Stoner auctions race-winning leathers for bushfire appeal

Stoner explains that it is the first-ever racing suit that has been released to the public from his own private collection and comes with an autographed certificate of authenticity by Alpinestars. All proceeds raised, which currently sits at above $10,000 (Australian), will go to the Australian Red Cross Disaster Relief and Recovery Fund.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

New Gear: Aerostich Transit 3 Waterproof Leather Suit

Aerostich Transit waterproof/breathable leather suit.
Aerostich Transit waterproof/breathable leather suit.

After a six-year absence due to a lack of specialized materials, Aerostich’s Transit waterproof/breathable leather suit is back and better than ever. The new Transit 3 uses 1.2mm perforated leather with a special impregnation that prevents it from absorbing water, and underneath is a breathable waterproof membrane. A complete set of TF5 impact armor is included. Jackets ($987) are sized 38-52 and pants ($897) 30-44, both available in Short, Regular and Long lengths.

Call (800) 222-1994 or visit aerostich.com

Source: RiderMagazine.com

New Gear: Edelweiss Bike Travel’s 2020 Tour Catalog

Edelweiss Bike Travel 2020 Tour Catalog.
Edelweiss Bike Travel 2020 Tour Catalog.

Thinking of an international motorcycle tour in 2020? Edelweiss Bike Travel has released its complete 2020 catalog of tours. There’s something for everyone, including guided, self-guided and private options to bucket-list locations like the Alps, Ireland, Africa, New Zealand and Thailand, from seven to 14 days and more! Or if you’re feeling very adventurous, join one or more legs of the World Tour, covering six continents and countless unforgettable encounters.

Call +011 43 5264 5690 or visit edelweissbike.com

Source: RiderMagazine.com

How To Get A Motorcycle License

Getting licensed to ride is the first step toward a fulfilling life with motorcycles. Motorcyclists ride on BMW motorcycle.Getting licensed to ride is the first step toward a fulfilling life with motorcycles.BMW

So the time has come. Maybe you’ve been dreaming of rides to far off locales, pricing used bikes on Craigslist, reading review after review to find the perfect bike for you. Maybe you have some friends who ride and you’re tired of being left out. Or maybe you’ve realized life is exponentially more rich and satisfying behind the bars. Whatever your reason, it’s time to make the dream a reality. It’s time to finally get a motorcycle license.

The problem is, getting a motorcycle license isn’t glamorous and probably hasn’t factored into your two-wheel fantasies. I don’t blame you—sitting around at the DMV, waiting to hand over paperwork doesn’t raise the pulse, but it’s an important part of getting legal.

Getting a license also gives you the chance to learn some fundamental safety rules, to practice basic skills, and to decide if riding really is something you want to pursue.

That’s all to say that there’s a process to getting licensed in America. It varies slightly from state to state, but the general steps outlined below will have you on the road to riding freedom in no time

Where To Start?

The open road awaits. Motorcyclist rides on Kawasaki motorcycle.The open road awaits.Harley-Davidson

First, you’ll want to check your state’s DMV requirements for a motorcycle permit or endorsement. Requirements vary state to state, so be sure to follow the procedure outlined by your state in order to make the process as simple as possible.

Just about any new rider looking to get licensed should expect to take a Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic RiderCourse or equivalent program. Some states, like Oregon, have their own rider training programs. But the format is similar across the board. There will be two to three days of instruction, both in class and on a closed course, where you will learn the fundamentals of motorcycle operation and safety.

Triple check your state’s DMV requirements before signing up for a course however. There are lots of online courses and riding schools that promise to get you into riding shape that won’t be accepted by the DMV as proof of your riding qualifications.

When you find the right course, start at the very beginning too. Even if you’ve never swung a leg over a bike before in your life, you will have the chance to learn how to turn a bike on, how to engage the clutch, how to switch gears, and a lot more. By the end you’ll need to pass both written and riding skills tests.

In some states, successfully completing a basic rider course like this will allow you to skip an on-bike skills test when it comes time to go back to the DMV. If that’s the case, you’ll have to pay a fee, pass a motorcycle knowledge test and a vision test before getting the endorsement to ride.

And that’s about it. Getting the endorsement is pretty easy as long as you pass the prerequisite training program and knowledge test.

In some states you can bypass the weekend MSF course by taking a written and on-bike skills test at the DMV or approved location.

