Tag Archives: Sport Motorcycle Reviews

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory | First Ride Review

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review
The 2021 Aprilia RSV4 and RSV4 Factory (above) were completely redesigned. (Photography by Larry Chen Photo)

Aprilia’s RSV4 is a bike that, like a fine wine, only gets better with age. Racing has always been a driving factor in the design of Aprilia’s sportbikes. The RSV4 was introduced for 2009 to compete in World Superbike, and Max Biaggi stood atop the podium nine times that season and won the championship in 2010. Four years later, the RSV4 was ridden to another WSBK championship by Sylvain Guintoli.

With racing in its DNA, it’s only natural that advancements made on the track influence design and engineering of models ridden by the general public, from advanced electronics to downforce-producing bodywork. The Aprilia RSV4 and RSV4 Factory underwent a ground-up redesign for 2021, giving us an opportunity to see how this racy red Italian wine tastes a decade on.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review
2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory in Aprilia Black (left) and 2021 Aprilia RSV4 in Dark Losail (right).

It’s been a few years since I through a leg over a RSV4, so I was interested to see how the folks back in Noale, Italy, improved an already great motorcycle. And what better place to stretch its legs than the legendary WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca in Monterey, California, home of the famous Corkscrew. Laguna Seca has a long history of Superbike racing, plus it’s a favorite track for many of us. If only the fog weren’t so cold and damp, conditions would have been perfect.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Before we get to how the bikes work, let’s take a look at what’s new. Last year, Aprilia’s two RSV4 models had engines with different displacements, with the FIM-homologated RSV4 1100 RR boasting 1,000cc (and a claimed 201 horsepower) and the RSV4 1100 Factory living up to its name with 1,077cc (and 217 horsepower). Aprilia simplified things for 2021, equipping the RSV4 and RSV4 Factory with the same 1,099cc, 65-degree V-4 engine — with an extra 22cc of displacement courtesy of a slightly longer 53.3mm stroke, up from 52.3 — that Aprilia says still cranks out an eye-watering 217 horsepower at 13,000 rpm and 92 lb-ft of torque at 10,500 rpm, even while meeting strict Euro 5 emissions regulations.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

The V-4 architecture allows the engine to be narrow while still offering the power-producing benefit of four cylinders. To keep the engine as light as possible, the crankshaft was made lighter and the external housings, oil sump and cylinder head covers are made of magnesium. To keep the engine as compact as possible, the cam chain drives the intake camshaft and a gear on the intake camshaft drives the exhaust camshaft. To maximize the engine’s rigidity, the crankcase is a monoblock design with integrated aluminum cylinder liners. And to minimize vibration, a countershaft cancels out engine imbalances. A new Magneti Marelli ECU 11MP allows more complex algorithms to be processed at a faster speed, and a new exhaust system not only satisfies Euro 5 but is lighter than its predecessor.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

With well over 200 horsepower on tap, electronics allow the riding experience on the RSV4s to be tailored the rider’s skill level and preferences. Guided by a Bosch 6-axis IMU, the APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) suite does crazy fast calculations to optimize the bike’s dynamic behavior while offering a wide range of adjustability. Fifth-generation APRC includes: ATC (Aprilia Traction Control, 8 levels adjustable on the fly), AWC (Aprilia Wheelie Control, 5 levels adjustable on the fly), AEM (Aprilia Engine Map, 3 to choose from), AEB (Aprilia Engine Brake, a new feature with 3 levels that take lean angle into account), ALC (Aprilia Launch Control, 3 settings for track use), AQS (Aprilia Quick Shift), APL (Aprilia Pit Limiter) and ACC (Aprilia Cruise Control). Everything comes together with the six riding modes, with three for the street (Street, Sport and customizable User) and three for the track (Race and customizable Track 1 and Track 2).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

That hardworking IMU also provides input for the Bosch 9.1 MP cornering ABS, which ensures maximum safety on the road and exceptional performance on the track. Co-developed between Aprilia and Bosch, it offers three levels of intervention and works in conjunction with Aprilia RLM (Rear Lift Mitigation) to keep the rear tire on the ground during hard braking.

We’re not done yet.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Whereas the standard RSV4 features fully adjustable Sachs suspension, the RSV4 Factory is equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension, with a 43mm NIX upside-down fork, a TTX rear shock and an electronic steering damper. An array of sensors and servo motors adjust compression and rebound damping automatically as you ride, adapting to changing conditions. There are two modes — semi-active and manual — and three suspension maps for each mode, and Öhlins’ OBTi (Objective Based Tuning Interface) simplifies pushbutton adjustments. Both RSV4 models are perfectly capable of delivering effective feel and control in any situation, but the standard RSV4 requires manual changes while the Factory’s setup can be changed on the fly with the touch of a button (preload must be manually adjusted on both models).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Perhaps it goes without saying that the RSV4 is smarter than I am. I’ve done a lot of racing over the years, including the Isle of Man TT, back when control was all in the wrist and I had to rely on my own brain rather than the motorcycle’s to keep me out of trouble. But things can and do go wrong from time to time, and I have come to appreciate not only the helping hand but also the convenience and customization that modern electronics provide.

