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2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo | Road Test Review

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
The KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo is a torque monster. Once wheelie control is turned off, it will lift the front wheel on command. Experts only, please. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Some motorcycles are like Buddha, such as a Gold Wing gliding down the road in near silence, its deep bucket seat cradling your fundament and scarcely a vibration felt at the feet and hands. Others are like mad dogs, snarling and pulling at their chains, ready to rip, tear, and lacerate at a moment’s notice. The original KTM 1290 Super Duke R was pretty much the latter – an idealized naked hyperbike that was introduced in 2014. It had terrific power, satisfying daily-rider ergonomics, and the immediate response that earmarks most race machines. KTM’s “Ready to Race” slogan was aptly fulfilled.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
The 1,301cc V-Twin is the star of the show, and the Super Duke’s minimal bodywork and trellis frame does little to hide it.

Now, after eight years of evolution, the latest-gen 1290 Super Duke R Evo goes further with the addition of multi-mode semi-active WP suspension to the KTM’s existing electronic elements, including throttle-by-wire, ride modes (which adjust throttle response and engine power), cornering ABS and traction control, wheelie control, cruise control, and more. Our test bike was equipped with the Tech Pack, a $899.99 option that adds an up/down quickshifter, Motor Slip Regulation (MSR), Suspension Pro, and Track Pack.

The settings may be configured statically or on the fly via multifunction switchgear on the left handlebar. The multilayered menu appears bright and crisp, day or night, on a 4.8-inch color TFT screen, which also includes a hockey-stick-style tachometer, a large digital speedometer, a gear-position indicator, and various annunciators.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
With its top-shelf components and comprehensive electronics, the KTM is designed to work equally well on road or track.

FIRE ME UP

Let’s take a ride. There is no traditional ignition key, but rather an electronic transponder with a flip-out key that’s used only to unlock the seat. Approach within a few feet of the bike and the transponder and machine connect wirelessly. A quick press of the master power button on the right handlebar unlocks the fork and gas cap and illuminates the instrument panel.

From there, climb aboard and tag the start button. The highly tuned 1,301cc DOHC 75-degree V-Twin whirs and churns like a Massey Ferguson before firing and settling into a grumbling baritone idle through its enormous stainless headers. Sound pressure recorded at idle at helmet height was 88 decibels. And it gets louder as the revs build, naturally along with wind noise.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
Bikes in KTM’s naked and adventure lineups share a common design language, with a vertically split headlight surrounded by a daytime running light.

While the liquid-cooled motor warms up – we found the KTM to be somewhat coldblooded – use the opportunity to configure the electronic engine and chassis parameters for the ride. Which invites a fair question: What kind of ride?

First, select a ride mode: Street, Rain, and Sport modes are standard, while Performance and Track modes are part of the optional Track Pack. Next, select a suspension damping mode: Comfort, Street, and Sport are standard, along with electronically adjustable rear preload (in 2mm increments). Track, Advanced, and Automatic modes are part of the optional Suspension Pro package, which also adds automatic preload leveling with three modes (Low, Standard, and High). You can also turn off both traction control and MSR, turn off the quickshifter, and select an ABS mode (Road or Supermoto, which deactivates ABS at the rear wheel). Or not. Everything can be left in default settings, and you can just grab a gear and go.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
The scratch-and glare-resistant TFT display shows speed in a big, bold font with a hockey stick-style tachometer at the top.

It would take much more space than we have available to review all the settings and permutations. It takes some time to get familiar with everything, but for most riders the only settings that will be regularly changed are ride mode and suspension mode. Two customizable profiles allow riders to configure their favorite settings and toggle between them using a switch on the right handlebar. Set it and forget it.

CREATURE COMFORT

Let’s start the ride with the default Street ride mode and the genial Comfort suspension mode to get a baseline understanding of how the semi-active suspension interplays with the carryover electronics. It’s surprising what a pleasant motorcycle the 1290 SD-R Evo is with these soft settings. The suspension – a 48mm WP inverted fork, a linked monoshock, and a single-sided swingarm – is surprisingly comfy. Rowing across town, I found the steering characteristics to be pure joy. The Super Duke is nimble and agreeable for any necessary urban maneuver, from tight turns to quick lane changes to streaking away from offensive traffic.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
KTM’s optional Suspension Pro package adds an anti-dive function to the semi-active suspension, preventing the fork from compressing excessively under heavy braking.

GEAR UP
Helmet: Arai Quantum-X
Jacket: Alpinestars Hyper Drystar
Gloves: Alpinestars SMX-2
Pants: Alpinestars Victory Denim
Boots: Alpinestars Faster-3 Rideknit

Switching to the Street suspension mode, the ride quality still proved fine for a rabid naked bike making a claimed 180 hp. So is the engine’s vibration signature, a minor miracle in that the motor is bolted solidly to the space frame’s thin-wall chromoly tubing, and serves as a stressed member. The motocross-style tapered aluminum handlebar wears a pair of 6-oz bar-end mass dampers, which change the bar’s resonant frequency to quell engine-induced vibration in the grips.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
The semi-active suspension is made by KTM subsidiary WP. An array of electronic sensors and actuators adjust damping in real-time based on conditions and riding behavior.

Breaking free of town onto a winding two-lane highway, I toggled to Sport mode for both ride and suspension, which firmed up damping characteristics and shock spring preload, quickened throttle response, unleashed full power, and loosened up traction and wheelie control. Like observing a dog perking up its ears, the countenance of the Super Duke noticeably sharpened. Gone was the relaxed, easy cadence of Comfort and Street modes; Sport settings picked up the pace, and so did I. Ride aggressively or casually, Honey Badger don’t care.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
Bikes equipped with Suspension Pro have six suspension damping modes and three automatic rear preload modes.

In fact, the twin-spark engine is so flexible, it can just lug around as a torque monster or rage to its 10,250-rpm redline. On Jett Tuning’s dyno, the KTM generated 166 hp at 10,000 rpm and 96 lb-ft of torque at 8,400 rpm at the rear wheel in Sport mode. Horsepower increases steadily with revs, while torque is prodigious throughout the rev range, exceeding 80 lb-ft from 4,000 rpm to redline.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

In town, the profiles and contact patches of the Bridgestone Battlax HyperSport S22 radials – 120/70-ZR17 front and fat 200/55-ZR17 rear – proved most agreeable. Linear, predictable, and confidence-inspiring. With their fine-particle silica compound, these refined treads are said to excel in conditions from rain to racetracks. We hit neither on this test, but on every mile of street, road, and freeway we covered, they proved highly satisfying.

A word now about seating. Though dimensionally small, the pilot’s seat feels more standard than sportbike. In other words, it’s just right for most riding activities. (If you want to go sport-touring, check out KTM’s accessory Ergo rider’s and pillion seats.) With no front fairing or windscreen, it’s full wind blast, baby. Complementing the fine steering geometry, the ergonomics are refreshingly sensible compared to superbikes – that is, except for the wide tank/airbox combination that splays knees unnaturally. Further, with its hard finishing panel at the rear, the tank can be a ballbreaker if sudden braking intrudes.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
With ride modes, suspension modes, ABS modes, and other settings, the 1290 Super Duke R Evo is highly configurable. Though nicknamed The Beast, the KTM can play many roles, from docile to hyperactive.

ALL IN

For the most fun part of this test, high above the city on empty mountain roads, I toggled to the Track ride mode, which is included as part of the Tech Pack. It maximizes throttle response and power, allows rear wheelspin to be adjusted on the fly over nine levels, and turns off wheelie control. (A more street-oriented Performance mode offers the same features, but also allows riders to use cruise control and the KTM MY RIDE multimedia system.)

