Tag Archives: Yamaha Motorcycles

Plant-Based Engine Resin for Yamaha Motorcycles?

Yamaha’s working on a new resin for their engines that will ramp up the sustainability initiative that was pledged back in 2019; it’s a plant-based, reinforced bit of blobby stuff that shows huge promise – and yes, we might see the stuff inside our own Team Blue engines after 2024.

Yamaha's Tenere 700. Media sourced from Yamaha's website.
Yamaha’s Tenere 700. Media sourced from Yamaha’s website.

According to a recent press release published by Yamaha on Businesswire, Yamaha’s teamed up with Nippon Paper Industries, a company focused on plant-based materials. Recent success in a multi-puropse waterproof cardboard has also resulted in the creation of a plant-derived cellulose nanofiber (CNF) reinforced resin for marine products – something that could also have great use in the two-wheeled sector.

The reinforced plant-based resin Yamaha plans on using for her Powersports engines. Media sourced from Yamaha's press release.
The reinforced plant-based resin Yamaha plans on using for her Powersports engines. Media sourced from Yamaha’s press release.

“Yamaha Motor is examining the utilization of this material not only in marine products but also in motorcycles and a wide range of other products in the future,” says the Japanese brand in a press release off BusinessWire.

“[We] will adopt plant-derived cellulose nanofiber (CNF) reinforced resin for marine products as an initiative toward reducing CO2 emissions and the Company’s environmental footprint.” 

EICMA 2022. Media sourced from EICMA.

The creation of CNF for the Powersports industry will be “the first practical use of the material for vehicle parts” – a pioneering first that Yammie is more than happy to splurge on, it seems.

Yamaha's headquarters. Media sourced from VisorDown.
Yamaha’s headquarters. Media sourced from VisorDown.

All the best in the continued efforts of this partnership from MBW; be sure to stay tuned as we continue forward toward 2023, drop a comment below letting us know what you think, and as always – stay safe on the twisties.

*Media sourced from Yamaha’s press release on BusinessWire, Yamaha’s website and VisorDown*

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Yamaha Announces 2023 Updated and Returning Models

2023 Yamaha XMAX 5

Yamaha has announced the release of its remaining 2023 motorcycle lineup, which includes the first extensive update to the Yamaha XMAX Sport Scooter since its 2018 introduction. Additionally, the 2023 Yamaha MT-07 has received tech updates, and the Yamaha Ténéré 700 returns for 2023 with two new color/graphic options.

2023 Yamaha XMAX Sport Scooter

2023 Yamaha XMAX
2023 Yamaha XMAX in Granite Gray

The 2023 Yamaha XMAX retains the key attributes that Yamaha says make it a class leader in the Sport Scooter category. It uses a liquid-cooled 292cc Blue Core single-cylinder engine, a telescoping front fork, a 15-inch front wheel, a 14-inch rear wheel, traction control, and disc brakes front and rear.

The scooter has a two-position windscreen, adjustable handlebars, underseat storage with room for two full-face helmets, a 12-volt accessory outlet, and Smart Key keyless ignition. 

Claimed fuel economy on the 2018 XMAX was 75 mpg, which should yield more than 250 miles from the 3.4-gallon tank, and the scooter comes in at a claimed 397 pounds wet.

2023 Yamaha XMAX 5

Related Story: 2018 Yamaha XMAX Scooter | First Look Review

Going beyond the familiar, Yamaha says the 2023 XMAX represents the biggest step forward in the company’s scooter design in recent years, from a new look to new tech.

Updated Styling

Virtually every part of the XMAX’s exterior has been redesigned to create what Yamaha says is “a more compact and visually impressive machine.” New X-shaped LED headlights and taillights complement the aggressive styling, and new high-mount LED front indicators add to the streamlined look. While the seat height remains at 31.3 in, Yamaha says it has been completely redesigned for increased comfort and decreased leg reach to the ground.

2023 Yamaha XMAX 5

New Yamaha Motorcycle Connect

New for 2023, Yamaha is introducing Y-Connect smartphone connectivity allowing riders to connect their smartphone directly to their scooter, enabling a wide range of new capabilities, including phone and music control, as well as a newly available Garmin turn-by-turn navigation system.

