Tag Archives: Yamaha Motorcycles

2022 Yamaha MT-10 and MT-10 SP | First Look Review

2022 Yamaha MT-10 and MT-10 SP
Offered in the U.S. for the first time, the up-spec 2022 Yamaha MT-10 SP receives the same updates as the MT-10 but also features Öhlins semi-active suspension, a color-matched lower fairing, and braided steel brake lines. It comes in YZF-R1M-inspired Liquid Metal/Raven.

Yamaha’s “Hyper Naked” lineup includes six MT models, with MT standing for “Master of Torque.” The range starts with the entry-level MT-03 and works its way up to the MT-07, MT-09, MT-09 SP, MT-10, and MT-10 SP. All have been updated recently, and the 2022 Yamaha MT-10 and MT-10 SP, the latter being offered in the U.S. for the first time, are the latest to get upgraded.

2022 Yamaha MT-10

2022 Yamaha MT-10 and MT-10 SP
2022 Yamaha MT-10 in Cyan Storm

Our last test of the MT-10 was in 2017 (when it was known as the FZ-10), and it proved to be an exciting, versatile sit-up sportbike, even performing well as a sport-tourer when accessorized with a taller windscreen, a comfort seat, and luggage.

For 2022, the MT-10 gets a more stripped-down look, with unnecessary bodywork removed. Enlarged intake ducts mounted on either side of the fuel tank cover increase efficiency while enhancing the bike’s aggressive stance. New twin-eye mono-focus LED headlights and LED position lights above the headlights combine with a more compact nose assembly to minimize overhang. Separate high and low beam units are said to project a powerful, even beam with softer light at the edges.

Yamaha has also improved the MT-10’s ergonomics with a reshaped fuel tank, a revised rider triangle that enhances the feeling of sitting “in” the bike, and a more comfortable seat.

2022 Yamaha MT-10 and MT-10 SP

Also new is a 6-axis IMU and a full suite of electronic rider aids originally developed for the YZF-R1. The system includes lean-sensitive traction control, slide control, lift (wheelie) control, engine brake management, and ABS, all with multiple levels or modes. Each can be adjusted independently, or the Yamaha Ride Control system provides four ride modes with presets for each one. The MT-10 is also equipped with an up/down quickshifter.

Yamaha has refined the MT-10’s liquid-cooled, 998cc CP4 inline-Four with new fuel injection settings and revised intake and exhaust systems that are said to deliver a more torquey, street-focused engine character. A new airbox with three differing-length intake ducts tuned to resonate harmoniously at varying engine speeds creates a unique intake roar that enhances the overall riding experience. Sound is heightened further by new Acoustic Amplifier Grilles positioned on the front left and right of the fuel tank, transmitting the tuned induction sound directly to the rider.

2022 Yamaha MT-10 and MT-10 SP

Like the YZF-R1, the new MT-10 features a throttle-by-wire system with the Accelerator Position Sensor Grip (APSG), which uses a spring, slider, and gear mechanism to produce varying degrees of resistance to recreate a natural throttle feel during use. The rider can also change throttle response characteristics by adjusting the PWR (Power delivery mode) between four different power modes.

Originally developed to cope with the demands of high-horsepower superbikes under race conditions, the MT-10’s aluminum Deltabox frame uses the engine as a stressed member to minimize weight. Equipped with a long aluminum swingarm while still maintaining a compact 55.3-inch wheelbase, the chassis is designed to deliver agile yet stable handling in a wide variety of low- and high-speed riding conditions.

2022 Yamaha MT-10 and MT-10 SP
2022 Yamaha MT-10 in Matte Raven Black

Fully adjustable KYB suspension can be tailored to rider preferences. The triple-disc brakes, with dual 320mm floating discs with 4-piston radial calipers in front and a single 220mm disc with a 2-piston caliper out back, get upgraded for 2022 with the addition of a Brembo radial brake master cylinder. Also new is a 4.2-inch color TFT display.

The 2022 Yamaha MT-10 will be offered in two color options: Cyan Storm or Matte Raven Black. It will be available from dealers in March 2022 for an MSRP of $13,999.

2022 Yamaha MT-10 SP

2022 Yamaha MT-10 and MT-10 SP

Joining the MT-10 for 2022 is the up-spec MT-10 SP, which replaces the manually adjustable KYB suspension with Öhlins semi-active suspension and is offered in a YZF-R1M-inspired colorway with premium styling accents.

The new MT-10 SP is the first production motorcycle to be fitted with the Öhlins’ next-generation electronically controlled suspension employing the latest spool valve damping. This state-of-the-art technology provides an even greater range of damping adjustments and a higher degree of response.