In Track mode, everything gets really focused. Throttle response, already made more direct thanks to the new 65-degree quick-turn throttle (reduced by 7 degrees), which also helps reduce wrist angle and elbow drop at full throttle, becomes immediate. The Track suspension mode likewise dramatically firms things up. Although harder-edged, these settings make the Super Duke the ultimate confidence-inspiring machine for attacking road or track. With so much horsepower cued up and lacking the runoff of a modern racetrack, I backed out of this after several miles and reverted to the slightly more docile Sport ride and suspension modes.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

Our test of the Super Duke R Evo revealed its complete mastery of all kinds of roads, including fast sweepers and tight corners, off-camber bends, and varied surfaces. Throughout, it required no undue tugging of the handlebar to change directions, engaged in no weird chassis hijinks or bobbles, and stayed faithful and true in whatever conditions appeared. Building such a tenable package is complicated, requiring a refined blend of chassis geometry and stiffness, mass placement, suspension design and tuning, power delivery, adaptive electronics, and way more. And the Bridgestones make it all work, whether at trolling speeds or lightspeed. All primary controls – including throttle, clutch, shifter, and front and rear brakes – are balanced with a well-connected feel.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
Switchgear and menus are intuitive.

There are a few demerits, but they’re relatively minor balanced against the total 1290 SD-R Evo package. Some of the handlebar switches are poorly shaped. Particularly egregious is the triangular turnsignal switch; activation feel is fine, but canceling requires pushing what feels like the pointy end of a carpenter’s pencil. Additionally, the headlight high/low switch, toggled by the left forefinger, should be larger, and the horn button is too far from the left thumb. And that 3.2-inch horn! I’m sure it’s stamped with the letters “moo,” emitting barely a plebian bleat no better than a newborn calf’s. Riders deserve better, and not just Super Duke pilots. Lastly, while I was personally happy with the clutch and front brake lever adjustability, the thumbscrews are small, and the adjustment range might not satisfy riders with small hands. Balancing this, the shift lever and rear brake pedal (and fork stops) are also adjustable, albeit with some light wrench work.

The Super Duke R Evo’s optional quickshifter can be turned on or off through the electronics menu. It works spectacularly for rapid upshifts, but is quite sensitive, and so a careless touch of the gear shift lever interrupts power. Admittedly, this only caused problems during particularly aggressive riding. Bottom line, for track duty or raging up a mountain road, the quickshifter is a fine addition; for street riding, though, I was happier deactivating it.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
The Beast’s confidence-inspiring handling and stout motor are delightful when bending into corners and exploding out of them.

Part of the Suspension Pro package is a programmable anti-dive feature. I well remember hammering bikes with conventional inverted forks and cursing the nosebleed dives they’d make under hard braking while rushing downhill. No worries with the SD-R Evo, as this feature keeps the chassis more balanced and its rider happy. While eclipsing miles of narrow, twisting downhill road, the 1290’s chassis, Bridgestones, and Brembo brakes with Stylema 4-piston radial front calipers seamlessly mastered the conditions, with excellent feedback and precision. The tires offer an additional advantage of sticking even when they’re cool. Translation: Premium DOT sport tires are a great choice for the wide range of conditions that this improved Super Duke can handle.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

TASTES GREAT, LESS FILLING

As much as I enjoyed my time aboard the 1290 while bending it into and out of undulating mountain corners, the KTM proved to be well-mannered on efficient-yet-boring freeways. That’s the real magic of bikes like this with fully customizable riding dynamics. You can tame the power, soften the suspension, and set the cruise control, all while queueing up your favorite song on your smartphone. At 70 mph on the freeway in 6th gear, the engine turns a relaxed 3,500 rpm. The motor seems to be at its smoothest exactly at this point, perfect for touring or droning commutes. On the highway, I found no detriments to the nimble steering geometry; the 1290 tracked beautifully and retained excellent stability.

Modern bikes like this latest Super Duke augment riding fun while reducing certain hassle factors. Pull into a gas station, drop the sidestand, hit the kill switch, and pop open the fuel filler without ever pulling the fob out of your pocket. From the 1290’s 4.2-gal. tank, over a mix of city, freeway, and mowing-down-the-mountain riding, we netted 35 mpg, yielding nearly 150 miles of range. The transponder that allows key-free unlocking, starting, and fueling also simplifies locking. When parked, hit the power button to shut down the bike, then hold it down again to lock the steering.

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo
The Super Duke’s structural chassis uses a tubular-steel trellis main frame, a composite subframe, and a cast-aluminum single-sided swingarm.

During a night ride, I happily discovered that the Super Duke’s twin LED headlights are vastly better than the first Super Duke’s halogen system. KTM surrounded the headlight array (split up the center to feed twin ram-air openings) with a racy illuminated surround in white and orange, KTM’s signature colors. Thoughtfully, the headlight assembly can be quickly removed for track duty with three fasteners and an electrical plug. Same goes for the rear turnsignal/license plate assembly. The TFT display, which automatically adjusts background colors in low-light conditions, seems even more beautifully illuminated at night. The switchgear illumination is modest but gives a general idea where the key switches are.

The 2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo is a highly attractive motorcycle for riders with serious sporting intentions – and the skills to go with them. For me, it’s close to a perfect streetbike thanks to its instantaneous response, excellent dynamics and feel, agreeable ergonomics, and the added bandwidth of its new semi-active suspension. Let’s be clear though: In its most active state, a Super Duke pushes the boundaries of sanity for streetbike performance. Do we actually need such a device? Nope. Do we want one? Absolutely!

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo Specs

Base Price: $19,599
Price as Tested: $20,499 (Tech Pack)
Warranty: 1 yr., 12,000 miles
Website: ktm.com
ENGINE
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 75-degree V-Twin
Displacement: 1,301cc
Bore x Stroke: 108.0 x 71.0mm
Compression Ratio: 13.6:1
Valve Train: DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Valve Insp. Interval: 18,600 miles
Fuel Delivery: Keihin EFI w/ 56mm throttle bodies x 2
Lubrication System: Dry sump, 3.7 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain
CHASSIS
Frame: Tubular-steel w/ engine as stressed member, composite subframe & cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 58.9 in.
Rake/Trail: 25.2 degrees/4.2 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Suspension, Front: 48mm inverted fork, electronically adj., 4.9 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, electronically adj., 5.5 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.50 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 6.00 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 200/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 466 lbs.
Load Capacity: 471 lbs.
GVWR: 937 lbs.
PERFORMANCE
Horsepower: 165.5 hp @ 10,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 95.9 lb-ft @ 8,400 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 4.2 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 35.3 mpg
Estimated Range: 149 miles

The post 2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS | First Ride Review

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
The all-new 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS brings retro style to Team Green’s middleweight Z lineup. Photos by Kevin Wing.

The last bike I rode before swinging a leg over the 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS was a 1975 Honda CB400F SuperSport. I’ve owned this Honda for more than 30 years and, having just come back from Moto41 motorcycle restorations in Santa Ana, California, it’s as new as a 47-year-old bike can be. While not a Kawasaki, there’s an interesting juxtaposition comparing a modern retro throwback to an OG member of the era.

Check out Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
The 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS is available in Candy Emerald Green or Metallic Moondust Gray/Ebony for $8,999. The 50th anniversary edition in Candy Diamond Brown (not shown) is $9,249.