2023 Yamaha XMAX 5

The 2023 XMAX comes equipped with a new 4.2-inch color TFT infotainment display  located below the 3.2-inch LCD speedometer , as well as a new handlebar-mounted switchgear to enable connectivity control. Y-Connect and the Y-Connect app are free and provide the following functionality for the new XMAX: 

  • Onboard navigation through the installation of the Garmin StreetCross navigation app on the user’s smartphone. 
  • Call, text, and email notifications through pairing with a Bluetooth headset, as well as weather forecasts, time, phone battery level, and connection status information on the TFT display.
  • Music capability. 
  • Vehicle running information such as engine speed, average fuel consumption, coolant temperature, battery voltage, and ambient temperature. Vehicle data can also be collected within the app for viewing information such as service interval recommendations or the last known location of the vehicle on the user’s smartphone. 
  • Riding log and a ranking function that compares things like a rider’s mileage or fuel economy with other Yamaha riders within the U.S. or around the world.

The 2023 Yamaha XMAX will be offered in Granite Gray and will be available from dealers beginning January 2023 for an MSRP of $6,099.  

2023 Yamaha MT-07 

2023 Yamaha MT-07 in Cyan Storm
2023 Yamaha MT-07 in Cyan Storm

The 2023 Yamaha MT-07 includes key upgrades that enhance the overall package while remaining true to the hypernaked bike’s basic concept.

The MT-07 still features a liquid-cooled 689cc DOHC parallel-Twin. In our First Ride Review of the 2021 model, the dyno testing reported 68 hp and 46.5 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel. Yamaha says on its website that the CP2 engine “provides both outstanding low- to mid-range torque and strong high-rpm pulling power.” Our reviewer put it as “all the thrill the combustion forces working below can exert but with none of the hairiness.”

2023 Yamaha MT-07 in Team Yamaha Blue
2023 Yamaha MT-07 in Team Yamaha Blue

The MT-07 has a steel frame with the engine as a stressed member of the chassis, lightweight 10-spoke cast aluminum wheels with Michelin Road 5 tires, and a 3.7-gal. fuel tank, all of which combine for a claimed wet weight of 406 lb.

The MT-07’s front suspension features a 41mm KYB fork with 5.1 inches of travel and a link-type KYB rear shock that’s adjustable for both rebound damping and spring preload. With 5.1 inches of rear travel, the shock is positioned below the seat with an almost horizontal alignment to help make the chassis even more compact. Stopping power comes from 298mm front brake discs with four-piston calipers and a 245mm rear disc. ABS comes standard.

One of the most significant additions for the 2023 Yamaha MT-07 is the installation of a new 5-inch full-color TFT display that provides a choice of two different screen modes. The “Street” mode is a more modern layout with a bar-type tachometer, digital speedo, and gear-selection readouts. The “Touring” mode features a more conventional circular analog-style tachometer on the right of the screen and digital speedometer on the left.

2023 Yamaha MT-07

The 2023 MT-07 also now features Yamaha Motorcycle Connect smartphone connectivity, which works in conjunction with the free Y-Connect app (available for iOS and Android) to enable a direct connection between motorcycle and smartphone. See above in the XMAX section for all the Y-Connect capabilities.

Finally,  the new MT-07 is pre-wired with the necessary electronics for installation of a quickshifter, making it  easy to install Yamaha’s Quick Shift System, which is available through the Yamaha Genuine Accessory catalog.

2023 Yamaha MT-07 in Matte Raven Black
2023 Yamaha MT-07 in Matte Raven Black

The 2023 Yamaha MT-07 will be offered in three color options: Cyan Storm, Team Yamaha Blue and Matte Raven Black. It will be available from dealers beginning April 2023 for an MSRP of $8,199.

Other Updates and Returning Models

The Yamaha Ténéré 700 returns for 2023 with two new color/graphic options: Team Yamaha Blue and Shadow Gray.

2023 Yamaha Tenere 700 in Team Yamaha Blue
2023 Yamaha Tenere 700 in Team Yamaha Blue
2023 Yamaha Tenere 700 in Shadow Gray
2023 Yamaha Tenere 700 in Shadow Gray

Yamaha’s remaining 2023 models – including the Yamaha MT-03, MT-09, MT-09 SP, MT-10, MT-10 SP, XSR700, XSR900, Bolt R-Spec, Super Ténéré ES, FJR1300ES and Zuma 125 – all return unchanged.

