Tag Archives: Yamaha Motorcycles

2024 Yamaha MT-09 Video Review

Ten years after its debut in the U.S., the Yamaha MT-09 has been updated and refined for 2024 while maintaining its wild side that we enjoyed on the first generation. Updates on this generation are extensive, including new acoustic amplifier grilles, an improved transmission, more aggressive ergonomics, a stiffer chassis, updated suspension, new Bridgestone Battlax Hypersport S23 tires, a new 5-inch TFT display, new switchgear, and a complete electronics package.

We rode the MT-09 in the Santa Cruz Mountains in California during Yamaha’s press launch and then rode the bike home after the launch, testing the MT-09 on a variety of roads. We came away impressed with the bike’s refinements and happy to see how this motorcycle has evolved in the past decade.

2024 Yamaha MT-09 Video

2024 Yamaha MT-09 Specifications

  • Base Price: $10,599
  • Website: YamahaMotorsports.com
  • Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
  • Engine Type: Liquid-cooled transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
  • Displacement: 890cc
  • Bore x Stroke: 78.0 x 62.1mm
  • Horsepower: 117 hp @ 10,000 (factory claim)
  • Torque: 69 lb-ft @ 7,000 rpm (factory claim)
  • Transmission: 6-speed, multiplate slip/assist wet clutch
  • Final Drive: Chain
  • Wheelbase: 56.3 in.
  • Rake/Trail: 24.7 degrees/4.3 in.
  • Seat Height: 32.5 in.
  • Wet Weight: 425 lb (factory claim)
  • Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gal.

The post 2024 Yamaha MT-09 Video Review appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
John Alger rides the historic U.S. Route 66 from Chicago, Illinois, to Amarillo, Texas, on his kickstart-only 1978 Yamaha SR500.

Dubbed the “Mother Road” by John Steinbeck in The Grapes of Wrath and known as “Main Street USA,” U.S. Route 66 will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2026. No other road in America had such an impact on growth, migration, transportation, and popular culture. During the Great Depression and the horrific Dust Bowl of the 1930s, Route 66 was a paved pathway to a better life, transporting tens of thousands of people from the heartland to the West.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
Map of Route 66 courtesy of Encyclopedia Brytannica

Right after WWII, my Uncle Don traveled from California to his hometown of Springfield, Illinois, using much of Route 66 and riding a kickstart, air-cooled, single-cylinder AJS. As I pondered my own journey on the Mother Road, it seemed fitting to attempt it on my 1978 Yamaha SR500, which is also an air-cooled, kickstart Single. Over the years, I have owned several Yamahas, but the SR500 has been my preferred ride for its light weight, effortless cornering ability, competent disc brakes, and simple but elegant design. I like it so much, I own two.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
The author’s 1978 Yamaha SR500 on Route 66 in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

For my trip, I chose the one with 30,000 miles on the odometer. Except for upgraded brake hoses, it was bone stock. To get it ready for my Route 66 adventure, I gave it a complete engine and chassis overhaul, as well as a 535cc big bore kit, an oil cooler, and a SuperTrapp exhaust. I retained the stock air box and K&N air filter but re-jetted it as required. The new chain and sprockets were one tooth larger on the countershaft, which lowered cruising rpms and resulted in a mostly vibration-free ride.

Related: 2015 Yamaha SR400 Review | First Ride

The SR500 also has a no-frills CDI ignition system with a strong charging system, allowing me to keep my cellphone and Bluetooth full of juice, and a centerstand, a must-have for daily chain lubrication and fixing flat tires (I had one).

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
U.S. Route 66 begins in Chicago, Illinois, within sight of the Willis Tower (formerly the Sears Tower).

Find out more about the First 100 Miles of Route 66

Since Route 66 starts in Chicago, I transported my bike from my hometown of Merritt Island, Florida, in my Chevy van. The first day of riding started in Chicago rush-hour traffic on the Kennedy Expressway, which was undergoing road construction, but after stop-and-go for two hours in record heat, I was rewarded with the U.S. 66 “Begin” sign at the corner of Adams Street and Michigan Avenue across from The Art Institute of Chicago. Just a few blocks away is the Willis Tower (formerly the Sears Tower), and a few blocks farther is the famous Lou Mitchell’s restaurant, which is over 100 years old and served a great breakfast to start my trip.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
Lou Mitchell’s is a legendary eatery in downtown Chicago.

Aside from the sweltering temperatures and humidity of August, Chicago’s beautiful residential areas and parks made the short trip to the suburbs quite pleasant. The first 100 miles of Route 66 is known as the Heritage Corridor, which also includes towns along the Illinois & Michigan Canal, which connected Lake Michigan to the Illinois River, and Starved Rock State Park. In Cicero, I stopped to see one of Al Capone’s houses. In Berwyn, I checked out the world’s largest laundromat, which is over 13,000 square feet and even has a bird aviary, and I also passed by one of the oldest-operating White Castle restaurants.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
Dick’s on 66 is located in Joliet, Illinois.

Traveling south, I found a neat roadside display in the town of Joliet called Dick’s on 66, an old towing shop decorated with several vintage vehicles and a patch of bricks purportedly from the original Route 66. Across the street is a restored gas pump and ice-cream shop. Joliet is also the home of the state prison and was featured in the 1980 movie The Blues Brothers.

In Wilmington, Illinois, I cooled down with a sundae at the Route 66 Creamery and spotted the first of five “giants” I would see on my trip: a Sinclair dinosaur on the roof of G&D Tire Company.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
Route 66 Creamery is in Wilmington, Illinois.

For this trip, I tried to take the oldest sections possible of Route 66, and Illinois had them clearly marked. Some sections of road looked more like abandoned driveways, with weeds growing through cracks in the concrete. My little SR500 was perfect for this kind of duty.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
One of the few remaining Muffler Men is located in Wilmington, Illinois. The bright green Gemini Giant holds a silver rocket and was named in honor of the Gemini space program of the 1960s.

In Towanda is Dead Man’s Curve, a sharp curve that caught many drivers unaware and was the site of numerous accidents from the 1920s to the 1950s. There’s even a preserved series of Burma Shave signs that say: Around the curve / lickety-split / beautiful car / wasn’t it? I had a 25-plus mph headwind for most of that first day, and it felt as if I was riding into a blow drier. My first night was spent at the Ghost Hollow Lodge in Chandlerville, Illinois, where I fortified myself with a dinner of venison and fresh veggies.

On the second day, I stopped in Springfield to cool down with an iced tea at Route 66 Motorheads Bar & Grill, which also has a museum and gaming room. Just south of Springfield in Carlinville, my fun was interrupted by a flat tire. I had packed tools, tire irons, a portable compressor, and a tube patch kit, but my tube was too badly mangled by the nail. Scott McDaniels of S&S ATV came to the rescue by delivering a new tube (at no charge), a local resident across the street brought me ice water, and the local city hall allowed me to do the work on the north side of their office in the shade on the concrete. It just goes to show how kind strangers can be when you are in a bind.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
The Old Chain of Rocks Bridge is located in Granite City, Illinois.

The repair set me back almost four hours, and I had to bypass many of the Route 66 sights from Carlinville to St. Charles, Missouri, where I stayed with friends. The following day, I unloaded my luggage and backtracked to Granite City, Illinois, to see the Old Chain of Rocks Bridge. The mile-long bridge was part of the original Route 66 from 1936 to 1965 and allowed motor vehicles to cross the Mississippi River from Illinois to Missouri. It features a 30-degree turn partway through. I had gone over this bridge in a car as a kid before it was decommissioned in 1968. It is now only open to foot traffic and bicycles.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
The 630-foot Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri, was completed in 1965.

While in St. Louis, I also went up into the 630-foot Gateway Arch, which was completed in 1965. It is now part of the National Park Service, and with recent remodeling and upgrades, it’s a not-to-miss experience. I also visited the National Museum of Transportation on the west side of St. Louis. This may be one of the best transportation museums in the country and has the only remaining GM Aerotrains. It also has a running Chrysler Turbine Car like the one at the Henry Ford Museum in Michigan.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
A Chrysler Turbine Car at the National Museum of Transportation in St. Louis.

After getting my luggage loaded back on the SR500, my next stop was Times Beach, Missouri. Route 66 used to cross the Meramec River there, and the remnants of the bridge are still there, along with a Route 66 State Park. I met some folks from Europe riding Route 66 on rented Harleys, and they were aghast that I was attempting to make the same trip on my antique bike with no GPS navigation and only an EZ66 guide in my tankbag.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
Remnants of the Route 66 bridge in Times Beach, Missouri.

Times Beach was the site of the second largest EPA Superfund site due to a local contractor spraying dioxin on the dirt roads for dust control. All the buildings were bought by the EPA and leveled, and it’s currently considered a ghost town. West of Times Beach is the Meramec Caverns, where I ran into my new European friends again. My bike would do roughly 100 miles per tank of fuel, which coincided with my body’s need to stand up and stretch out a bit and suck down a cold beverage.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
A group of Europeans riding Route 66 on rented Harleys stopped at the Route Route 66 State Park in Missouri.

I stayed at the KOA in Springfield, Missouri, that night and rented a cabin. I had planned on renting a primitive campsite, but for only about $40 more, I got an air-conditioned cabin, lights, electricity, a mattress, a table, and a TV. It was a bargain!