Because most changes can be made on the fly, I was able to try out various setups without having to return to the paddock. Pressing a button on the right cluster below the kill switch changes the riding mode, while a four-button setup on the left makes adjustments within each mode. A lever on the bottom of the left cluster adjusts traction control, and a switch on the top of the left cluster adjusts both cruise control and wheelie control. There wasn’t much cruising going on at Laguna Seca, but there were plenty of wheelies that needed to be tamed! And a new 5-inch full-color TFT display, which offers Road and Track screens, provides an easy-to-read mission control.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Aprilia revised the RSV4’s chassis and bodywork as well. To optimize strength, rigidity and feedback, the twin-beam aluminum frame uses both cast and pressed-and-welded elements. The cast aluminum swingarm has a new lower reinforcing brace for added stiffness and uses three welded sections instead of seven, reducing unsprung weight by 1.3 pounds. Unique among production sportbikes is the degree of adjustment possible with the RSV4’s chassis, including engine position, headstock angle, swingarm pivot and rear ride height. Chassis geometry has been tweaked slightly to improve handling, and to keep mass centralized mass, most of the RSV4’s fuel is carried under the rider’s seat.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Inspired by the Aprilia RS 660, the new RSV4 is more aerodynamic, with revised bodywork, a larger windscreen and new winglets built into the double-wall fairing that provide more wind protection for the rider, more downforce and a 7% increase in airbox pressure. Revisions to the lower cowling help improve cornering agility and reduce cross wind buffeting. A new fuel tank provides more support during braking and cornering and has a deeper chin perch for getting behind the windscreen when fully tucked in. Seat height was reduced by 9mm and the footpegs were lowered by 10mm, yet cornering clearance increased by 1.5 degrees on both sides thanks to narrower pegs. All this adds up to a more comfortable cockpit, especially for someone my size (5 feet, 10 inches).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

The RSV4 has always been a looker, and the new bodywork only enhances its go-fast, form-follows-function stance. The front lighting application is what really stuck out to me. New DRL light rails that run under and up the sides of the LED cat-eye headlights really make it pop, and cornering lights add visibility during nighttime riding. And the exhaust muffler looks the business. The Factory is available in either Lava Red or Aprilia Black (shown), while the standard RSV4 comes in Dark Losail. The Factory also rolls on light, strong, five-spoke forged and machined aluminum wheels rather the three-spoke cast aluminum wheels on the standard model.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

After a few laps on the RSV4 Factory I realized this bike is seriously fast. The smooth nature and low growling sound of the V-4 were deceptive, making me think I was going slower than I actually was. With 80% of peak torque available in the midrange, you don’t have to rev the engine into the stratosphere to get a strong pull out of corners. And it continues to pull even harder as the revs pick up heading down the straight to the next corner. The new Brembo Stylema monoblock radial front calipers paired with 330mm rotors were perfectly capable of slowing things down. Front brake action was superb, allowing me to modulate the needed pressure to control corner entry with plenty of feel and braking power.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

I started the day in Race mode, which had a rather abrupt throttle response, but switching to Street mode smoothed things right out. As the day progressed, I ended up back in the Race and Track modes because, once I found my groove, it’s never fast enough, right? Unlike the Track modes, the three road-going modes tame power delivery for everyday riding, like commuting (don’t forget the cruise control!) or riding through town on your way to the good stuff, with the APRC electronics on standby in the background.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

In terms of handling, the RSV4 and RSV4 Factory are perfectly suited to a challenging track like Laguna Seca. The RSV4 has always offered positive feedback to the rider, and the latest iteration is even better, allowing me to attack corners with complete confidence. Leaned over in the middle of a corner, the bike felt planted and told me exactly what was going on. Under hard braking the RSV4 never got out of shape, and with three levels of engine braking I could explore how much to let the rear step out.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

I managed to get the RSV4 out of shape a few times on hard exits, especially coming out of Turn 2. The bike started to lift the front and I could feel the rear starting to let go, but before things went pear-shaped the wheelie control and traction control kicked in and kept me from ending the day early. The quickshifter with auto-blip downshifting is almost like cheating; just move your foot and the shift is made up or down with no clutch and no hesitation (it’s adjustable too).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Although the RSV4 Factory performed exceptionally, I struggled with the bike squatting on hard corner exits. Since the day got off to a late start due to a foggy and damp morning, we lost some valuable track time. The bike I was on seemed a little out of balance front to rear, but more preload at the rear remedied the problem. Fine-tuning is part of the process when you’re trying to squeeze every bit of performance out of a race-ready sportbike.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

For conoisseurs, Aprilia’s latest RSV4 and RSV4 Factory offer robust, full-bodied vintages suitable for different budgets and tastes. The standard RSV4 has an MSRP of $18,999, whereas the RSV4 Factory has an MSRP of $25,999, with the extra lira paying for the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension and primo forged wheels. Enjoy responsibly.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory Specs

Base Price: $25,999
Website: aprilia.com

ENGINE
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 65-degree V-4, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,099cc
Bore x Stroke: 81.0 x 53.3mm
Compression Ratio: 13.6:1
Horsepower: 217 @ 13,000 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 92 lb-ft @ 10,500 rpm (claimed)
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated wet slipper clutch
Final Drive: Chain

CHASSIS
Frame: Aluminum dual-beam with pressed & cast sheet elements, cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 56.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.6 degrees/4.1 in.
Seat Height: 33.3 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm USD fork, electronically adj., 4.9 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, electronically adj., 4.5 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 330mm floating discs w/ 4-piston opposed radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 220mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Forged aluminum, 3.5 x 17 in.
Rear: Forged aluminum, 6 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 200/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 445 lbs. (claimed, 90% fuel)
Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gals.

The post 2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
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2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 | First Look Review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 in Metallic Triton Blue

Just a few months after announcing the updated-for-2022 Suzuki Hayabusa, Suzuki has unveiled another updated sportbike. The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is a naked sportbike powered by an updated version of the GSX-R-derived liquid-cooled 999cc in-line four.

Introduced for 2016 in both naked (GSX-S1000) and faired (GSX-S1000F) versions, the GSX-S used a detuned version of the engine from the K5 (2005-2008) GSX-R1000.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review

For 2022, the GSX-S1000 gets more aggressive, angular styling with stacked LED headlights and MotoGP-inspired winglets. Its new 4-2-1 exhaust system with a stubby silencer on the right side meets Euro 5 emission standards. Updated camshafts and valve springs, a new fuel injection system and a new airbox deliver increased power and a broader, smoother torque curve. A 6-speed transmission is mated to a wet, multi-plate clutch equipped with the Suzuki Clutch Assist System (SCAS) for smoother deceleration and better control when downshifting.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review

Like the Hayabusa, the 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (S.I.R.S.), which includes the Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (SDMS), Suzuki Traction Control, Ride by Wire Electronic Throttle, Bi-Directional Quick Shift, Suzuki Easy Start and Low RPM Assist systems.

