Tag Archives: Sport Motorcycle Reviews

Rider Comparo: 2024 CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX-8S

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
With short wheelbases, sporty geometry, and low curb weights, the CFMOTO 800NK and Suzuki GSX‑­8S hustle through tight corners with ease. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Back in the ’70s, Cycle magazine coined the term “Universal Japanese Motorcycle” to refer to the proliferation of standard bikes built by the Japanese Big Four that adhered to the same formula: air‑cooled inline‑Fours with tubular cradle frames, disc front brakes, telescopic forks, and dual rear shocks.

Much has changed in the last five decades, but manufacturers still stick to tried‑and‑true formulas when designing motorcycles. These days, regardless of where bikes hail from, there has been a convergence in the middleweight class on parallel‑Twin engines because they are cost‑effective to produce, easy to package within a frame, and flexible in terms of tuning. Also known as vertical Twins because the two side‑by‑side cylinders stand upright, modern versions typically have liquid cooling, fuel injection, and a 270‑degree crankshaft that produces a V‑Twin‑like rumble.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
We put the CFMOTO 800NK (left) side-by-side with the Suzuki GSX-8S (right) for this comparo.

Last year, Suzuki, a veteran of the UJM wars, introduced a liquid‑cooled 776cc parallel‑Twin that powered two new models: the GSX‑8S naked sportbike and V‑Strom 800DE adventure bike. The engine has DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, a 270‑degree crank, throttle‑by‑wire, and Suzuki’s patented Cross Balancer system, which minimizes vibration. The GSX‑8S is equipped with several Suzuki Intelligent Ride System electronic rider aids, including throttle response modes (Active, Basic, and Comfort), multi‑mode traction control (1, 2, 3, and Off), an up/down quickshifter, Easy Start, and Low RPM Assist.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
2024 Suzuki GSX-8S

Chinese manufacturer CFMOTO entered the U.S. motorcycle market in 2022 and has expanded its lineup to 11 models for 2024. One of its newest is the 800NK, a naked sportbike powered by a liquid‑cooled 799cc parallel‑Twin that’s a previous‑gen version of the KTM 790 engine, which CFMOTO now builds under a partnership agreement. Similar to Suzuki’s modular approach, the same engine is found in CFMOTO’s Ibex 800 adventure bikes. On the tech front, the 800NK has throttle‑by‑wire, throttle response modes (Sport, Street, and Rain), and cruise control but no traction control or quickshifter.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK
2024 CFMOTO 800NK

Those looking for an affordable, streetfighter‑styled motorcycle would likely cross‑shop these two bikes, especially since there’s just a $500 delta between their MSRPs: $8,999 for the Suzuki and $8,499 for the CFMOTO. To suss out their differences, we tested them back‑to‑back on local freeways and backroads and had our friend John Ethell at Jett Tuning run them on a Dynojet dynamometer.

CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX8S: Wonder Twin Powers, Activate!

Despite just a 23cc difference in displacement between the CFMOTO and Suzuki, there’s a significant difference in engine output. Both Twins rev out to nearly 10,000 rpm, and their dyno curves show fairly linear increases in power and flat torque curves. Past 6,000 rpm, their curves begin to diverge, with the CFMOTO climbing to 93.4 hp at 9,400 rpm while the Suzuki levels out at 75.9 hp at 8,300 rpm. Torque figures are closer, but the 800NK still has the advantage in the upper rev range, maxing out at 57.1 lb‑ft at 6,600 rpm compared to 53.3 lb‑ft at 6,700 rpm on the GSX‑8S.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S dyno

The CFMOTO also has a lower curb weight, giving it a higher power‑to‑weight ratio. It weighs 410 lb with its 4.0‑gallon tank full, whereas the Suzuki weighs 445 lb with 3.7 gallons in its tank.

Differences in power and weight aren’t readily apparent at lower rpm and around‑town speeds, but the Suzuki feels more refined. The GSX‑8S starts easily when cold, idles smoothly, and has spot‑on fueling and throttle response. The 800NK, on the other hand, is slow to warm up, idles like it’s in a bad mood, and exhibits some hesitation when making throttle adjustments between 4,000 to 6,000 rpm, which corresponds to a dip in the horsepower and torque curves.

Above 6,000 rpm, however, the CFMOTO finds its groove, responding cleanly and directly to throttle inputs and making its power and weight advantages readily apparent. It flicks back and forth through tight corners more easily than the Suzuki, and a twist of the wrist catapults the 800NK ahead more rapidly than the GSX‑8S, which falls flat in the upper rev range. Although sound doesn’t necessarily affect performance, it does tap into our emotions. The CFMOTO’s more aggressive exhaust note makes for a more engaging riding experience without being too loud.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK
New for 2024, the CFMOTO 800NK charges forward with a distinctive LED running light and angular bodywork in either Nebula Black (shown) or Nebula White.

GEAR UP

There’s also some daylight between these bikes in terms of shifting. Both are equipped with 6‑speed transmissions with cable‑actuated slip/assist clutches. Neither bike requires much effort to change gears, but the Suzuki’s gearbox is noticeably smoother, and it’s aided by the convenience of a quickshifter. The CFMOTO has an adjustable clutch lever, but the Suzuki does not.

See all of Rider‘s CFMOTO coverage here.

More Bounce to the Ounce

When manufacturers aim for aggressive price targets, one of the most common places to cut costs is with the suspension, particularly in terms of adjustability. Both CFMOTO and Suzuki sourced their components from Japanese suspension maker KYB, and both bikes have inverted forks (43mm on the CFMOTO, 41mm on the Suzuki) and rear monoshocks. The only adjustability on the GSX‑8S is rear preload, but the 800NK offers full adjustability on the fork and rebound and preload adjustability on the shock. Ride quality between the two is fairly similar, with their damping rates calibrated for general use rather than the tautness of more aggressive sportbikes, but the CFMOTO allows riders to dial in their preferences front and rear.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
Yerba Buena Road, which slithers through California’s rugged Santa Monica Mountains, was the perfect place to test these two middleweight streetfighters.

The CFMOTO has a slight edge in terms of braking. With components sourced from J.Juan, a Spanish subsidiary of Brembo, the 800NK has a pair of 4‑piston radial front calipers pinching 320mm discs, a 2‑piston rear caliper pinching a 260mm disc, a radial‑pump front master cylinder, and steel‑braided lines. The 800NK’s brakes provide strong, consistent power with good feedback from the adjustable front lever, but they could use more initial bite.

The Suzuki wears Nissin brakes, with dual 4‑piston radial front calipers squeezing 310mm discs, a 1‑piston rear caliper squeezing a 240mm disc, an axial‑pump front master cylinder, and rubber lines. Stopping power is decent, but the Suzuki’s brakes feel more numb and provide less feedback than the CFMOTO’s. ABS is standard on both bikes.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
The Suzuki GSX‑­8S has a minimalist look, and it’s available in Pearl Cosmic Blue (shown), Glass Matte Mechanical Gray, and Metallic Matte Black No. 2.

GEAR UP

Sit Up and Be Somebody

The 800NK and GSX‑8S are compact machines with short wheelbases, narrow waistlines, and sporty chassis geometry. Both have steel frames, steel subframes, cast‑aluminum swingarms, and tapered aluminum handlebars. From the cockpit, the Suzuki almost disappears beneath the rider thanks to its svelte tank, 1.7-inch narrower handlebar, and slender (but 0.4 inch taller) seat. The CFMOTO’s tank and bodywork flare out more, and its handlebar is wider, giving it more visual presence from the saddle. Its seat is also wider at the back and has thicker, more comfortable foam.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
The CFMOTO’s higher power, lighter weight, and wider handlebar give it an advantage over the Suzuki.

As streetfighters, these bikes lend themselves to an aggressive riding style, but they’re comfortable enough for everyday riding or commuting. Their handlebars’ bends and risers allow for an upright seating position, and their footpegs are placed high enough for good cornering clearance but low enough for adequate legroom.

When you exit the highway and find your way to a winding backroad, they are more than happy to display their athleticism. Both roll on 17‑inch cast wheels with 120/70 front and 180/55 rear tire sizes, and their radials – Maxxis Supermaxx ST on the CFMOTO, Dunlop Roadsmart 2 on the Suzuki – provide neutral handling and decent grip. With its additional steering leverage and 35‑lb weight advantage, the CFMOTO is more agile than the Suzuki but not by much.

See all of Rider‘s Suzuki coverage here.

CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX8S: Devil in the Details

In some ways, these are two evenly matched motorcycles, while in others, they diverge. One is built by a well‑established Japanese brand that has been building motorcycles since the early 1950s and selling them in America since 1963. The other is built by an upstart Chinese company that has been building motorcycles only since 2000 but has grown rapidly and not only builds its own engines and motorcycles but also builds them for KTM, Europe’s largest manufacturer.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
Both bikes have similar profiles, with pointy headlight shrouds and dagger‑­like tailsections. Despite the riders’ go‑­fast crouches above, handlebars positioned well above the triple clamp and sensibly placed footpegs allow for comfortable, upright seating positions.