Riders can choose between three semi-active damping modes (A-1 [Sport], A-2 [Intermediate], A-3 [Tour]), as well as three manual settings (M-1, M-2, M-3). When any of the automatic modes are selected the system adjusts rebound and compression damping continuously to match the current running conditions, ensuring the most appropriate settings are always in play.

2022 Yamaha MT-10 and MT-10 SP

Manual mode allows precise electronic adjustment of compression and rebound damping for both the front fork and rear shock. Managed through the YRC menu, the suspension can be tailored to suit the riding style or environment.

The MT-10 SP is also equipped with an exclusive color-matched lower fairing for a more aggressive race-bred look, while also directing more air to the oil cooler at speed. It’s also equipped with braided steel brake lines, providing a high level of feel at the lever and more resistance to fade.

The 2022 Yamaha MT-10 SP is available in Liquid Metal/Raven. It will be available from dealers in May 2022 for an MSRP of $16,899.

For more information or to find a Yamaha dealer near you, visit yamahamotorsports.com.

The post 2022 Yamaha MT-10 and MT-10 SP | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

EICMA 2021: Yamaha Ténéré 700 Raid Prototype Unveiled

The middle-weight adventure bike segment is arguably one of the most populated and thus exciting ones at the moment. The Yamaha Tenere 700 has grown to be one of the best options in the segment, showing the world what a hardcore twin-cylinder adventure bike is truly capable of. Now, Yamaha has gone and made it even sweeter by announcing the arrival of a higher-spec, more capable iteration — the 2022 Yamaha Ténéré 700 Raid Prototype.

One of the few complaints with the standard Ténéré 700 was that its suspension was a little too soft for more demanding off-road use. Yamaha has been listening to its customers and has addressed this with the new model. The Yamaha Ténéré 700 Raid digs deep into the GYTR (Genuine Yamaha Technology Racing) parts bin and features a host of components from Yamaha’s rally bikes. 

ADV Pulse reports that the Raid uses “larger 48mm forks with 10.6 inches of suspension travel and mounts them with CNC Machined aluminum triple clamps for extra rigidity. The rear shock has also been upgraded with 10.2 inches of suspension travel and also gets a revised suspension linkage.”

It’s also worth mentioning that the bike has been developed with input from off-road riders Alessandro Botturi and Pol Tarrés. If these names don’t sound familiar, you should definitely check out the ‘Seeker’ series on YouTube; what Pol Tarrés can do with the Ténéré is phenomenal.

There are also some performance updates on the Raid. A new airbox and filter, along with the addition of an oil cooler for the radiator, should improve performance. Then there’s a custom ECU and full titanium Akrapovic exhaust that provide a bump in power. Other changes include better protection for aggressive off-road riding and better braking hardware. 

Considering that the Dakar rally is still restricted to the 450cc class, we won’t be seeing the Rallye spec iteration participating in the world’s most challenging race anytime soon. However, there are still numerous other competitors that the Yamaha Ténéré 700 Raid can join in, and it looks like an excellent motorcycle for us common folk as well.

There’s no word on when the Ténéré 700 Raid will go into production or if the GYTR catalog will be available to existing owners of the standard bike. We’ll post an update when Yamaha releases more information.



Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

2022 Yamaha XSR900 | First Look Review

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review
The 2022 Yamaha XSR900 gets a new engine and chassis, a full suite of electronic rider aids, and fresh styling.

Yamaha knows that motorcyclists are not all the same, and one of the major dividing lines when it comes to choosing a motorcycle is styling. Some riders get excited by modern bodywork with sharp, aggressive lines, while others prefer more of a retro look, which the 2022 Yamaha XSR900 has in spades.

A couple of years after Yamaha introduced the 2014 MT-09 (originally called the FZ-09) naked sportbike, it released the XSR900. They shared an engine and chassis, but the XSR900 had throwback styling inspired by Yamaha’s ’70s-era XS750 Triple, with a round headlight, a traditional-looking fuel tank with knee cutouts, and hand-finished aluminum covers.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review
2022 Yamaha XSR900 in Legend Blue

The 2022 Yamaha XSR900 gets the updated 890cc inline-Triple that powers the latest MT-09 and Tracer 9 GT, as well as an all-new chassis, a more advanced electronics package, and a refreshed look drawn from Yamaha’s classic 1980s-era Grand Prix racing machines.

“The new generation XSR900 borrows its high performance CP3 engine, chassis, and electronics directly from Yamaha’s extensively updated 2021 MT-09 Hyper Naked to create the lightest, most agile, most performance-driven motorcycle in its class,” said Derek Brooks, Yamaha Motorcycle Product Line Manager. “But it’s the styling that really sets this new bike apart. As someone who’s very familiar with Yamaha’s racing history, it’s exciting to see the design team’s clear nod to the iconic race designs of our past, while incorporating so much tech and premium detailing. This new XSR really cuts to the heart of why we are passionate about motorcycles.”