Along the way in Missouri are a few museums and stops such as a replica 1930s Sinclair station called Gary’s Gay Parita in Ash Grove, Missouri, where the sign reads “Gas Wars” and advertises fuel at 15 cents per gallon. Another sign reads “Kendal, your 2,000 mile oil!” We have certainly come a long way!

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
A replica 1930s Sinclair gas station called Gary’s Gay Parita in Ash Grove, Missouri.

Shortly after the Sinclair station on the Old Route 66 trail, I crossed an old truss bridge that crossed over Johnson Creek in Spencer, Missouri. Like the old sections of Route 66 in Illinois, this section looked like an abandoned road going into the backwoods. It was beautiful.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
Only 13 miles of Route 66 pass through Kansas.

Kansas only has a very short 13-mile section of the Old Route 66 path, and if you take that, you are blessed with crossing one of the few remaining Marsh Arch bridges left in the country – and the only remaining one on Route 66, this one having been built in the early 1900s.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
The Rainbow Curve Bridge was built in 1923. It’s the only remaining Marsh Arch bridge on Route 66.

Oklahoma likely has the most Route 66 sites of any state. After the road was decommissioned by the federal government for use as a federal highway, Oklahoma named it State Road 66. It’s easy to follow, although I did manage to miss a sign and ride maybe 50 miles off course. The best Route 66 Museum is in Clinton, Oklahoma. It covers the initial planning and construction of the route, along with different scenes of Americana, a video of the Dust Bowl, and more.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
Buck Atom, a 21-foot-tall space cowboy in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is one of the iconic Muffler Men of Route 66.

There are more giant statues to be seen as you pass through Oklahoma, including Buck Atom, the 21-foot-tall space cowboy in Tulsa holding a rocket. Tulsa also has a cool park downtown called the Cyrus Avery Centennial Plaza that has three tall old neon motel signs relocated there from the early days of Route 66. Further south is a Route 66 village with an old train, a gas station, and an oil derrick.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
Route 66 in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

The last section of Route 66 I rode in Oklahoma was a mostly abandoned concrete road that paralleled Interstate 40, but you could tell it was part of the original route. How many mostly abandoned four-lane concrete highways going into nowhere with no traffic do you see? At one point, I thought I was off-track, but then I saw the Texas state sign and the familiar white outlined Route 66 logo painted on the road.

In Texas, much of Route 66 is access highways on either side of the interstate, which worked just fine for my trusty mule since I could travel at more relaxed speeds in the intense heat. Along the way, you pass by the Leaning (water) Tower of Britten in Groom, Texas, and Amarillo gives you the Cadillac Ranch.

Get Your Kickstart on Route 66
Cadillac Ranch is located in Amarillo, Texas.

After visiting the Cadillac Ranch, I stopped at a KOA, and when I tried to start my bike again, it didn’t fire up. It turned out to be an issue with the ignition system, and despite having the parts from my other SR500 shipped to me to attempt a repair, it didn’t take. I cut my trip short and loaded the bike in the back of a Penske truck and headed back east.

In spite of a flat tire, intense heat and humidity, and an ignition failure, this was the most fun I can recall in most of my life. In retrospect, I should have tried making this trip on a newer bike, but part of the fun was riding a kickstart antique.

If you are considering riding this road, I would suggest waiting until 2026 for the 100-year anniversary since I heard plans in various towns along the way for some centennial events, so it should be even better.

ROUTE 66 RESOURCES:

The post Get Your Kickstart on Route 66 appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Yamaha Ténéré 700 Review | Rider Test

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo
What makes the Yamaha Ténéré 700 such a well-rounded bike is its capability on any surface. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

When the Yamaha Ténéré 700 was introduced in the summer of 2020, it was a rare bright spot during the dark time of lockdowns, masks, and toilet paper shortages. It was a new entry in the middleweight adventure bike class, slotting between Yamaha’s WR250R and 1,200cc Super Ténéré. Unlike midsized ADV models from BMW, KTM, and Triumph, Yamaha took a “less is more” approach with the Ténéré 700 – aka the T7 – eschewing electronic rider aids and other costly features and pricing it well below the competition at $9,999.

Contributing photographer Kevin Wing attended the T7’s debut in Tennessee, and he took a shine to it. “As someone who spends most of his time on lightweight dirtbikes without any electronic interventions, I felt immediately comfortable on the Ténéré 700 with its light clutch, smooth shifting, and excellent fueling,” he wrote in his test for the August 2020 issue (see Wing’s 2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700 review here).

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo
With test rider Thad Wolff at the controls, the Yamaha Ténéré 700 easily jumps tall berms in a single bound. Few adventure bikes are as capable off-road as the tenacious T7.

When long-time contributor and dual-sport aficionado Arden Kysley got his hands on our Ténéré 700 test bike in California that same year, he added some factory luggage and other accessories and hit the road for 3,000 miles. “In my local mountains or out in the desert, the T7 has been an excellent partner for exploration, corner carving, and flat-out movin’ down the road,” he wrote in his 2021 tour test review. Kysely liked the T7 so much, he sold his 2009 BMW F 800 GS – which had 65,000 adventure-heavy miles on its odometer – and bought our test bike from Yamaha.

Consistent with the no-frills theme of the original, when Yamaha updated the Ténéré 700 for 2024, it didn’t go overboard. The monochrome LCD screen, which Wing and Kysely said required too much scrolling to access key info and was rendered useless when powdered with trail dust, has been replaced with a 5-inch color TFT display with smartphone connectivity. Like the old screen, the new one has a rally-style vertical orientation, and it now has two display modes: Explorer and Street.

Related: Backcountry Discovery Routes: Two Buddies on Yamaha Ténéré 700s in Utah and Arizona

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo

GEAR UP

Other updates include an additional ABS mode. Whereas the previous model’s ABS was only switchable between On and Off, the 2024 model also has an Off-Road mode that deactivates ABS at the rear only. To better access settings and menus on the TFT display and change ABS mode, there’s a new scroll wheel on the right switchgear. There are also sleek new LED turnsignals with clear lenses that replace homely amber “pumpkin” indicators, and the T7’s wiring harness has been updated to accept Yamaha’s plug-and-play accessory QSS quickshifter ($199.99), which allows for clutchless upshifts.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo
Most off-road adventures require miles of pavement to get to the trail, and the T7 is smooth, agile, and fun on curves and reasonably comfortable on the highway.

We had been testing a 2023 T7 for several months – that’s the bike you see on the cover and in the action shots, ridden by our capable contributor Thad Wolff – when Yamaha hosted a one-day launch for the 2024 model in December. I rode our 2023 test bike down to Yamaha’s SoCal headquarters, swapped it for a 2024 fitted with a quickshifter, and racked up a few hundred more on- and off-road miles.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo
The CP2 689cc parallel-Twin is a lively engine. New for 2024 is a plug-and-play accessory quickshifter.

Modular Motor

Sending power via chain to the T7’s rear wheel is Yamaha’s CP2 689cc parallel-Twin, the same compact engine also found in the MT-07 naked bike, YZF-R7 sportbike, and – in highly modified form – MT-07 DT racebike that’s used in American Flat Track. For T7 duty, the engine gets a dedicated airbox, cooling system, ECU settings, and exhaust system.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo
With a 48% front/52% rear weight bias and a 452-lb curb weight, the T7 lofts its front wheel with ease.

The Twin’s 270-degree crankshaft provides more evenly spaced power pulses than a 180-degree crank. It also produces a torquey feel and a lively exhaust note yet runs smoothly throughout the rev range. Fueling is spot-on, and power delivery is linear, reaching a peak of 63 hp at 9,000 rpm and 43 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm at the rear wheel, as measured on Jett Tuning’s dyno. There are no ride modes, selectable engine maps, or traction control; just calibrate the twist of your wrist for direct results.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 dyno

Holding the T7 together is a durable steel perimeter frame with a double-braced steering head and removable lower frame rails for engine maintenance, and the steel trellis subframe is welded to the main frame. The long cast-aluminum swingarm enhances rear-wheel traction, and the distance between the axles is a lengthy 62.8 inches.

Sitting or standing on the Ténéré 700, it feels very narrow between the knees. The two-piece seat is long and slender, with a flat section that slopes down from the pillion to its lowest point directly above the footpegs and then continues up onto the tank. If the 34.4-inch seat height is too intimidating, Yamaha offers some relief with a low seat ($129.99) that reduces height by 0.8 inch and a lowering kit ($114.99) that drops seat height by another 0.7 inch, bringing the seat down to 32.9 inches.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo
The stock seat is tall, narrow, and firm.

For our test on the 2024 model, we opted for the accessory one-piece rally seat ($219.99), which has cover material that’s less grippy than the stock seat and a flatter surface that makes it easier to slide fore and aft when riding over uneven terrain. By eliminating the lower dished section, the rally seat has thicker foam and sits at a lofty 36 inches.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Joseph Agustin Photo
The new color TFT dash has two display modes and smartphone connectivity to Yamaha’s Y-Connect app. (Photo by Joseph Agustin)

Yamaha Ténéré 700: Perfect for Roads Less Traveled

The popularity of adventure bikes is largely due to their versatility. The Ténéré 700 can go just about anywhere and do just about anything, and it’s aimed at riders who place a high importance on off-road capability. Its 21-inch front and 18-inch rear wheels are better for rolling over technical terrain and accommodate a wider variety of knobby tires than the 19-inch/17-inch wheels found on many adventure bikes.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo
Ténéré, meaning “desert” in the Tuareg language, refers to a vast, dune-filled Saharan plain that was a grueling stage in the Paris-Dakar Rally, which Yamaha won in 1979 and 1980.