Although the Suzuki GSX‑8S was introduced in 2023 as a new model with a new engine, it feels very refined. It has the build quality and fit and finish one expects from one of the Big Four Japanese manufacturers, and its engine, electronics, and chassis work together harmoniously. The GSX‑8S costs $500 more than the 800NK, but it has standard features that the CFMOTO lacks, such as traction control and an up/down quickshifter. Its bright TFT instrument panel uses a larger, thicker font and is easier to read in all conditions than the one on the 800NK.

As the new kid on the block looking to build trust in the market, CFMOTO’s value proposition is to provide more bang for the buck. For the 800NK, that starts with the tried‑and‑true KTM 790 engine that delivers an additional 17.5 hp and 3.8 lb‑ft of torque over the GSX‑8S motor. It continues with a 35‑lb lower curb weight, suspension with more adjustability, higher‑spec brakes, and features like cruise control and smartphone connectivity. Not only is the base price lower, but it comes with an additional year of warranty coverage. But it also feels rougher around the edges, particularly regarding its low‑rpm fueling.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK
The 2024 CFMOTO 800NK TFT display changes with ride mode, but the text is too small.
2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
The 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S TFT display is easy to read and adjusts to light/dark conditions.

If you’re an experienced rider who wants a light, powerful, somewhat rowdy streetfighter and can live without traction control and a quickshifter, you’ll want the CFMOTO 800NK. But if you’re someone who prioritizes smoothness and refinement over power, or if you’re a newer rider, the Suzuki GSX‑8S is for you.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
Each bike has its strengths and weaknesses, but both provide a respectable mix of performance, technology, and style at a reasonable price.

Spec Comparo: 2024 CFMOTO 800NK vs. 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S

  • Base Price: $8,499 (CFMOTO) — $8,999 (Suzuki)
  • Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles — 1 yr., unltd. miles 
  • Website: CFMOTOusa.comSuzukiCycles.com
  • Engine Type: Liquid‑­cooled, transverse parallel‑­Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl. — Liquid­-cooled, transverse parallel-­Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
  • Displacement: 799cc — 776cc 
  • Bore x Stroke: 88 x 65.7mm — 84.0 x 70.0mm
  • Horsepower (rear-­wheel dyno): 93.4 hp @ 9,400 rpm — 75.9 hp @ 8,300 rpm
  • Torque (rear-­wheel dyno): 57.1 lb‑­ft @ 6,600 rpm — 53.3 lb‑­ft @ 6,700 rpm
  • Transmission: 6‑­speed, cable‑­actuated slip/assist wet clutch — 6‑­speed, cable‑­actuated slip/assist wet clutch 
  • Final Drive: Chain — Chain
  • Wheelbase: 57.8 in. — 57.7 in.
  • Rake/Trail: 24 degrees/3.8 in. — 25 degrees/4.1 in. 
  • Seat Height: 31.5 in. — 31.9 in. 
  • Wet Weight: 410 lb — 445 lb
  • Fuel Capacity: 4.0 gal. — 3.7 gal.
  • Fuel Consumption: 42.9 mpg — 48.7 mpg
2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S

The post Rider Comparo: 2024 CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX-8S appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 KTM 390 Duke Review | First Ride

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
For this 2024 KTM 390 Duke review, we traveled to Almeria, Spain, to test the updated naked bike on the street and a gymkhana course. (Photos by Francesc Montero & Sebas Romero)

This is a year of milestones. The AMA is celebrating its 100th anniversary, Rider is celebrating its 50th, and KTM is celebrating “30 Years of Duke.” What started out as one bike in 1994 is now a seven-model lineup, including the 125 Duke, 250 Duke, 390 Duke, 790 Duke, 990 Duke, 1290 Super Duke GT, and 1390 Super Duke R Evo. We tested three new/updated models recently – the 390, 990, and 1390 – and we’ll start off with our KTM 390 Duke review.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
A selection of Dukes over the years, with the original Duke 620 in the middle, three 2024 models (390 Duke to the right of the Duke 620, and the 990 Duke (l) and 1390 Super Duke R (r) in the front), and others from intervening years.

Thirty years ago, KTM – then a small Austrian manufacturer of dirtbikes – launched its first street-focused motorcycle, the Duke 620, a supermotard-style bike that was the brainchild of KTM engineer Wolfgang Felber. Starting with a KTM 620 R/XC dual-sport, which had a kickstart-only 602cc Single that made 56 hp, Felber shortened the suspension and gave it 17-inch spoked wheels shod with sticky street tires. Weighing just 315 lb, the flickable, wheelie-happy Duke – named after Geoff Duke, a British GP racer who won multiple world championships – became a cult favorite, a hooligan bike that encouraged a rowdy riding style.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review - 1994 KTM Duke 620
On display at the “30 Years of Duke” launch in Almeria, Spain, was the first 1994 KTM Duke 620 that rolled off the assembly line. Even three decades on, it’s still a bad-ass looking bike. (Photo by the author)

Today, KTM is the biggest brand in the Pierer Mobility empire – Europe’s largest motorcycle manufacturer that also includes Husqvarna, GasGas, and MV Agusta. Although the “Ready to Race” brand says it prefers to look ahead to the future than dwell on the past, KTM recently honored the Duke legacy by hosting a press launch in Almeria, Spain, for three new/updated models: the 390 Duke, 990 Duke, and 1390 Super Duke R Evo. The launch began with a half-day ride on the 390 Duke, which is the focus of this review.

Related: 2024 KTM 990 Duke Review | First Look

Related: 2024 KTM 1390 Super Duke R Evo Review | First Look

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
Except where noted, the 2024 KTM 390 Duke in the static photos is outfitted with a long list of PowerParts accessories and its mirrors have been removed. The Akrapovic exhaust system and engine crash guards are two of the most obvious ones in this photo.

What’s New | 2024 KTM 390 Duke

Launched in Europe in 2013, the 390 Duke made its way to our shores in 2015 (read our road test review). Along with the 125 Duke and 250 Duke, the 390 Duke is made in India by Bajaj under the scrupulous supervision of KTM engineers. Just as KTM’s 790 Duke and 790 Adventure models are made in China by CFMOTO, these strategic partnerships allow KTM to increase its production capacity, keep a lid on ever-increasing labor costs, and gain in-country access to the two largest motorcycle markets in the world.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
Displacement of the liquid-cooled, counterbalanced LC4 Single was increased from 373cc to 399cc, netting a small gain in horsepower and torque.

While the 390 Duke has evolved steadily over the years, the 2024 model represents a major leap forward. Compared to its predecessor, KTM says it is 90% new. Displacement of its liquid-cooled, single-cylinder engine has increased from 373cc to 399cc, contributing to a small increase in horsepower (45, up from 44) and torque (28.8 lb-ft, up from 27.3). The updated engine is lighter, has improved cooling yet also warms up faster, and has longer oil-change and valve-inspection service intervals. A larger airbox is located under the seat, and the fuel tank now holds 3.9 gallons, up from 3.6.

The 390’s tubular-steel trellis frame was made stiffer and now has an upper mount for the rear shock, which was moved from the center to the right side and positioned at a more horizontal angle, lowering the seat height from 32.7 to 32.3 inches. A new pressure die-cast aluminum subframe is also stiffer, and the new curved, open-lattice cast-aluminum swingarm has a lower mount on the right side for the shock and is curved to accommodate the tucked-in exhaust.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
WP suspension front and rear was upgraded to adjustable Apex components. The rear shock was moved to the right side and mounted at a more horizontal angle to lower the seat height. The orange billet reservoir cover is an accessory.

As before, the 390 Duke’s suspension is made by KTM-owned WP, but for 2024, it is upgraded to higher-spec Apex components. The 43mm inverted fork, held in place by new triple clamps, now offers rebound and compression adjustability with five-position clickers atop the fork caps. The Separate Piston rear shock has five-position rebound adjustability in addition to adjustable preload (both easily done with toolkit stored under the seat). Suspension travel has increased from 5.6 to 5.9 inches in the front and remains 5.9 inches out back.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
For 2024, the single-disc Bybre front brake was moved to the right side of the wheel, and the 320mm disc is 20mm larger than on last year’s model. Revised wheels and new Michelin Power 6 tires reduced unsprung weight by nearly 10 lb.