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review

Motorcycles in Yamaha’s Sport Heritage lineup, which includes the V Star 250 and Bolt R-spec cruisers as well as the XSR700 (based on the MT-07 platform) and XSR900, are the models that pay homage to the tuning fork company’s seven decades of motorcycle design and engineering history. What Yamaha calls its “Faster Sons” design philosophy blends classic style with modern technology, resulting in neo-retro models that visually embrace elements of the past while delivering today’s performance and reliability.

From the reshaped fuel tank to the boxy tail section, the new XSR900’s styling leaps forward a decade from its predecessor. Premium touches include drilled fork caps, machined headlight stays, a forged brake pedal, hidden passenger pegs, blacked-out levers, darkened brake reservoirs, bar-end mirrors, an embossed aluminum rear underplate, and an aluminum XSR logo. And modern touches include full LED lighting and a new full-color 3.5-inch TFT display.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review
2022 Yamaha XSR900 in Raven

The Legend Blue colorway is a modern take on the classic French Sonauto Yamaha race colors – the striking blue, cyan, and yellow livery campaigned by legendary French Grand Prix champion Christian Sarron, an important page from Yamaha’s rich racing history.

Revised ergonomics give the new XSR900 a more aggressive profile. A lowered head pipe position, a unique subframe with lower seat height, and a lengthened swingarm are said to improve handling and give the rider a greater sense of control.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review

The updated 890cc CP3 engine delivers more power and torque, reduces weight, and revs more freely. The slip/assist clutch has new friction plates and a modified cam angle to reduce load on the clutch springs for a lighter feel at the lever, and an up/down quickshifter is now standard. The Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle (YCC-T) now uses a YZF-R1-type Accelerator Position Sensor Grip (APSG), which replicates varying degrees of resistance for a traditional throttle feel.

A new compact, lightweight aluminum frame is made using Yamaha’s Controlled Filling (CF) die-cast technology. Featuring ultra-thin 1.7mm sections, the frame is lighter and its balance of longitudinal, lateral, and torsional rigidity is improved. The lower head pipe position also helps load the front for increased feel when cornering.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review

The chassis features a new Brembo radial front master cylinder for better feel at the lever and a new front brake lever eases adjustability and improves style. New adjustable suspension is made by KYB, with a fully adjustable 41mm inverted fork and a preload- and rebound-adjustable rear shock. Like the Tracer 9 GT (which won Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year award), the XSR900 rolls on 17-inch aluminum wheels made using Yamaha’s exclusive new spinforging process, which reduces unsprung weight, and they’re shod with Bridgestone Battlax Hypersport S22 rubber.

A new 6-axis IMU enables an expanded suite of electronic rider aids, including a lean-sensitive Traction Control System, Slide Control System, front wheel Lift Control System, and Brake Control System (aka ABS). Each can be adjusted for different levels of intervention or turned off completely depending on rider preference. Cruise control is also standard.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review

Yamaha engineers carefully considered both intake and exhaust sound in developing the new XSR900, seeking to emphasize and enhance the unique soundtrack of the crossplane Triple. The all-new airbox incorporates differing cross-section and length air ducts tuned so induction noises resonate harmoniously at varying wavelengths. Two functional air intake vents located on either side of the fuel tank further boost the mid- and high-rpm induction sound traveling to the rider for a greater sense of acceleration. Likewise, a new 1.5-chambered exhaust features a left-right symmetrical tailpipe arrangement that directs sound pressure to both sides of the machine, adding to the feel of torque when opening the throttle. The low-slung exhaust design also centralizes mass and is significantly lighter than the previous generation.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 review

The 2022 Yamaha XSR900 will be available in Legend Blue with gold wheels and gold fork tubes or Raven with black wheels and black fork tubes. It arrives in dealerships in April 2022 with an MSRP of $9,999.

2022 Yamaha XSR900 Specs

Base Price: $9,999
Website: yamahamotorsports.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 78.0 x 62.1mm
Displacement: 890cc
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 58.9 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Wet Weight: 425 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gals.

The post 2022 Yamaha XSR900 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Yamaha TMAX and TMAX Tech MAX Updated for 2022

Yamaha has updated the immensely popular Yamaha TMAX and TMAX Tech MAX for 2022. The scooters made their debut in 2001, and VisorDown reports that they are currently the highest-selling scooters in Europe. It’s no surprise then that the Japanese manufacturer wants to keep them as fresh as possible. Updates for 2022 are comprehensive and come in revised styling, better suspension, and new color schemes.