Joining the Z900RS in Kawasaki’s lineup, the Z650RS in Candy Emerald Green or Metallic Moondust Gray/Ebony retails for $8,999, while the 50th anniversary edition in Candy Diamond Brown is $9,249. When the CB400F was new in 1975, it retailed for $1,433, or $7,818 in 2022 dollars. The Z costs more but, considering its performance and technological advancements over the CB, it’s a bargain.

The price of the Z650RS becomes a little harder to justify when compared to its half-brother stablemate, the non-RS Z650 ABS model, retails for $8,049. Considering the Z650RS and Z650 share the same engine and chassis, the retro styling of the RS comes at a $950 premium.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
The retro-styled Kawasaki Z650RS is built on the same solid, reliable platform as the Z650, Ninja 650, and Versys 650.

Producing an extra 21 hp while weighing just 5 lbs more than the AARP-eligible Honda, the Ninja-derived 649cc parallel-Twin scuttles the Z650RS through a tight set of twisties with fervor. The motorcycle’s chassis is solid and up to the task, but depending on rider weight and aggression level, the non-adjustable fork and preload-only adjustable shock can get overwhelmed. Nothing a skilled rider can’t compensate for, but it’s clear the RS is suspended to meet a price point as well as the needs of a variety of riders in a variety of situations, which has baked-in limitations.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
The 659cc parallel-Twin in the Z650RS makes 67 hp at 8,000 rpm and 48.5 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm.

The fuel system of the Z650RS features a dual throttle valve configuration, with the main valves directly attached to the cable extending back from the twistgrip and the secondary valves controlled by the bike’s ECU. The two-step process, according to Kawasaki, endeavors to “precisely regulate intake airflow to ensure a natural, linear response.” However, in lower gears at around-town speeds, throttle application felt abrupt. No matter how smoothly I attempted to modulate a steady throttle, the Z650RS responded by light-switching between acceleration and deceleration. At higher speeds in higher gears, however, there was a more rheostatic throttle response. Given such inconsistent behavior, I wouldn’t swap the Kawi’s EFI for the Honda’s carburetors. But ask me again when it comes time to clean those four carbs.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
Classic round headlight is powered by a modern LED. Bullet-shaped gauges add to throwback style.

Sometimes you just don’t realize how good you have it until you’re physically reminded. Clutch pull on the Honda is hastening arthritis in my left hand. Working the clutch lever in stop-and-go city traffic has the muscles and tendons in my hand and forearm pleading for respite after an hour of riding. The Z, in contrast, features a slip/assist clutch that offers a feather-light pull. Not only does it lessen the amount of strength required to operate the clutch, it also reduces the amount of engine braking at the rear wheel during downshifts – a modern luxury that has spoiled us.

With no other motorcycling option, I drove a cage from my home in Long Beach, California, to attend the Z650RS press launch that began in downtown Hollywood. The notion of navigating the Honda through LA’s rush-hour traffic was outweighed by my desire to survive. The CB400F’s ancient brakes seem to be carved from balsa wood.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
Cast wheels are designed to mimic spoked rims. They’re shod with Dunlop Sportmax Roadsport 2 tires.

The retro-styled Kawi employs fully modern dual 300mm front discs squeezed by two-piston Nissin calipers, which providing all the braking performance I needed. There was good feel at the lever, allowing me to increase or decrease pressure as warranted. The single rear disc was equally praiseworthy, and the whole package gets an added level of safety with standard ABS.

The seating position and rider-machine interface of the Z650RS is everything you’d expect of a sport standard – comfy and user-friendly. From the reach to the handlebars, bend in the knees, positioning of the footrests, and width of the seat, the RS just feels right. Whether around town, in the canyons, or on the freeway, I struggled to find something ergonomic to complain about.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
The 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS has the agreeable ergonomics of a sport standard, with a modest seat height and a user-friendly riding position.

Just over a yard (31.5 inches) separates the top of the seat from the pavement, keeping the Z650RS manageable for the inseams of most riders. Combined with the bike’s low curb weight of 412 pounds, the Z650RS is lightweight and feels even lighter once in motion. A rubber-mounted handlebar helps nullify the already minimal amount of engine buzz, while 5-way adjustable clutch and brake levers allow for customization of settings between hands big and small.

There’s no reason why I should fixate on the fact that the Z650RS has a helmet lock, other than it being one of those useful and inexpensive conveniences that many modern motorcycles now lack. Don’t get me started on what passes for toolkits these days.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
The round analog gauges are handsome, and the LCD screen in the center is useful and discreet.

Instrumentation is a matter of old-school clocks meeting new-school multi-functionality. The analog speedo and tach are era-appropriate and nicely outfitted with chrome bezels, while the LCD screen features easy-to-read white letters on a black background and includes a gear-position indicator, clock, and fuel gauge. Eat your heart out, 1975!

Styling of the Z650RS is a mash-up of new meets old, which will most likely spark unresolved arguments of a subjective nature. While not an inherently smooth inline-Four like my CB, the Kawi’s parallel-Twin is a better engine choice for reducing cost, complexity, maintenance, and weight. It’s bulletproof, too, getting its neck wrung out on bikes ranging from the Versys 650 to flat-track racebikes. The cast wheels resemble the spoked wheels of distant-past KZ650 models, though later KZs were outfitted with cast wheels.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
Reminiscent of the old-school UJMs, the Z650RS brings modern performance and technology to the table while delivering solid value.

Then there’s the exhaust. What first attracted me to the 400 Four was its unmistakably beautiful exhaust system. While the Z900RS holds true to its ’70s era roots with a long-swept pipe ending in a chrome muffler, Kawasaki chose to equip the Z650RS with the same stubby Versys-esque muffler found on the Z650. Another visual eyesore is the parts-bin radiator made obvious by its unused mounting tabs and too-wide width forcing the ugly routing of the return and overflow tubes. When you’re paying a premium for style, details matter.

Available color schemes are spot-on for the era, especially for the Candy Emerald Green version with its use of pinstripes and raised Kawasaki tank emblem. Blinkers on all the RS models are modern with transparent lenses encasing colored LED lights, not the saucer-shaped disco-age variety. A must-have upgrade is the chrome grab bar available as an accessory from the Kawasaki parts catalog.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
Fuel capacity of the Z650RS is just 3.2 gallons.

For now, I’ll keep my Honda. I’ve owned it for so long, it’d be like an itchy phantom limb if it weren’t in my garage. But, given the choice between buying one today (clean examples will set you back anywhere from $5,000 to $7,000) and buying a brand-new Z650RS, the decision would hinge on riding intentions and wrenching ability.

The Honda holds the upper hand in the coolness factor by way of its authenticity, but it is seriously compromised in the harsh light of modern transportation and pales in comparison to the performance and ability of the Z650RS. A daily commuter in La La Land the Honda is not. There are also mechanical concerns such as adjusting points, syncing carburetors, and a host of other woes old bike ownership demands.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
2022 Kawasaki Z650RS in Metallic Moondust Gray/Ebony

The Kawasaki has the ability to be whatever a rider wants it to be: commuter, sportbike, sport-tourer, or weekend runabout. The Z650RS, like many of the old standards, is built to conquer it all. Throw in all its wonderful modern conveniences and reliability, there’s little to worry about. Lube and adjust the chain, change the oil regularly, keep the battery charged, and just ride. If you’re attracted to old-school cool styling but want to avoid old-school bike ownership, you can get the best of both worlds with the Z650RS.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS Specs

Base Price: $8,999
Website: kawasaki.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 649cc
Bore x Stroke: 83.0 x 60.0mm
Horsepower: 67 hp @ 8,000 rpm
Torque: 48.5 lb-ft @ 6,500 rpm
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 55.3 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.0 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 31.5 in.
Wet Weight: 419 lbs
Fuel Capacity: 3.2 gals.