Permits Are Another Option

There’s no better place on earth. Riding a motorcycle on the road.There’s no better place on earth.Kawasaki

In some states, riders as young as 14 can apply for a riding permit. With a permit, riders can be out in the daylight, riding without a passenger within eyesight of a fully endorsed rider above a certain age/experience level. You will still need to take a motorcycle knowledge test and pass a vision test in order to get the permit, but it’s a great way to get some experience if you have a bike and a mentor rider available.

Many states still require successful completion of a basic rider course or supervised skills test even if you’ve been riding with a permit. Again, be sure to know your state’s requirements thoroughly before you make any decisions.

The 10,000-Foot View

Getting licensed is straightforward and definitely worth the effort. Riding a Yamaha motorcycle under a bridge.Getting licensed is straightforward and definitely worth the effort.Yamaha

Getting a license (endorsement) to ride a motorcycle is not confirmation of your superior riding skills. Rather, it’s the start of a potentially lifelong relationship with motorcycles that can be extremely fulfilling if you take it slow to start and nail down the fundamentals.

MSF has additional rider training courses that teach more advanced skills in a controlled environment and there are some great written assets out there from guys like Keith Code that drill down into all aspects of the mechanics of riding. Getting a license is an opportunity to develop your skills as a rider, in the real world where there are real consequences.

If you’re anything like me, you’ll be completely stoked when you get that endorsement and itching to hit the road. But remember to take a breath, use your head and the skills you’ve learned, and ride within your limits. Speed and ability will come, it just takes time and practice.

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

What does 2020 hold for the manufacturers? Part 3: Ducati

It turned out that the Grand Prix Commission, who make the rules, and not considered putting spoilers on a swing arm. So that’s exactly what Ducati did, adding a spoiler to the bottom of the swing arm and covers over the front wheel, ostensibly to help cool the rear tyre – tyre temperature is a key factor in tyre wear, an area which Ducati have invested heavily in during the Michelin era. That it also added a small amount of downforce on the rear wheel, helping to improve braking by keeping it in contact with the ground, was merely a useful side effect. So useful that by the end of the year, all six MotoGP™ manufacturers were either running them in races, or testing them for the future.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

Snipers Team unveil 2020 Moto3™ livery in Verona

The first team presentation of 2020 took place over the weekend in Verona, Italy, as the VNE Snipers squad unveiled their brand-new livery ahead of the Moto3™ World Championship. A hot favourite for the 2020 crown, Italy’s Tony Arbolino, will look to build on the first two Grand Prix victories of his career from last year, which, along with five other trips to the rostrum, helped him to fourth in the World Championship.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

Marquez admits surgery recovery has been “quite difficult”

Twelve months on from intrusive surgery on his left shoulder, the reigning MotoGP™ World Champion had hoped his recovery would be more straight forward this time around. However, speaking at a Catalan athlete award ceremony last week, Marquez admitted his recovery has been challenging.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

Confrontation leads to motorcycle crash

A motorcycle rider has ended up rear-ending a vehicle that brake-checked him after they had a confrontation recently on Melbourne’s Western Ring Road.

This video posted on Dashcam Owners Australia shows that the rider has taken offence to something done by the P-plate driver of the BMW. Perhaps they were tailgating him – one of our pet peeves!

The rider stops for a confrontation with the driver, bringing traffic dangerously to a halt in the right lane.

One driver dangerously has to pass the stopped vehicles, giving the dashcam car a clear view of what happens next.

After the rider gets back on his bike and takes off, the BMW driver dangerously and illegally moves over on the rider, passes him and then brake checks him.

The result of the confrontation is that the rider slams into the back of the BMW which leaves the scene of the accident.

VicPol say they have no record of the incident being reported.

I imagine the rider wouldn’t be stupid enough to report it as he could also be liable for a $289 fine for obstructing the path of other motorists. The fine is the same as exceeding the speed limit by 10-15km/h. 

How to report road rage

Vicpol urges motorists to report all road rage incidents to police so that we can investigate accordingly.Rider punches and kicks SUV in road rage

“We know that many of these incidents start as minor traffic incidents but can escalate very quickly which turns into criminal offending,” a VicPol spokeswoman says.

“We’ve seen a distinct change in driving behaviour over the years where there is a lack of courtesy and respect on the roads. It is often the case that minor incidents escalate into much more serious offending. Unfortunately we are seeing a small number of people who are unable to hold their temper while on the roads however there is never an excuse for this type of behaviour.

“We want to remind all drivers to take their time on the roads and drive to the conditions. We all need to be mindful of other road users.