The GSX-S1000’s twin-spar aluminum frame and aluminum-alloy braced swingarm are from the GSX-R1000. Fully adjustable KYB suspension, ABS-equipped radial-mount Brembo monoblock calipers, an updated seat design, new wheels shod with new Dunlop Roadsport 2 tires, revised instrumentation and switches, and a new larger fuel tank (5 gallons, up from 4.5) round out the street-oriented sportbike package.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review

The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 will be available in Metallic Triton Blue, Metallic Matte Mechanical Gray and Glass Sparkle Black. Pricing is TBD but bikes will arrive in dealerships in Fall 2021.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 Specs

Base Price: TBD
Website: suzukicycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse in-line four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 999cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm
Transmission: 6-speed, wet multi-plate assist clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 57.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Wet Weight: 472 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 Photo Gallery:

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2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM | Video Review

We test two new models from Kawasaki: the KLX300 dual-sport (MSRP $5,599) and the KLX300SM supermoto (MSRP $5,999). Both are powered by a 292cc DOHC liquid-cooled four-valve fuel-injected single borrowed from the KLX300R off-road bike.
2021 Kawasaki KLX300 dual-sport (left) and KLX300SM supermoto (right). Photos by Kevin Wing.

We test two new models from Kawasaki: the KLX300 dual-sport (MSRP $5,599) and the KLX300SM supermoto (MSRP $5,999). Both are powered by a 292cc DOHC liquid-cooled four-valve fuel-injected single borrowed from the KLX300R off-road bike.

The KLX300 dual-sport is equipped with off-road-ready 21- and 18-inch wheels shod with Dunlop D605 knobby tires, a 43mm USD fork with adjustable compression damping and 10 inches of travel and a fully adjustable gas-charged Uni-Trak shock with 9.1 inches of travel. It has a 35.2-inch seat height and weighs 302 pounds wet.

The KLX300SM has 17-inch wire-spoke wheels shod with IRC Road Winner RX-01 rubber. Compared to the KLX300, the SM has stiffer suspension damping, less suspension travel, taller final-drive gearing and a larger front rotor.

Road Test Editor Nic de Sena spent a full day testing each bike, on public roads, at an OHV park (on the KLX300) and on a kart track (on the KLX300SM). He had a ball and says these bikes are great for newer riders or for those who just want to have fun on a budget. Check out his video review below:

The post 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM | Video Review

We test two new models from Kawasaki: the KLX300 dual-sport (MSRP $5,599) and the KLX300SM supermoto (MSRP $5,999). Both are powered by a 292cc DOHC liquid-cooled four-valve fuel-injected single borrowed from the KLX300R off-road bike.
2021 Kawasaki KLX300 dual-sport (left) and KLX300SM supermoto (right). Photos by Kevin Wing.

We test two new models from Kawasaki: the KLX300 dual-sport (MSRP $5,599) and the KLX300SM supermoto (MSRP $5,999). Both are powered by a 292cc DOHC liquid-cooled four-valve fuel-injected single borrowed from the KLX300R off-road bike.

The KLX300 dual-sport is equipped with off-road-ready 21- and 18-inch wheels shod with Dunlop D605 knobby tires, a 43mm USD fork with adjustable compression damping and 10 inches of travel and a fully adjustable gas-charged Uni-Trak shock with 9.1 inches of travel. It has a 35.2-inch seat height and weighs 302 pounds wet.

The KLX300SM has 17-inch wire-spoke wheels shod with IRC Road Winner RX-01 rubber. Compared to the KLX300, the SM has stiffer suspension damping, less suspension travel, taller final-drive gearing and a larger front rotor.

Road Test Editor Nic de Sena spent a full day testing each bike, on public roads, at an OHV park (on the KLX300) and on a kart track (on the KLX300SM). He had a ball and says these bikes are great for newer riders or for those who just want to have fun on a budget. Check out his video review below:

The post 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM | Video Review

We test two new models from Kawasaki: the KLX300 dual-sport (MSRP $5,599) and the KLX300SM supermoto (MSRP $5,999). Both are powered by a 292cc DOHC liquid-cooled four-valve fuel-injected single borrowed from the KLX300R off-road bike.
2021 Kawasaki KLX300 dual-sport (left) and KLX300SM supermoto (right). Photos by Kevin Wing.

We test two new models from Kawasaki: the KLX300 dual-sport (MSRP $5,599) and the KLX300SM supermoto (MSRP $5,999). Both are powered by a 292cc DOHC liquid-cooled four-valve fuel-injected single borrowed from the KLX300R off-road bike.

The KLX300 dual-sport is equipped with off-road-ready 21- and 18-inch wheels shod with Dunlop D605 knobby tires, a 43mm USD fork with adjustable compression damping and 10 inches of travel and a fully adjustable gas-charged Uni-Trak shock with 9.1 inches of travel. It has a 35.2-inch seat height and weighs 302 pounds wet.

The KLX300SM has 17-inch wire-spoke wheels shod with IRC Road Winner RX-01 rubber. Compared to the KLX300, the SM has stiffer suspension damping, less suspension travel, taller final-drive gearing and a larger front rotor.

Road Test Editor Nic de Sena spent a full day testing each bike, on public roads, at an OHV park (on the KLX300) and on a kart track (on the KLX300SM). He had a ball and says these bikes are great for newer riders or for those who just want to have fun on a budget. Check out his video review below:

The post 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 KTM 450 SMR | First Ride Review

2021 KTM 450 SMR Review
Photos by Casey Davis.

If you’re a person of culture and sophistication, you’ll agree that action movies of the ’80s and ’90s are the pinnacle of American cinema. Never mind distractions like plots or character development; these gems of the silver screen thrill us with explosions, high-flying hijinks and protagonists who dispatch bad guys while delivering cheeky one-liners.