Revised 17-inch cast-aluminum wheels are shod with new Michelin Power 6 tires, and the combo sheds a remarkable 9.5 lb of unsprung weight. Claimed wet weight for the bike, however, remains the same at 364 lb. Single-disc brakes front and rear are made by Bybre, with a 4-piston radial front caliper pinching a 320mm disc (up from 300mm) and a 1-piston rear caliper with a 240mm disc (up from 230mm). ABS with a rear-off Supermoto mode is standard.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
The new headlight design is similar to that on the 2024 2024 KTM 990 Duke and 1390 Super Duke R Evo. The orange-anodized reservoir cover and levers as well as the lever guards are accessories.

The 390 Duke has a new LED headlight with a DRL surround that’s shaped like the new headlights on the 990 Duke and 1390 Super Duke R Evo, and all three bikes share a 5-inch color TFT display. With an MSRP of $6,299, electronics are typically limited in this price range, but the 390 Duke has throttle-by-wire with two ride modes (Street and Rain) that adjust throttle response and lean-adaptive traction control, as well as new launch control. New switchgear and revised menus on the TFT are easier to use, but multiple buttons must be pushed to change ride mode and other settings. We’d prefer a single button to change ride mode on the fly.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
The 5-inch color TFT display is shared with the 990 Duke and 1390 Super Duke R Evo.

What’s It Like to Ride? | 2024 KTM 390 Duke

I love small sporty bikes, and I have a particular fondness for the 390 Duke. My Duke dalliance started in 2017, when KTM hosted a launch for an updated version of the 390 Duke in Turin, Italy, where we began our test ride by turning laps on a test track with banked curves on the roof of the Lingotto building, a massive five-story structure that was a Fiat factory from 1923 to 1982. Then we buzzed around the streets of Turin before making our way into the foothills of the Alps. Cool location notwithstanding, it was the most fun I’d ever had on such a light, affordable bike. Its MSRP back then was just $5,299.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review - 2017 KTM 390 Duke
Riding the 2017 KTM 390 Duke on one of the banked corners of the rooftop test track at the Lingotto building in Turin, Italy. (Photo by Sebas Romero & Marco Campelli)

A year later, we got a 390 Duke for a test on our own turf, and I wrangled the keys away from Jenny Smith long enough to give it a proper thrash.

This time around, it was a cold, clear day in Almeria, Spain, when our multinational group of journalists hopped on a fleet of shiny new 390 Dukes. I chose one in KTM orange, with the bright color found not only on the tank and sharply angled bodywork but also on the seat, frame, and wheels. When I turned on the key, the instrument panel welcomed me with a “30 Years of Duke” animation that’s exclusive to 2024 models. Although the seat is a tad lower, the 390 Duke doesn’t feel dainty or undersized but rather slender and compact.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
Over its 11-year history, the KTM 390 Duke has been updated multiple times. The 2024 model is 90% new.

Gear Up

The 390 Duke is an eager beaver, a fiesty machine that begs to be flogged. Its 399cc Single fires up quickly and settles into a mellow burble at idle, but the ’lil Duke really comes alive when its throttle is twisted WFO. With peak horsepower at 8,500 rpm, peak torque at 7,000 rpm, and a 10,000-rpm redline, it pays to keep the engine spinning. Let the revs drop too much, and it can be hard to regain momentum on a twisty road. Though counterbalanced, the engine gets buzzy at high revs.

And believe you me, Spain has more than its fair share of muy twisty roads.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
The KTM 390 Duke is a compact, narrow machine that is fun to toss around on tight, technical roads. The best approach is to maintain corner speed and keep the revs up.

KTM’s nickname for the 390 Duke is “Corner Rocket,” and it lives up to the name. With just 53.4 inches between the axles, sporty steering geometry, and narrow, grippy tires (110/70 front, 150/60 rear), the 390 turns almost as quickly as your brain’s synapses fire off the command to your hands. A lot of shifting is required to stay in the meat of the powerband, and the 6-speed gearbox with slip/assist clutch does the rider’s bidding with minimal effort. The bikes we were riding had the optional Quickshifter+ installed, allowing us to bang our way up and down through the gears without the clutch.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
New electronics for 2024 include ride modes, cornering traction control, and launch control.

The new Apex suspension did a good job of soaking up bumps as well as the chassis gyrations of being constantly on and off the gas. Since my 200-plus pounds is above average, I used the hook spanner under the seat to ratchet up the rear preload a few clicks. Likewise, the brakes capably slowed the bike and its oversized cargo, and the adjustable hand levers were appreciated.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
As with all KTM streetbikes, the 390 Duke’s design is heavy on sharp angles.

After a 75-mile hair-on-fire street ride, we returned to the hotel, where KTM had set up a gymkhana course in the parking lot. Pairs of riders went head-to-head on an out-and-back slalom course, with bragging rights going to the fastest time. I’m not a racer, so even though I beat the other rider, I didn’t bother to ask my time. The fastest journalist was a guy from Australia who sliced and diced the course in 34 seconds. Jeremy McWilliams, the former MotoGP racer, current King Of The Baggers racer for Indian, and development rider for KTM, beat all comers with a 32-second time – while wearing jeans and tennis shoes. Check out his Instagram page to see a photo of him losing the front, which he saved on his way to victory.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
2024 KTM 390 Duke in orange colorway (no accessories)

Upgrades like ride modes, cornering traction control, and adjustable suspension have pushed the 390 Duke’s price up to $6,299, but it’s still a reasonably priced bike that’s more fun than ever. And it’s certainly worthy of the Duke’s 30-year legacy.

2024 KTM 390 Duke review
2024 KTM 390 Duke in blue colorway (no accessories)

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

2024 KTM 390 Duke Specifications

  • Base Price: $6,299
  • Website: KTM.com
  • Warranty: 2 yrs., 24,000 miles
  • Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse Single, DOHC w/ 4 valves
  • Displacement: 399cc
  • Bore x Stroke: 89.0 x 64.0mm
  • Horsepower: 45 hp @ 8,500 rpm (factory claim)
  • Torque: 28.8 lb-ft @ 7,000 rpm (factory claim)
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
  • Final Drive: Chain
  • Wheelbase: 53.4 in.
  • Rake/Trail: 24 degrees/3.7 in.
  • Seat Height: 32.3 in.
  • Wet Weight: 364 lb
  • Fuel Capacity: 4.0 gal.
  • Fuel Consumption: 69 mpg (factory claim)

The post 2024 KTM 390 Duke Review | First Ride appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | Video

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The muffler and catalytic converter are tucked away under the chassis for a cleaner appearance that exposes the 8R’s aluminum swingarm.

The Suzuki GSX-8R is the fully-faired sibling of the Suzuki GSX-8S, which was just released in 2023. Both bikes are powered by an all-new 776cc 4-stroke DOHC parallel-Twin that can also be found in the V-Strom 800 models. The tubular handlebar from the 8S is traded for a pair of clip-ons on the GSX-8R that are about 2 inches lower and a smidge farther away from a rider, and the KYB suspension on the 8S has been replaced with Showa suspension on the 8R.

To demonstrate the breadth of capabilities offered by the GSX-8R, Suzuki invited us to Palm Desert in California for a ride on rural and mountain roads, followed the next day by sessions at a racetrack. Watch the video below to see the 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R in action, and read our full review here.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Specs 

  • Base Price: $9,439  
  • Website: SuzukiCycles.com  
  • Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles  
  • Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.  
  • Displacement: 776cc  
  • Bore x Stroke: 84.0 x 70.0mm  
  • Horsepower: 82.0 @ 8,500 rpm (factory claim)  
  • Torque: 57.5 lb-ft @ 6,800 rpm (factory claim)  
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch  
  • Final Drive: Chain  
  • Wheelbase: 57.7 in.  
  • Rake/Trail: 25.0 degrees/4.1 in.  
  • Seat Height: 31.9 in.  
  • Wet Weight: 452 lb (factory claim)  
  • Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gal 

GEAR UP

The post 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | Video appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2025 Moto Morini Corsaro 750 and Corsaro Sport Review | First Look 

2025 Moto Morini Corsaro 750
2025 Moto Morini Corsaro 750

The new 2025 Moto Morini Corsaro 750 naked and fully faired Corsaro Sport were announced for the U.S. market at the 2024 AIMExpo show in Las Vegas. The brand says these new models are a reinterpretation of Moto Morini’s historic Corsaro, “embodying its past values while expressing defining elements of Moto Morini’s future.” 

2025 Moto Morini Corsaro Sport
2025 Moto Morini Corsaro Sport

Related: 2025 Moto Morini X-Cape 1200 Review | First Look 

These two new models by the Italian brand appear to be mostly the same, though there are a few differences. They share the same engine, frame, braking components, and suspension, but the Sport gets a wider rear tire, clip-ons, a taller seat, and more bodywork compared to the Corsaro 750. 