The post 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 | Road Test Review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
The updated 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 received engine updates, new electronics, all-new styling, improved ergonomics, and more. Photos by Kevin Wing.

Engine development is the costliest aspect of designing a new motorcycle. Manufacturers, always vigilant about the bottom line, sometimes spread out these costs by using the same engine in multiple models. The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is built around the 999cc inline-Four originally from the GSX-R1000 K5 (2005-2008), which won multiple AMA Superbike championships. Advantages of the K5 engine include a long-stroke design that delivers strong low and midrange power, a crankshaft/gearbox configuration that allows the twin-spar frame to run directly from the steering head to the swingarm pivot, and a proven track record of performance and reliability.

Check out Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is available in Metallic Matte Mechanical Gray with black wheels (on left) and in a Metallic Triton Blue paint scheme inspired by Suzuki’s MotoGP race livery with color-matched wheels.

When the GSX-S1000 debuted for 2016, it was available in a naked version and a faired “F” version. Because the GSX-S was a sportbike designed for the street rather than the track, its detuned engine made less peak power than the GSX-R it was based on. Cam profiles and valve timing were mellower. Valves and the exhaust were made of steel rather than titanium. The tradeoff was a less expensive bike that was easier to live with thanks in large part to its more relaxed ergonomics.

Over time, successful spin-off models – like the Suzuki V-Strom 650 that was derived from the SV650 – take on a life of their own and follow their own development path. That’s the case with the GSX-S1000, which has been thoroughly overhauled for 2022 and is joined by two new sport-touring models, the GSX-S1000GT and saddle-bags-equipped GSX-S1000GT+ (we’ll have a test of the latter soon).

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Steering leverage and comfort are aided by a handlebar that’s wider and closer to the rider.

Visually, the new GSX-S1000 has much more aggressive, sharp-edged bodywork than its predecessor. It has angular panels flanking the larger fuel tank (5 gals., up from 4.5) and radiator, small MotoGP-style winglets, and a stacked headlight array that juts forward like a beak. It also has a slimmer tailsection and LED lighting all around. But the GSX-S received more than just a facelift.

New camshaft profiles, valve springs, throttle bodies, and airbox, and a revised 4-2-1 exhaust contribute to a 2-hp bump in peak power, a broader, smoother torque curve, and Euro 5 emissions compliance. On Jett Tuning’s dyno, the GSX-S1000 sent 136 hp and 73 lb-ft of torque to the rear wheel. Power climbs linearly to its peak at 10,200 rpm while torque spreads out wide like a mesa, with more than 60 lb-ft on tap from 4,300 rpm to 11,300 rpm. (See dyno chart at end of post.)

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Despite its aggressive stance, the new GSX-S1000 has a larger fuel tank, more comfortable ergonomics, engine
refinements, and other changes that make it a well-rounded streetbike.

A new throttle-by-wire system enables three ride modes (Active, Basic, and Comfort) that adjust throttle response and power delivery. The GSX-S1000 is equipped with switchable, five-level traction control, a new up/down quickshifter, and Suzuki’s Easy Start and Low RPM Assist. And the 6-speed transmission is mated to a new slip/assist clutch.

From the first few moments in the GSX-S1000’s saddle until the last time I dropped the kickstand, the word that kept popping into my head was “smooth.” At idle, the engine hums dutifully, and spent gasses exiting the stubby exhaust seem to barely disturb the surrounding air. The riding position is pleasantly neutral, with a damped-mount aluminum handlebar that is 0.9 inch wider and 0.8 inch closer to the rider than on the previous model. The seat has been revised with more comfortable padding and a dished shape that cradles the rider.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Precise fueling and throttle response, linear power delivery, a rapid-fire quickshifter, and quality components help keep the GSX-S1000 cool and composed on curvy roads.

Greg’s Gear
Helmet: Fly Racing Sentinel
Jacket: Fly Racing Strata
Gloves: Fly Racing Brawler
Pants: Fly Racing Resistance Jeans
Boots: Fly Racing Milepost

Pulling away from stops and rowing up and down through the gears feels effortless. Like other slip/assist clutches, the Suzuki Clutch Assist System uses interlocking ramps that increase plate pressure during acceleration and provide slip as needed during aggressive deceleration and downshifts. The clutch requires only a light pull, and feel and engagement are spot-on. Both the clutch and brake levers are adjustable for reach.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
A twin-spar aluminum frame wraps around a 999cc inline-Four derived from the GSX-R1000 K5.

Suzuki’s Bi-Directional Quick Shift system uses a gear-position sensor near the shifter that provides more precise response than quickshifters incorporated into the shift rod. Of the many quickshifters I’ve tested on a variety of different motorcycles, none have responded with such crisp, immediate engagement, especially in lower gears and on downshifts. No vagueness, no hiccups, just smooth, accurate gear changes.

Fueling and power delivery are close to faultless. Even the slightest movements in the throttle translate to small adjustments in speed with no hesitation or electronic delay. The connection between the rider’s right wrist and the rear wheel feels direct, almost intuitive. Likewise, large handfuls of throttle produce a rapid surge in thrust with no ap-parent peaks or valleys, the exhaust delivering a satisfying wail as the inline-Four spins up quickly.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Coming to a curve near you….

In keeping with its Superbike pedigree, the GSX-S1000 has a massive twin-spar cast-aluminum main frame that wraps around the engine, as well as a robust cast-aluminum swingarm. Suspension is by KYB, with a fully adjustable 43mm inverted fork and a link-type monoshock that’s adjustable for preload and rebound. With damping tuned for the street, the suspension is responsive at speed and provides reassuring compliance on irregular pavement.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Part of the GSX-S1000’s redesign includes MotoGP-style winglets.

A pair of Brembo 4-piston radial-mount monoblock calipers provide stopping power at the front, squeezing fully floating 310mm rotors. They have good initial bite and progressive feel at the lever, slowing the 472-lb bike and its rider with authority. Out back, a Nissin 1-piston caliper squeezes a 240mm disc. ABS is standard but, like the traction control system, it is not lean-angle sensitive.

The GSX-S1000 rolls on Dunlop Roadsmart 2 sport-touring tires that walk a middle ground between grip and mileage. Their Intuitive Response Profile (IRP) provides a large, reassuring contact patch when leaned over in corners. The rubber is wrapped around six-spoke, 17-inch cast-aluminum wheels. On bikes with the Metallic Triton Blue paint scheme inspired by Suzuki’s MotoGP race livery, the wheels are color-matched to the bike; the wheels are black in the Metallic Matte Mechanical Gray colorway.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Mono-focus LED headlights shine light through convex lenses to create a bright, broad spread of light.

While negotiating one challenging series of corners after another, I continued to be impressed with how smooth and composed the GSX-S1000 felt. Its agreeable rider tri-angle, easy-to-operate controls, predictable handling, and silky power delivery help the bike work with the rider, not against them. There are no frustrating quirks, no “if only” caveats. But the GSX isn’t dull, either. It’s a well-engineered, precision-crafted perfor-mance machine that is a genuine pleasure to ride.