Like the best action flicks, supermoto distills all the excitement of motorcycling into one no-holds-barred blockbuster. And after an all-day closed-course matinee on the race-ready 2021 KTM 450 SMR, I can say it packs one helluva punch!

2021 KTM 450 SMR Review
The 2021 KTM 450 SMR.

Supermoto is a discipline that I have precious little experience with, but what’s not to love — a lightweight motocross machine fitted with smaller, racing-slick-shod wheels, ready to tackle twisty kart tracks and dirt jump sections in equal measure. KTM showcased its new 450 SMR at Apex Racing Center in Perris, California, and now I’m hooked. 

After a seven-year hiatus, which is about how long it takes Hollywood to pump out two or three profit-making sequels, the KTM 450 SMR is back. Using the 450 SX-F motocross racer as its foundation, the SMR shares its 63-horsepower 450cc single-cylinder SOHC engine, lightweight steel frame and cast-aluminum swingarm. 

2021 KTM 450 SMR Horsepower
The 450cc thumper pumps out a rip-roaring 63 horsepower. It also features an updated connecting rod with a new upper copper-beryllium bushing, reducing internal friction and improving its ability to rev.

To suit its supermoto purpose, wider triple clamps with a 16mm offset accommodate tubeless Alpina wheels (16.5-inch front and 17-inch rear) fitted with ultra-sticky Bridgestone Battlax Supermoto slicks. The WP Xact suspension is updated, reducing suspension travel to an ample 11.2 inches in the front and 10.5 inches in the rear, lowering the bike’s center of gravity and improving handling. Lastly, a radially mounted Brembo M50 front caliper squeezes a 310mm Galfer floating rotor to deliver all the braking power you’ll ever need on a bike that weighs just 232 pounds wet.

Any motorcycle with this kind of power-to-weight ratio is a recipe for a good time, but riding the SMR is like mainlining pure adrenaline at every turn. And in the tight, close-quarters layout of a kart track, there are endless opportunities to chase that high while stretching the 450’s throttle cables.

2021 KTM 450 SMR Review

Catapulting you from one apex to the next is the punchy 450cc engine that offers plenty of low-down grunt and midrange puff to hover the front wheel during hard-charging corner exits. It’s topped off with a short burst of top-end power and plenty of over-rev, should you need to wring it out through a corner. The extra-crisp throttle requires a tempered wrist, and I treated it with respect while getting to know the thumper’s exciting and free-revving personality. Of the two fuel maps that alter the engine’s character, I preferred Map 1’s softer power delivery to Map 2’s more aggressive response.

Clicking through the precise Pankl-built 5-speed gearbox is a treat made even sweeter by the excellent Suter slipper clutch. Any wheel hop is eliminated while grabbing multiple downshifts and barreling into a corner hard on the brakes. It’s exactly the kind of kit you’ll need when backing it in like the pros, though I’m not quite there yet.

2021 KTM 450 SMR Seat Height
The WP Xact suspension soaks up hits well and stays composed when riding aggressively.

Top MotoGP and World Superbike racers train by riding supermoto, a fact that didn’t take hold until I experienced the 450 SMR’s extremely communicative chassis. The amount of feedback is excellent, where every ounce of traction is translated so loud and clear that it might as well be blared through a megaphone. What’s more is that you’re learning to flirt with grip at lower speeds, which lowers risk while being directly applicable to riding sportbikes on the track.

Thanks to its feathery weight, the SMR responds to any input immediately, flicking through chicanes with ease, and stays remarkably planted while cranked over on the edge of the tire, encouraging you to push harder. Its wafer-thin motocross chassis is eager to turn, even requiring some recalibration when coming from heavier street-legal motorcycles. As if that isn’t enough inspiration to crack the whip, traction control is standard and doesn’t step in prematurely. Launch control is included too, should you ever find yourself lining up on a starting grid. 

2021 KTM 450 SMR Review

Aiding in the chassis cause is the fully adjustable WP Xact air fork and conventional shock. The air fork, which still uses traditional cartridge damping in one leg, gleefully soaks up every hit and begs for more while also staying composed under hard braking. Same goes for the fully adjustable shock, though my taco-laden diet probably calls for a slightly heavier spring rate. If you’re buying a competition supermoto, you’ll customize it for your particular needs.

After catching my breath between sessions, the only thought I could muster is, “I need to ride supermoto more often.” The pool for production-competition supermotos is limited, with KTM, Husqvarna and TM Racing being the only contenders, but just like a good action flick, you know exactly what you’re getting — unadulterated fun from the first brap to the last. The only thing left to say about the 2021 KTM 450 SMR and supermoto is, “I’ll be back.”

2021 KTM 450 SMR Review

Nic’s Gear:
Helmet: Arai Corsair-X
Baselayer: VnM Sport ActivCool-GP Top and Pants
Suit: Mithos RCP-18
Gloves: Alpinestars GP Pro R3
Boots: Alpinestars Super Tech R

2021 KTM 450 SMR Specs:

Price: $11,299
Website: ktm.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled single, SOHC, 4 valves
Displacement: 449.9cc
Bore x Stroke: 95 x 63.4mm
Transmission: 5-speed, hydraulically actuated wet slipper clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 57.8 ± 0.4 in.
Rake: 27 degrees
Seat Height: 35 in.
Wet Weight: 232 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 1.85 gal.

2021 KTM 450 SMR Photo Gallery:

The post 2021 KTM 450 SMR | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.