“If you are involved in a road rage situation, do not get out of your car and call Triple Zero (000).

“Obtain the registration number and report the incident to police. If you see someone acting aggressively on the road please make a confidential report to Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

“We encourage everyone to be courteous on the roads. Yes, people do make mistakes and there are instances on the road where people cut people off. However if this is the case, a simple wave apologising to the other vehicle often de-escalates the situation very quickly.” 

Tips on handling confrontationBlame road rage helmet cameras dash cam

This is not the first road rage video featuring a rider-versus-driver confrontation that we have posted. (Just type “road rage” into our search field and see what comes up!)

In every video, the rider comes off second-best to the bigger vehicle.

Riders are vulnerable and get harassed almost every day by other traffic.

But it is pointless being being lured into confrontation. Just smile, give a shrug or a wave and ride away from the problem.

If you are tailgated like the guy in the video, click here to find out what you can do to avoid such a situation, rather than ending up in a bleeding heap on the road.

Queensland Police Senior Sergeant Ian Park who created the #ridesafely4me Facebook site says he’s not sure if it’s perception or reality, but “our roads appear to be becoming angrier places”.

“Unfortunately, it seems to involve individuals from all road user groups as both the victims and the perpetrators. Motorcyclists and bicyclists are of course the most vulnerable due to the lack of physical protection around them. But the fundamentals of personal safety of the roads are no different to anywhere else,” he says.

Queensland Police Senior Sergeant Ian Park a social media sensation reason confrontationSgt Park and a group of riders

Here are Ian’s tips to avoiding road rage:

If you find yourself feeling unsafe as a result of the actions of another road user, the first priority is to remove yourself from the situation as safely as possible. Unfortunately far too often incidents of poor behaviour by one road user to another are only exacerbated when the ‘victim’ retaliates. If another party chooses to yell at you, beep their horn or flash their lights – so what? Let them get it out of their system and get on their way. Inflaming the situation by ‘biting back’ rarely assists, and often only makes the situation more unsafe for everyone.

However if the other party continues to behave in a manner that makes you feel unsafe, then consider your environment. Perhaps pull into a service station, licensed premises or shopping centre that is likely to be fitted with external CCTV. This will often discourage the aggressor from taking the matter further if they know their actions (and registration details) are going to be recorded.

If no such place is available continue to drive without reacting to the aggressor until a place of safety is available, avoid making eye contact and attempt to disengage from the situation as best and safely as you can.

If you feel that you are in imminent danger, pull over and call triple zero (000). Don’t forget that ‘000’ from a mobile phone doesn’t necessarily go to your nearest operator, so always be ready to say ‘I need police in (name of City/town or nearest regional centre)’.

When speaking with a 000 operator, pass on relevant information that could assist police to investigate the matter, for example, registration details, descriptions of the person/s in the vehicle, time, date, correct location (in case there are traffic monitoring cameras located nearby etc.), descriptions about any features of the vehicle that are not standard (i.e. post factory fitted wheels, decorations, accessories, damage).

Emergency first-aid apps reason

If you carry any kind of video recording device, ensure the footage is set aside so that it doesn’t get recorded over before being provided to police. Make sure you don’t just secure the footage of the incident – also keep footage leading up to and beyond the incident to help clarify any potential counter claims by the other party that it was actually you that was the aggressor.

If the situation is over, but you are still of the belief that the matter warrants investigation with a view to action by police, you always have the right to report it. You can either attend your nearest open police station to speak to someone, contact the non-urgent police reporting number which is now 131 444 in almost all Australian Police Jurisdictions. Similarly most policing services across Australia also provide on-line reporting services. Just search the police service in your State or Territory to find their websites and follow the prompts.

Be mindful, however that any complaint of an incident involving one person upon another without any supporting evidence is often difficult to successfully prosecute. A successful prosecution requires sufficient evidence being presented to a court to determine that an offence was committed beyond reasonable doubt.

However, this should not prevent you from reporting the matter, but is something to keep in mind if police determine there is not sufficient evidence for a matter to proceed. It doesn’t necessarily mean police don’t believe you! If you provide police with a video recording you must be willing and able to give evidence.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

GloveTacts touchscreen contacts updated

GloveTacts have improved their touchscreen-sensitive stick-on pads so they are now the most effective way to use touchscreens (smartphones, GPS units, smart watches, instruments and MP3 players) without removing your gloves.