2025 Moto Morini Corsaro 750

Both models are powered by a new 749cc 90-degree V-Twin with a claimed power output of 96 hp and a bore and stroke of 90mm and 58.9mm, respectively. Moto Morini claims a top speed of 130 mph. Highlights of the engine include a dry sump and counter-rotating crankshaft. 

2025 Moto Morini Corsaro Sport

Related: 2023 Moto Morini Seiemmezzo SCR and STR Review | First Ride 

Brembo brake components include dual 320mm front discs paired with 4-piston monoblock calipers and a 220mm rear disc with a 1-piston caliper, and ABS is standard. The inverted fork is fully adjustable, and these bikes feature a progressive link shock in the rear. 

2025 Moto Morini Corsaro 750

The frame for the Moto Morini Corsaro 750 and Corsaro Sport is made of both aluminum and steel with an aluminum swingarm. The wheelbase is 57.6 inches, and the claimed curb weight is 441 lb. The Corsaro 750 has a seat height of 32.3 inches, while the fully faired version gets a taller seat of 33.1 inches. 

2025 Moto Morini Corsaro Sport

Both models feature 17-inch aluminum wheels. The rear tire of the Corsaro Sport is wider at 190mm compared to the Corsaro 750’s 180mm. 

Pricing for the 2025 Moto Morini Corsaro 750 and Corsaro Sport has not yet been announced. 

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide 

The post 2025 Moto Morini Corsaro 750 and Corsaro Sport Review | First Look  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

21 Cool New Motorcycles at AIMExpo 2024

We’re at the 2024 American International Motorcycle Exposition (AIMExpo) in Las Vegas, where nearly 200 vendors from around the world are displaying the latest motorcycles and products to dealers, media, and other industry insiders. Here are 21 cool new motorcycles we’ve seen at the show.

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C
2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C

2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450
2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450

2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450 Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 CFMOTO Papio SS
2024 CFMOTO Papio SS

2024 CFMOTO 800NK, 450NK, and Papio CL/SS Announced


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 GasGas ES 500
2024 GasGas ES 500

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS
2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS and Z7 Hybrid ABS Review | First Look 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 KTM 890 SMT
2024 KTM 890 SMT

2024 KTM 890 SMT Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 KTM 1390 Super Duke R Evo
2024 KTM 1390 Super Duke R Evo

2024 KTM 1390 Super Duke R Evo Review | First Look 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Moto Guzzi Stelvio
2024 Moto Guzzi Stelvio

2024 Moto Guzzi Stelvio Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Moto Morini Calibro
2024 Moto Morini Calibro

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 Moto Morini Corsaro Sport
2025 Moto Morini Corsaro Sport

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 Moto Morini X-Cape 1200
2025 Moto Morini X-Cape 1200

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 MV Agusta LXP Orioli
2024 MV Agusta LXP Orioli

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 MV Agusta Rush 1000
2024 MV Agusta Rush 1000

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 MV Agusta Superveloce 98
2024 MV Agusta Superveloce 98

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
2024 Suzuki GSX-8R

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | First Ride 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Review | First Ride 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Suzuki Hayabusa 25th Anniversary Edition
2024 Suzuki Hayabusa 25th Anniversary Edition

2024 Suzuki Hayabusa 25th Anniversary Model | First Look Review


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Triumph Scrambler 400 X
2024 Triumph Scrambler 400 X

2024 Triumph Speed 400 and Scrambler 400 X | First Look Review


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Triumph Speed 400
2024 Triumph Speed 400

2024 Triumph Speed 400 and Scrambler 400 X | First Look Review


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Triumph TF 250-X
2024 Triumph TF 250-X

2024 Triumph TF 250-X Review | First Look 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo Yamaha Tricera Concept
Yamaha Tricera Concept

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide 

The post 21 Cool New Motorcycles at AIMExpo 2024 appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | First Ride 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
An aggressive rider posture adapts the ergonomics on the 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R from open and comfy to quite sporty when required.

The Suzuki GSX-8R takes an ironic turn in the evolution of motorcycles. For decades we’ve extolled the virtues of sporty standard-style motorcycles over dramatically more aggressive pure sportbikes, but American riders largely turned up their collective nose at naked bikes and ignored them in favor of swoopier sportbikes.  

The Honda 599 and 919 came and went seemingly without notice. Same for Kawasaki’s Z750, BMW’s F 800 R, Yamaha’s FZ8, and Aprilia’s Shiver. The only really successful naked bikes were the Ducati Monster and Suzuki SV650.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
A set of forged-aluminum handlebar clamps provide a sportier riding position than the naked 8S, with the bars 60mm lower and 6mm forward.

But now the script has been flipped, and sales of pure sportbikes are but a blip on the radar, while every manufacturer successfully sells sporty nakeds. A recent example is Suzuki’s GSX-8S that debuted last year. Powered by a new 776cc parallel-Twin also found in the V-Strom 800, the 8S proved to be both sporty and utilitarian, capable of nearly any type of riding. 

Related: Suzuki GSX-8S Review | First Ride 

And now here we are with the new GSX-8R, which is a slightly sportier version of the 8S, but it’s a far cry from something like a GSX-R. You’ll notice the new fairing, but you might not notice the new Showa suspension, accounting for the $440 price increase over its stablemate’s $8,999 MSRP.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The GSX-8R is available in Metallic Matte Sword Silver and Pearl Ignite Yellow, as well as the Metallic Triton Blue of our test bike.

“We wanted,” says Suzuki, “to create a new middle-class standard in the sport segment that achieves high levels of practicality and rider-friendliness.” 

Road and Track | Suzuki GSX-8R Review

To demonstrate the breadth of capabilities offered by the GSX-8R, Suzuki invited us to Palm Desert in California for a ride on rural and mountain roads, followed the next day by sessions at a racetrack.  

First impressions were favorable, as the 8R displays nice fit and finish details that belie its sub-$10K price tag. Three colorways are available, and I think they all look great. For my steed, I chose the Metallic Triton Blue version that best represents Suzuki’s heritage. Scaling in at 452 lb with its 3.7-gal. tank full, it’s easy enough to wheel around but not exactly light. The seat is placed at 31.9 inches. 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The GSX-8R carves corners like a sportbike but without the punishing ergonomics of a sportbike.

Our street ride took place on a chilly and damp day, climbing out of town from 440 feet above sea level on the Palms to Pines Scenic Byway, cresting at nearly 5,000 feet. I was grateful to be aboard the 8R rather than the 8S, as its fairing provided welcome shelter from the elements. The windscreen is low but reasonably effective, and I was also pleased with the airflow deflection offered by the fairing, which kept my legs shielded from the wind.  

On a typically sunny California day, this road invites horizon-tilting lean angles, but damp sections and automobile bottle-ups thwarted sporting maneuvers. It was difficult to determine if the Dunlop Roadsmart 2 tires lacked grip or if it was simply the fault of the cool pavement. I switched the bike’s ride mode from A (active) to B (basic) to help moderate throttle response in conjunction with the traction-control system, which can be set independently if desired.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
An attractive fairing is the key distinction between the GSX-8R and its naked sibling, the GSX-8S.

GEAR UP

Antilock brakes provide another level of security, although the system doesn’t benefit from an IMU, so it doesn’t feature a cornering ABS function. Regardless, the triple-disc brakes are precise, allowing a rider to deftly apply just a hint of application to scrub off 1 or 2 mph while angling into corners. The Nissin radially mounted front calipers deliver a firm lever feel despite not using braided-steel lines.  

The most frequently used rider assist on the 8R is the standard quickshifter, which allows clutchless upshifts and auto-blipping downshifts. It works reasonably well but not with the seamlessness as experienced with other quickshifters that benefit from data gathered by IMUs.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The muffler and catalytic converter are tucked away under the chassis for a cleaner appearance that exposes the 8R’s aluminum swingarm.

After descending the mountain road, we were faced with a boring straight one that provided the opportunity to settle in and evaluate the 8R’s cockpit and ergonomics.  

The tubular handlebar from the 8S is traded for a pair of clip-ons that are about 2 inches lower and a smidge farther away from a rider. They deliver a sportier riding position but one that’s a mile away from truly aggressive, similar in ergos to the GSX-S1000GT sport-tourer. A moderately tight seat-to-footpeg distance might cramp riders long of leg, but the seat proved to be comfortable after hour-long stints in the saddle. 

Related:  Suzuki GSX-S1000GT Review | Road Test 

The 5-inch TFT instrumentation from the 8S is also used on the 8R, providing a bright and readable display with a large analog tachometer. It’s a modern but basic system that is easy and intuitive to navigate via switches on the left handlebar.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The GSX-8R uses the same highly readable 5-inch color TFT instrument panel as the 8S. The lower portion can be toggled to display coolant temperature, ambient air temperature, dual tripmeters, fuel consumption, and fuel range.