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MV Agusta Unveils Limited-Edition Superveloce Alpine

MV Agusta Superveloce Alpine
MV Agusta Superveloce Alpine

Legendary Italian motorcycle manufacturer MV Agusta has teamed up with Alpine, the iconic French constructor of racing and sports cars, for the design and production of a limited-edition sportbike inspired by the Alpine A110. The MV Agusta Superveloce was a natural choice for this project as it perfectly embodies the spirit of the A110, sharing the same timeless elegance and offering unique riding emotions on any road.

The MV Agusta Superveloce will be limited to just 110 units.

MV Agusta Superveloce Alpine
MV Agusta Superveloce Alpine

The collaboration draws on the common passion of both MV Agusta and Alpine enthusiasts for singular design and elegantly engineered machines. Both manufacturers have illustrious histories in competition, and their winning spirit and passion are infused into vehicles that inspire emotion. MV Agusta and Alpine create innovative, forward-looking solutions while staying true to their championship roots.

MV Agusta Superveloce Alpine
MV Agusta Superveloce Alpine

The Superveloce Alpine features MV Agusta’s signature inline three-cylinder engine, which makes 147 horsepower at 13,000 rpm and can achieve a top speed in excess of 150 mph. The Superveloce Alpine’s graphic design, special details and unique accessories will bear the unmistakable mark of Alpine. Just like the sports car icon, the bike will deliver premium performance yet remaining agile and easy to ride.

Monaco Design Studio, MV Agusta’s spearhead design division for the production of exclusive bespoke models, was involved in the project since the beginning and worked in close contact with its counterpart at Alpine. The result is a stunning bike that is a perfect synthesis of the two brands’ personalities yet with an identity of its own.

MV Agusta Superveloce Alpine and the Alpine A110
MV Agusta Superveloce Alpine and the Alpine A110

The blue livery of the Superveloce Alpine exactly matches that of the current A110. The raised “A” logos on the fairings are also reminiscent of the original A110 detailing, as well as the black Alcantara seats with blue stitching and the CNC-machined black rims. To mark the collaboration between two national heritage brands, the French and Italian flags are proudly displayed on either side of the front fender.

Timur Sardarov, CEO of MV Agusta Motor S.p.A., said, “Many Alpine customers are also big MV Agusta fans, and vice versa. The Superveloce Alpine will ideally bring the two worlds together, with incredible synergies in terms of design, personality and style. We look forward to this collaboration with one of the most admired brands in the history of motorsport, and are confident that this new, superb limited edition will be met with enthusiasm by bikers and motorsport fans around the world.”

MV Agusta Superveloce Alpine and the Alpine A110
MV Agusta Superveloce Alpine and the Alpine A110

Patrick Marinoff, Managing Director of Alpine, added, “MV Agusta is a symbol of Italian craftsmanship and excellence that makes motorcycles like no other. Our two brands are driven by the same passion for creating beautifully engineered products and unique emotions for our customers. The Superveloce Alpine is a fine piece of design and technology that makes no compromise on performance and riding pleasure.”

The MV Agusta Superveloce Alpine will be distributed through MV Agusta’s dealer network. Pricing is EUR 36,300 (approx. USD $44,431) for Italian market, including the Racing Kit.

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2021 Ducati Monster | First Look Review

2021 Ducati Monster First Look Review

Ducati has announced an update to its middleweight naked bike lineup, with the new 2021 Ducati Monster and Monster+ models. Singularly dubbed “Monster” by the Bologna-based brand, the latest iteration of Ducati’s iconic series features a new chassis and utilizes the same weight-saving front-frame design as the Panigale and Streetfighter V4 motorcycles. That’s right — the new Monster is no longer using a steel-trellis frame. The result is a 40-pound weight reduction when compared to the Monster 821. Couple that with a more powerful 937cc Testastretta 11-degree V-twin engine, top-shelf electronics and a complete aesthetic refresh, and this Monster looks like a whole new beast.

Pricing for Ducati Red color options of the 2021 Ducati Monster and Monster+ is $11,895 and $12,195, respectively. Meanwhile, Aviator Grey and Dark Stealth colorways are an additional $200.

2021 Ducati Monster First Look Review

Interestingly, the MSRPs for the new Monster and Monster+ are cheaper than the 2020 Monster 821 ($11,995) and 821 Stealth ($12,895) models.

The Monster series dates back to 1993 and is the brainchild of famed motorcycle designer Miguel Galluzzi. Since its inception, Monster motorcycles have satiated those looking for real-world street sensibilities coupled with sporting performance. It has been a winning formula for Ducati, with over 350,000 Monster units sold since its introduction.

2021 Ducati Monster First Look Review

The rider triangle is more neutral and upright, thanks to the handlebar moving 2.8 inches closer to the rider. Legroom is said to have increased as well. In stock trim, the new Monster’s seat height is 32.3 inches and, with its narrow chassis, should accommodate riders of varying sizes. Ducati has taken an extra step for riders with shorter inseam lengths, offering a low seat option (31.5 inches) and spring lowering that drops the saddle height to 30.5 inches.

Powering the Monster and Monster+ is the 5.5-pounds-lighter 937cc Testastretta 11-degree V-twin that is also found in the SuperSport and Hypermotard lineups. Claimed peak horsepower has increased 2 ponies to 111 at 9,250 rpm, and peak torque has risen to 68.7 lb-ft at a street-friendly 6,500 rpm. The increase in displacement is said to distribute power more evenly across the entire rev range, emphasizing low and mid-range grunt. An up/down quickshifter is also standard and will make quick work of the 6-speed gearbox.

2021 Ducati Monster First Look Review

A full suite of rider aids is standard, and owners will be able to choose from three preset riding modes — Sport, Urban and Touring — which adjust throttle response and intervention levels. The new Monster also benefits from IMU-supported cornering ABS, lean-angle-sensitive traction control, wheelie control and launch control — all of which are adjustable from the 4.3-inch color TFT instrument panel. The top-tier amenities don’t stop there, with LED lighting all around, self-canceling turn signals and a USB charging port.