The T7’s Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tires have a 70/30 on/off-road bias, and they work quite well in the dirt yet also provide decent grip on pavement without being noisy at highway speeds. The T7 also has tube-type spoked rims, which are light and will take a beating, but they make flat repairs a more involved process than with tubeless tires.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo

Furthering the Ténéré 700’s off-road prowess is fully adjustable long-travel KYB suspension, which has good damping and soaks up big hits and dips like a champ. During the off-road portion of our photoshoot, Thad Wolff said he felt comfortable right away, allowing him to slide, jump, and wheelie the T7 like a big dirtbike. During my off-road ride through the mountains of Cleveland National Forest, I had fun jumping the T7 off water bars and lofting the front wheel over small gullies on the trail, maneuvers that were made easier by the bike’s 48% front/52% rear weight bias and 9.4-inch ground clearance. I appreciate the new Off-Road ABS mode because it provides more confidence in the front on sketchy, loose terrain while allowing rear-wheel skids or slides. The T7’s 452-lb curb weight is comparable to other bikes in its class. Though it’s light for a streetbike, its weight needs to be respected when riding off-road.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo
The big “pumpkin” turnsignals have been replaced in 2024 with clear-lens LED indicators.

But when the trail ride is done, and you’ve got miles of slab ahead of you – like the 100 miles of pavement on my route home after the press launch – the Ténéré 700 adapts like a chameleon to the new environment. Its rally-style windscreen is small but does a good job of managing airflow. The engine runs smoothly at highway speeds, and the 4.2-gallon tank was good for more than 200 miles at the 49-mpg average we recorded during our test, which included some aggressive throttle twisting. On the downside, there is no cruise control, and the stock seat leaves much to be desired for the long haul. If the taller (and thicker) rally seat isn’t a viable option, there are aftermarket saddles from companies like Seat Concepts.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo
A new Off-Road ABS mode deactivates anti-lock braking at the rear only. Blue anodized spoked rims look trick but require tubes.

On twisty pavement, the Ténéré 700 handles with confidence without any untoward turning resistance from the 21-inch front wheel. Its torquey Twin, moderate weight, wide handlebar, and narrow tires help the T7 rail through curves like an overgrown supermoto, and its brakes shed speed competently if not impressively.

Related: A Yamaha Ténéré 700 Adventure from Biarritz, France, to the Bardenas Badlands

Yamaha Ténéré 700: My Next Bike?

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Joseph Agustin Photo
2024 Yamaha Ténéré 700 (Photo by Joseph Agustin)

When it comes to test bikes, I’m promiscuous. As a Rider staffer, I’ve tested hundreds of motorcycles over the past 16 years. But when it comes to personal bikes, I’m a serial monogamist. Soon after getting hired, I started borrowing former EIC Mark Tuttle’s Kawasaki KLR650, which is the bike I cut my off-road teeth on. After lots of cajoling, Mark finally sold me the KLR, and the bike and I enjoyed several faithful, adventurous years together. Eventually, having grown tired of the KLR’s finicky carburetor and lack of power, I got the seven-year itch. I sold it and bought our lighter, more powerful 2017 KTM 690 Enduro R test bike. It’s fantastic off-road, but its vibration and lack of comfort on the road get old quick.

Related: White Rim Trail on KTM 690 Enduros | Favorite Ride

So here I am, at a crossroads, wondering what to do next and seriously considering the new Ténéré 700 for my own garage. Thad Wolff also really likes the Ténéré 700, especially its price, simplicity, and capability, and he could see himself owning one, though he’d like to make a few modifications to improve its comfort and touring ability. I agree on all counts, and Arden Kysely’s 2021 tour test and his long-term reviews of the T7 cover some useful upgrades. Arden now has nearly 17,000 trouble-free miles on his T7, and he’s a satisfied owner – an endorsement that further stokes my desire for the T7. To help me decide, I’ll keep our test bike for as long as possible, tailor it to my needs, and report on the experience. Stay tuned.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 Kevin Wing Photo

Check out more new/updated bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

2024 Yamaha Ténéré 700 Specs

  • Base Price: $10,799
  • Price as Tested: $11,219 (quickshifter, rally seat)
  • Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
  • Website: YamahaMotorsports.com 

ENGINE

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
  • Displacement: 689cc 
  • Bore x Stroke: 80.0mm x 68.6mm 
  • Compression Ratio: 11.5:1
  • Valve Adj. Interval: 26,600 miles
  • Fuel Delivery: DFI w/ 38mm throttle bodies x 2
  • Lubrication System: Wet sump, 2.75 qt. cap.
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet clutch 
  • Final Drive: Chain 

CHASSIS

  • Frame: Steel perimeter frame w/ removable lower rails, steel trellis subframe & cast-aluminum swingarm
  • Wheelbase: 62.8 in.
  • Rake/Trail: 27.0 degrees/4.1 in.
  • Seat Height: 34.4 in.
  • Suspension, Front: 43mm inverted fork, fully adj., 8.3 in. travel
  • Rear: Single shock, fully adj. w/ remote preload adjuster, 7.9 in. travel
  • Brakes, Front: Dual 282mm discs w/ 2-piston floating calipers & ABS
  • Rear: Single 245mm disc w/ 1-piston floating caliper & ABS
  • Wheels, Front: Spoked, 1.85 x 21 in.
  • Rear: Spoked, 4.0 x 18 in.
  • Tires, Front: Tube-type, 90/90-21
  • Rear: Tube-type, 150/70-R18
  • Wet Weight: 452 lb
  • Load Capacity: 417 lb
  • GVWR: 869 lb

PERFORMANCE

  • Horsepower: 63.1 hp @ 9,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
  • Torque: 43.4 lb-ft @ 6,500 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
  • Fuel Capacity: 4.2 gal. 
  • Fuel Consumption: 49 mpg
  • Estimated Range: 206 miles

The post 2024 Yamaha Ténéré 700 Review | Rider Test appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Yamaha MT-09 and MT-09 SP Review | First Look

2024 Yamaha MT-09 SP
2024 Yamaha MT-09 SP

Yamaha recently announced the newest evolution of its popular hyper naked middleweight sportbike, the 2024 Yamaha MT-09 and MT-09 SP. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the bike originally known as the FZ-09 in the U.S. but which was released as the MT-09 in 2013.

The new 2024 MT-09 retains the previous model’s liquid-cooled 890cc inline-Triple with DOHC, a lightweight controlled fill diecast aluminum frame, and 6-axis IMU with a full suite of lean-sensitve rider aids, but it adds a long list of new features to further enhance the MT experience. And the MT-09 SP takes it up another notch.

Related: 2023 Yamaha MT-09 SP | First Ride Review

Adding to the electronics suite on the bikes is the addition of a new Back Slip Regulator (BSR), which uses engine RPM and wheel speed data to reduce rear wheel lock up under engine braking by controlling the level of torque produced. This is especially useful in low-grip situations when it is difficult to activate the slipper clutch. The system can be turned on or off in the Yamaha Ride Control (YRC) settings menu.

2024 Yamaha MT-09 Matte Raven Black
2024 Yamaha MT-09 in Matte Raven Black
2024 Yamaha MT-09 Team Yamaha Blue
2024 Yamaha MT-09 in Team Yamaha Blue

Both bikes are also equipped with Yamaha’s new third-generation Quick Shift System (QSS) for clutchless upshifts and downshifts. QSS has two settings. Setting 1 enables shifting up while accelerating and shifting down when decelerating. Setting 2 expands functionality across a wider range of situations by permitting downshifts while accelerating and upshifts when decelerating.

From a braking standpoint, the MT-09 is enhanced by a new Brembo radial master cylinder where the piston moves in a direction parallel to brake lever travel. This sends hydraulic pressure in a linear manner when the rider pulls the lever for improved controllability. The new master cylinder is paired with dual 298mm front discs and a single 245mm rear disc. The MT-09 SP levels up with Brembo Stylema monoblock calipers, which feature a slimmer piston and brake pad area compared to conventional calipers, as well as being lighter and more rigid and offering enhanced control. In addition, larger-diameter pistons create more braking force.

2024 Yamaha MT-09 SP
2024 Yamaha MT-09 SP

Suspension has also been revised for 2024, with the MT-09 sporting a 41mm inverted fork adjustable for preload, compression, and rebound, and the adjustable KYB rear shock features revised linkage settings. New for 2024, higher spring rates and updated damping characteristics are tuned to accommodate a wider range of speeds and to match new standard fitment Bridgestone Battlax Hypersport S23 tires.

2024 Yamaha MT-09 SP
2024 Yamaha MT-09 SP

On the MT-09 SP, a DLC-coated 41mm KYB fork offers full adjustability for preload, rebound, and high- and low-speed compression damping. In the back, the Öhlins shock is also fully adjustable and comes equipped with a remote preload adjuster enabling quick and easy changes.

See all of Rider’s Yamaha coverage here.

New for 2024, MT-09 riders can further customize their riding experience via Yamaha Ride Control (YRC) settings that allow the selection of engine power characteristics and electronic intervention levels. Three integrated ride modes are programmed with factory settings to suit different situations: Sport, Street, and Rain.  Additionally, riders can create two custom programs with tailored settings to suit exact preferences. YRC settings can be customized either directly within the TFT display menu or on a smartphone via the Y-Connect app.

