcycle using
their smartphone and the Harley-Davidson app. H-D Connect provides key vehicle information
(e.g., battery voltage, fuel level, available range, riding statistics and
more) as well as remote security monitoring, including tamper alerts and stolen
vehicle assistance. H-D Connect is a standard feature on 2020 Touring (except
Road King/S and Electra Glide Standard models), Tri Glide Ultra, CVO models and
LiveWire, and it includes free service for one year.

Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS)

Also seen on the LiveWire, Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS) is a suite of electronic riding assistance features, including cornering enhanced linked braking, ABS, traction control and drag-torque slip control; hill hold control; and tire-pressure monitoring. All RDRS features are standard on CVO models (though on the CVO Tri Glide, nothing is “cornering enhanced”), and they are available as options on all Touring models except the Electra Glide Standard.

2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S
2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

Chopper-style Low Rider models have been in Harley-Davidson’s lineup almost continuously since 1977. When Dyna models were rolled into the Softail family for 2018, the Low Rider got a new chassis and a Milwaukee-Eight 107ci V-twin. The last Low Rider S model, which we reviewed in 2016, was built around a 110-cubic-inch Screamin’ Eagle Twin Cam V-twin. For 2020, the Softail-based Low Rider S flexes its muscles with a Milwaukee-Eight 114 that churns out 119 lb-ft of torque at 3,000 rpm (claimed).

2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S
2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

Radiate cast wheels (19-inch front, 16-inch rear) finished in Matte Dark Bronze, a 1-inch-diameter motocross-style handlebar on 4-inch straight risers, a color-matched mini-fairing, a high-back solo seat and black finishes on the powertrain and mufflers add plenty of attitude.

The Low Rider S also gets premium suspension components (including a 43mm USD fork) and triple-disc brakes with standard ABS. It’s available in Vivid Black and Barracuda Silver (shown above), and pricing starts at $17,999.

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited
2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited

Replacing the Road Glide Ultra model for 2020 is the new Road Glide Limited, which offers premium luxury-touring features, including painted pin striping, a gloss-finish inner fairing, heated grips, Slicer II Contrast Bright wheels and new tank, front and rear fender medallions. The Road Glide’s distinctive shark-nose fairing has triple split stream vents that improve airflow and reduce buffeting.

Read our Comparison Review: Harley-Davidson Road Glide Ultra
vs Indian Roadmaster vs Yamaha Star Venture TC

The Road Glide Limited is powered by the Twin-Cooled Milwaukee-Eight
114, and features premium suspension, Reflex linked Brembo brakes with ABS, a Boom!
Box GTS infotainment system with color touchscreen, H-D Connect and dual
Daymaker LED headlamps.

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited
2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited

A new Black Finish Option (shown in the photos above), which is also available for the 2020 Ultra Limited, includes Slicer II cast wheels finished in Gloss Black; fuel tank, front and rear fender medallions with a Gloss Black fill surrounded by a Charcoal border; Gloss Black powdercoat powertrain, covers and exhaust; black Tour-Pak luggage carrier hinges, latches and rack, console, footboards, handlebar, gauge trim rings, hand control levers, mirrors and foot controls; black LED Daymaker headlamp, trim ring and LED fog lamps (Ultra Limited only); and black fork lowers, fork covers, engine guard and saddlebag guards.

Pricing for the 2020 Road Glide Limited starts at $28,299.

2020 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic

2020 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic
2020 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic

The Softail-chassis Heritage Classic has been re-styled for 2020, swapping the previous model’s blacked-out look for a generous helping of chrome. (The Heritage Classic 114 model powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine will retain the model’s original, blacked-out look.) The updated Heritage Classic has a bright powertrain with chrome air cleaner and covers; chrome steel laced wheels; chrome headlamp bucket and auxiliary light buckets, bright fork legs and chrome fork covers and nacelle; chrome rear fender struts and side covers; a chrome console; a polished stainless steel handlebar with a chrome riser and top clamp; and a full clear windscreen with chrome support hardware.

Read our 2018 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic Road Test Review

The Heritage Classic is powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 107 V-twin and is mechanically identical to the 2019 model. This touring-ready Softail features lockable hard saddlebags, a detachable windscreen, a two-piece skirted seat and pillion with black studs, and standard cruise control and ABS. Color options include: Vivid Black, Billiard Burgundy, two-tone Silver Pine/Spruce and Billiard Red/Vivid Black. Pricing starts at $18,999.

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide
2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide

Returning for 2020 with a new look and new premium features, the CVO Street Glide is one of Harley-Davidson’s most popular limited-edition Custom Vehicle Operations models. Powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 117 V-Twin with red rocker covers, it gets premium custom paint, premium Talon wheels, custom controls and an all-new BOOM! Box GTS infotainment system with three separate amplifiers, 75 watts per channel and 900 watts of audio performance. It also includes the Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS), smartphone-linked H-D Connect and a wireless Bluetooth headset interface.

Pricing for the 2020 CVO Street Glide starts at $40,539.

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited
2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited

For the ultimate in two-up V-twin touring, the 2020 CVO Limited offers the rider and passenger plenty of comfort, luggage capacity, style and performance. Its Twin-Cooled Milwaukee-Eight 117 grunts out 125 lb-ft of torque. Premium suspension, premium paint and finishes, premium audio, RDRS, H-D Connect, wireless Bluetooth—the CVO Limited gets it all.

Read our 2019 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited First Ride Review

Pricing for the 2020 CVO Limited starts at $44,039.

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Tri Glide

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Tri Glide
2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Tri Glide

Said to be the most-requested CVO model, a new addition to
the lineup for 2020 is the CVO Tri Glide, the ultimate Milwaukee-built trike.
Like its Custom Vehicle Operations stable mates, the CVO Tri Glide gets big
power from a Milwaukee-Eight 117 V-twin, big sound from the BOOM! Box GTS
infotainment system and big style courtesy of premium paint and finishes and
the Kahuna collection of grips, levers, pegs and floorboards, and Tomahawk
contrast-cut wheels. RDRS, H-D Connect, wireless Bluetooth, Daymaker LED
headlamps and the choice of two custom paint finishes round out the wish list.

Pricing for the 2020 CVO Tri Glide starts at $48,999.

Source: RiderMagazine.com