See all of Rider’s Yamaha coverage here.

2023 Yamaha

No model-year 2023 Tracer 9 GT has been announced for the U.S. market at this time. Please contact your local Yamaha dealer for availability and price on any of these models.  

For more information related to all Yamaha products, visit the Yamaha Motorsports website

Follow Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA, at FacebookInstagram, and Twitter. #Yamaha #YamahaMotor #YamahaMotorUSA  

The post Yamaha Announces 2023 Updated and Returning Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative Honors National Public Lands Day

Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative

Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative (OAI) has pledged to donate at least $500,000 this year to organizations supporting access to land for outdoor recreation in honor of National Public Lands Day and National Hunting and Fishing Day on Sept. 24. Yamaha OAI, National Public Lands Day, and National Hunting and Fishing Day all share the goal of protecting and preserving public land for outdoor recreation.

This Saturday, Yamaha OAI encourages everyone to get outdoors and enjoy what they are working to protect. Organizations that share OAI’s goals are encouraged to apply for a grant by Sept. 30. For more information, read the press release below.


MARIETTA, Ga. (Sept. 21, 2022) – Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, is encouraging people to get outside and enjoy the outdoors on Saturday, Sept. 24, in honor of National Public Lands Day and National Hunting and Fishing Day (NHF Day). In recognition of these events, the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative (OAI) is renewing its annual pledge to commit $500,000 to organizations supporting access to land for outdoor recreation and encouraging applications for grants before the next quarterly deadline on Sept. 30.

Related Story: Yamaha Celebrates 14 Years and $15M in Outdoor Access Initiative Grants

Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative

National Public Lands Day invites volunteers nationwide to help restore and preserve public lands – from national parks to local urban green spaces – directly aligning with Yamaha OAI’s goal of protecting public lands for outdoor recreation. To date, the Yamaha OAI program has contributed over $5 million in funding and equipment across more than 425 projects in the last 14 years to assist outdoor recreationists working to protect and improve access to public land and educate everyone on safe, sustainable recreational use. Yamaha OAI has proven to be the industry’s most reliable partner and a significant resource for those who depend on access to public land for work and play.

Additionally, on Sept. 24, National Hunting and Fishing Day is celebrating its 50th anniversary. NHF Day events are organized each year by Wonders of Wildlife to spread awareness of the conservation and economic benefits as well as traditions and values of hunting and fishing. Yamaha OAI is a founding partner of Wonders of Wildlife’s Live It! program and a supporter of its efforts to expand NHF Day events across the country. These events play a significant role in expanding awareness of the issues facing public access and outdoor recreation, and the Live It! program supports local conservation groups wanting to host or enhance NHF Day events but are limited in their resources.

Since access to public land is best protected by visitors’ responsible and sustainable practices, Yamaha OAI partners with Recreate Responsibly Coalition (RRC) on a variety of activities, including signage for land managers to educate visitors on appropriate, responsible use of trails and riding areas. Those interested in applying for signs can simply complete a form at the following link: Yamaha OAI / RRC Responsible Use Signage Request.

Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative

“Last year we made a commitment to grant half a million dollars to outdoor projects, and we’re proud to say we exceeded that goal,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s Motorsports marketing manager. “Our lives are rooted in the outdoors, and Yamaha’s direct and significant financial support of Wonders of Wildlife, Recreate Responsibly, and so many other outdoor organizations help make recreation on public lands possible. In celebration of National Hunting and Fishing Day and National Public Lands Day, we’re excited to renew our annual commitment to make a minimum of $500,000 available in 2022 to organizations who help create opportunities for outdoor recreation.”

The Yamaha OAI program encourages riding clubs, land stewardship associations, and public land managers to work together with Yamaha dealers to identify projects and apply for support. Yamaha OAI is a one-stop resource for outdoor organizations seeking support for their next project. Visit Yamaha OAI’s website for application details or examples of some typical projects the program supports for inspiration.