2024 Yamaha MT-09 SP
2024 Yamaha MT-09 SP

In addition to factory and custom setting available on the standard MT-09, SP specification adds four exclusive Track modes allowing for more specialized track settings, including the option of choosing between two Engine Brake Management settings and the ability to turn rear ABS off.

Intuitive new turn signal functions further improve the riding experience. A soft click of the indicator switch will flash the turn signals three times for lane changes, while a full click will flash continuously. Turn signals will also self-cancel after 15 seconds and once the bike has travelled for more than 500 feet.

Already known for its engaging riding experience, ergonomics on the new 2024 MT-09 have been further enhanced, including a lower handlebar position with two customizable settings. Newly designed footrests sit slightly more rearward and are also adjustable. Combined with the new fuel tank design, which sits 30mm lower than the previous model, riding position is more dedicated, and handlebar steering angle is 4 degrees greater on each side for a tighter turning radius and improved low-speed maneuverability. Additionally, the new two-part seat design is slimmer for increased freedom of movement and an easier reach to the ground.

2024 Yamaha MT-09
2024 Yamaha MT-09

Visually speaking, a new headlight has a bi-functional LED projector that features a compact diameter lens module that is both smaller and thinner than the previous model while still providing a broad, powerful beam. Transparent twin LED position lights complete the MT-09’s more compact, sharp, and aggressive face. This theme is continued at the rear with a newly designed LED taillight with a slimmer look and new color layout, along with LED turn signals. In addition the lower position of the fuel tank, it has also been redesigned with sharper, more defined lines while still maintaining the distinctively modern street aesthetic.

2024 Yamaha MT-09
2024 Yamaha MT-09

And of course, you can’t forget the distinctive wail of the MT-09’s crossplane Triple powerplant. The 2024 MT-09 features a new two-duct intake design with acoustic amplifier grilles located on top of the fuel tank to accentuate high frequency induction sounds, delivering the CP3’s induction roar directly to the rider for an enhanced sensation of torque and acceleration.

Both bikes have a new 5-inch full-color TFT display replacing the 3.5-inch display on the previous model and offering four different themes to suit specific riding situations or individual preference. The screen is navigated through all-new integrated handlebar switches, and Yamaha says the buttons’ shape and feel have been extensively refined to provide intuitive operation in a compact, easy-to-use solution. For the SP, the on-track riding experience is further enhanced by a dedicated SP-exclusive Track theme featuring a prominent lap timer.

2024 Yamaha MT-09 TFT
A 5-inch TFT replaces the former 3.5-inch TFT on both MT-09 models.
2024 Yamaha MT-09 SP
The 2024 Yamaha MT-09 SP display includes a specific Track theme with a lap timer.

Connectivity now comes standard on the MT-09 via a built-in Communication Control Unit (CCU), allowing riders to link their smartphone to the motorcycle using Yamaha’s free Y-Connect app. As well as receiving call and message notifications on the TFT display, a new dimension is added to the ride with the option of taking calls or listening to music through use of an aftermarket Bluetooth headset (not provided). Additionally, full turn-by-turn navigation is available through the Garmin StreetCross app. Finally, riders can opt to personalize the TFT display by sending images from their smartphone via the Y-Connect app.

The 2024 MT-09 SP will also incorporate Yamaha’s Smart Key System. When the smart key is within a specified range of the motorcycle, such as in your pocket, the engine can be started by turning a newly designed switch. The new system also features a lock and unlock function for the fuel tank cap for added convenience.

The new 2024 Yamaha MT-09 will be available in either Team Yamaha Blue, Midnight Cyan, or Matte Raven Black, arriving to dealers in March 2024 for $10,599 MSRP.

2024 Yamaha MT-09 Midnight Cyan
2024 Yamaha MT-09 in Midnight Cyan

The 2024 MT-09 SP comes in an R1M-inspired Liquid Metal/Raven color scheme with the SP’s hallmark polished and clear coated aluminum swingarm. The MT-09 SP will arrive in dealerships in late spring 2024 for $12,299 MSRP.

For more information, visit the Yamaha Motorsports website.

Check out more new/updated bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

The post 2024 Yamaha MT-09 and MT-09 SP Review | First Look appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

More Returning 2024 Yamaha Motorcycles Announced

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha XSR900
2024 Yamaha XSR900 in Heritage White

In July, Yamaha announced several new/updated motorcycles for 2024, including the Ténéré 700 adventure bike and Tracer 9 GT+ sport-tourer, as well as returning dual-sport and adventure models (XT250, TW200, and Super Ténéré ES).

This week, during the EICMA show in Milan, Yamaha announced updated versions of the MT-09 and MT-09 SP naked sportbikes as well as returning models in several categories, including Hyper Naked, Sport Heritage, Sport Touring, Supersport, and Scooter.


2024 Yamaha Motorcycles: Hyper Naked

Born from the “Dark Side of Japan” design concept, Yamaha says its line of Hyper Naked MT models deliver aggressive street-focused styling and supersport-level capability. In addition to the updated MT-09 and MT-09 SP, the MT-03, MT-07, MT-10, and MT-10 SP return unchanged for 2024.

2024 Yamaha MT-03

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha MT-03
2024 Yamaha MT-03 in Midnight Cyan

The entry-level MT-03, with a liquid-cooled 321cc parallel-Twin with DOHC and 4 valves per cylinder, returns in Midnight Cyan or Matte Stealth Black for $4,999 MSRP.

Related: Yamaha MT-03 Review | First Ride

2024 Yamaha MT-07

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha MT-07
2024 Yamaha MT-07 in Team Yamaha Blue

The middleweight MT-07, powered by a liquid-cooled 689cc CP2 parallel-Twin with a crossplane-style 270-degree crankshaft, DOHC, and 4 valves per cylinder returns in Team Yamaha Blue, Midnight Cyan or Matte Raven Black for $8,199 MSRP

Related: Yamaha MT-07 Review | Road Test

2024 Yamaha MT-10

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha MT-10
2024 Yamaha MT-10 in Midnight Cyan

The MT-10, powered by a liquid-cooled 998cc CP4 inline-Four with a crossplane crankshaft, DOHC, and 4 valves per cylinder, returns in Midnight Cyan for $14,499 MSRP.

Related: Yamaha MT-10 Review | First Ride

2024 Yamaha MT-10 SP

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha MT-10 SP
2024 Yamaha MT-10 SP in Liquid Metal/Raven

The up-spec MT-10 SP returns in Liquid Metal/Raven for $16,999 MSRP.

Related: Yamaha MT-10 SP Review | First Ride


2024 Yamaha Motorcycles: Sport Heritage

Yamaha says its Sport Heritage lineup offers equal parts street-conquering performance and standout retro-inspired style. It includes two cruisers and two roadsters.

2024 Yamaha Bolt

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha Bolt R-Spec
2024 Yamaha Bolt R-Spec in Raven

The Bolt R-Spec cruiser, which has an air-cooled 58ci (942cc) V-Twin, returns in Raven for $8,899 MSRP.

Related: Renting a Yamaha Star Bolt from EagleRider

2024 Yamaha V Star 250

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha V Star 250
2024 Yamaha V Star 250 in Raven

The light and accessible V Star 250 cruiser, powered by an air-cooled 15ci (249cc) V-Twin, returns in Raven for $4,699 MSRP.

2024 Yamaha XSR700

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha XSR700
2024 Yamaha XS7900 in Raven

The XSR700, a retro roadster with a liquid-cooled 689cc CP2 parallel-Twin with a crossplane-style crankshaft, returns in Raven for $8,899 MSRP.

Related: Yamaha XSR700 Review | Long-Term Ride

2024 Yamaha XSR900

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha XSR900
2024 Yamaha XSR900 in Heritage White

The XSR900, a larger retro roadster powered by a liquid-cooled 890cc CP3 inline-Triple with a crossplane-style crankshaft, returns in Heritage White for $10,299 MSRP.

Related: Yamaha XSR900 Review | First Ride


2024 Yamaha Motorcycles: Sport Touring

2024 Yamaha FJR1300ES

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha FJR1300ES
2024 Yamaha FJR1300ES in Cobalt Blue

The perfect tool for long-distance on-road adventures, Yamaha’s sport-touring motorcycles are designed to provide strong, torquey engines, advanced technology, and all-day comfort. In addition to the 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+, the open-class FJR1300ES, powered by a liquid-cooled 1,298cc inline-Four and equipped with electronic suspension (ES), returns in Cobalt Blue for $18,299 MSRP.

Related: Yamaha FJR1300ES Review | Road Test


2024 Yamaha Motorcycles: Supersport

Yamaha’s line of high-performance R-Series supersport motorcycles are designed for the track as well as the street, combining high-revving engines, agile chassis, and distinctive styling.

2024 Yamaha YZF-R3

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha YZF-R3
2024 Yamaha YZF-R3 in Vivid White

The entry-level YZF-R3, with a liquid-cooled 321cc parallel-Twin with DOHC and 4 valves per cylinder, returns in Team Yamaha Blue or Vivid White for $5,499 MSRP.

Related: Yamaha YZF-R3 Review | First Ride

2024 Yamaha YZF-R7

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha YZF-R7
2024 Yamaha YZF-R7 in Team Yamaha Blue

The middleweight YZF-R7, with a liquid-cooled 689cc CP2 parallel-Twin with a crossplane-style 270-degree crankshaft, DOHC, and 4 valves per cylinder, returns in Team Yamaha Blue, Raven, or Matte Gray for $9,199 MSRP.