If there’s one area that left me wanting, however, it’s the instrumentation. The GSX’s monochrome LCD display is cluttered with information and, despite the screen’s adjust-able brightness, was difficult to read in direct sunlight. With vivid, easy-to-read TFT displays being the norm on many modern bikes, the GSX’s instrument panel looks dated. And while I appreciate the simplified switchgear, with a single mode button and a large up/down toggle on the left side to adjust settings, it isn’t intuitive.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
The cockpit is minimalist, while the LCD display is overly busy and difficult to read in bright light.

It’s clear the GSX-S1000 was designed to meet an aggressive price target. The LCD instrument panel, the simplified electronic riding aids, the lack of cruise control, and other cost-saving measures enabled Suzuki to achieve an MSRP of $11,299. Other liter-class naked sportbikes from Japan cost significantly more – the Honda CB1000R retails for $12,999, and the Yamaha MT-10 is priced at for $13,999.

Suzuki has been smart about updating the GSX-S1000. It gave it a distinctive new look, improved power delivery, more comfortable ergonomics, and useful new features like throttle-by-wire, ride modes, and a fantastic quickshifter. Some manufacturers go all-in on IMU-enabled electronics, but they ratchet up the price. The GSX-S1000 is much improved from its predecessor yet still delivers solid value. Smooth is as smooth does.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review

2022 SUZUKI GSX-S1000 SPECS
Base Price: $11,299
Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
Website: suzukicycles.com

ENGINE
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 999cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm
Compression Ratio: 12.2:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 15,000 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ throttle-by-wire, 40mm throttle bodies x 4
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.6 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain

CHASSIS
Frame: Twin-spar cast aluminum frame & swingarm
Wheelbase: 57.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm inverted fork, fully adj., 4.7 in. travel
Rear: Single linkage shock, adj. spring preload & rebound, 5.1 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 310mm floating discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.5 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast, 6.0 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 190/50-ZR17
Wet Weight: 472 lbs.
Load Capacity: 408 lbs.
GVWR: 880 lbs.

PERFORMANCE
Horsepower: 136 hp @ 10,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 73 lb-ft @ 9,300 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 33.4 mpg
Estimated Range: 167 miles

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review dyno

The post 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Indian Motorcycle’s FTR Championship Edition

Indian Motorcycle FTR Championship Edition

Indian Motorcycle, America’s First Motorcycle Company, today celebrates its flat track racing legacy with the launch of the FTR Championship Edition. With only 400 available globally, the limited-edition FTR allows race fans from around the world to join the Indian Wrecking Crew in celebration of the team’s five-consecutive American Flat Track championships.

Inspired by the sport’s preeminent flat track race machine, the FTR750, the FTR Championship Edition touts an authentic race paint scheme and a commemorative Indian Motorcycle Racing bezel with each championship season on display. But more than a show piece, the limited-edition FTR features premium components, including a titanium Akrapovič Exhaust and fully adjustable front forks and piggyback shock. Carbon fiber parts, including a seat cowl, front fender, airbox covers and headlight nacelle, complete the bike’s premium design.

Indian Motorcycle FTR Championship Edition

“Since the FTR’s debut in 2019, riders around the world have expressed their passion and enthusiasm for the FTR’s flat track-inspired design,” said Aaron Jax, Indian Motorcycle Vice President. “While the 2022 FTR lineup optimizes the FTR’s on-road performance, the FTR Championship Edition reignites our flat track racing legacy and celebrates the Wrecking Crew’s historic success. Although this limited-edition bike is a commemorative show piece, it’s also an on-road ripper that performs in the twisties as well as turns heads on city streets.”

Adding to its flat track-inspired design are a host of premium features and ride-enhancing technologies, including three ride modes, wheelie control with rear lift mitigation, stability control, traction control, and cornering ABS. The FTR Championship Edition also touts a 4.3-inch digital touchscreen display and a 1,203cc liquid-cooled V-Twin engine that produces 120 horsepower and 87 lb-ft of torque. The limited-edition FTR is equipped with a race-inspired wheel combination of a 19-inch front and 18-inch rear wheel – wrapped in Dunlop street tires with flat track-inspired tread. Radially mounted dual front disc Brembo brakes offer exceptional control and stopping power, while ProTaper flat tracker aluminum handlebars complete the race bike look.

Indian Motorcycle FTR Championship Edition

Indian Motorcycle Racing, the winner of the last five Manufacturer’s Championships, returned to professional flat track racing in 2017. Since the debut of the FTR750, an Indian Motorcycle Racing factory rider has won the championship every year in the sport’s premiere class. The 2022 Indian Wrecking Crew, consisting of 2021 SuperTwins Champion Jared Mees, two-time champion Briar Bauman, and the team’s newest member, the winningest rider in American Flat Track Singles history, Shayna Texter-Bauman, will look to defend its title at the season opener on March 10 at the Volusia Half-Mile.

MSRP is $16,499. The FTR Championship LE will begin shipping to Indian Motorcycle dealers around the world starting in April. Riders can learn more at their local Indian Motorcycle dealership, by visiting IndianMotorcycle.com, or by following along on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

The post Indian Motorcycle’s FTR Championship Edition first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Suzuki Announces 2022 Returning Models

Last year, Suzuki announced several new or significantly updated motorcycles, including the third-generation Hayabusa hyper-sportbike, the revamped GSX-S1000 naked bike, and the all-new GSX-S1000GT sport-tourer. We’ve tested the Hayabusa, and we’ll get a chance to ride the GSXs soon.

Meantime, Suzuki has announced the return of several popular models for 2022, including the V-Strom 1050XT, V-Strom 1050XT Adventure, Boulevard C50, Boulevard C50T, and GSX250R ABS.

2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT

2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT
2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT

The V-Strom 1050XT is a perennial favorite in the adventure-touring segment, powered by a 1,037cc 90-degree that sends 96 hp and 66 lb-ft of torque to the rear wheel, according to our 2020 tour test. It’s also equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which uses a 6-axis IMU to inform a full suite of electronics, including ride modes, cornering ABS and traction control, cruise control, and more. The V-Strom 1050XT also has an adjustable windscreen, handguards, a two-piece seat with height adjustability for the rider’s section, an accessory bar, a centerstand, and much more. It’s available in a cool Metallic Oort Gray with Glass Sparkle Black color scheme with blue-anodized tubeless spoked wheels. MSRP is $14,849.

2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT Adventure

2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT Adventure
2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT Adventure

The V-Stroke 1050XT Adventure makes a statement with its Suzuki Champion Yellow and Glass Sparkle Black colorway with silver and blue accents as well as gold-anodized tubeless spoked wheels. Added to the 1050XT’s impressive standard equipment list is a set of Suzuki’s quick release 37-liter aluminum panniers, LED fog lights, and heated grips. MSRP is $17,049.

2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50

2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50
2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50

Suzuki’s Boulevard line of cruisers has delivered solid value, reliability, and style for years. The Boulevard C50 is powered by a liquid-cooled 805cc (49ci) 45-degree V-Twin that delivers plenty of low-end torque. The C50’s traditional styling includes a kicked-out fork, valance-style fenders, and a staggered, chromed, dual exhaust system. The Boulevard C50 is available in Candy Daring Red (shown) or Solid Iron Gray, and MSRP is $8,609.

2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50T

2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50T
2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50T

If you’re interested in a touring cruiser, the Boulevard C50T should be right up your alley. Travel-ready features include a spacious riding position, an aerodynamic windshield, and custom studded saddlebags that match the studded rider and passenger seats. The C50T is available in Pearl Brilliant White with classic whitewall tires. MSRP is $10,059.