Motor’n | Suzuki GSX-8R Review 

This was my first chance to sample Suzuki’s first all-new engine, and the 776cc parallel-Twin proved to be amiable and sweetly tuned. It uses the Low‐RPM Assist System that automatically increases engine speed as the clutch lever is released for smooth getaways. The patented Suzuki Cross Balancer mechanism, consisting of two counterbalancers, tames vibration beyond what’s experienced from most parallel-Twins.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The 8R’s clutch cover and magneto cover have dark gray finishes that complement the body colors, with the Suzuki name revealed in a contrasting machined silver. Note the stubby outlet from the stainless-steel exhaust system that muffles and cleans in a chamber below the chassis.

The engine is friendly and vibe-free, but what it isn’t is thrilling. It makes accessible and usable power, supplying the necessary grunt to elicit satisfaction while performing most street duties, but when pointed down a deserted road, it feels a little strangled at its top end. Power hounds will wish for more.

Suspenders Surprise | Suzuki GSX-8R Review

An upgrade from the 8S is the Showa suspension that replaces the Kayaba components. There are two surprises here. First, there isn’t any suspension adjustability other than rear preload. Second, it’s remarkable how well it works at providing comfortable bump absorption as well as respectable chassis composure.  

The 41mm Separate Function Fork-Big Piston inverted fork nicely holds up its end of the bargain with 5.1 inches of travel. The SFF-BP design uses an oil-bathed spring in one fork leg, while the other leg uses a big-piston damping circuit, which saves a bit of weight while delivering more precise damping characteristics. The link-type rear suspension incorporates a Showa shock that has a single-rate spring rather than the progressive coil on the 8S. It uses a cam-style spring-preload adjuster for easier adjustments than the more basic locking-ring design. 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The 41mm Showa SFF-BP inverted fork provides excellent front-end feedback despite its lack of adjustability. Nissin radial-mount brake calipers deliver reassuring feedback via 310mm rotors.

As set up, I noticed the rear end lacked a bit of rebound damping and consulted with Suzuki engineers. They told me the 8R is sprung for a 165-lb rider, so to accommodate for weightier American physiques, they added a step of preload on all the test bikes. My geared-up 155-lb mass doesn’t require as much spring, so I backed off the preload one position and enjoyed better rebound-damping balance.  

The final portion of our street ride was accompanied by sunny skies and dry roads that culminated in a fun descent on Montezuma Grade into Borrego Springs. Finally, we could push the 8R like a sportbike, leaning into corners briskly enough to skim the pavement with footpegs. Good front-end feedback had me salivating for exploring the bike’s limits at the twisty Chuckwalla Valley Raceway.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
A position light is placed above the stacked headlights rather than to the sides as on the 8S. A duct below the windscreen was incorporated to reduce turbulence hitting riders.

Chucky Cheese | Suzuki GSX-8R Review 

When we arrived at Chuckwalla, I smiled as I saw a row of GSX-8Rs ready for flogging and fitted with Dunlop Sportmax Q5+ tires. With warm pavement and grippier rubber, I donned my leathers and soon began dragging knees.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
Streetbike, commuter, lightweight sport-tourer, and trackday toy, the GSX-8R can do it all.

Sportbike snobs have disdain for motorcycles without aluminum frames, but just like the Kawasaki ZX-4RR I tested last year, motorcycles with steel frames have nothing to be ashamed of aside from some extra poundage. The 8R demonstrates its GSX-R heritage and provides a capable and secure platform to explore sporting limits. 

I didn’t expect a 452-lb sportbike with sport-touring ergos to comport itself so well on the racetrack, but it wasn’t the first time I’ve been mistaken, as the missus often reminds me. A firm set of trustworthy brakes combines with neutral steering responses for trustworthy composure when leaned over all the way to – and sometimes beyond – the footpegs decking out and grinding on the tarmac.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
A close look at the footpegs reveals beveled nubs, an indication of the fun that was had on the 8R as well as its racetrack limits.

GEAR UP

It’s only on the straightaways where the 8R comes up a bit short. The 776cc Twin that works so well in the V-Strom 800 and in most street scenarios with the 8S and 8R feels a bit breathless when exploring the upper reaches of the tachometer. Its redline is just shy of 10,000 rpm, but it’s claimed to produce peak power at 8,500 revs, so there’s no advantage to screaming it out. When we dyno’d the identically tuned GSX-8S, it spat out 76 hp to its rear wheel at 8,300 rpm. I discovered the 8R gathers speed better when leaving some revs on the table and shifting at 9,000 rpm.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The 8R’s speed on a racetrack is limited only by cornering clearance and mundane engine output.

Regardless, I can attest that if you took a GSX-8R to a trackday, you’d be impressed by its composure and sure-footedness while scratching pegs. Chuckwalla has a fairly smooth surface, so the rudimentary suspension wasn’t greatly taxed and held up both ends without complaint.

Sum Up | Suzuki GSX-8R Review 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The GSX-8R isn’t a fire-breathing dragon like its GSX-R siblings, but it has plenty of sporting potential.

The GSX-8R’s best attribute is that it straddles a wide line in the world of motorcycling – an all-in-one machine. It’s docile and friendly for commuting duties, but it’s also fun and engaging when ridden like a sportbike. Strap on some luggage, and it can be a reasonably comfy and capable sport-touring rig. Suzuki’s accessory line offers side cases, tankbags, a taller windscreen, and heated grips to help transport you to the next horizon in style and comfort. 

Complaints about the 8R are few. I would’ve liked to have seen a mildly hot-rodded motor to up the ante from the 8S, and an aluminum frame would’ve trimmed a few pounds from a moderately portly curb weight. An IMU and fuller suspension adjustability would be welcome additions.  

But all those things would add to Suzuki’s build costs, resulting in a bike that would likely push past $12K. In this era of ever-increasing prices, the GSX-8R’s MSRP of $9,439 hits a sweet spot of value and capabilities that set it apart from similar offerings on the market. To ease the way into 8R ownership, Suzuki is offering 1.98% introductory financing for it.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The GSX-8R is designed to appeal to riders across a wide range of ages and levels of experience.

Prior to testing the bike, the jaded and expert journalists at the launch didn’t seem terribly excited about riding what seemed to be a relatively tame motorcycle. After two days experiencing the GSX-8R on road and track, our preconceptions had been banished. It proved to be one of those rare machines that feel greater than the sum of its parts.

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Specs 

  • Base Price: $9,439  
  • Website: SuzukiCycles.com  
  • Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles  
  • Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.  
  • Displacement: 776cc  
  • Bore x Stroke: 84.0 x 70.0mm  
  • Horsepower: 82.0 @ 8,500 rpm (factory claim)  
  • Torque: 57.5 lb-ft @ 6,800 rpm (factory claim)  
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch  
  • Final Drive: Chain  
  • Wheelbase: 57.7 in.  
  • Rake/Trail: 25.0 degrees/4.1 in.  
  • Seat Height: 31.9 in.  
  • Wet Weight: 452 lb (factory claim)  
  • Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gal 

See all of Rider‘s Suzuki coverage here.

The post 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | First Ride  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Returning 2024 Honda Motorcycles | First Look 

2024 Honda CBR600RR Grand Prix Red
The CBR600RR in Grand Prix Red joins the list of returning 2024 Honda motorcycles in the company’s latest announcement.

Joining an already growing list of 2024 Honda motorcycles are 11 returning models. Included in Honda’s latest announcement are color options, pricing, and availability. 

This announcement adds to the list of new, updated, and returning models for 2024, including the new 2024 Honda Transalp middleweight adventure bike, which we tested in November, and the updated 2024 Shadow Phantom bobber-style cruiser, which we tested in September. See the previous Honda announcement for news on other returning models, including the Gold Wing family, the Rebel family, the NC750X, the Fury, and others. 

Related: 2024 Honda Transalp Review | Video 

Related: 2024 Honda Shadow Phantom Review | First Ride 

CBR1000RR | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda CBR1000RR Grand Prix Red
2024 Honda CBR1000RR in Grand Prix Red

The 2024 Honda CBR1000RR sportbike is powered by a 998cc inline 4-cylinder engine with dual-stage fuel injection. The RR also boasts a TFT display, full LED lighting, and your choice of ABS or conventional brakes. 

The 2024 Honda CBR1000RR will be available in Grand Prix Red for $16,699 without ABS and $16,999 with ABS, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in March. 

CBR600RR | 2024 Honda Motorcycles  

2024 Honda CBR600RR Grand Prix Red
2024 Honda CBR600RR in Grand Prix Red

With eight World Supersport titles under its belt, the Honda CBR600RR returns for 2024, ready to take on the racetrack or your favorite canyon roads with its high-revving inline four-cylinder engine and high-performance Showa suspension. 