Related: Yamaha YZF-R7 Review | First Ride

2024 Yamaha YZF-R1

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha YZF-R1
2024 Yamaha YZF-R1 in Raven

The liter-class YZF-R1, powered by a liquid-cooled 998cc CP4 inline-Four with a crossplane crankshaft, DOHC, and 4 valves per cylinder, returns in Team Yamaha Blue or Raven for $18,399 MSRP.

Related: Yamaha YZF-R1 and YZF-R1M Review | First Look

2024 Yamaha YZF-R1M

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha YZF-R1M
2024 Yamaha YZF-R1M in Carbon Fiber

The top-of-the-line YZF-R1M returns in Carbon Fiber for $27,399 MSRP.

Related: Yamaha YZF-R1 and YZF-R1M Review | First Look


2024 Yamaha Scooters

Yamaha says its scooters are built for economical urban fun. Reliable, efficient, and offering motorcycle-inspired capability for handling everything from rush-hour commutes to weekend get-aways.

2024 Yamaha XMAX

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha XMAX Scooter
2024 Yamaha XMAX in Granite Gray

The XMAX, powered by a liquid-cooled 292cc Single with SOHC and 4 valves, returns in Granite Gray for $6,199 MSRP.

Related: Yamaha XMAX Scooter Review | First Look

2024 Yamaha Zuma 125

2024 Yamaha Motorcycles 2024 Yamaha Zuma 125
2024 Yamaha Zuma 125 in Sand Gray

The Zuma 125, powered by a liquid-cooled 125cc Single with SOHC and 4 valves, returns in Matte Black or Sand Gray for $3,799 MSRP.

For more information on all 2024 Yamaha motorcycles, visit Yamaha’s website.

Check out more new bikes in Rider‘s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

The post More Returning 2024 Yamaha Motorcycles Announced appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ Review | Video

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
This is the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+’s happy place. (Photo by Joseph Agustin)

Now in its fourth generation since the FJ-09 debuted for 2015, the 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ sport-tourer has been updated with an eye toward refinement and sophistication.

The ‘+’ added to the model name this year brings with it a host of upgrades: a new millimeter-wave radar that continuously measures distance to vehicles ahead and enables adaptive cruise control and a world-first radar-linked Unified Brake System, integrated ride modes, the next generation of the KYB Actimatic Damper System (KADS) electronic suspension, an updated quickshifter, a new 7-inch TFT display with simplified menus, new switchgear, and integration with the Yamaha MyLink and Garmin Motorize smartphone apps.

Rider’s Editor-in-Chief Greg Drevenstedt logged 1,400 miles for our road test and he had this to say: The Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ gets a big gold star for being a fantastic, well-rounded, well-sorted sport-tourer. Although its $16,499 MSRP is $1,500 above that of the previous model, the GT+ offers a level of technological sophistication that isn’t available on another motorcycle priced less than $25,000.

Watch the video below to see the Tracer 9 GT+ in action and read our full review.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ Specifications

ENGINE

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
  • Displacement: 890cc
  • Bore x Stroke: 78.0 x 62.1mm
  • Compression Ratio: 11.5:1
  • Valve Insp. Interval: 26,600 miles
  • Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ YCC-T & 41mm throttle bodies x 3
  • Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.4 qt. cap.
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet slip/assist clutch & up/down quickshifter
  • Final Drive: O-ring chain

CHASSIS

  • Frame: Cast aluminum w/ engine as stressed member, cast aluminum swingarm & steel subframe
  • Wheelbase: 59.1 in.
  • Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
  • Seat Height: 32.3/32.9 in.
  • Suspension, Front: 41mm inverted fork, electronically adj. rebound & compression, manually adj. preload, 5.1 in. travel
  • Rear: Single shock, electronically adj. rebound, manually adj. preload (remote), 5.4 in. travel
  • Brakes, Front: Dual 298mm discs w/ 4-piston radial calipers & ABS
  • Rear: Single 267mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
  • Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.50 x 17 in.
  • Rear: Cast, 5.50 x 17 in.
  • Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
  • Rear: 180/55-ZR17
  • Wet Weight: 492 lb
  • Load Capacity: 407 lb
  • GVWR: 910 lb

PERFORMANCE

  • Horsepower: 108 @ 10,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
  • Torque: 63 lb-ft @ 7,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
  • Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gal.
  • Fuel Consumption: 45.9 mpg
  • Estimated Range: 230 miles

The post 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ Review | Video appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ Review | Road Test

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
The 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ has been updated with new technology, including adaptive cruise control and a radar-linked Unified Braking System, as well as numerous refinements. (Photos by Joseph Agustin)

When a bike wins Rider’s Motorcycle of the Year award, as the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT did in 2021, it’s a special machine that beat out dozens of others in the year it was selected. But every motorcycle, even very good ones, can be made better. Just two years after earning MOTY honors, we have the new and improved Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+.

What does the ‘+’ at the end of the name entail? Quite a bit, actually. Tucked under the nose of the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ is a new millimeter-wave radar that continuously measures distance to vehicles ahead and enables two features: adaptive cruise control and a radar-linked Unified Brake System. Also new on the GT+ are integrated ride modes, the next generation of the KYB Actimatic Damper System (KADS) electronic suspension, an updated quickshifter, a new 7-inch TFT display with simplified menus, new switchgear, and integration with the Yamaha MyLink and Garmin Motorize smartphone apps.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
For 2024, the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ is available in only one colorway: Storm Gray with black and gold accents.

This fourth generation of the Tracer 9 platform – which began with the FJ-09 for 2015 and became the Tracer 900 GT for 2019, the Tracer 9 GT for 2021, and now the Tracer 9 GT+ for 2024 – is about refinement. It adds useful tech and smooths out a few rough edges but retains what has made the FJ/Tracer a Rider favorite for nearly a decade. As we wrote when the Tracer 9 GT won MOTY in 2021, “Thanks to steady evolution and improvement over three generations, Yamaha has demonstrated just how good a modern sport-tourer can be, especially for riders who value agility over couch-like luxury. Performance, sophistication, comfort, versatility, load/luggage capacity – the Tracer checks all the right boxes and leaves nothing on the table.”

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
With a curb weight less than 500 lb and a strong, responsive chassis, the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ loves to dive into and out of corners.

Returning unchanged is the star of the show – the liquid-cooled 890cc CP3 inline-Triple with a crossplane crankshaft, which made 108 hp at 10,000 rpm and 63 lb-ft of torque at 7,200 rpm at the rear wheel on Jett Tuning’s dyno. The CP3 has always been an exciting engine that’s full of character, and it continues to deliver in spades. As before, wrapped around the engine is a controlled-fill diecast Deltabox aluminum frame that is both strong and light. The GT+ also has an aluminum swingarm, a steel subframe, and lightweight spinforged wheels shod with excellent Bridgestone Battlax T32 sport-touring tires. A comprehensive electronics package, 30-liter side cases, LED cornering lights, heated grips, a height-adjustable windscreen, adjustable ergonomics, and many other useful features are all part of the deal.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
The Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ is powered by a liquid-cooled 890cc inline-Triple with a crossplane crankshaft.

Since this review takes a deep dive into the new tech, I’ll cut to the chase: The Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ gets a big gold star for being a fantastic, well-rounded, well-sorted sport-tourer. For this test, I logged over 1,400 miles in three days, and my admiration for the bike deepened with each passing mile. Although its $16,499 MSRP is $1,500 above that of the previous model, the GT+ offers a level of technological sophistication that isn’t available on another motorcycle priced less than $25,000.

Related: Yamaha Announces Updated Ténéré 700, Other Returning 2024 Models

ACC and UBS on the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
The millimeter-wave radar unit is the black box between the two round LED headlights (the left is low beam, right in high beam). The cat-eye lights below the windscreen have LED position lights along the bottom and cornering lights in the center.

A millimeter-wave (mmWave) radar system emits short-wavelength electromagnetic wave signals that are reflected by objects in their path, allowing the system to determine the distance and velocity of those objects. In the case of the Tracer 9 GT+, the radar detects vehicles ahead in the same lane – it’s unaffected by vehicles going in the same direction in adjacent lanes or approaching vehicles in opposing lanes. When adaptive cruise control (ACC) is engaged, the system shows a car icon if a vehicle is detected within a certain range. If the vehicle ahead is traveling at a slower speed than that set for cruise control, the Tracer will slow to match the lead vehicle’s speed and maintain a set distance. A trigger on the left grip allows the rider to select among four set following distances, ranging from a minimum of one second to a maximum of two seconds. With the mmWave radar box tucked into a central cavity between the headlights and weighing only 7 ounces, it has minimal impact on aesthetics or overall weight.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
For my two-day ride home from Boise, Idaho, I had my gear packed into the two 30L side cases and a Nelson-Rigg dry duffel bag. (Photo by the author)

After riding 200 miles around Boise, Idaho, during the one-day press launch, I logged two consecutive 600-mile days riding home to Ventura, California. Day 1 took me due south from Boise through the empty high desert of southwestern Idaho, down into Nevada to Eureka, and across Nevada’s basin-and-range landscape on U.S. Route 50 – “The Loneliest Road in America” – to Carson City. On Day 2, I climbed up the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada range, rode along the shore of Lake Tahoe, crossed into California, and bagged four of the highest paved Sierra passes – Ebbetts (8,730 feet), Monitor (8,314 feet), Sonora (9,624 feet), and Tioga (9,945 feet) – before cruising south on U.S. Route 395 and west on State Routes 14 and 26 to the coast.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
California Route 120, just a few miles from Tioga Pass, which is located at the eastern entrance to Yosemite National Park. (Photo by the author)