The most notable update is with the design, and the new Yamaha TMAX and TMAX Tech MAX feature sportier styling. The brand mentioned in its press release that the scooters boast of ‘radical new Supersport-inspired design’ with a new compact body and aluminum chassis. The updated scooters will also put you in a sportier riding position, owing to adjustments across all points of the rider triangle. 

A rider on the Yamaha TMAX taking a corner

However, this change doesn’t come up at the cost of comfort. There’s a new adjustable windscreen that will reduce wind blast as well as wind noise at higher speeds.

Hardware updates on the 2022 Yamaha TMAX models include redesigned 10-spoke wheels, which are now lighter and more robust; the wheels are shod in grippy Bridgestone Battlax SC2 tires. Yamaha has also tweaked the scooter’s 41mm USD fork and monoshock for better performance and feedback. The engine, meanwhile, remains unchanged for 2022, and the scooters will continue to be powered by a 560cc parallel-twin engine that produces 47.5hp.

A static shot of the Yamaha TMAX

There’s also a host of tech features on offer, such as a new 7-inch, TFT display which offers Bluetooth and WiFi connectivity, as well as USB connectivity. You can also opt to add navigation via a Garmin GPS unit.

In addition to all the features and updates mentioned above, the TMAX Tech MAX also offers a heated saddle and grips, an electronically adjustable windscreen, cruise control, and adjustable rear suspension.

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The standard TMAX will be available in Extreme Yellow, Icon Blue and Sword Grey colorways, while the TMAX Tech MAX will come in Dark Petrol and Power Grey schemes.

Yamaha has not revealed pricing for the scooter yet, but the source suggests that the scooter is expected to reach European dealerships by March 2022.

A rear static shot of the Yamaha TMAX



Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Toprak Razgatlioglu Crowned 2021 WorldSBK Champion, Ends Rea’s Streak

Toprak Razgatlioglu has become the first rider to dethrone Jonathan Rea as WorldSBK Champion since 2015. Razgatlioglu clinched the 2021 WorldSBK Championship title with a second-place finish, behind Rea, in Race 1 at Mandalika, Indonesia, this past weekend.

Visordown reports that he becomes the first rider from Turkey to win the WorldSBK title, while Yamaha – one of WorldSBK’s founding manufacturers – lands only its second, 12 years after Ben Spies won in 2009. This past weekend, Race 1 scheduled for Saturday was postponed to Sunday because of bad weather conditions. This also forced the cancellation of the Superpole Race.

Raceday saw some heavy rains and a thrilling battle between Rea, Razgatlioglu, and Ducati’s Scott Redding. In the second half of the race, Razgatlioglu ran wide at Turn 12 and was forced to settle for second — enough to seal the championship. The Turk’s title charge has been spectacular overall but had its fair share of ups and downs, including three DNFs, two of which were caused by technical issues and the other because of an incident involving Garrett Gerloff at Assen.

Rea and Kawasaki have dominated the WorldSBK Championship for the last 6 years, and Razgatlioglu may bring about a change in momentum. This is only his fourth season in WorldSBK racing, but Razgatlioglu has been competing at the top for a while. He’s also the first rider with a junior category title — European SSTK 600 — to win the WorldSBK title.

Razgatlioglu made his WorldSBK debut in 2018 with Kawasaki, racing for the Puccetti Kawasaki team for two seasons. He managed to finish on the podium 15 times and also won 2 races, starting 16th. He moved to the factory Yamaha team in 2020, and the rest is history.

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He saw his first win of the 2021 season only at Round 3 at Misano but found his momentum as the season progressed, racking up a total of 13 victories. 

Jonathan Rea’s streaking may have come to an end, but the Northern Irish racer has already established himself as the most successful WorldSBK rider of all time with a career total of 111 wins. We’re certainly excited to see how the 2022 season shapes out.

Toprak Razgatlioglu backing it into a corner in Indonesia



Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

2022 Yamaha MT-10 Unveiled

Late last year, the Yamaha MT-07 and MT-09 received substantial updates, and now it’s the flagship liter-class naked, the MT-10’s turn.

Like with the smaller MT models, Yamaha has given the MT-10 revised styling rendering it a more aggressive look. The most notable is the addition of a new headlight design that resembles bug eyes with LED DRLs placed right above, like eyebrows. It’s an interesting-looking thing.