This year, the Monster has hit the gym, boasting a claimed wet weight of 414 pounds, shedding a whopping 40 pounds of weight compared to the Monster 821. This was achieved in numerous ways, and the biggest break in Ducati Monster tradition is the use of a much lighter aluminum front-frame design that uses the 937cc as a stressed member. The new superbike-derived front-frame weighs just 6.6 pounds, nearly 10 pounds lighter than the traditional steel-trellis frame featured on all prior Monster motorcycles. Also, engineers whittled the swingarm down by 3.5 pounds and the cast aluminum wheels by an additional 3.75 pounds. Other weight savings were achieved by using a lightweight GFRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer) subframe.

2021 Ducati Monster First Look Review

Weight reduction also extended to the 3.7-gallon fuel tank, which holds 0.7 gallon less than the Monster 821’s.

Ducati engineers also worked to create a more agile middleweight Monster by altering its geometry. The wheelbase comes in a slightly shorter 58 inches, and the rake is now at 24 degrees.

2021 Ducati Monster First Look Review

The suspension is handled by a non-adjustable 43mm inverted fork with 5.1 inches of travel and a spring preload-adjustable shock equipped with 5.5 inches of travel.

Braking duties are handled by robust radially mounted Brembo M4.32 4-piston calipers, clamping onto 320mm floating rotors in the front. In the back, a Brembo 2-piston caliper.

2021 Ducati Monster First Look Review

Available in two models, the Monster and Monster+ are identical mechanically and their technological features. For an additional $300, the Monster+ is equipped with a svelte flyscreen and passenger seat cover.

Ducati anticipates that the 2021 Ducati Monster and Monster+ will arrive in North American dealerships in April 2021. We can’t wait to throw a leg over one for a full review, but until then, feast your eyes on the new Monster.

2021 Ducati Monster First Look Review

2021 Ducati Monster and Monster+ Specs:

Base Price: $11,995 / $12,195 (Monster+)
Website: ducati.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 90-degree V-twin, desmodromic DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder
Bore x Stroke: 94 x 67.5mm
Displacement: 937cc
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated assist-and-slipper wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 58.3 in.
Rake/Trail: 24 degrees/3.7 in.
Seat Height: 32.3 in.
Claimed Wet Weight: 414 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gals.
MPG: 91 PON min. / NA

2021 Ducati Monster and Monster+ Photo Gallery:

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2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS | Road Test Review

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review
The Z900 ABS is eager to get into the corners and doesn’t require much coaxing from the rider. Revised suspension settings help keep the chassis balanced. Photos by Kevin Wing.

When the 2017 Kawasaki Z900 naked bike leaped onto the scene, it quickly garnered praise for its no-frills, bare-bones approach to sport riding. Hold the cost-increasing rider aids, please — I want a good chassis, punchy motor and all-day ergonomics, said utilitarian riders. Kawasaki delivered as ordered, affordably, too, making it one of the best values in the class. This year, the 2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS is getting a tech update without breaking the bank.

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review
Kawasaki’s paint quality stands out in the class.

The pocket-protector-wearing bunch at Kawi waved their graphing calculators at the 2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS and bestowed new technical amenities such as adjustable traction control, a full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity and four selectable ride modes. Even the design department joined in, with a restyled LED headlight and indicators, shrouds and various covers that add up to just the right amount of Sugomi styling — all for a nominal $200 upcharge over the last ABS model. A non-ABS model is no longer offered stateside.

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review
In 2020, Kawasaki’s Z900 ABS is coming out swinging with technology and features it never had. New to the party is adjustable traction control, selectable ride modes, and a full-color TFT instrument panel, not to mention a redesigned LED headlight and a slight aesthetic facelift. That’s a far cry from the stripped-down approach the Z900 took when first released in 2017, and it’s still a serious value.

On the engine front, the 948cc powerplant returns with minor finagling to the airbox intake funnels and a new fuel map to meet Euro 5 standards. The good news is that it hasn’t spoiled the party one bit, as the engine produced a healthy 113.3 horsepower at 9,800 rpm and 66 lb-ft of torque at 8,100 rpm on the Jett Tuning Dyno and power is delivered in an impressively linear fashion.

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review
The inline four-cylinder engine is incredibly smooth and the lack of bad vibes is due in part to the rubber-mounted handlebar and footpegs. Additionally, footpeg weights also help keep vibrations in check.

There is plenty of low-end brawn and heaping midrange power on tap, thanks in no small part to the low 1st – 5th gear ratios in the slick 6-speed gearbox; 6th is overdrive. From the moment you release the light assist-and-slip clutch, the 948cc engine spools up quickly and will pull as hard as you like in the canyons, or take on a friendly, urban-minded role when scooting around traffic. This isn’t your stereotypical peaky inline-four engine and, in that sense, is far more versatile. The Z900’s powerplant is also silky-smooth, with no bad vibrations, allowing the acoustically tuned intake howl and exhaust note to come to the top of the mix.

With a sporty, short throw at the shift lever, the Z900 is practically begging for a quickshifter. Of course, we know that would increase the MSRP, but the perky engine and peachy transmission are primed for one.

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review
The new 4.5-inch TFT dash is crystal clear and easy to read.

Freshly added is the 4.3-inch full-color TFT dash that is found on several Kawasaki models, paving the way for four selectable ride modes; Sport, Road, Rain and a customizable Rider mode. In Rider mode, owners can choose between Full or Low (55-percent max output) engine power, as well as the new 3-level traction control that can be disabled. ABS cannot be adjusted, per Euro 5 regulations.

I stuck with Sport predominantly since it has the least restriction and is, consequently, the most fun. A good whack of the throttle results in a cheeky front-end lift, while TC and ABS extend the leash for spirited riding without intervening aggressively. They’ll step in when needed, as any well-designed system will do. This does lead me to one complaint about the new Sport and Road riding modes. The throttle response is abrupt during the initial on-off application, requiring the wrist-calibration of a world-class surgeon. You can get it right but sticks out in my mind because of how great the throttle is everywhere else.