The application deadline for consideration in the third quarter of the 2022 funding cycle is Sept. 30, 2022. Submission guidelines and an application for a Yamaha OAI grant are available at YamahaOAI.com. Connect with Yamaha on social media via @YamahaOutdoors or search any of the following hashtags on all platforms: #Yamaha #YamahaOAI #REALizeYourAdventure #ProvenOffRoad #AssembledInUSA

Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative

About the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative

Since 2008, the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative has led the Powersports industry in supporting responsible access to our nation’s public lands for outdoor enthusiasts. With more than $5 million contributed to 425 projects across the country, Yamaha has directly and indirectly supported thousands of miles of motorized recreation trails, maintained and rehabilitated riding and hunting areas, improved staging areas, supplied agricultural organizations with essential OHV safety education, built bridges over fish-bearing streams, and partnered with local outdoor enthusiast communities across the country to improve access to public lands. Each quarter, Yamaha accepts applications from nonprofit or tax-exempt organizations including OHV riding clubs and associations, national, state, and local public land-use agencies, outdoor enthusiast associations, and land conservation groups with an interest in protecting, improving, expanding, and/or maintaining access for safe, responsible, and sustainable public use.

Updated guidelines, an application form, information, and news about the Outdoor Access Initiative are available at YamahaOAI’s website. For specific questions about the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative, call the dedicated hotline at 1-877-OHV-TRAIL (877-648-8724), email [email protected], or write to:

Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative

Yamaha Motor Corp., USA

3065 Chastain Meadows Parkway, Bldg. 100

Marietta, GA 30066

Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative

The post Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative Honors National Public Lands Day first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Yamaha Debuts a Track-Only R1 for 2023

Yamaha’s been keeping her shoes tied as of late. 

Between the brand’s successes on the track as Quartararo logged the fastest time at the Misano testthe brand’s 2022 release of their ‘Certified Pre-Owned’ platform, and Yammie’s signing on to the Swappable Battery Consortium, the marque has hardly allowed a breath between debuts – and, in typical fashion, we have another Team Blue machine for you. 

Yamaha's all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.
Yamaha’s all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.

Meet the track-only YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro – Yamaha’s first-ever GYTR (Genuine Yamaha Technology Racing) package for their biggest supersport offering. 

This thing is the closest you’ll ever get to having a WSB-spec bike under your caboose (discounting, of course, those WSB-contracted legends that yoink about on the daily). 

In giving us the package deal all set to go, Yamaha’s deliberately freed up space in the ol’ garage; care to know the pretty penny needed to get her in there? 

Yamaha's all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.
Yamaha’s all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.

According to Motorcycle.com, you’re hovering aruond the €25,000 – €30,000 mark for the privilege of ownership…though the price certainly comes with a list of perks. 

Over 25 bonus performance-orientated parts, ‘bring the bike in line with FIM Superstock 1000 rules,’ including full Öhlins suspension, an Akrapovič Race pipe, Brembo master cylinder brakes (complete with Brembo Z04 brake pads and stainless steel brake lines), underslung rear calipers, a handy wiring harness, and a brand spankin’ new ECU – all of which will likely complement whichever color you decide to dress your race cowl. 

Yamaha's all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.
Yamaha’s all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.

“With our R series, combined with the GYTR Racing parts, we try to cater to two target groups,” enthuses Yamaha Europe’s racing product management lead, Leon Oosterhof to MCN.

“The first is what we call the track enthusiasts, who are basically trackday riders wanting to enjoy a few trackdays a year, but when they go, they really want to enjoy it…the technology and…cool machine.”

This past Wednesday saw reigning 2021 MotoGP Champion, Fabio Quartararo, logging the quickest times at the Misano Test. Media sourced from Motorcycle Daily.
Yamaha's all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.
Yamaha’s all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.

“There is a part of that market, of course that will always prefer to choose a used machine as a base and that’s understandable, but that’s not something we as a manufacturer can tap into. What we are trying to do is to try and be very accessible in what we offer.”

Like what you see?

Yamaha's all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.
Yamaha’s all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.

Be sure to drop a comment below letting us know what you think – we love hearing from you. 

Stay tuned for all things bikes, and as always – stay safe on the twisties.

*Media sourced from Motorcycle.com*

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoGP: Team Yamaha Boasts Quickest Rider

The jury is out – and of all the machines on the Misano’s Wednesday circuit, Yamaha’s Monster Energy team saw the quickest rider!