There were few people in these wide-open spaces, and the heaviest traffic I encountered was millions and millions of Mormon crickets that covered some of the roads in Idaho and Nevada for miles. At times I shared the road with a coyote, a few antelopes, and several fast-moving pikas, their tails sticking straight up in the air as they scurried across the hot asphalt. Temperatures ranged from 50 to 100 degrees, and several desert rainstorms provided cooling relief from the summer heat.⁠

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
For 88 desolate miles, Nevada Route 278 connects Interstate 80 at Carlin to U.S. Route 50 near Eureka. If you want to get away from crowds, this road is for you. (Photo by the author)

I’ve never been a heavy user of cruise control – I’d use it occasionally to give my right arm a break, to do some stretches, or to keep the bike at a steady speed while I opened or closed vents in my jacket – but I disliked having to disengage and re-engage cruise control when I came upon other vehicles in my lane. But I used adaptive cruise control for much of my 1,200-mile trip home. I’d set it to avoid the speed creep that can happen on long rides, sometimes leading to unpleasant interactions with the local constabulary. When I’d come upon a vehicle ahead of me, ACC would adjust the bike’s speed using engine braking, and then, if necessary, the front and rear brakes. If I changed lanes to overtake the vehicle, ACC would accelerate to the set speed.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
View of the TFT display on the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ with the Garmin Motorize navigation screen up and adaptive cruise control engaged. The single white line atop three gray lines below the green ACC icon indicates that the shortest following distance is selected. If the radar detected a vehicle in front, there would be a white car icon above the dashed lines. (Photo by the author)

ACC works from 20-99 mph in all gears, and only if traction control, slide control, and (front wheel) lift control are turned on (which they are by default in all ride modes). When using ACC’s acceleration and deceleration toggle switch, speed can be adjusted in 1-mph or 5-mph increments. Furthermore, using inputs from the 6-axis IMU (inertial measurement unit), ACC employs cornering assist (limits acceleration when leaned over), passing assist (smooths acceleration when the turnsignal is on), KADS integration (adjusts suspension damping to limit chassis pitch), and a rider warning system if following distance is too close. While all the different features of ACC may make it sound complicated, in practice it is very intuitive to use. ACC, however, is not a collision avoidance system or some sort of autopilot; the rider needs to stay engaged at all times.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
Up front, the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ has dual 298mm discs pinched by 4-piston radial calipers. When needed (and the rider is already on the brakes), the radar-linked Unified Braking System will use engine braking and then front/rear brakes as needed.

The mmWave radar system also enables a radar-linked Unified Brake System that Yamaha says is a world-first technology on the Tracer 9 GT+. Using inputs from the IMU, suspension control unit, and engine control unit, the system adjusts braking and suspension forces to help keep the motorcycle under control. If the rider applies the brakes and the radar system detects an object or vehicle in the road, UBS will apply additional front/rear braking as needed, and compression damping will be increased to prevent chassis pitch. The Brake Control (cornering ABS) system must be turned on, and UBS works whether or not ACC is engaged. UBS is not an emergency braking system; it provides assistance only if the rider is already on the brakes. To support UBS and improve overall braking performance, Yamaha increased the diameter of the Tracer’s rear brake disc from 245mm to 267mm and made the rear brake pedal slightly wider with a more beveled shape.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
When ACC is engaged on the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+, the cornering assist function will limit acceleration when the bike is leaned over.

GEAR UP

I used ACC for many hours of my two-day ride home, and how it worked when I approached or passed other vehicles on the road was obvious. Perhaps because there was little traffic on the road, I don’t recall any moments of hard or abrupt braking that would have engaged the radar-linked UBS function. An icon will flash on the TFT display, similar to a traction control light flickering when rear wheel spin is being managed, but I didn’t see such an icon. Then again, if I’m braking hard to avoid hitting something, I’m focused on the road and not on the dash.

Other New New on the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

Whereas ACC and UBS are new features, other updates refine existing ones. The quickshifter previously allowed clutchless upshifts during acceleration and clutchless downshifts during deceleration. On the GT+, the quickshifter also allows upshifts during deceleration (e.g., to limit engine braking) and downshifts during acceleration (e.g., to assist with making a pass). Also, the quickshifter can be used when ACC is engaged.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
The 7-inch TFT screen on the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ has three display modes and an anti-glare coating. The vehicle info “favorites” can be selected to show on the right side.

From a user-interface perspective, two of the best upgrades on the Tracer 9 GT+ are the move from a pair of 3.5-inch TFT displays to a single 7-inch TFT display and revised switchgear. The TFT has crisp, full-color graphics, three display modes, and an anti-glare coating that makes the screen legible even in bright sunlight. Simplified menu systems are more intuitive than before, and the joystick and home button on the left grip make navigating between screens, menus, and functions easy (though occasionally I’d mistake the joystick for the turnsignal switch, which is just to the left of it). All the switches have ergonomic shapes, a tactile feel, and new backlighting.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
The switchgear on the left grip of the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ includes controls for high beam/low beam/pass, adaptive cruise control, turnsignal, horn, menu joystick, home/return, and ACC distance set (on front, not shown).

The Tracer 9 GT+ offers Bluetooth connectivity, allowing a smartphone and up to two headsets to be connected to the bike for controlling music and phone calls. The free Yamaha MyLink app allows text messages and incoming call info to be displayed on the dash, provides weather info and alerts, and allows use of the Garmin Motorize navigation app (subscription required – $4.99/month or $39.99/year). I used both, and Garmin Motorize was especially useful because it displayed Garmin’s familiar GPS screen right on the TFT display, eliminating the hassle of mounting a separate GPS unit or my smartphone on the bike for navigation. Using the Garmin app, however, was a drain on my iPhone’s battery, going from 100% to about 50% in just a few hours. There is a USB-A outlet just below the dash, so I ran a charging cord from the outlet to the phone in my pocket as needed.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
The Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ TFT display showing the Garmin navigation screen.

As much as I liked the features and capabilities of the Yamaha MyLink and Garmin Motorize apps, I do have a couple nits to pick. First, the Yamaha app must be paired to a smartphone via wi-fi, but when the bike is shut down (such as removing the key to open the fuel filler) and then turned back on, the bike and Yamaha MyLink app wouldn’t always reconnect automatically. Sometimes it would be just a matter of opening the app and tapping the paired device button to reestablish the connection. But occasionally it would connect and then quickly disconnect, saying “communication error.” I’d get stuck in a connect/disconnect loop until finally the app and the bike decided to start talking to each other again. When on the side of the road after a photo stop or at a gas station during a long day’s ride, such connectivity issues can be frustrating.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
When I’m in a place like this, at the top of 9,624-foot Sonora Pass, I don’t want to deal with app connectivity issues. (Photo by the author)

My other nit to pick may reflect my personal proclivities and be completely irrelevant to others. When the Garmin Motorize app is being used, a long press of the home button on the left grip switches between the main screen and the navigation screen (a short tap of the home button brings up other functions). When the navigation screen is up, only limited vehicle information is displayed: coolant temperature on the left, fuel level on the right, and along the top, speed, ride mode, gear position, quickshifter status, and one of only four data points: odometer, tripmeter 1, total travel time, and clock, which can be scrolled through using the joystick. One of my favorite data points is ambient temperature, but it’s not available on that screen.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
Part of our test ride on the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ in Idaho included Wildlife Canyon Scenic Byway, which runs along the Payette River.

When adaptive cruise control is engaged, ACC info replaces the engine temperature gauge on the left side of the navigation screen. Switching over to the main screen, ACC info is also shown on the left, and it replaces the vehicle info that is normally displayed on the left side of the screen. On the right side of the screen, the rider can choose three vehicle info “favorites” from among the following: ambient temperature, coolant temperature, average speed, tripmeter 1, tripmeter 2, total trip time, average mpg, instant mpg, and low-fuel tripmeter (which begins counting once low-fuel warning comes on). Three of the remaining vehicle info data points are shown on the left, and the rest can be scrolled through using the joystick but their order can’t be changed. And when ACC is engaged, the remaining vehicle info data points are not available.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
The Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ has LED cornering lights that activate above 3 mph and with 7 or more degrees of lean.

Riding the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

Whew, that was a lot of technical info! But for those who are interested in keeping abreast of new technology, we do our best to report them. Now comes my favorite part of the review: what it’s like to ride the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
This is the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+’s happy place.

As mentioned, the Tracer’s 890cc Triple is a gem of an engine. Yamaha’s “crossplane concept” design means that each crankpin is offset 120 degrees from the next, and the three cylinders fire sequentially (1-2-3) in even 240-degree intervals. The engine is versatile, remaining smooth and docile at low revs and cruising along at highway speeds with minimal vibration, but it’s ready to party with a quick twist of the throttle. Horsepower builds linearly to its peak at 10,000 rpm, while torque holds steady: 54-63 lb-ft between 3,000 and 10,200 rpm (redline is 10,500). With a max of 108 hp, the Tracer doesn’t launch out of corners like an open-class sport-tourer, but keeping revs in the sweet spot between 6,000 and 9,000 rpm will please all but the greediest power addicts.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
The 30L side cases on the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ have a damped mounting system. The cases are easy to use and hold a full-face helmet in each side. Accessory top cases (34L or 45L) are also available.