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review
Kawasaki upped the rear spring rate by roughly 5% and also updated stock suspension settings.

Another bugbear is the unintuitive user interface on the Z’s shiny new dash. I’ll admit that diving into the menu’s depths isn’t something that owners regularly do; once you’ve found your settings, you’ll generally keep them. Prod at the dash long enough and you’ll figure it out, but I can’t help feeling like one of the monkeys from “2001: A Space Odyssey,” if only momentarily.

Speaking of new technology, the dash supports Bluetooth connectivity and the Kawasaki Rideology app, which has a host of features ranging from a riding log, text and call notification, to service information and more.

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review
There isn’t much padding in the Z900’s saddle, but it helps Kawasaki achieve the low 31.3-inch seat height. It also contributes to some of the harshness felt when riding on bumpy tarmac.

Overall, the cockpit and bike feel svelte; you’re in command of the Z900 ABS and able to whip it around on a whim. At 31.3 inches, the Z900’s seat height is the lowest in its class, and Kawasaki has also done a fine job of whittling down the 4.5-gallon fuel tank where it meets the thinly padded seat, giving the bike a less-bulky feel.

Those characteristics pay off for riders with shorter inseams, since many full-sized motorcycles sporting taller seat heights are less accommodating. At 5-foot, 10-inches tall, my 32-inch inseam does see some knee-bend, although I’m not uncomfortable and can confidently flatfoot at a stop. Taller or leggier riders may experience more knee bend, making the 1-inch higher ergo-fit seat a wise investment.

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review
New Dunlop D214 Sportmax tires perked up the Z900’s handling.

With a sporting 57.1-inch wheelbase and 24.5-degree rake, the Z900 is light and playful, ready to pounce at any corner, while its sturdy steel-trellis frame telegraphs information to the rider well. Kawasaki also says that the frame is beefed up around the swingarm area. It feels a sight nimbler than what the hefty 467-pound wet weight we measured would suggest — the bike could stand to hit the gym.

Whether you’re peeling into a choice mountain sweeper or zipping through traffic, the Z900 is surefooted at both ends, helped along by sportier Dunlop D214 Sportmax rubber that features a more aggressive profile, livening up the Z’s handling.

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review
The low 31.3-inch seat height will be a boon for shorter riders, but it does create some knee-bend for my 32-inch inseam. Taller individuals will want to opt for the higher ergo-fit seat.

To complement the strengthened frame, Kawasaki tweaked the settings of the 41mm KYB fork, which features spring preload and rebound damping adjustment only. The horizontal back-link KYB shock now boasts a roughly 5-percent heavier spring rate, along with spring preload and rebound damping adjustment.

The initial setup isn’t supersport stiff, nor is it pool-noodle soft. The confidence-inspiring chassis is aided by an athletic setup that helps the Z900 stay balanced, even when you start pushing it to a brisk pace. Firming up the suspension might appeal to those who only venture to mountain roads on Sunday, giving those riders an edge when riding quickly, but it would be detrimental in other environments.

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review
Kawasaki’s paint quality stands out in the class.

The MSRP-friendly suspension fares well in the city, although rough tarmac will expose a weakness in the shock’s non-adjustable compression damping, especially if you’re a heavier rider. That charge cannot be squarely leveled at the shock alone, as the thin seat padding is an accomplice in the crime of a harsh ride over bumpy tarmac.

Four-piston Nissin calipers that clamp onto 300mm petal discs handle braking duties, resulting in strong braking power and good feel at the adjustable lever. A single Nissin caliper works with a 250mm disc in the rear and is great for low-speed maneuvers or line correction. Together, the braking components do a fine job and remind us that spec-sheets don’t always tell the whole story.

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review
The modest Nissin 4-piston calipers offer good feel and stopping power, once again proving that spec-sheets listing pricier components don’t always tell the whole story.

Kawasaki has upped their fit-and-finish game in recent years and even on the affordable Z900 ABS, that trend has continued. High quality paint on the fairings and frame make the entire bike pop, while graphic decals maintain the alluring price tag.

Undoubtedly, there will be those drawn to the 2020 Z900 ABS primarily due to its lovely MSRP. Smart consumers, indeed. Being budget-conscious used to mean you’d be making plenty of sacrifices in performance and features, and yes, its noticeably pricier competition will have a leg up in certain areas. Here, you’re not giving up much of anything on the street. Telling someone, “You get what you pay for” is usually a warning, but in this case, it’s just a good bike. 

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Review

Nic’s Gear:
Helmet: Scorpion EXO-R1
Jacket: Scorpion Optima
Pants: Scorpion Covert Ultra
Gloves: Racer Guide
Boots: TCX Rush 2 Air

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Specs:

Base Price: $8,999
Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
Website: Kawasaki.com

Engine
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-four
Displacement: 948cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 56.0 mm
Compression Ratio: 11.8:1
Valve Train: DOHC, 4 valves per cyl.
Valve Adj. Interval: 15,200 miles
Fuel Delivery: DFI with Mikuni 36mm throttle bodies x 4
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 4.2 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, wet assist-and-slipper clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain

Electrical
Ignition: TCBI with Digital Advance
Charging Output: 329 Watts max
Battery: 12V 8AH

Chassis
Frame: Tubular steel trellis frame, w/ box section swingarm
Wheelbase: 57.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.5 degrees/4.1 in.
Seat Height: 31.3 in.
Suspension, Front: 41mm USD fork, adj. for spring preload & rebound damping w/ 4.7-in. travel
Rear: Horizontal back-link shock, adj. for preload & rebound damping w/ 5.5-in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 300mm semi-floating discs w/ opposed 4-piston calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 250mm disc w/ 1-piston pin-slide caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.5 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast, 5.5 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 180/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 466 lbs.
Load Capacity: 380 lbs.
GVWR: 846 lbs.