A rider on the 2022 Yamaha MT-10 riding through a tunnel at night

Autocar India reports that MT-10 continues to be powered by a cross-plane, inline-four engine but now features lightweight aluminum forged pistons, offset con-rods, and direct-plated cylinders. The engine is also now Euro 5 compliant, largely thanks to a new intake and titanium exhaust. Peak output figures are 164hp at 11,500 rpm and 82.6lb-ft of torque at 9,000, a slight bump over the previous generation model. 

TFT display on the 2022 Yamaha MT-10

Electronics on offer include traction control, slide control, engine braking management, and wheelie control that work alongside a six-axis IMU. For 2022, Yamaha has also refined the ride-by-wire system and ride modes that you can now toggle via new switchgear. 

The new 2022 Yamaha MT-10 will be available in Cyan Storm, Icon Blue, and Tech Black color schemes and will go on sale early next year. Currently, Yamaha has not announced pricing for the motorcycle, but we shall update this space when it does.

Studio shot of the 2022 Yamaha MT-10



Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Europe to Receive Yamaha’s 2022 XSR900

Yamaha has just released some new details on 2022 XSR900 – and I’m digging the retro graphics.

With the MT-09 compliant with Euro5 standards as of last year, we knew the XSR900 wouldn’t be too far behind.  After all, the XSR900 is the MT’s sibling…only it sports Oxfords, not Brogues.

The all-new Yamaha 2022 XSR900, set to debut in EU by 2022

The report from MCN states that the XSR900’s now got the now-Euro5-compliant transverse triple engine to push it about (889cc’s worth, same as the MT-09), and we’re guessing the torque will be something similar. 93Nm was the (brilliant) torque figure for Yamaha’s 2021 MT-09, and that combined with the 119bhp and new tuned exhaust system promises to give a wee bit more fun than not. 

The all-new Yamaha 2022 XSR900, set to debut in EU by 2022

The XSR900 will also sport MT-09’s Deltabox frame, as well as Brembo radial master cylinder brakes, inverted KYB forks, front air intakes, and the race-style filler (to complement the lower handlebars, MotoGP-inspired 15-litre gas tank, and longer swingarm – all set up to make the machine more race-ready).

The all-new Yamaha 2022 XSR900, set to debut in EU by 2022

Yamaha’s 2022 XSR900 will also have four ride modes, a new TFT dash (3.5″), a standard quick shifter, a six-axis IMU that gives us three-way lean-sensitive traction and slide control plus anti-wheelie and cornering ABS – the beauty even sports a pair of ‘spin-forged’ cast wheels, lightening the bike by a further 700g. 

The all-new Yamaha 2022 XSR900, set to debut in EU by 2022

The pricing hasn’t been revealed yet, though we’re expecting something along the $10,000 USD mark, given that the 2021 MT-09 and XSR900 were priced from $9,399 and $9,499, respectively. 

Having reviewed Yamaha’s 2016 XSR900 with our own Brandon Jackson, we’re excited to see how this narrower, stiffer unit handles.

Stay tuned for updates, and be sure to brush up on other news from Yamaha while you’re here.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Yamaha Funds Six All Kids Bike Programs in Georgia and California

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, has announced $30,000 in funding to All Kids Bike, covering the cost for six programs teaching kids in Georgia and California public schools’ kindergarten Physical Education (PE) classes how to ride bikes. With the grant provided through the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative (OAI), Yamaha joins the national movement helping kids transition from digital screens to going outside and learning important life skills, along with building confidence and coordination that feeds into lifelong enthusiasm for outdoor recreation.

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

“With kids in the U.S. spending an average of seven hours a day on a digital screen, it’s never been more important for companies like Yamaha to invest in the future of outdoor recreation by getting our youth off of the devices and participating in healthy and fun activities to increase their confidence, instill valuable life lessons, and simply enjoy all the outdoors has to offer,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s Motorsports Marketing Manager.

“Research shows approximately seventy-five percent of kids won’t even ride a bicycle one time this year,” said Ryan McFarland, All Kids Bike founder, who helped Yamaha employees deliver bikes to Morris Elementary in Cypress, California, last month. “We believe it’s critical for the future of our kids and our communities to change that stat, so All Kids Bike is on a mission to teach every kid in America how to ride a bike in kindergarten PE class. We share a common goal with the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative of getting people outside and enjoying nature. This is a big win for our program, but mostly for the kids at these schools.”

Listen to Ryan McFarland interview on the Rider Magazine Insider Podcast

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, (YMUS) employees from the Marietta, Georgia, and Cypress, California corporate offices, and Yamaha Motor Manufacturing Corporation of America (YMMC) personnel, in Newnan, Georgia, recently volunteered their time to build and deliver bikes and helmets to local schools. Full All Kids Bike programs, including 24 balance bikes, pedal conversion kits, helmets, and a teacher’s bike, were delivered to Elm Street Elementary in Newnan, Georgia, A.L. Burruss Elementary School in Marietta, Georgia, and Juliet Morris Elementary School in Cypress, California. Three more schools in Newnan, Marietta, and Cypress are also guaranteed funding through the Yamaha grant and will receive the same program support this year.