Doing the honors was none other than Fabio Quartararo, who – according to a press release issued by Monster Energy Yamaha via Roadracing World – is really liking the bike Yammie gave him. 

This past Wednesday saw reigning 2021 MotoGP Champion, Fabio Quartararo, logging the quickest times at the Misano Test. Media sourced from Motorsport Magazine.
This past Wednesday saw reigning 2021 MotoGP Champion, Fabio Quartararo, logging the quickest times at the Misano Test. Media sourced from Motorsport Magazine.

The relevance of this is night and day; if you recall, Quartararo refused to sign on with the Japanese marque until they were able to give him a bike worthy of his talents at the yoink – and fair.

This is MotoGP’s reigning 2021 Champion, after all. 

His improved feeling with his YZR-M1 put the Frenchman in a great mood as he tested fairings and winglets in the afternoon,” states the report. 

This past Wednesday saw reigning 2021 MotoGP Champion, Fabio Quartararo, logging the quickest times at the Misano Test. Media sourced from Roadracing World.
This past Wednesday saw reigning 2021 MotoGP Champion, Fabio Quartararo, logging the quickest times at the Misano Test. Media sourced from Roadracing World.

“Quartararo clocked 288.3 km/h in the pre-lunchtime running on Wednesday, third on that metric at less than 2 km an hour slower than Jorge Martin (Prima Pramac Racig) Recorded on one of the Bologna Bullets…‘El Diablo’ admitted he used a slip stream to achieve that speed, but was still quite happy with what the Iwata manufacturer has rolled out.”

Yamaha's all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.

With the 2022 World Championship not too far away (and a purported new chassis situ for Team Blue), we’ll be looking forward to seeing the results hit the 2022 docket. 

This past Wednesday saw reigning 2021 MotoGP Champion, Fabio Quartararo, logging the quickest times at the Misano Test. Media sourced from Roadracing World.
This past Wednesday saw reigning 2021 MotoGP Champion, Fabio Quartararo, logging the quickest times at the Misano Test. Media sourced from Roadracing World.

Join us after Sept 16 for the festivities, drop a comment below letting us know what you think, and as ever – stay safe on the twisties. 

*Media sourced from Roadracing World, Motorsport Magazine, and Motorcycle Daily*

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

2022 Yamaha MT-10 | Video Review

2022 Yamaha MT-10 review
The 2022 Yamaha MT-10 is a backroad bomber. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

We test the updated 2022 Yamaha MT-10, the 160-hp scream machine that’s at the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked lineup. Aggressive new styling includes a pair of functional intake snorkels with Acoustic Sound Grilles that send a howling symphony up into the cockpit. Other updates include a revised 998cc CP4 inline-Four, new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, refreshed ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.

Read our full review here and watch our video review below:

2022 Yamaha MT-10 Specs

Base Price: $13,999
Website: YamahaMotorsports.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 998cc
Bore x Stroke: 79.0 x 50.9mm
Horsepower: 138 hp at 9,400 rpm (rear-wheel dyno, previous model)
Torque: 77 lb-ft at 9,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno, previous model)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 55.3 in.
Rake/Trail: 24 degrees/4.0 in.
Seat Height: 32.9 in.
Wet Weight: 467 lb
Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gal.
Fuel Consumption: 36 mpg

The post 2022 Yamaha MT-10 | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Yamaha Awards New Outdoor Initiative Grants

Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative
All Kids Bike is one of six Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative grant recipients for 2Q 2022.

As motorcycle enthusiasts, we celebrate all things outdoors. Whether it’s riding a bicycle or a dirtbike or a streetbike, whether you’re into hiking or fishing or camping, spending time outside recharges our mental and physical batteries and makes us better people. We applaud the financial commitment Yamaha has made and continues to make to maintain access to outdoor activities for people of all ages and walks of life. Read about the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative in the press release below.