The 2024 Honda CBR600RR will be available in Grand Prix Red for $12,199 without ABS and $13,199 with ABS, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in March. 

CB1000R | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda CB1000R Black
2024 Honda CB1000R in Black

The CB1000R naked streetfighter is a versatile machine with the power and torque of a liter bike and an open, upright riding position. It’s powered by a 998cc inline four-cylinder engine and has a blacked-out design. 

Related: Honda CB1000R | Road Test Review 

The 2024 CB1000R will be available in Black for $12,999, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in March. 

SCL500 | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda SCL500 Candy Orange
2024 Honda SCL500 in Candy Orange

Released last year, the scrambler-style SCL500 is built for fun and features the same 500cc parallel-Twin from the Rebel 500, an upright riding position, a flat seat, and a high-mounted exhaust. The SCL500 also lends itself to personalization through Honda’s range of SCL500-tailored accessories. 

Related: 2023 Honda SCL500 Review | First Ride 

2024 Honda SCL500 Matte Black Metallic
2024 Honda SCL500 in Matte Black Metallic

The 2024 Honda SCL500 will be available in Candy Orange, Matte Laurel Green Metallic, or Matte Black Metallic (new color for 2024) for $6,799, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in April. 

2024 Honda SCL500 Matte Laurel Green Metallic
2024 Honda SCL500 in Matte Laurel Green Metallic

PCX | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda PCX Matte Brown Metallic
2024 Honda PCX i Matte Brown Metallic

Designed for urban environments, the Honda PCX scooter features a liquid-cooled 157cc Single, convenient underseat storage, and standard front-wheel ABS. 

The 2024 Honda PCX will be available in Matte Brown Metallic with an MSRP of $4,249, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in April. 

CRF300L | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda CRF300L Red
2024 Honda CRF300L in Red

The Honda CRF300L is an approachable dual-sport that provides an entry point for riders new to off-road riding. It’s powered by a liquid-cooled 286cc Single, and it’s available with or without ABS, as well as a low-seat ABS version. 

Related: Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally | First Ride Review 

2024 Honda CRF300LS Swift Gray
2024 Honda CRF300LS in Swift Gray

The 2024 Honda CRF300L will be available in Red with an MSRP of $5,749 with ABS and $5,449 without ABS. The CRF300LS low-seat version will be available in Swift Gray with an MSRP of $5,749. These models will arrive at dealerships in April. 

CRF300L Rally | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda CRF300L Rally Red
2024 Honda CRF300L Rally in Red

The Rally version of the CRF300L dual-sport features comfort-focused enhancements like a windscreen, handguards, and larger fuel tank. Like the CRF300L, the Rally also comes with the option of ABS. 

Related: Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally | First Ride Review 

The 2024 Honda CRF300L Rally will be available in Red with an MSRP of $6,499 with ABS or $6,199 without ABS, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in April. 

XR650L | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda XR650L White
2024 Honda XR650L in White

Introduced in 1993, the Honda XR650L dual-sport features a simple design with a focus on reliability. It’s powered by an air-cooled 644cc Single and features a rugged steel frame and long-travel suspension, built to perform in the dirt while being street-legal for around-town transportation. 

The 2024 Honda XR650L will be available in White with an MSRP of $6,999, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in March. 

XR150L | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda XR150L Black
2024 Honda XR150L in Black

For a more affordable dual-sport option, the XR150L features an air-cooled 149cc Single, an approachable and accessible design, and a convenient rear cargo rack, ideal for around-town commuting or transportation around the campground. 

2024 Honda XR150L White
2024 Honda XR150L in White

The 2024 Honda XR150L will be available in Black or White with an MSRP of $3,099, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in February. 

Trail125 | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda Trail125 Turmeric Yellow
2024 Honda Trail125 in Turmeric Yellow

The Trail125 minimoto nods to Trail models of the 1960s with a classic design, but its current version includes convenient modern features like fuel injection, an electric starter, and front-wheel ABS. 

The 2024 Trail125 will be available in Turmeric Yellow with an MSRP of $4,099, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in March. 

Montesa | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda Montesa Cota 4RT301RR White
2024 Honda Montesa Cota 4RT301RR in White

The Montesa Cota 4RT trials bike has been tested and proven to perform, capturing an FIM World Trials Championship Crown in the hands of Toni Bou. It features top-shelf Showa suspension, programmed fuel injection, and a dual-map ECU. The Montesa comes in the competition-ready 4RT301RR version and the standard 4RT260R. 

2024 Honda Montesa Cota 4RT260R Red
2024 Honda Montesa Cota 4RT260R in Red

The 2024 Honda Montesa Cota 4RT301RR will be available in White or Red with an MSRP of $11,899, and the Montesa Cota 4RT260R will be available in Red with an MSRP of $9,299. These two models will arrive in dealerships in February. 

For more information, visit the Honda website

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide  

The post Returning 2024 Honda Motorcycles | First Look  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS and Z7 Hybrid ABS Review | First Look 

2024 Kawasaki Z7 Hybrid ABS and Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS
2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS (left) and Kawasaki Z7 Hybrid ABS (right)

No one can stop the wheel of time from turning, and that wheel is turning away from internal combustion engines (ICE) and toward alternative power sources. As the world investigates cleaner fuel options, motorcycle brands are following suit. Kawasaki released the Ninja e-1 and Z e-1 fully electric bikes last year, and adding to the range of power options are the new Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS and Z7 Hybrid ABS models, both of which employ an ICE and an electric motor to produce power. 

Related: Kawasaki Announces Ninja e-1 ABS and Z e-1 ABS Electric Motorcycles, Other Updated Models 

Kawasaki says these bikes as the first “strong” hybrid motorcycles, meaning they can run on ICE power, electric power, or both depending on the ride mode selected. Being able to select which power source is used at any given time allows riders to choose if they want a full-power experience or a fuel-efficient and zero-emission ride. Providing both in one motorcycle takes some ingenuity, and while the styling of these bikes will remind one of recognizable Ninja and Z-series motorcycles, the inner workings are different than what you’re used to. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS
2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS

This First Look Review covers both the Ninja 7 and the Z7 Hybrid bikes, as these two motorcycles are essentially the same with some cosmetic differences. Like other Kawasaki models in the Ninja and Z-series families, the Ninja variant has full bodywork while the Z7 has less. One other difference is that the Z7 has a higher handlebar for a more upright riding position, although the handlebar on the Ninja 7 Hybrid is also raised higher than on other Ninjas. The rest of the details below will be the same for both hybrid motorcycles. 

2024 Kawasaki Z7 Hybrid ABS
2024 Kawasaki Z7 Hybrid ABS

Engine & Motor | Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS and Z7 Hybrid ABS 

The ICE unit in these bikes is the liquid-cooled 451cc parallel-Twin taken from the Kawasaki Eliminator. The engine prioritizes high-rpm performance, and the Integrated Starter Generator is a first for Kawasaki and combines starter and generator functions. The electric power source is a liquid-cooled traction motor paired with a 48V lithium-ion battery pack and rated at 7.0 kW (9.0 kW max). Unlike fully electric vehicles, the battery on these bikes charges while riding, so there’s no need to plug in to a power source before your ride. 

Related: 2024 Kawasaki Eliminator Review | Video 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS Engine and Motor

The battery pack is located beneath the seat. The Integrated Starter Generator is on the left side of the ICE, and the ECU is in the tail section. All of this is placed within a lightweight trellis frame. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS Right Side

Chassis | Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS and Z7 Hybrid ABS 

Suspension on both bikes is provided by a nonadjustable 41mm telescopic fork and a new Uni-Trak suspension with linkage positioned below the swingarm in the rear. The rear suspension also offers adjustable ride height (seat height is 31.3 inches). Both bikes use dual 300mm front disc brakes with 2-piston calipers and a single 220mm rear disc with a 1-piston caliper, and both come with ABS. Kawasaki claims that the ergonomics of these bikes optimize low- and medium-speed maneuvers. The fuel tank holds 3.7 gallons of fuel, and curb weight for the Ninja 7 is claimed at 502.7 lb (weight for the Z7 is not available). 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS Frame

Ride Modes | Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS and Z7 Hybrid ABS 

The versatility of these two hybrid bikes is accessed through the three ride modes: Sport-Hybrid, Eco-Hybrid, and EV modes. As the name suggests, Sport-Hybrid mode is designed for sporty riding, and gives the rider access to the bike’s full power potential. In Eco-Hybrid mode, the electric motor kicks in during startup and transitions from electric to hybrid power once the engine gets up to around 2,000 rpm, optimizing fuel efficiency. For all-electric power, EV mode is designed for low-speed and short-distance rides and can only be engaged when the bike is in 4th gear or lower and with a speed of less than 15 mph. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS Windshield
Both hybrid models come with a windshield.