“Being able to financially support these efforts is always great but giving Yamaha employees the opportunity to contribute their time to help build and deliver the bikes to schools in the communities where they work is much more meaningful and valuable,” Nessl said. “It’s rewarding to know we’re playing a role in getting more kids outside.”

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

The All Kids Bike program, developed to be a plug-and-play program for public schools that aligns with SHAPE America National Physical Education Standards, also includes an eight-lesson Kindergarten PE Learn-To-Ride Curriculum, teacher training and certification, and a five-year support plan.

“Yamaha has longstanding, essential ties to the Newnan community. It’s where we live, where we work, and where we play, and we’re excited to help bring this program to the kids at our local elementary schools,” said Bob Brown, Vice President, Finance and Operations Support at YMMC. “These are the first schools in Georgia to receive the All Kids Bike program, and we expect to see a positive ripple effect when more communities start to learn about it and see the outcome of its many wonderful aspects.”

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

The All Kids Bike program is now in 350 schools in 45 states, with another 50 schools currently in training that will have the program by the end of the year.

“My dad was a Yamaha dealer when I was a kid, so I grew up on Yamaha. The very first Strider Bike I built for my son 15 years ago, I painted it blue and put some Yamaha stickers on it,” said McFarland, who is also the founder and CEO of Strider Sports International, Inc., maker of the Strider Bikes utilized in the All Kids Bike program. “Now that we’ve teamed up with Yamaha’s offices and employees to bring this important program to kids in their communities, we know it will continue to grow from here and we’re already seeing interest from their neighboring schools.”

Yamaha All Kids Bike Strider Bikes

As the powersports industry’s leading outdoor access program, the Yamaha OAI remains an essential resource to grassroots efforts initiated by riding clubs, land stewardship organizations, educational programs, and public land managers across the country. For more than 12 years, Yamaha has been issuing quarterly grants to non-profit organizations supporting the needs of riding groups, outdoor enthusiasts, land stewardship organizations, and land managers to improve recreational facilities, expand outdoor access, and educate the public on outdoor recreation. Yamaha has contributed more than $4.5 million in aid to nearly 400 projects across the nation over the life of the program.

“Funding for our local schools is integral, and so is helping spread awareness for these national programs that support and activate local efforts where our employees and customers live,” Nessl said. “Yamaha’s Outdoor Access Initiative grant will serve kids at these six schools for years, and we hope the awareness this grant will bring to the broader outdoor recreation community will continue to generate funding for more schools.”

Submission guidelines and applications for Yamaha OAI grants are available at YamahaOAI.com.

About the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative

For more than a decade, the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative has led the Powersports industry in guaranteeing responsible access to our nation’s land for outdoor enthusiasts. Through this program, Yamaha has directly and indirectly supported thousands of miles of motorized recreation trails, maintained and rehabilitated riding and hunting areas, improved staging areas, supplied agricultural organizations with essential OHV safety education, built bridges over fish-bearing streams and partnered with local outdoor enthusiast communities across the country to improve access to public lands. Updated guidelines, application form, information and news about the Outdoor Access Initiative are available at YamahaOAI.com.

About All Kids Bike

All Kids Bike is a national movement led by the nonprofit Strider Education Foundation to place Kindergarten PE Learn-To-Ride Programs into public schools for free using donations from individuals, businesses and organizations. One of the key goals of the organization is to make riding a bicycle the fourth “R” of elementary education along with reading, writing and arithmetic. The ability to ride improves a life greatly while developing balance, mobility, safety, environmental awareness and facilitating exercise. It instills confidence in the classroom, home and community. For more information, visit allkidsbike.org.

The post Yamaha Funds Six All Kids Bike Programs in Georgia and California first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Video Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT video review
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT in Liquid Metal (Photo by Joseph Agustin)

We test the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, which won Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year award. It’s a fully featured sport-tourer powered by an 890cc inline-Triple that makes 108 horsepower at 10,000 rpm and 63 lb-ft of torque at 7,200 rpm at the rear wheel. MSRP is $14,899.

For 2021, the new Tracer 9 GT gets the larger crossplane Triple from the MT-09, which is lighter, more fuel efficient, and more powerful. An all-new aluminum frame is made using a controlled-fill diecast process that reduces mass and increases rigidity. A new aluminum swingarm is more rigid, and a new steel subframe increases load capacity and allows an accessory top trunk to be mounted along with the larger 30-liter saddlebags. New spinforged wheels reduce unsprung weight, and they’re shod with grippy Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires.