Yamaha Motor Corp., USA recently announced the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative (OAI) grant awards totaling $145,175 for the second quarter of 2022 in support of its ongoing mission to protect, improve, and expand access to public land for motorized and outdoor recreation. This quarter, Yamaha OAI resources were deployed to help national efforts, as well as specific projects directly impacting the future of motorized recreation. Projects being funded in the second quarter grant cycle include:

  • Developing a database of public land trades to help generate public awareness and involvement in protecting access for recreation.
  • Conducting a workshop educating land managers on sustainable trail building and maintenance to protect the safety of riders and the future of access on public lands.
  • Significant trail rehabilitation and rerouting efforts to improve off-road experiences while protecting sensitive environments.
  • Introducing kindergarteners to biking.
Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative

“We continue to prioritize projects offering innovative and sustainable solutions to the problems facing access to land for motorized and outdoor recreation. This quarter’s applicants delivered in many impactful ways and we are excited to continue being involved in making real progress on the ground,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s Motorsports marketing manager. “We are additionally pleased to continue our partnership with The Nature Conservancy in Tennessee in support of their efforts to build 150 miles of legal motorized trails on the Northumberland Plateau.”

The second quarter grants for 2022 have been awarded to six applicants:

  • Colorado Wild Public Lands — Basalt, CO
  • Indian Creek Valley ATV Club – Indian Head, PA
  • Limestone Trail Hawks — Aroostook County, ME
  • National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council
  • All Kids Bike
  • The Nature Conservancy – Tennessee Chapter

Related Story: Listen to our podcast interview with All Kids Bike founder Ryan McFarland

The application deadline for consideration in the third quarter of this year’s funding cycle is September 30, 2022, and riding clubs, land stewardship associations, and public land managers are encouraged to work together with Yamaha dealers to identify projects and apply for support. To aid those considering applying for a Yamaha OAI grant, visit YamahaOAI.com for submission guidelines, an application, answers to most popular questions about the program, and recaps of some typical projects.

About the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative
Since 2008, the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative has led the Powersports industry in supporting responsible access to our nation’s public lands for outdoor enthusiasts. With more than $5 million contributed to 400 projects across the country, Yamaha has directly and indirectly supported thousands of miles of motorized recreation trails, maintained and rehabilitated riding and hunting areas, improved staging areas, supplied agricultural organizations with essential OHV safety education, built bridges over fish-bearing streams, and partnered with local outdoor enthusiast communities across the country to improve access to public lands. Each quarter, Yamaha accepts applications from nonprofit or tax-exempt organizations including OHV riding clubs and associations, national, state, and local public land-use agencies, outdoor enthusiast associations, and land conservation groups with an interest in protecting, improving, expanding, and/or maintaining access for safe, responsible, and sustainable public use.

Updated guidelines, application form, information, and news about the Outdoor Access Initiative are available at YamahaOAI.com. For specific questions about the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative, call the dedicated hotline at 1-877-OHV-TRAIL (877-648-8724), email [email protected], or write to:

Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative
Yamaha Motor Corp., USA
3065 Chastain Meadows Parkway, Bldg. 100
Marietta, GA 30066

About Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA
Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA (YMUS), is a recognized leader in the outdoor recreation industry. The company’s ever-expanding product offerings include Motorcycles and Scooters, ATV and Side-by-Side vehicles, Snowmobiles, WaveRunner Personal Watercraft, Boats, Outboard Motors, Outdoor Power Equipment, Power Assist Bicycles, Golf Cars, Power Assist Wheelchair Systems, Surface Mount Technology (SMT) and Robotic Machines, Unmanned Helicopters, Accessories, Apparel, Yamalube products, and much more. YMUS products are sold through a nationwide network of distributors and dealers in the United States.

YMUS has a corporate office in California, two corporate offices in Georgia, facilities in Wisconsin and Alabama, and factory operations in Tennessee and Georgia. Additional U.S.-based subsidiaries include Yamaha Marine Systems Company (YMSC) with divisions Bennett Marine (Florida), Kracor Systems (Wisconsin) and Siren Marine, Inc. (Rhode Island), Skeeter Boats (Texas), with division G3 Boats (Missouri), and Yamaha Precision Propeller (Indiana).

Connect with Yamaha on social media via @YamahaOutdoors or search any of the following hashtags on all platforms: #Yamaha #YamahaOAI #REALizeYourAdventure #ProvenOffRoad #AssembledInUSA

The post Yamaha Awards New Outdoor Initiative Grants first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Long-Term Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT won Rider’s Motorcycle of the Year award last year, and we’ve tested it over a period of 12 months. Photos by Kevin Wing.