Unlike most ICE-powered motorcycles, the Ninja 7 Hybrid and Z7 Hybrid feature an electronically controlled 6-speed transmission – no clutch lever or left-foot shift lever is included. In Sport-Hybrid and Eco-Hybrid ride modes, riders have the option to operate the transmission manually with shift buttons on the left switchgear. The hydraulic clutch is controlled by the ECU to operate automatically. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS Left Switchgear
Ride mode selection, manual/automatic selection, and shift buttons are located on the left switchgear.
2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS Right Switchgear
The e-boost functionality is activated with a button on the right switchgear.

Rider Aids and Other Technologies | Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS and Z7 Hybrid ABS 

Since the ride modes put power to the ground in different ways, they each have distinct functions and rider aids available that contribute to the riding experience. In Sport-Hybrid mode, the e-boost function elevates the overall output for a brief 5-second period, providing a burst of power that Kawasaki claims matches that of a 650cc-class motorcycle. This function can be activated while riding or when stopped for a more thrilling acceleration off a standing start. 

2024 Kawasaki Z7 Hybrid ABS

These two bikes are also equipped with an Automatic Launch Position Finder. This feature automatically drops the transmission down to 1st gear when the bike comes to a stop, and the system can be deactivated for riders who prefer more manual control. 

Adding to this growing list of technologies is Walk Mode with a reverse function. This mode allows for easy maneuvering in a parking lot or garage and propels the bike at a speed of 2 mph. Closing the throttle beyond the “zero” position kicks the bike into reverse, again no faster than 2 mph. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS Dash

The Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid and Z7 Hybrid come with a 4.3-inch TFT full-color display with Bluetooth connectivity to a smartphone via Rideology the App. The screen’s background transitions from white to black depending on ambient lighting, or it can be set to white or black for personal preference. The brightness also adjusts automatically. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS Seat

Through smartphone connectivity, riders can access a list of data and options through Kawasaki’s app, including vehicle information, a GPS-informed riding log, call or mail notifications on the display, a maintenance log, and the ability to share riding logs and location with other Rideology the App users. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS Dash

Styling and Pricing | Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS and Z7 Hybrid ABS 

The styling of these bikes merges recognizable Ninja and Z-series styling with a futuristic hybrid aesthetic. They both come equipped with a windshield to help deflect wind from the rider and passenger. All lighting is LED. 

2024 Kawasaki Z7 Hybrid ABS and Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS
2024 Kawasaki Z7 Hybrid ABS (left) and Kawasaki Ninja Hybrid ABS (right)

Both bikes come in a silver with lime-green color scheme. Pricing has not yet been announced. 

Find more information at the Kawasaki website

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide  

The post 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS and Z7 Hybrid ABS Review | First Look  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

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2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500, Z500, KLX230 S, and KLX230SM Review | First Look 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500
2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 KRT Edition in Lime Green / Ebony

Kawasaki updates its 2024 lineup with a new Ninja 500 sportbike and Z500 naked bike using the 451cc parallel-Twin found in the sport-cruiser Kawasaki Eliminator. It has also updated the Kawasaki KLX230 S dual-sport and KLX230SM supermoto. 

Related: 2024 Kawasaki Eliminator Review | First Ride 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 and Z500 

2024 Kawasaki Z500 ABS
2024 Kawasaki Z500 ABS in Candy Lime Green / Metallic Flat Spark Black / Metallic Graphite Gray

Kawasaki adds to its Ninja family of motorcycles with the 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 and the Z500 naked version. These two new motorcycles come in standard as well as SE versions with special features, and they both include a 451cc parallel-Twin, new styling, a new LCD instrument panel, and a new seat shape. 

Engine | 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 and Z500 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500
2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 SE ABS in Passion Red / Metallic Flat Spark Black / Metallic Matte Dark Gray

The Ninja 500 and Z500 are powered by the liquid-cooled 451cc parallel-Twin found in the Kawasaki Eliminator sport-cruiser introduced last year. Adapted from the same engine found in the Ninja 400, this engine adds 52cc of displacement for better acceleration and performance at high rpm due to a lengthened stroke of 6.8mm. Also new to the 500s are a new crankshaft, connecting rods, and pistons suitable for the larger displacement. Additionally, the top ring land of the aluminum pistons now features a hard alumite treatment suitable for higher pressure. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500
The 451cc parallel-Twin powering the Ninja 500 and Z500 is adopted from the Kawasaki Eliminator sport-cruiser.

Chassis | 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 and Z500 

The Ninja 500 and Z500 feature a trellis frame with the engine as a stressed member and with a supersport-style short-wheelbase/long-swingarm configuration. The wheelbase is 54.1 inches, and seat heigh is 30.9 inches. The Ninja 500 weighs 377 lb, while the Z500 with less bodywork comes in at 368 lb. Fuel capacity is 3.7 gallons. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500
2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 in Metallic Spark Black / Metallic Flat Raw Graystone

Both bikes feature a nonadjustable 41mm telescopic front fork. In the rear is a bottom-link Uni-Trak suspension unit with five-step preload adjustability using an included tool kit. Braking power comes in the form of a single 310mm front disc gripped by a 2-piston caliper and a single 220mm rear disc with a 2-piston caliper. The star-pattern 5-spoke wheels help keep weight low. 

2024 Kawasaki Z500 ABS
2024 Kawasaki Z500 SE ABS in Candy Persimmon Red/Metallic Flat Spark Black / Metallic Matte Graphenesteel Gray

The Ninja 500 features an elevated position of its clip-on handlebars along with a slightly foot-forward footpeg placement for a relaxed rider triangle. The handlebar on the Z500 is taller and wider for a more upright riding position. Kawasaki claims the ergonomics on both bikes is intended to provide a balance between comfort and a sporty attitude to satisfy a wide range of rider needs. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500

Technology | 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 and Z500 

Also new for the 500s is a high-contrast LCD instrument panel that displays odometer, gear position indicator, fuel gauge, dual trip meters, remaining range, current and average fuel consumption, coolant temperature, clock, connected device notification, service indicator, and the economical riding indicator. This last feature appears on the LCD screen to signal favorable fuel consumption conditions so that riders can optimize fuel efficiency. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500

Through Rideology the App, riders can access vehicle info, a riding log, smartphone notifications, a maintenance log, and the ability to share location and riding logs with other app users. 

Styling | 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 and Z500 

Styling is where the Ninja 500 and the Z500 diverge. The Ninja 500 features a redesigned front end and large-volume bodywork inherited from larger-displacement Ninjas, along with compact LED headlights, built-in front turnsignals, and an LED taillight with a new design. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500
2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 SE 40th Anniversary Edition ABS in Lime Green / Pearl Crystal White / Blue

The Z500 features less bodywork, as well as a triple LED headlight configuration that acts as a styling focal point. The two upper headlights serve as low beams while the lower headlight acts as the high beam. The Z500 also features a new LED taillight. 

2024 Kawasaki Z500 ABS
The 2024 Kawasaki Z500 ABS features a triple LED headlight.

The SE versions of the Ninja 500 and Z500 add a variety of upgrades. The SE versions of both bikes feature a full color TFT display, a USB-C outlet, a radiator screen, frame sliders, a pillion seat cover, a tank pad, and knee-grip pads. Also included on the Ninja 500 SE is a large clear windscreen and Kawasaki’s Intelligent Proximity Activation Start System, which uses a key fob to allow riders to remotely release the bike’s steering lock and main switch. The Z500 SE comes with a smoke-colored meter cover. 

Pricing | 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 and Z500 

The 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 comes standard in Metallic Spark Black / Metallic Flat Raw Graystone for $5,299. The KRT Edition adds $200. The ABS version is available in Metallic Spark Black / Metallic Flat Raw Graystone, White Silver / Metallic Moondust Gray, or Passion Red / Metallic Flat Spark Black / Metallic Matte Dark Gray from $5,699-5,899. The SE ABS and KRT SE ABS versions come in Passion Red / Metallic Flat Spark Black / Metallic Matte Dark Gray for $6,399. The SE 40th Anniversary Edition ABS comes in Lime Green / Pearl Crystal White / Blue for $6,599. 

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500
2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500 ABS in White Silver / Metallic Moondust Gray

The 2024 Kawasaki Z500 ABS comes in Candy Lime Green / Metallic Flat Spark Black / Metallic Graphite Gray for $5,599, and the SE ABS version comes in Candy Persimmon Red / Metallic Flat Spark Black / Metallic Matte Graphenesteel Gray for $6,299. 

All Kawasaki Ninja 500 and Z500 variations are available now. Visit the Kawasaki website for more information. 