In addition to updated throttle response modes and all-new KYB semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT now has a 6-axis IMU that enables a suite of electronic rider aids adapted from the YZF-R1, including lean-angle-sensitive traction control, ABS, slide control, and lift control. It also has full LED lighting (including cornering lights) and a new dual-screen TFT display. The rider/passenger seats have been upgraded, and the rider’s ergonomics are adjustable.

Check out our video review:

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Specs

Base Price: $14,899
Website: yamahamotorsports.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 890cc
Horsepower: 108 @ 10,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 63 lb-ft @ 7,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Bore x Stroke: 78.0mm x 62.1mm
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 59.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.9/32.5 in.
Wet Weight: 503 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 48.7 mpg
Estimated Range: 243 miles

The post 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year

2021 Motorcycle of the Year

Our first Motorcycle of the Year was awarded to the 1990 BMW K1, and for the past 31 years we’ve limited contenders to current model-year motorcycles that are new or significantly updated. In recent years, however, production timing and model-year designations have become more fluid.

And then there’s the economic shutdown last year caused by the pandemic, which disrupted the global supply chain for everything from toilet paper to semiconductors. Some manufacturers were forced to delay the release of certain models, while others skipped the 2021 model year altogether.

We’ve posted announcements of new/updated 2022 models as early as January of this year. And so far, we’ve ridden 2022 motorcycles from BMW, Honda, Indian, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha. To give all makes and models a fair shake during the calendar year when they are released and most relevant, eligible contenders for this year’s MOTY include any new/updated motorcycle released since last year’s award that are available for testing.

2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

There were plenty of motorcycles to consider, and we’ve narrowed them down to 10 contenders and one winner. Without further ado…

THE CONTENDERS

1) BMW R 18 B/Transcontinental

2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental review
2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental (Photo by Kevin Wing)

BMW entered the traditional cruiser segment in 2021 with the standard R 18 and windshield-and-saddlebags-equipped R 18 Classic, built around the 1,802cc “Big Boxer.” The 2022 R 18 B “Bagger” and R 18 Transcontinental are touring-ready with a batwing-style fairing, infotainment system, hard saddlebags, and a passenger seat, and the TC adds a top trunk with a passenger backrest.

Read our 2022 BMW R 18 B / Transcontinental review

2) Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250/Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Yes, pigs – or more accurately, hogs – can fly. The Motor Company shook up the hyper-competitive ADV segment when it introduced the 2021 Pan America 1250/Special. Powered by a 150-horsepower V-Twin and fully equipped with all the latest bells and whistles, it proved itself to be highly capable on- and off-road, and the optional Adaptive Ride Height is its killer app.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review

3) Honda Gold Wing Tour/DCT

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Honda’s GL1800 won Rider’s MOTY when it debuted in 2001 and again when it was thoroughly overhauled in 2018. Updates for 2021 may seem minor, but they make all the difference when it comes to the two-up touring the Wing was designed for. The larger trunk holds more stuff, the improved passenger accommodations are appreciated, and the audio and styling updates add refinement.

Read our 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review

4) Honda Rebel 1100/DCT

2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT review
2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The all-new Rebel 1100 is the sort of cruiser only Honda could make. It has styling like its smaller Rebel 300/500 siblings, a powerful engine adapted from the Africa Twin CRF1100L (including an optional 6-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission), ride modes and other electronics, well-damped suspension, good cornering clearance, modest weight, and a base price of just $9,299 (add $700 for DCT).

Read our 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT review

5) Kawasaki KLR650

2022 Kawasaki KLR650 review
2022 Kawasaki KLR650 (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The KLR is dead, long live the KLR! After a two-year absence, Kawasaki’s legendary dual-sport returns for 2022 with fuel injection (at last!), optional ABS, and other updates aimed at improving reliability, comfort, stability, load capacity, and user-friendliness. It remains one of the best deals on two wheels with a base price of $6,699.

Read our 2022 Kawasaki KLR650 Adventure review

6) KTM 890 Adventure R

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R review
2021 KTM 890 Adventure R (Photo by Kevin Wing)

KTM’s street-oriented 790 Adventure and off-road-ready 790 Adventure R shared Rider’s 2019 MOTY. Just two years later, the folks in Mattighofen kicked it up a notch with a larger, more powerful engine from the 890 Duke R, chassis updates, and tweaks to the suspension, brakes, and electronics, all of which contribute to the 890 Adventure R’s all-terrain capability.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R review

7) Indian Super Chief Limited

2022 Indian Super Chief Limited review
2022 Indian Super Chief Limited (Photo by Jordan Pay)

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the original Chief, Indian revamped its entire Chief lineup, with six models that strike a balance between old-school style and new-school technology. Powered by the Thunderstroke 116 V-Twin, the all-new Super Chief Limited has a quick-release windscreen, saddlebags, a two-up seat, ABS, and a Ride Command-equipped display.