2022 Suzuki GSX250R ABS

2022 Suzuki GSX250R ABS
2022 Suzuki GSX250R ABS

An entry-level sportbike doesn’t have to look like it. The GSX250R ABS has an aerodynamic full fairing that fits right in with full-sized sportbikes. It’s powered by an approachable but exciting 248cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin, and it has ABS-equipped single-disc brakes front and rear. Riders of any age and experience level will appreciate the GSX250R’s fuel efficiency, nimble handling, and comfortable riding position. It’s available in Crystal Blue with Pearl Nebular Black. MSRP is $4,999.

For more information or to find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit suzukicycles.com.

The post Suzuki Announces 2022 Returning Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 KTM 890 Duke GP | First Look Review

2022 KTM 890 DUKE GP

Earlier this month KTM announced a new look for the 890 Duke R – is known as “The Super Scalpel” – for the new model year. Both the 2022 KTM 890 Duke R and 2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo are being offered in a new Atlantic Blue colorway inspired by the KTM RC16 GP racebike. Now our friends in Austria have announced the 2022 KTM 890 Duke GP.

RELATED: 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

As the name implies, it too gets MotoGP-inspired livery, this time in an orange-and-black combo with KTM’s “Ready to Race” motto just below the 3.7-gallon fuel tank. What makes the 890 Duke GP stand out is the orange bodywork replacing the normally all-black panels covering the subframe, which also includes logos for industry partners Motorex, Pankl, and WP.

2022 KTM 890 DUKE GP

There’s also a special orange passenger seat cover with special “890 Duke GP” graphics. The orange treatment continues with orange powdercoated wheels and orange highlights on the front fender and headlight frame.

Beneath the GP-inspired livery, the rest of the 890 Duke GP is the same as the standard 890 Duke. It features adjustable WP Apex suspension, a PASC slip/assist clutch, Continental ContiRoad tires, and a state-of-the-art electronics package that includes cornering ABS with Supermoto mode, lean-angle-sensitive Motorcycle Traction Control, and selectable ride modes (Sport, Street, and Rain). An optional Track mode adds sharper throttle response along with on-the-fly TC adjustability over nine levels.

2022 KTM 890 DUKE GP

The 890 Duke R’s 889cc parallel-Twin engine has DOHC with four valves per cylinder, and it is tuned to deliver a claimed 114 horsepower at the crank. When we tested the 2021 KTM 890 Duke, it sent 111 horsepower at 9,500 rpm and 67 lb-ft of torque at 7,000 rpm to the rear wheel.

2022 KTM 890 DUKE GP

A full-color TFT display provides a wealth of information for the rider, and it allows for convenient navigation of the various menus and settings. An LED headlight is paired with an LED daytime running light for eye-catching visibility and excellent illumination. The flat, tapered aluminum handlebar can be adjusted to four positions within the triple clamp and rotated among three positions. Seat height is 32.8 inches, fuel capacity is 3.7 gallons, and dry weight is 373 pounds (curb weight with all fluids was 405 pounds for our 2020 test bike).

Pricing and availability for the 2022 KTM 890 Duke GP have not yet been announced. For more information or to find a KTM dealer near you, visit ktm.com.

2022 KTM 890 DUKE GP

2022 KTM 890 Duke GP Specifications

Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 889cc
Horsepower: 114 hp (claimed, at the crank)
Bore x Stroke: 90.7 x 68.8mm
Starter: Electric; 12V 10Ah
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated PASC assist-slipper wet clutch
Fuel System: DKK Dell’Orto, 46mm throttle body
Lubrication: Pressure lubrication with 2 oil pumps
Ignition: Bosch EMS with throttle-by-wire
Frame: Chrome-moly tubular steel w/ engine as stressed member
Subframe: Cast aluminum
Handlebar: Aluminum, tapered, Ø 26/22mm
Front Suspension: WP APEX USD Ø 43mm
Rear Suspension: WP APEX Monoshock
Suspension Travel Front/Rear: 140 mm/5.5 in; 150mm/5.9 in
Front/Rear Brakes: Disc Brake 320mm/240mm
Front/Rear Wheels: 3.50 x 17”, 5.50 x 17”
Front/Rear Tires: 120/70ZR17”; 180/55ZR17”
Steering Head Angle: 24.3º
Wheelbase: 1,482mm ± 15mm / 58.3 ± 0.6 in.
Ground Clearance: 206mm / 8.1 in
Seat Height: 834mm / 32.8 in
Tank Capacity: 14 L / 3.7 gal
Weight (without fuel), Approx: 166 kg / 365.9 lbs

The post 2022 KTM 890 Duke GP | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Honda CB/R500 Lineup | First Look Review

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
The Honda CBR500R (upper left), CB500X (lower left), and CB500F (right) have been updated for 2022.

If you’re looking for a light, dependable, affordable middleweight motorcycle, then Honda has several options to choose from. In addition to its Rebel 500 cruiser, there are three models in the Honda CB/R500 lineup that have been updated for 2022. The CB500X ABS adventure bike, CB500F ABS naked bike, and CBR500R ABS sportbike offer improvements in suspension, braking, and handling.

“It’s hard to find more versatile motorcycles than Honda’s 500cc CB/R models, and if you factor in affordability and reliability, nothing else even compares,” said Brandon Wilson, American Honda Manager of Sports & Experiential. “Each of these machines has been successful at addressing riders’ wide-ranging practical and recreational needs and tastes, and we’re pleased to offer them to U.S. customers in 2022, with improved performance for the new model year.”

Honda also confirmed the 2022 return of two additional street models – the CB1000R ABS naked bike and the CBR300R sportbike. All models in this announcement are available now.

2022 Honda CB500X ABS

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
2022 Honda CB500X

Honda’s middleweight adventure bike is powered by a liquid-cooled 471cc parallel-Twin with PGM-FI and DOHC with 4 valves per cylinder. The CB500X ABS benefits from a 5-pound weight reduction thanks to a lighter front wheel and a lighter swingarm (curb weight is 439 pounds). Other upgrades for 2022 include a new inverted 41mm Showa SFF-BP (Separate Function Fork-Big Piston) fork and dual front disc brakes. The CB500X ABS has a 32.8-inch seat height and a 4.7-gallon fuel capacity. It’s available in Pearl Organic Green/Black with an MSRP of $7,199.

2022 Honda CB500F ABS

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
2022 Honda CB500F

For those who prefer the sporty look of a motorcycle with minimal bodywork, the CB500F ABS naked bike fits the bill. Like the CB500X, for 2022 it gets an inverted 41mm Showa SFF-BP fork. It also gets dual front disc brakes with radial-mounted Nissin 4-piston calipers and lighter wheels. Curb weight has been reduced by 4 pounds, to 416 pounds. The CB500F ABS has a 31.1-inch seat height and a 4.5-gallon fuel capacity. It’s available in Matte Gray Metallic with an MSRP of $6,699.

2022 Honda CBR500R ABS

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
2022 Honda CBR500R in Grand Prix Red

Honda’s CBR sportbikes have always offered a balance between performance and practicality. For 2022, the CBR500R gets an inverted 41mm Showa SFF-BP fork, dual front disc brakes with radial-mounted Nissin 4-piston calipers, and lighter wheels. Curb weight remains the same at 423 pounds. The CB500F ABS has a 31.1-inch seat height and a 4.5-gallon fuel capacity. It’s available in Grand Prix Red or Silver Sword Metallic with an MSRP of $7,199.