Related Story: 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Road Test Review

Mileage: 6,294
Base Price: $14,899 (2021); $14,999 (2022)
Accessories: $729.95

After a year together, it’s finally time to say goodbye to our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year. We’ve had a great time with the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, so we’re sad to see it go.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
We added several Yamaha factory accessories to improve wind protection, storage capacity, and passenger comfort.

The Tracer 9 GT is the culmination of several generations of development and refinement, and the result is a fantastic lightweight sport-tourer built around Yamaha’s 890cc inline-Triple, which is good for 108 hp at 10,000 rpm and 63 lb-ft of torque at 7,200 rpm at the rear wheel. This is one of the most fun and engaging engines around – it’s like hanging out with three hellraising buddies who know how to keep it cool in polite company but love to get rowdy when the clock strikes 6,500 rpm.

In stock trim, the Tracer 9 GT is a versatile, comfortable machine that served us well on day rides, weekend jaunts, and multiday trips. We appreciated the Yamaha’s good wind protection, upright riding position, generous legroom, dual-height seat (31.9/32.5 inches), and adjustable handlebar and footpeg positions. None of our testers complained about soreness in wrists, lower backs, or shoulders, nor was engine heat ever an issue.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
We replaced the OE Bridgestone tires with Dunlop Sportmax Roadsmart IVs.

Any time the road turned twisty, we were glad to be on the Tracer. With its raucous engine, excellent chassis, and semi-active suspension, we attacked corners with gusto, enjoying the confidence boost that a well-sorted motorcycle can provide. 

To get to the good stuff, we logged many miles on the slab. One of our nits to pick is how busy the engine is in 6th gear at freeway speeds. At 65 mph, the engine turns 4,200 rpm. We lost count of how many times we grabbed ghost shifts to 7th thinking there might be another gear up top. We’d like to try a rear sprocket with one less tooth to make the gearing taller.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
Yamaha’s Touring Windshield is taller and wider than stock.

In terms of maintenance, we did routine checks of tire pressure, oil level, chain tension and lubrication, and such. We changed the oil and filter after about 5,000 miles, and we used the recommended Yamalube products. We also took the Tracer to our local Yamaha dealer after a safety recall was announced that all 2021-22 MT-09 and Tracer 9 GT models had an improperly programmed ECU that could cause engines to stall unexpectedly in certain circumstances. It was fixed quickly at no charge.

The Tracer proved to be unforgiving of laziness with the clutch when pulling away from a stop, both before and after the recall repair. Without adequate revs, we’d stall the Tracer like a newbie.

After about 5,000 miles of hard use, the rear Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT tire was toast. We spooned on a set of Dunlop Sportmax Roadsmart IV radials, and they’ve provided excellent grip and ride quality. MSRP for the Roadsmart IV tires is $189.95 for the front (120/70ZR17) and $250.95 for the rear (180/55ZR17). You can read our Roadsmart IV review here.

To enhance the Tracer 9 GT’s touring ability, we installed several Yamaha factory accessories, including the Touring Windshield ($179.99), Top Case Mounting Kit ($116.99), 50L Top Case ($289.99), 50L Top Case Backrest Pad ($74.99), and 50L Fitted Top Case Inner Bag ($66.99). 

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
We installed Yamaha’s 50L Top Case. It’s also available in a 39-liter size.

Installation was straightforward. The Touring Windshield is 2.8 inches wider and 3.2 inches taller than stock, and it made a big difference in terms of wind protection. The Tracer’s 30-liter saddlebags are large enough to hold a full-face helmet in each side. The 50L Top Case bumps total storage capacity to 110 liters, and the backrest pad was appreciated by passen-gers.

Over the course of nearly 6,300 miles, we averaged 44.4 mpg, which yields 222 miles from the 5-gallon tank (premium unleaded is required). Our fuel economy ranged from as high as 60.4 mpg to as low as 33.7 mpg, the latter after giving it the whip in a serious headwind.

After whining to Yamaha reps about having to return the Tracer 9 GT, we wiped away our tears when they offered us a lollipop: an accessorized 2022 MT-10. Stay tuned to find out how we get along with the Tracer’s big brother.

The post 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Long-Term Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com