Performance
Horsepower: 113.3 Horsepower at 9,800 rpm
Torque: 66.0 lb-ft of torque at 8,100 rpm
Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gals.
MPG: 90 PON Min (low/avg/high) 36.2/42.2/39.2
Estimated Range:  190 miles
Indicated RPM at 60 MPH: 4,200

2020 Kawasaki Z900 ABS Photo Gallery:

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2020 KTM 200 Duke | First Ride Review

2020 KTM 200 Duke Review
The 200 Duke’s hand-me-down steel-trellis frame with a detachable and replaceable subframe came from its big brother, the 390 Duke. It also snatched up the 390’s WP suspension, specifically updated for the 200 Duke. Photos courtesy of KTM.

Dubbed the “light heavyweight” by its Austrian creators, the entry-level 2020 KTM 200 Duke should wear the great Muhammad Ali’s quote, “Float like a butterfly and sting like a bee” on its sleeve, with its nimble handling and rev-happy 199.5cc single-cylinder engine. But its price is the real haymaker — at $3,999, KTM hopes that the 200 Duke will get serious attention from a new generation of riders.

2020 KTM 200 Duke Specs
High-quality Michelin Road 5 tires are standard fitment in the U.S. market and worlds above the typical OEM tire choices found in this class.

Manufactured in India, the 200 Duke has been available in other countries since 2012, but has never made an appearance in the United States until now. This year also marks the platform’s first major update — it gets the 390 Duke’s entire chassis, revamped styling in the current Duke family image and an all-new Euro 5 compliant engine.

2020 KTM 200 Duke Review
Non-adjustable levers are common on motorcycles at this price point. I wear a medium glove and found the reach acceptable, but adjustability is always appreciated.

Toss a leg over the Dukette and you’re met with backswept handlebars that prop the rider up in a neutral position, still allowing you to get your elbows out in the corners, and a low 31.6-inch seat height that’s unique to the U.S., European and Philippine markets.

2020 KTM 200 Duke Review
The LCD instrument panel is busy and difficult to read in direct sunlight. Luckily, mph and gear position can be identified at a quick glance, while the complex things like rpm are more challenging.

That’s one-inch lower than the 390 Duke’s seat, thanks to a shorter shock spring and reduced fork stroke. Combine that spec-sheet figure with the slender chassis and my 32-inch inseam can reach terra firma easily, which is attractive for new and shorter-statured riders. However, I did notice more knee-bend than I’d normally like with my boots on the grippy rubber-covered footpegs.

2020 KTM 200 Duke Review
The 200 Duke offers the riding position and experience of a full-sized motorcycle, in a light, affordable package.

Plastics are shared between the 200 and 390 Duke, and the 200 also boasts the predatory headlight design first seen on the mighty 1290 Super Duke R. As a cost saving measure, the 200 also features an LED daytime running light and a halogen bulb for illumination.

2020 KTM 200 Duke Review
The Super Duke R inspired headlight features an LED running light and halogen bulb.

Although the 199.5cc displacement is the same as the prior generation, the peppy thumper engine is all-new for 2020. The dual overhead camshafts are paired with ultra-hard, carbon-coated cam followers that help reduce weight in the valve train and contribute to the thumper’s free-revving, lively personality.

Most of the claimed 26 horsepower and 14.4 lb-ft of torque live above the 6,000-rpm mark, but considering how quickly 200’s engine wicks up, it’s a great companion when darting around city streets to work or school. It’s also freeway legal and topped out at an indicated 86 mph, which is impressive for a bike of this size. Crank-driven counterbalancers do their best to hide vibration, but some buzz is felt when wringing its neck. A completely updated exhaust system with dual catalysts is said to make the wee-Duke meet stringent emissions standards.

2020 KTM 200 Duke Seat Height
The 199.5cc single spools up quickly and offers performance perfect for new riders. We saw an indicated 86 mph – not too shabby.

It’s hard not twist to the grip and grin riding the 200 Duke, which encourages riders to whack through its 6-speed gearbox. It shifts well, but doesn’t have the same precision as its costlier brothers in the Duke family, nor is the clutch pull as light or refined as some other lightweight bikes that feature slip-and-assist clutches.

Both the non-adjustable 43mm WP fork with 4.6-inches of travel and WP shock featuring 5.0-inches of travel and spring preload adjustment are damped for comfort, soaking up rough urban tarmac well. Between the compliant suspension and communicative steel trellis frame, the 200 Duke is wonderfully agile, yet stays composed when cornering or hard on the binders.

2020 KTM 200 Duke Price

A radially mounted ByBre 4-piston brake caliper clamps onto a 300mm rotor up front, with plenty of stopping power for the speeds you can achieve, and decent feel at the lever. In the rear, a single-piston floating caliper grabs upon a 230mm disc with a relaxed bite and good stopping power. ABS is standard, as is a Supermoto Mode that disables ABS in the rear only — KTM is never one to shy away from hooliganism.

In 2020, the prospective rider has a wide variety of awesome bikes to choose from. Save for a few unrefined points, the KTM 200 Duke’s proposition is a strong one, with its spunky single-cylinder engine, great handling and ergonomics that are neophyte friendly — not to mention the serious $3,999 value. 

2020 KTM 200 Duke Review

Nic’s Gear:
Helmet: Shoei RF-SR
Jacket: Rev’it Vertex Air
gloves: Rev’it Echo
Pants: Rev’it Brentwood SF
Boots: Sidi SDS Meta

2020 KTM 200 Duke Specs

Website: ktm.com
Base Price: $3,999
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled single,
DOHC, 4 valves per cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 72.0 x 49.0mm
Displacement: 199.5cc
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 53.4 ± 0.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees / 3.7 in.
Seat Height: 31.6 in.
Claimed Dry Weight: 308.6 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 3.5 gals.

2020 KTM 200 Duke Photo Gallery:

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Source: RiderMagazine.com