2022 Honda CB1000R ABS

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
2021 Honda CB1000R Black Edition

Honda’s CB1000R ABS is the flagship model in the Neo-Sports Café lineup, blending aggressive naked-bike style with apex-strafing performance. It’s powered by a 998cc inline-Four derived from Honda’s CBR100RR line and features fully adjustable Showa suspension. It returns for 2022 in a menacing Black Edition with Graphite Black bodywork. MSRP is $12,999.

2022 Honda CBR300R

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
2022 Honda CBR300R in Grand Prix Red

The CBR300R offers the look of a fully faired sportbike in an accessible package that’s perfect for new riders. It’s powered by a liquid-cooled 286cc single-cylinder engine with DOHC and four valves. There are single-disc brakes at both ends and compliant suspension with adjustable rear preload. Seat height is just 30.7 inches and curb weight is 354 pounds. Fuel capacity is 3.4 gallons, and the CBR300R gets an EPA-tested 71 mpg. It’s available without ABS for $4,899 or with ABS for $5,099, in Grand Prix Red or Matte Gray Metallic.

For more information or to find a Honda dealer near you, visit powersports.honda.com.

The post 2022 Honda CB/R500 Lineup | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 KTM 890 Duke R | First Look Review

2022 KTM 890 Duke R

The KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo is known as “The Beast,” and its little brother – the KTM 890 Duke R – is known as “The Super Scalpel.” For 2022, both are offered in an all-new Atlantic Blue colorway inspired by the KTM RC16 GP racebike. KTM’s trademark orange is powercoated on the chromoly-steel trellis frame for contrast.

RELATED: 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

The KTM 890 Duke R debuted in 2020, with the “R” designation reserved for high-performance “Ready to Race” models. It features fully adjustable WP Apex suspension, a WP steering damper, Brembo Stylema monoblock front calipers, a Brembo MCS front master cylinder, a PASC slip/assist clutch, Michelin Power Cup tires, and a state-of-the-art electronics package that includes cornering ABS with Supermoto mode, lean-angle-sensitive Motorcycle Traction Control, and selectable ride modes (Sport, Street, and Rain). An optional Track mode adds sharper throttle response along with on-the-fly TC adjustability over nine levels.

2022 KTM 890 Duke R

The 890 Duke R’s 889cc parallel-Twin engine has DOHC with four valves per cylinder, and it is tuned to deliver an additional 6 horsepower over the standard 890 Duke. When we tested the 2020 KTM 890 Duke R, it sent 111 horsepower at 9,500 rpm and 67 lb-ft of torque at 7,000 rpm to the rear wheel.

Riders can dial in suspension settings to suit their tastes. The fully adjustable 43mm inverted WP Apex for has separate compression and rebound functions in each leg. The fully adjustable WP Apex shock offers high and low speed compression adjustability along with adjustable rebound and a remote preload adjuster.

A full-color TFT display provides a wealth of information for the rider, and it allows for convenient navigation of the various menus and settings. An LED headlight is paired with an LED daytime running light for eye-catching visibility and excellent illumination. The flat, tapered aluminum handlebar can be adjusted to four positions within the triple clamp and rotated among three positions. Seat height is 32.8 inches, fuel capacity is 3.7 gallons, and dry weight is 366 pounds (curb weight with all fluids was 405 pounds for our 2020 test bike).

Pricing and availability for the 2022 KTM 890 Duke R have not yet been announced. For more information or to find a KTM dealer near you, visit ktm.com.

2022 KTM 890 Duke R

2022 KTM 890 Duke R Specifications

Engine Type: Parallel Twin, 4-Stroke, DOHC
Displacement: 889cc
Bore/Stroke: 90.7/68.8mm
Starter: Electric; 12V 10Ah
Transmission: 6 Gears
Fuel System: DKK Dell’Orto, 46 mm Throttle Body
Lubrication: Pressure Lubrication with 2 Oil Pumps
Cooling: Liquid Cooling with Water/Oil Heat Exchanger
Clutch: PASC (Power Assisted Slipper Clutch), Mechanically Operated
Ignition: Bosch EMS with Ride-By-Wire
Frame: CroMoly Tubular Steel, Engine as Stressed Member
Subframe: Cast Aluminum
Handlebar: Aluminum, Tapered, Ø 26/22 mm
Front Suspension: WP APEX USD Ø 43 mm
Rear Suspension: WP APEX Monoshock
Suspension Travel Front/Rear: 140 mm/5.5 in; 150 mm/5.9 in
Front/Rear Brakes: Disc Brake 320 mm/240 mm
Front/Rear Wheels: 3.50 x 17”, 5.50 x 17”
Front/Rear Tires: 120/70ZR17”; 180/55ZR17”
Steering Head Angle: 24.3º
Wheelbase: 1,482mm ± 15mm / 58.3 ± 0.6 in.
Ground Clearance: 206mm / 8.1 in
Seat Height: 834mm / 32.8 in
Tank Capacity: 14 L / 3.7 gal
Weight (without fuel), Approx: 166 kg / 365.9 lbs

The post 2022 KTM 890 Duke R | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Honda Lineup | First Look Review

2022 Honda Africa Twin
Honda has announced its returning motorcycles for 2022, which includes four versions of the Africa Twin adventure bike.

We’ve seen (and tested) two 2022 Hondas already, both in the miniMOTO family: the updated Grom and the all-new Navi, an affordable, user-friendly motorcycle for commuters and new riders. The 2022 Honda lineup includes another miniMOTO, the Super Cub C125, as well as Africa Twin, Gold Wing, Rebel, Fury, CBR, and NC750X models.

2022 Honda Super Cub C125

Honda’s Super Cub is a living legend. Introduced in 1958, more than 100 million have been built, making it the most produced motor vehicle in history. It’s also the inspiration for the wildly successful “You meet the nicest people on a Honda” advertising campaign.

2022 Honda Super Cub C125
2022 Honda Super Cub C125

For 2022, the Super Cub’s new SOHC, 124cc, single-cylinder engine benefits from a longer stroke, which delivers more useable power while also improving fuel economy. Honda also managed to shave off 2 pounds, reducing curb weight to just 238 pounds. Offered in a new Matte Gray Metallic colorway, the 2022 Super Cub starts at just $3,799.

2022 Honda Africa Twin

Since its 2016 reintroduction, the legendary Africa Twin proven itself to be a highly capable adventure bike both on- and off-road, and the platform has grown to include four models. For 2022, the sporting- and off-road performance-oriented standard version now comes with the same rear carrier as its more distance riding-oriented Adventure Sports ES sibling. Meanwhile, that version gets a shorter windscreen for improved visibility.

2022 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports
2022 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES

Both Africa Twin versions are compatible with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and both are available with either a manual gearbox or Honda’s advanced automatic Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT), which has a program change for 2022, delivering smoother shifting in the lower gears.

2022 Honda Africa Twin
2022 Honda Africa Twin
2022 Honda Africa Twin
2022 Honda Africa Twin

The standard Africa Twin comes in Grand Prix Red, with an MSRP of $14,499 for the manual transmission version and $15,299 for the DCT version. The Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES comes in Pearl White, and MSRP is $17,299 for the manual and $18,099 for the DCT.

2022 Honda Gold Wing

Now in its sixth generation, Honda’s flagship Gold Wing caters to long-distance tourers with an ultra-smooth opposed six-cylinder engine, spacious cockpit, and ample storage capacity. Despite it’s 1,833cc mill and 804-pound running weight, it delivers sporty performance and handling that belies its size. The Gold Wing delivers style and luxury for multi-day road trips with comfortable seating options, cutting-edge rider aids, and a top-of-the-line infotainment system.