Rather than power modes (four), suspension modes (two), and electronic rider aids (traction control, slide control, and lift control) that must be adjusted separately as on the previous model, Yamaha made the Tracer 9 GT+ more user-friendly by giving it integrated ride modes with intuitive names and presets for all of the above: Sport, Street, Rain, and a Custom mode for those who like to tinker with settings.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
The Yamaha Ride Control menu allows riders to set parameters for the Custom ride mode: PWR (power), TCS (traction control), SCS (slide control), LIF (front wheel lift control), and SUS (electronic suspension mode).

With an upright seating position more like an adventure tourer than a traditional sport-tourer, the Tracer 9 GT+ is comfortable for long rides and allows the rider to quickly adopt an attack stance as needed, with the wide handlebar offering ample steering leverage. With a curb weight below 500 lb, a robust chassis, and frame geometry that favors agility, the Tracer loves to dive into and out of curves and responds obediently to small inputs. Strong, responsive brakes shed speed with good feedback or stop quickly as needed, and the 6-speed transmission changes gears effortlessly with either the slip/assist clutch or the quickshifter. The adjustable windscreen and standard hand guards provide good wind protection, and the revised seat, which has a new shape and cover, is reasonably comfortable but could use more support for long days in the saddle.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
U.S. Route 50 through Nevada is known as “The Loneliest Road in America.” (Photo by the author)

We’ve been heaping praise on the FJ/Tracer platform for years, while also pointing out flaws. With each new generation, Yamaha has addressed many of those flaws while also raising the bar in terms of performance, technology, safety, and convenience. If Rider selected a Motorcycle of the Decade, the Tracer 9 GT+ would be on the short list.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ review
2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ Specifications

ENGINE

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
  • Displacement: 890cc
  • Bore x Stroke: 78.0 x 62.1mm
  • Compression Ratio: 11.5:1
  • Valve Insp. Interval: 26,600 miles
  • Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ YCC-T & 41mm throttle bodies x 3
  • Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.4 qt. cap.
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet slip/assist clutch & up/down quickshifter
  • Final Drive: O-ring chain

CHASSIS

  • Frame: Cast aluminum w/ engine as stressed member, cast aluminum swingarm & steel subframe
  • Wheelbase: 59.1 in.
  • Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
  • Seat Height: 32.3/32.9 in.
  • Suspension, Front: 41mm inverted fork, electronically adj. rebound & compression, manually adj. preload, 5.1 in. travel
  • Rear: Single shock, electronically adj. rebound, manually adj. preload (remote), 5.4 in. travel
  • Brakes, Front: Dual 298mm discs w/ 4-piston radial calipers & ABS
  • Rear: Single 267mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
  • Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.50 x 17 in.
  • Rear: Cast, 5.50 x 17 in.
  • Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
  • Rear: 180/55-ZR17
  • Wet Weight: 492 lb
  • Load Capacity: 407 lb
  • GVWR: 910 lb

PERFORMANCE

  • Horsepower: 108 @ 10,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
  • Torque: 63 lb-ft @ 7,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
  • Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gal.
  • Fuel Consumption: 45.9 mpg
  • Estimated Range: 230 miles

The post 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ Review | Road Test appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

A Yamaha Ténéré 700 Adventure from Biarritz, France, to the Bardenas Badlands

The following Yamaha Ténéré 700 adventure story about a trip to beat the winter blues in France came from a new contributor, Jean-François Muguet, and appeared in the July issue of Rider, our second Adventure Issue. – Ed.


Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
After being cold and wet in France, it was hard to believe we’d enjoy such good weather and conditions in January. That’s one of the many cool things about Spain’s Bardenas Reales Natural Park.

At some point, all motorcyclists must admit that winter sucks. Especially here in France. You can dress warmly and put on raingear to stay dry, but the roads will still be soaked, dirty, cold, and slippery. Not the best season for a road trip.

Fed up with yet another bleak winter, I called my friend Robin. He’s a great friend to have. He knows all the roads of the Basque Country and northern Spain, and he owns Rental Motorcycle Biarritz, just south of the coastal resort town in southwestern France. Biarritz is the home of Wheels & Waves, the annual festival that celebrates motorcycles, surfing, skateboarding, music, and art. But W&W is in June, at beach time, which was six months away.

Robin and I have known each other for a long time, and we both needed to get away from crowded places, preferably on motorcycles. We would be joined by another friend, Eric, and our busy schedules afforded us just three days, so we couldn’t go far. Robin suggested a trip to Bardenas Reales Natural Park, a desert badlands area in Navarre, an autonomous region in northern Spain.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
We just rode and rode. Almost no speaking, just enjoying.

See all of Rider‘s international touring stories here.

Yamaha Ténéré 700 or Royal Enfield Himalayan?

Since we’d be riding off-road, Robin’s rental fleet gave us two options: the Royal Enfield Himalayan or the Yamaha Ténéré 700. We would be logging road miles to get to Bardenas, including small, curvy roads through the Pyrenees, so we opted for the larger, twin-cylinder T7.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales

We got an early start from RMB headquarters on a gray, rainy day. It was foggy and beautiful in the Pyrenees, the mountain chain separating Spain from France, dividing the Iberian Peninsula from the rest of Europe. We made our way south to Pamplona, the city known for the Running of the Bulls during the Feast of San Fermín. The sun decided to come out and warm us a little bit, right in time for us to hit the dirt.

Related: Yamaha Announces Updated Ténéré 700, Other Returning 2024 Models

Gas On, ABS Off

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
Declared a biosphere reserve by UNESCO, Bardenas Reales is beautiful.

It was time to press the button to turn off the T7’s ABS, and it would stay off for a long time. After starting our day cold and wet, we welcomed the warm, dry, dusty conditions. We began on trails that were easy and wide, sometimes rocky, sometimes with ruts, but nothing too challenging. We floated through hills and among sandy dunes, and the landscape opened more and more.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
Near Pamplona, the landscape opened up as we climbed into the hills.

We’d been riding for hours, and our stomachs started making strange noises, so we left the trails and found a restaurant. We were in Spain, so everything was closed until 2 p.m. because of siesta. But the good news is, once the restaurants open, you can have a starter, a main course, dessert, wine, and coffee for about $12. Some might think it’s unwise to ride dirtbikes after a big meal, but we needed our strength for the rest of our trip.

Bienvenida a Las Bardenas

We continued our ride and entered a huge valley. From the plateau we were on, it looked like the ground had been torn apart. Welcome to Bardenas Reales. It was incredible, tremendous – all ocher, white, and yellow. It was late afternoon, and the sun was sinking low. Time for a picture, then many pictures. We parked the T7s in the grass, which was actually thyme. Each step we took shook the thyme and released a fragrant aroma to our noses.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
Robin treated Bardenas Reales Natural Park like his own personal playground.

From the cliff where we stood, we could see for miles. This incredible scenery was cut in two by a serpentine trail, and it was all ours. Our goal was to ride the trail and get to Tudela, where we would spend the night. For the next hour and a half, we chased the sunset through the desert, the yellow and white canyons, sandstone cliffs, and rocks slowly turning orange and then red. It was gorgeous – pure pleasure for the eyes and pure happiness for our hearts.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
Riding with friends at sunset in a big, empty desert. That’s the kind of stuff we live for, isn’t it?

It was getting dark, and fatigue was setting in as we finally reached a paved road. The lights of the city got closer as we approached Tudela. We had ridden 170 miles, but the day passed so quickly. Checking into the hotel, we looked at each other and realized we were filthy. We were dirty and tired but happy like little kids, which made the receptionist laugh. We needed a shower and dinner.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
Bardenas Reales is particularly beautiful in late-afternoon light.

Ride, Eat, Sleep, Repeat

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
Our route through the desert offered glorious, endless views.

Day 2 started off slow as we were a little sore from the previous day. This ride would be about 125 miles, with 90% on dirt trails. The sun was shining, but it was still a bit cold in the morning. The first few miles of trail got our blood flowing and warmed us quickly, and we had splendid views of snowy mountains.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
Snowy in the mountains, perfect in the valley.

The T7s were roaring along, a pleasure to ride. Robin was leading with the GPS, and Eric and I were just enjoying ourselves. The trails were easy, but we still needed to stay focused. In some places, parts of the trail had collapsed, creating holes where you wouldn’t want to put your front wheel or else you’d learn how to fly.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
Robin is always happy to loft a nice wheelie for the camera.

The rest of the day was like riding through the set of a Spaghetti Western like The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. There were no cowboys, but a Spanish military base was nearby. Sometimes we came across soldiers in cars or trucks or saw signs warning that areas were off-limits. But the trails were fun, and the landscape was perfect. Once again, the sunset in the desert was an incredible show. We slept well with colorful dreams.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
There is a military base in the middle of the desert, so riding after dark is prohibited.

Ride to Eat, Eat to Ride

As French people, we love to eat. Oftentimes while eating a meal, we’ll talk about meals we’ve had in the past, both good and bad. It might seem strange to people from other countries, but that is what we do.

During the day, we’d found a cheap menú del día at a roadside eatery. At night in Tudela, we enjoyed going to an old-fashioned restaurant called Remigio. Locals recommended it, and it turned out to be great. Always trust the locals. Robin was a chef for many years before he started his motorcycle rental business, so he knows good food. Remigio served us traditional dishes like pig’s ear and snail stew with sausage. It was delicious, and so was the Riojà wine. Robin was like a kid in a candy store.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
Robin and Eric compare notes on the Yamaha Ténéré 700, which was perfect for this trip.