2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S and KLX230SM 

2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S
2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S in Lime Green

The Kawasaki KLX230 S dual-sport and KLX230SM supermoto models, first introduced in 2020, also receive updates for 2024. The most notable updates for these two models are found in the chassis and the revised rear subframe, along with some other updates to the ABS system, styling, seat, and added smartphone connectivity. 

Related: 2024 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM | First Look Review 

Engine | 2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S and KLX230SM 

2024 Kawasaki KLX230SM
The 2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S and KLX230SM are powered by an air-cooled 232cc Single.

Powering the KLX230 S and KLX230SM is an air-cooled 233cc Single with a bore and stroke of 67.0mm x 66.0mm. The long stroke offers good low-to-mid-range torque. The intake port is 4mm narrower for 2024 (now measuring 33mm) to help contribute to low-to-mid-range performance. These bikes use a 6-speed transmission with a 45/14 final gear ratio selected for a balance of road and trail riding. 

Chassis | 2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S and KLX230SM 

Both models ride on a high-tensile steel perimeter frame, and for 2024, the rear subframe has been redesigned to trace a lower line on the machine, allowing for longer wheel travel while maintaining good ground reach. Both bikes have a 53.7-inch wheelbase. Ground clearance on the KLX230 S is 9.5 inches, while on the KLX230SM it’s 8.7 inches. 

2024 Kawasaki KLX230SM
2024 Kawasaki KLX230SM in Battle Gray

On the KLX230 S, a 37mm telescopic fork provides 7.9 inches of travel. A new Uni-Trak rear linkage shock allows 8.9 inches of travel and is preload adjustable. Additionally, a new aluminum swingarm is 2.6 lb lighter than the previous swingarm. The new chassis design has allowed for a lower seat height of 33.3 inches, and the sidestand has also been shortened to match the lower seat height. 

2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S
2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S in Battle Gray

The KLX230 SM, designed more for on-road use than its KLX230 S brethren, uses a 37mm inverted fork up front with 7.4 inches of front wheel travel. Like the KLX230 S, the SM adds the Uni-Trak rear linkage shock with preload adjustability. For 2024, suspension settings were revised to create a more forward-leaning posture and increase rear wheel travel to 8.8 inches. To accommodate on-road riding, the SM comes with stiffer spring settings, and the off-road footpegs from the 230S are replaced with standard footpegs with rubber pads on the SM. The SM’s seat height is 33.1 inches. 

2024 Kawasaki KLX230SM
The 2024 Kawasaki KLX230SM and KLX230 S feature a new compact LED headlight.

The 2024 Kawaski KLX230 S rides on aluminum wheels, measuring 21 inches in the front and 18 inches in the rear compared to the Kawasaki KLX230SM’s 17-inch front and rear wheels that are wider than the KLX230 S wheels. The dual-sport KLX230 S comes with a 240mm front petal disc gripped by a 2-piston caliper, while the supermoto KLX230SM uses a 300mm front petal disc and 2-piston caliper. Both bikes feature the same 220mm rear disc with single-piston caliper. 

Technology | 2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S and KLX230SM 

The KLX230 S dual-sport comes standard without ABS, and an ABS version is available, while the KLX230SM supermoto comes standard with ABS. The ABS unit has been updated for 2024 with a switch on the left side of the handlebar that can be used to disable both front and rear ABS. When the bike is turned off and back on, ABS returns to default. 

2024 Kawasaki KLX230SM

Both bikes feature a new compact LED headlight and a redesigned two-toned seat with a flatter silhouette that allows more freedom of movement. Additionally, the bodywork has been smoothed over to eliminate some protruding parts. The 2-gallon fuel tank has also been redesigned.  

2024 Kawasaki KLX230SM
The LCD display offers additional functionality through Rideology the App.

Also new for 2024 is smartphone connectivity through Rideology the App. The app gives riders access to vehicle information, a GPS-informed riding log, smartphone notifications on the LCD display screen, a maintenance log, and communication sharing with other app users. 

Pricing | 2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S and KLX230SM 

2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S
2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S in Lime Green

The 2024 Kawasaki KLX230 S comes in Lime Green / Battle Gray for $4,999 without ABS or $5,299 with ABS. The 2024 Kawasaki KLX230SM supermoto variant comes in Battle Gray for $5,599. Both bikes are available now. 

Visit the Kawasaki website for more information. 

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide  

The post 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 500, Z500, KLX230 S, and KLX230SM Review | First Look  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Triumph Daytona 660 Review | First Look 

2024 Triumph Daytona 660 Red Carnival
2024 Triumph Daytona 660 in Red Carnival

Following up on the success of Triumph’s other middleweights, including the Trident 660 roadster and the Tiger Sport 660 adventure sport-tourer, Triumph has revealed a new Triple-powered middleweight sportbike for 2024, the Triumph Daytona 660.  

Related: 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Ride Review 

At the unveiling of the Daytona 660, Alastair Fairgrieve, Triumph’s global product marketing manager, said the name was originally chosen to honor Buddy Elmore’s victory on a Triumph in the 1966 Daytona 200, where Elmore came from the 46th on the grid to win the race. 

The name has appeared in various iterations of Triumph motorcycles over the subsequent years and returns in 2024 with the Daytona 660, which features a liquid-cooled 660cc inline-Triple with DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, and a 240-degree firing order. It makes a claimed 94 hp at 11,250 rpm (17% higher than the Trident 660), with redline at 12,650 rpm, and 51 lb-ft of torque at 8,250 rpm (9% more than the Trident), with more than 80% of the torque available from 3,125 rpm.

2024 Triumph Daytona 660

The bike has a 6-speed gearbox, throttle-by-wire, a slip/assist clutch, and 3-into-1 exhaust with a low stainless-steel silencer. Triumph’s Shift Assist is available as an accessory fit for clutchless up- and downshifts. 

2024 Triumph Daytona 660 Snowdonia White
2024 Triumph Daytona 660 in Snowdonia White

Stuart Wood, chief engineer of concept and electrical at Triumph, said the Dayton 660 is focused for “real-world use.” 

“Everything we do inspires us,” Wood said. “(With) everything we do at the highest level … we’re learning, and we’re getting more into the engine. We’re looking for better economy, cleaner, and more performance all the time. And I think we’ve delivered fairly well on this one.” 

2024 Triumph Daytona 660

See all of Rider‘s Triumph coverage here.

The Triumph Daytona 660 has three ride modes – Sport, Road and Rain – each offering a different throttle response and level of traction control intervention, with Sport mode geared toward more aggressive road riding or track sessions. The traction control system can be turned off for riders who prefer complete freedom from electronic intervention, and a new Emergency Deceleration Warning system activates the hazard lights to alert other drivers during heavy braking. 

2024 Triumph Daytona 660

Stopping power comes from twin 4-piston radial calipers biting 310mm floating discs up front and a single-piston sliding caliper and 220 fixed disc in the rear. ABS is standard. An inverted nonadjustable Showa SFF-BP (Separate Function Fork-Big Piston) fork provides 4.3 inches of travel, and a Showa rear monoshock offers 5.1 inches of travel and preload adjustability. When asked about the lack of adjustment on the front fork, Triumph Chief Product Officer Steve Sargent said that when supersport bikes evolved to become more track-focused, they became more tech- and spec-laden.  

2024 Triumph Daytona 660

“The price point moved up to a point where the (middleweight) class really kind of disappeared because they got to a price point where they were not that far away from the cost of going to a larger capacity machine,” he said. “But they weren’t delivering the same kind of performance.” 

Sargent said it became a question of delivering the balance between the specification and the price that a customer really wants. 

“So that’s the way we’ve ended up with this bike,” he said. “We think this really hits the mark.”      

2024 Triumph Daytona 660

Ergonomics also reflect the idea of “real-world use.” Clip-on bars are positioned above the top yoke, and footpegs have been moved slightly up and back for a balance of comfort and cornering clearance. Separate rider and passenger seats, with a rider seat height of 31.9 inches and a narrow stand-over make the Daytona 660 manageable for riders of all sizes, and an accessory low seat is also available, lowering the seat height almost an inch to 30.9 inches. The bike rides on five-spoke cast aluminum wheels wrapped in Michelin’s new Power 6 tires. 

2024 Triumph Daytona 660

The Daytona 660 has twin LED headlights that incorporate a central air intake, as well as a contoured LED taillight. The bike has a color TFT screen integrated into a white-on-black LCD display that is compatible with the accessory fit My Triumph Connectivity System, which enables turn-by-turn navigation plus phone and music interaction. 

2024 Triumph Daytona 660 Satin Granite
2024 Triumph Daytona 660 in Satin Granite

The 2024 Triumph Daytona 660 will come in Carnival Red, Satin Granite, and Snowdonia White starting at $9,195, available in dealers in March 2024. 

Check out more new bikes in Rider‘s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide 

The post 2024 Triumph Daytona 660 Review | First Look  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com