2022 Honda Gold Wing DCT
2022 Honda Gold Wing DCT

Last year, Honda updated the Gold Wing Tour with a larger trunk and more comfortable passenger accommodations, and all Gold Wing models got updated audio and Android Auto integration in addition to Apple Car Play.

2022 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT
2022 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT

In 2022, the Gold Wing DCT trim comes in Nightshade Blue and retails for $25,300. At $28,500, the trunk-equipped Gold Wing Tour now sports Ultra Blue Metallic and Metallic Black colorways. The Gold Wing Tour DCT offers the same paint schemes but with an MSRP of $29,500 and the 2022 Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT rounds out the range with a $32,800 sticker price and Ultra Blue Metallic livery.

2022 Honda NC750X

For commuters covering longer distances, the Honda NC750X has become one of the top picks in the adventure category. The fuel-sipping 745cc parallel-Twin isn’t all business though. Its low to midrange torque makes it a great option for backroad weekend excursions as well.

2022 Honda NC750X
2022 Honda NC750X

The standard NC750X remains affordable in 2022 with a $8,699 sticker price. The Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) trim comes in close behind at $9,299. Honda’s Selectable Torque Control is available in both trims, reassuring the rider that the NC750X is just as practical as it is versatile.

2022 Honda Rebel 1100

Introduced last year, the Rebel 1100 returns for 2022. Don’t let its cruiser stance fool you. With a liquid-cooled, 1,084cc parallel-Twin derived from the Africa Twin, a solid chassis, and electronic rider aids, it delivers both style and performance.

2022 Honda Rebel 1100 ABS
2022 Honda Rebel 1100 ABS

The Metallic Black and Bordeaux Red Metallic paint options carry over from 2021, but a stunning new Pearl Stallion Brown makes the Rebel stand out from the crowd. Honda offers the 2022 Rebel 1100 at $9,399 while the DCT version comes in at $9,999. Regardless of the trim, both Rebel 1100 models include ABS as standard.

2022 Honda Rebel 300/500

Also returning for 2022 are two of the industry’s most popular entry-level cruisers, Honda’s Rebel 300 and Rebel 500. They combine user-friendliness with stylish, minimalist design, including a peanut fuel tank, LED lighting, and blacked-out finishes.

2022 Honda Rebel 300
2022 Honda Rebel 300
2022 Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE
2022 Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE

The Honda Rebel 300 is available in Matte Gray Metallic and Pearl Blue, with an MSRP of $4,699, or $4,999 with ABS. The Honda Rebel 500 is available in Matte Gray Metallic and Matte Pearl White, with an MSRP of $6,399, or $6,699 with ABS. The Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE ($6,899) comes in a new Matte Silver and has select accessories preinstalled.

2022 Honda Fury

The Rebel may bring cruiser performance and aesthetics into the 21st century, but the 2022 Honda Fury sticks to its chopper roots. With a long and lean stance, aggressive styling, and 1,312cc V-Twin, the factory-direct custom lives up to its name.

2022 Honda Fury
2022 Honda Fury

However, with dual counter-balancers, fuel injection, and shaft drive, the Fury delivers a smooth ride. In Pearl Yellow paint, the 2022 Fury is sure to turn heads, and at $11,499, it’s priced to take on all competitors.

2022 Honda CBR600RR

Honda’s CBR600RR is back in 2022, offering the utmost supersport performance for spirited road riders and track day enthusiasts. With eight World Supersport titles under its belt, the CBR600RR retains its championship pedigree in 2022 with full Showa suspension and a high-revving inline-four engine.

2022 Honda CBR600RR
2022 Honda CBR600RR

Resplendent in Grand Prix Red, the base 2022 Honda CBR600RR has an MSRP of $11,999 and the ABS-equipped model goes for $12,999.

2022 Honda CBR1000RR

Last year Honda introduced the exclusive, track-focused CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP, a premium, World Superbike-caliber machine that cost $28,500.

2022 Honda CBR1000RR
2022 Honda CBR1000RR

For those seeking liter-class performance on a more affordable scale, Honda’s legendary CBR1000RR is available for 2022 in Grand Prix Red for $16,499, or $16,799 with ABS.

For more information or to find a dealer near you, visit powersports.honda.com.

The post 2022 Honda Lineup | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki Z 50th Anniversary | First Look Review

Kawasaki Z 50th Anniversary Z900RS
2022 Kawasaki Z900RS 50th Anniversary

To challenge the dominance of Honda’s CB750, Kawasaki unleashed the Z1 in 1972. At the time, Team Green didn’t just produce the most powerful Japanese inline-Four, it also beat its rivals to the punch with a double overhead cam valvetrain. That innovative engine configuration may have impressed gearheads, but the Z1’s ultra-attractive Fireball paint scheme turned heads as well. Fifty years later, the Z1’s DNA is still found in its Z Series descendants. Celebrating the milestone are 2022 Kawasaki Z 50th Anniversary editions of the retro-style Z650RS and Z900RS as well as the more modern Z650 and Z900.

Kawasaki Z 50th Anniversary Z650RS
2022 Kawasaki Z650RS 50th Anniversary

The retro-styled RS line borrows most from the Z1, donning the legendary Fireball livery. As many Kawi fans know, the original 2018 Z900RS paid tribute to the Z1 in a similar colorway. However, Kawasaki reproduces the Candy Diamond Brown and Orange of the 1972 model with a special multi-layer painting process on the 2022 Z900RS and Z650RS.

Kawasaki Z 50th Anniversary Z650RS
2022 Kawasaki Z650RS 50th Anniversary

A gold wheelset alludes to the Z Series’ golden anniversary, while Z 50th branding on the front fender and engine case covers take a more literal approach. The nostalgia only ramps up from there. Both variants bear Double Overhead Camshaft badges on the side panels, and the classically styled seats come wrapped in new textured material. Despite the absence of a center stand, a grab rail offers peak vintage styling.

Kawasaki Z 50th Anniversary Z900RS
2022 Kawasaki Z900RS 50th Anniversary

While the RS trims harken back to the Z1, the 2022 Z650 and Z900 draw inspiration from the 1982 Kawasaki Z1100GP. Draped in Firecracker Red, the modern-day naked bikes honor the 40-year-old GP while retaining their aggressive appearance. The sporty silver and dark blue graphics toe the line of classic and contemporary while a commemorative logo adorns the front fender.

Kawasaki Z 50th Anniversary Z900
2022 Kawasaki Z900 50th Anniversary

The RS line may tout a gold wheelset, but the 50th Anniversary Z650 and Z900 take a different route with gold tank emblems, Z logos, and fork tubes, and they roll on red wheels. Similar to the Z650RS and Z900RS, however, the two modern nakeds tout a new textured seat.

Kawasaki Z 50th Anniversary Z650
2022 Kawasaki Z650 50th Anniversary

Despite the cosmetic revisions, the 50th Anniversary Z editions are mechanically identical to their base model counterparts. Kawasaki will produce all four special-edition motorcycles in a limited capacity and each customer will receive a coffee table book celebrating the iconic Z Series. The 50th Anniversary are available now and priced as follows:

  • 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS 50th Anniversary: $9,249
  • 2022 Kawasaki Z900RS 50th Anniversary: $12,049
  • 2022 Kawasaki Z650 50th Anniversary: $8,299
  • 2022 Kawasaki Z900 50th Anniversary: $9,499

For more information or to find a dealer near you, visit kawasaki.com.

The post 2022 Kawasaki Z 50th Anniversary | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com