Taking the Yamaha Ténéré 700 Home

Helmets on for Day 3. It was time to go back north to Biarritz. Clouds followed us for the first few miles through the desert. We stopped at the spot where you must take a picture to show the world you have been to Bardenas: Castillo de Tierra, a natural column of sandstone that rises up to the sky and was formed by millions of years of erosion.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales Castillo de Terra
Castillo de Terra is the most famous landmark in Bardenas Reales.

We squeezed as much trail time as we could out of our final day before finally returning to tarmac. We got back on the road near the medieval village of Olleta, continuing north to Pamplona. We summited many passes as we wound our way up and down through the Pyrenees. Before we knew it, we were back in Biarritz.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
We stopped often just to enjoy the view.

The trip was fun, and Robin made it easy by providing the bikes and planning the route. He was a great traveling companion, even if he ate more than his fair share of the pig’s ears. And Eric was our third musketeer. The T7s were fantastic on the road and on dirt. And Bardenas Reales was amazing, like a lunar park for motorcycles.

Yamaha Tenere 700 Bardenas Reales
There aren’t many desert areas in Europe, so this is an exotic experience for us.

Those three days passed like a colorful dream – a bubble of fresh air, sun, desert, and fun with motorcycles that provided relief from the doldrums of winter. Exactly what we were looking for.  From April to November, Rental Motorcycle Biarritz rents BMW, Ducati, Indian, Royal Enfield, and Yamaha motorcycles – including the Yamaha Ténéré 700 – with prices starting at 50 euros per day. RMB can provide GPS routes as well as guided tours. For information, visit the Rental Motorcycle Biarritz website.

See all of Rider‘s touring stories here.

The post A Yamaha Ténéré 700 Adventure from Biarritz, France, to the Bardenas Badlands appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Yamaha Announces Updated Ténéré 700, Other Returning 2024 Models

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700
2024 Yamaha Ténéré 700 in Yamaha Team Blue

On the same day that Yamaha announced the all-new Tracer 9 GT+, the company also released details on an updated 2024 Ténéré 700, a bike that Yamaha says has “quickly become a favorite among adventure enthusiast around the world.”

Related: 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ | First Look Review

The 2024 Ténéré 700 has a liquid-cooled 689cc inline-Twin derived from the MT-07 naked sportbike that features Yamaha’s “Crossplane Crankshaft Concept” 270-degree crank.

After 3,000 miles of mixed riding for a tour test of a 2021 Ténéré 700, our reviewer had the following to say: “In my local mountains or out in the desert, on pavement or off, the T7 has been an excellent partner for exploration, corner carving and flat-out movin’ down the road.”

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700

The Ténéré 700 has a fully adjustable 43mm inverted fork with 8.3 inches of travel and a rear single shock with remote-adjustable preload, rebound damping, and 7.9 inches of travel. The bike rides on spoked wheels (21-inch front/18-inch rear) wrapped in Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tires with tubes. It has a 34.4-inch seat height, 9.4 inches of ground clearance, and a wet weight of 452 lb.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700

The Ténéré 700 still has dual 282mm discs up front and a single 245mm disc in the rear, but a new feature for 2024 is the addition of a new ABS mode. Instead of the previous model’s on/of ABS selection, the new model now features three-mode selectable ABS allowing riders to choose their preferred level of braking intervention. Mode 1 fully activates ABS on both front and rear wheels, Mode 2 enables ABS on front wheel only and turns ABS off for the rear wheel, and Mode 3 turns ABS off for both the front and rear wheel.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700

Related: Backcountry Discovery Routes: Two Buddies on Yamaha Ténéré 700s in Utah and Arizona

Another update is a new 5-inch color TFT display. With functionality controlled by a new scrolling dial on the right handlebar, the new display offers two different screen themes: a modern dynamic design and a more traditional look reminiscent of the analog era.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700

The 2024 Ténéré 700 also features Yamaha Y-Connect smartphone connectivity, which works in conjunction with the Y-Connect app to enable a direct connection between motorcycle and smartphone. Y-Connect capability for the Ténéré 700 includes the ability to receive incoming text and phone call notifications on the new TFT display and track and record key motorcycle ride data within the app, including distance covered, average fuel consumption, top speed, and more.

Additional updates include new front and rear LED turnsignals, along with prewiring for the installation of Yamaha’s accessory Quick Shifter.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700

The 2024 Yamaha Ténéré 700 will be available in either Team Yamaha Blue arriving to dealers in September 2023 or Shadow Gray arriving to dealers in October 2023 for $10,799 MSRP.

2024 Yamaha Tenere 700
2024 Yamaha Tenere 700 in Shadow Gray.

2024 Returning Models

Along with the new 2024 Tracer 9 9 GT+ and 2024 Ténéré 700, Yamaha announced that the XT250, TW200, and Super Ténéré ES will return unchanged for 2024. The XT250 will be priced at $5,399 and the TW200 at $4,999. Pricing has not been announced for the 2024 Super Ténéré ES.

For more information, visit the Yamaha website.

The post Yamaha Announces Updated Ténéré 700, Other Returning 2024 Models appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ | First Look Review

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+
The 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ features a host of updates, including Adaptive Cruise Control, a radar-linked Unified Brake System, revised semi-active suspension, and more.

Just three years after introducing the Tracer 9 GT sport-tourer, which won Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year award, an upgraded version has been announced for 2024: the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+.

Related: Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year: Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

“We are excited to mark the return of the much-lauded Tracer 9 to the model lineup in the form of this extremely advanced new 2024 Tracer 9 GT+,” said Derek Brooks, Yamaha Motorsports Motorcycle Product Line Manager. “Already offering an incredibly sporty riding experience with its thrilling 890cc CP3 inline-Triple engine, well-sorted lightweight chassis and semi-active suspension, the new Tracer 9 GT+ ups the level of capability and comfort significantly with a long list of features that make it equally adept at attacking canyon twisties as it is tackling a multi-state tour.”

Related: 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Road Test Review

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

Topping the list of updates on the 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ are innovative electronic rider aids, including Adaptive Cruise Control and a radar-linked Unified Brake System, which are enabled by a new Millimeter Wave Radar unit that constantly measures distance to vehicles ahead. Similar to systems used in automobiles and motorcycles such as the Ducati Multistrada V4 and BMW R 18 Transcontinental, Adaptive Cruise Control automatically controls cruising speed, deceleration, and acceleration to match the speed of the vehicle in front in order to maintain a constant following distance based on four adjustable pre-sets.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

The 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ is the world’s first motorcycle to employ a radar-linked Unified Brake System, which uses inputs from the Millimeter Wave Radar and a 6-axis IMU to assist the rider’s braking input when the distance to the vehicle in front closes to a certain level while simultaneously adjusting front/rear braking bias and front/rear suspension damping force for a higher degree of braking efficiency and handling. If the vehicle ahead is determined to be too close for the given brake pressure, the system assists by adding more braking force. Yamaha says the system is not a collision avoidance system. It will only provide braking assistance when the Brake Control (BC) feature is turned on and the rider is braking, and it includes cornering brake control.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

In addition to the new Adaptive Cruise Control and Unified Brake System, the 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ is equipped with a full suite of other electronic rider aids, including the Traction Control System (TCS), Slide Control System (SCS), front-wheel LIFt control system (LIF), and Brake Control System. Yamaha says all systems work together seamlessly, each of them can be turned off, and TCS, SCS and LIF offer adjustable levels of intervention.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

The 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ also features the next generation of the KYB Actimatic Damper System (KADS) electronically controlled suspension. Using inputs from the IMU and various sensors, the system adjusts suspension damping in real time based on prevailing riding conditions. The semi-active suspension also operates in conjunction with the Adaptive Cruise Control and Unified Brake System.

An updated quickshifter not only enables rapid-fire, clutchless upshifts and downshifts, it also works in conjunction with the new Adaptive Cruise Control, allowing riders to change gears without disengaging cruise control.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

With such a deep roster of electronic functions, Yamaha has given the Tracer 9 GT+ a new 7-inch TFT display, which replaces the pair of 3.5-inch displays on the previous model. Riders can choose from three different screen layouts, and below the TFT is a USB-A outlet for connecting to a smartphone.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

Smartphones and Bluetooth helmet communicators can now be connected directly to the bike to make and receive phone calls or control music. Using the Yamaha MyRide-Link app allows riders to receive weather information, receive text messages, and access a range of additional features. And the Garmin Motorize app provides full-screen turn-by-turn navigation through a subscription service. All functions can be controlled using a new joystick on the left handlebar switchgear and shown on the TFT display.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

Returning unchanged is Yamaha’s liquid-cooled, crossplane-crankshaft 890cc CP3 inline-Triple. When we tested the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, it produced 108 hp at 10,000 rpm and 63 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel on Jett Tuning’s dyno. Four integrated ride modes – Sport, Street, Rain, and Custom – have unique throttle-response maps and level presets for TCS, SCS, LIF, and semi-active suspension.

2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+

The Tracer 9 GT+ has a proprietary CF (controlled filling) aluminum die-cast frame, lightweight spin-forged wheels, a 10-level adjustable windscreen, a height-adjustable seat with new padding and cover material, adjustable footpegs, 10-level heated grips, lockable/removeable hard cases that hold a full-face helmet in each side, and cornering lights.

Available in a Storm Gray two-tone colorway, the 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ will be in dealerships in August with an MSRP of $16,499.

The post 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ | First Look Review appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com