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited review

8) Royal Enfield Meteor 350

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 review
2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Yes, the Meteor 350’s air-/oil-cooled Single makes just 18 horsepower and 18 lb-ft of torque. But rarely have we encountered a motorcycle that offers so much substance for so little money. In top-spec Supernova trim, the Meteor comes with ABS, turn-by-turn navigation, a two-up seat with a passenger backrest, a windshield, and a two-tone paint scheme for just $4,599.

Read our 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 review

9) Suzuki Hayabusa

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The former winner of the late-’90s top-speed wars got its first major update since 2008. Thanks to more grunt in the midrange, the Hayabusa’s updated 187-horsepower 1,340cc inline-Four helps it accelerate faster than ever before. Refined and reworked from nose to tail, the ’Busa has more aerodynamic bodywork, a full suite of IMU-enabled electronics, and much more.

Read our 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review

10) Yamaha Ténéré 700

2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 review
2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

Designed to be equally capable on- and off-road, Yamaha’s middleweight adventure bike is powered by a liquid-cooled, 689cc CP2 parallel-Twin and has a durable tubular-steel frame, adjustable long-travel suspension, switchable ABS, and spoked wheels in 21-inch front/18-inch rear sizes. Contributor Arden Kysely liked the T7 so much, he bought our test bike from Yamaha.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700 review

And the winner is…

Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT (Photos by Joseph Agustin)

For the better part of the past decade, the adventure bike segment has been the darling of the motorcycle industry, growing while other segments have been flat or declining and siphoning off R&D resources. With some adventure bikes making 150 horsepower or more, traditional sport-tourers have been all but neglected. Stalwarts such as the Honda ST1300, Kawasaki Concours 14, and Yamaha FJR1300 haven’t been updated in years.

That’s what makes the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT such a breath of fresh air. At less than 500 pounds fully fueled, it’s much easier to handle than the 600-plus-pound S-T bikes on the market. And with a claimed 115 horsepower on tap, there are few motorcycles that will leave it behind.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

We first tested the bike that would evolve into the Tracer 9 GT when Yamaha introduced the FJ-09 for 2015. At its heart was the liquid-cooled 847cc CP3 Triple from the FZ-09 – an absolute ripper of a motor. It had an ADV-ish upright seating position and wind-blocking handguards but rolled on 17-inch wheels with sport-touring rubber, while its windscreen, centerstand, and optional 22-liter saddlebags added touring capability. The FJ-09 was light and fun to ride, but it was held back by fueling issues, poorly damped suspension, and weak brakes.

Yamaha did its homework and gave its middleweight sport-tourer an overhaul for 2019, renaming it the Tracer 900 GT in the process. Updates included better throttle response, a longer swingarm for more stability, higher-quality suspension, a new TFT color display, and a larger, one-hand-adjustable windscreen. The saddlebags were made standard as were other features, such as cruise control, heated grips, and a quickshifter.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

Two years later, Yamaha went even further. For 2021, the new Tracer 9 GT gets the larger 890cc CP3 Triple from the MT-09, which is lighter, more fuel efficient, and more powerful. An all-new lightweight aluminum frame is made using a controlled-fill diecast process that reduces mass and increases rigidity. A new aluminum swingarm is longer and stronger, and a new steel subframe increases load capacity to 425 pounds and allows an accessory top trunk to be mounted along with the larger 30-liter saddlebags. New spinforged wheels reduce unsprung weight, and they’re shod with grippy Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires.

In addition to updated throttle response modes and all-new KYB semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT now has a 6-axis IMU that enables a suite of electronic rider aids adapted from the YZF-R1, including lean-angle-sensitive traction control, ABS, slide control, and lift control. It also has full LED lighting (including cornering lights) and a new dual-screen TFT display. The rider/passenger seats have been upgraded, and the rider’s ergonomics are adjustable.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

We had an opportunity to test the Tracer 9 GT just before the MOTY polls closed, and it swept the field. Thanks to steady evolution and improvement over three generations, Yamaha has demonstrated just how good a modern sport-tourer can be, especially for riders who value agility over couch-like luxury. Performance, sophistication, comfort, versatility, load/luggage capacity – the Tracer checks all the right boxes and leaves nothing on the table.

Congratulations to Yamaha for the Tracer 9 GT, Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year!

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

The post Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com