Many motorcycle gloves now come with touchscreen-sensitive fingertips, but we have come across few that actually work very well.

GloveTacts are thin black stickers that stick to your glove’s index finger or thumb since many people use their thumbs for texting.

Obviously we don’t condone texting while riding, but these touchscreen pads are great for using your phone when stopped without having to take off your gloves.

Handy if you just want to quickly stop and take a photo of the view or reply to an urgent work text: “2 sic 2 come 2 work“.

You could also use them on the run for various simple tasks, but we don’t recommend it.

GloveTacts testedGloveTacts touchscreen pads

We tried the original GloveTacts version in June 2016 and were not overly impressed.

They were claimed to stick to “almost any glove”, old or new, so long as they are cleaned first.

However, I found they pulled off my index finger with clutch use, so I switched to the thumb.

Then, after just a few short uses, they simply stopped working.

I contacted the company for comment and they didn’t reply until late last year telling me they had upgraded them.

A couple of weeks ago a couple of new sets of GloveTacts arrived in the post.

Each includes two short stickers for summer gloves and two long ones for thick winter gloves or if the short ones don’t work.

GloveTacts touchscreen pads

We didn’t have any problems with any of the short ones on several pairs of gloves.

So we simply split the long ones in the middle where the cut marks are.

Unlike the supplied photo at the top of this page, we positioned them over the end of the fingertip as below which works better, especially for more precise duties such as typing a text.

GloveTacts touchscreen pads

A pack of two GloveTacts used to cost $US10 (about $A14.50) plus postage; now you get four for the same price. Or six short ones! You can order them online here.

They work very effectively in either wet or dry conditions and have not failed us yet.

How the work

They used to be made of AX Suede Connect, but now they don’t specify. They just say they use a material that mimics how the skin interacts with touchscreen electronics.

Touchscreen sensors detect a tiny electrical charge transferred to the finger which completes a circuit and drops the voltage at that point on the screen, activating the button’s function.

While your finger will conduct electricity, most glove materials won’t.

We also tried Farkle Fingers which are like little glove puppets that annoyingly got caught up in the glove Velcro fasteners and would come off.

A pack of four costs $US20 and you can swap them from your winter to summer gloves with the change of seasons.

However, they were not as sensitive as the GloveTacts which never failed.

DIY

If you want to do it yourself, you could buy some conductive thread and sew a few stitches on to the finger tips, but it is not always very effective or accurate.

You could also try Any Glove or Nanotips which are a black liquid that you paint on to the fingertips.

It takes a long time to dry, but once it’s on, it is claimed to be waterproof and will not wash off.

Even the USArmy uses Any Glove on their combat gloves, so it must be tough.

However, it will wear off in a few weeks and need reapplying.

A bottle of AnyGlove costs $US20 and $15 for Nantips which is contains enough for about 30 applications.

The accuracy of any of these products will never be as good as your finger because a glove is fatter than your fingertip and the touchscreen may get confused about what button you are touching.

While some touchscreen functions can be quickly and safely performed while riding, we advise that anything complex such as texting be done when you stop. At least now, you won’t have to remove your gloves first which is great for convenience and in cold weather!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Ducati V4 Superleggera has super power

Ducati’s planned V4 Superleggera is expected to be one of the world’s most powerful street-legal super bikes with 167kW (224hp) at 15,250 revs.

Throw on the optional Akrapovic full racing exhaust system and power is boosted to 174kW (234bhp), even beating the supercharged Kawasaki H2 at 171kW (230hp).

That compares with the Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory at 162kW (217hp) and new Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade with 160kW (212hp).

Super lightDucati V4 Superleggera super power

A leaked photo (above) and details show the largely carbon-fibre bike will weigh just 152kg which is 20kg less than the V4R, hence the term superleggera (super light).

The Superleggera’s Desmosedici Stradale R V4 engine is a big jump up from the “standard” V4 with (155kW/208hp, 124Nm) and V4S/R (top of page) with 159kW (214hp).

However, it is expected to have a super cost as well at $US100,000 (about $A145,000).

Superleggera will be produced in a limited edition of 500. We expect they will only be available here on order.

It will also feature MotoGP livery, exotic components (top-shelf Brembo brakes and Ohlins suspension) with all-LED lighting.

Ducati is expected to start production in April 2020 with deliveries the following month.

Like the V4R, it will have bi-place wings plus extra winglets to increase downforce at 270km/h from 30kg to 50kg.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com