Tag Archives: Honda Reviews

Honda Announces More 2023 Returning Models

2023 Honda CB1000R non-U.S.
2023 Honda CB1000R in Black (non-U.S. model)

In addition to previous announcements from Honda about new and returning models for 2023, including the all-new 2023 Rebel 1100T DCT “bagger” model, the company recently confirmed the return of eight motorcycle models across the sport, standard, adventure, dual-sport, and cruiser categories.

Related: 2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT and Returning Models | First Look Review

The eight returning models include the CBR650R and CBR500R sportbikes; the CB1000R, CB650R, and CB500F naked bikes; the CB500X adventure bike; the XR650L dual-sport; and the Fury cruiser. Honda says that taken as a whole, the group highlights the diversity of the company’s motorcycle offerings.

2023 Honda CB1000R

2023 Honda CB1000R non-U.S.
2023 Honda CB1000R in Black (non-U.S. model)

Honda says the CB1000R “touts both flair and function.” The bike features a 998cc DOHC four-cylinder engine, throttle-by-wire, three-level adjustable quickshifter, four ride modes (Standard, Rain, Sport, and User), and three levels of Engine Power (P), Engine Brake (EB), and Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC).

Related: 2018 Honda CB1000R | Road Test Review

The 2023 Honda CB1000R has a 32.7-inch seat height, adjustable Showa suspension, dual 310mm floating discs and 4-piston calipers up front matched to a 2-piston caliper and 256mm disc in the rear, and two-channel ABS. It has a 4.3-gal fuel tank, and curb weight is a claimed 470 lb. 

The 2023 Honda CB1000R will come in Black and be available in February starting at $12,999.

2023 Honda CBR650R

2023 Honda CBR650R non-U.S.
2023 Honda CBR650R in Grand Prix Red (non-U.S. model)

The 2023 Honda CBR650R sportbike has a 649cc DOHC 16-valve inline-Four that Honda says has been tuned to deliver good power above 10,000 rpm, with peak power arriving at 12,000 rpm and peak torque delivered at 8,500.

The bike has a 6-speed gearbox, slip/assist clutch, and Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) that can be turned off should the rider choose. It features a 31.9-inch seat height and adjustable Showa suspension. Four-piston radial-mount front brake calipers work on 310mm floating discs and are paired with a single-piston rear caliper and 240mm discs. Two-channel ABS is standard. It has a 4.1-gal fuel tank and 456-lb curb weight.

The 2023 Honda CBR650 will come in Grand Prix Red and be available in February starting at $9,899.

2023 Honda CB650R

2023 Honda CB650R non-U.S.
2023 Honda CB650R in Matte Gray Metallic (non-U.S. model)

Honda says the 2023 Honda CB650R middleweight naked bike has excellent emissions performance, stylish aesthetics, and comfortable ergonomics, making it “ideally suited for everything from daily commutes to weekend outings on canyon backroads.”

Related: 2019 Honda CB650R vs. Kawasaki W800 Cafe vs. Suzuki SV650X | Comparison Review

Like it’s CBR650R stablemate, the CB650R has a 649cc DOHC 16-valve inline-Four mated to a 6-speed gearbox, slip/assist clutch, and Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC), as well as the same adjustable Showa suspension and stopping power. It has a 4.1-gal fuel tank and 445-lb claimed curb weight.

From an ergonomic standpoint, a 21.9-inch tapered handlebar is set forward and positioned to offer a “sporty yet comfortable” riding position, as is the foot-peg position. Seat height is 31.9 inches. The 2023 Honda CB650R comes in Matte Gray Metallic starting at $9,399.

2023 Honda CBR500R

2023 Honda CBR500R Grand-Prix-Red non-U.S.
2023 Honda CBR500R in Grand Prix Red (non-U.S. model)

Whether you’re a beginning looking for your first bike or a veteran rider looking for a fun ride, Honda says the 2023 CBR500R, originally launched in 2013, offers “the excitement of a sportbike in a smaller package.”

The light-middleweight sportbike has an 8-valve 471cc parallel-Twin with crankshaft pins phased in at 180 degrees, working together to create what Honda says is good low-to-midrange power and torque in the 3,000 to 7,000 rpm range.

2023 Honda CBR500R Sword-Silver-Metallic non-U.S.
2023 Honda CBR500R in Sword Silver Metallic (non-U.S. model)

The CBR500R features a Showa SFF-BP fork and an adjustable ProLink single-tube shock absorber found on larger-capacity sport bikes. Braking is provided by dual 296mm petal-style discs and radial-mounted Nissin two-piston calipers in the front and a single-piston caliper and 240mm petal-style disc in the rear. It has a 4.5-gal tank and 423-lb curb weight.

The CBR500R has straight, wedge-like feature lines and extended lower fairings, and the rider’s seat pad and seat unit – plus the upper and side fairings – are narrow to improve ergonomics and movement. The 2023 Honda CBR500R comes in Grand Prix Red and Sword Silver Metallic and will be available summer 2023 starting at $7,299.

2023 Honda CB500F

2023 Honda CB500F non-U.S.
2023 Honda CB500F in Matte Gray Metallic (non-U.S. model)

Similar to the CBR500R, the CB500F naked bike was also launched in 2013 and features an 8-valve 471cc parallel-Twin and crankshaft pins firing at 180 degrees. It also shares the suspension and braking power of its stablemate.

However, Honda says the naked form of the CB500F “exudes aggression.”

“Led by the sharply chiseled headlight with extra-powerful LEDs, the machine’s stance is low-set and ready for action,” Honda states, adding that the side shrouds interlock with the fuel tank and “fully emphasize the engine, while the side covers and seat unit continue the theme of muscular angularity.” The compact front fender is drawn directly from the CB650R.

Related: 2017 Honda CB500F | First Ride Review

The 2023 Honda CB500F has a 4.5-gal fuel tank, and the lack of fairings shave the curb weight down to 416 lb. It will be available in February in Matte Gray Metallic starting at $6,799.

2023 Honda CB500X

2023 Honda CB500X non-U.S.
2023 Honda CB500X in Pearl Organic Green (non-U.S. model)

Rounding out Honda’s light-middleweight family featuring the 8-valve 471cc parallel-Twin, the CB500X was also introduced in 2013. A 2016 upgrade included a larger fuel tank and more wind protection via an adjustable screen (56.9 inches and 55.5 inches). The bike also gained LED lighting, a spring preload-adjustable fork and an adjustable brake lever. Another evolution happened in 2019, with a switch to a 19-inch front wheel (from 17 inches) and longer travel suspension. The CB500X received additional improvements for the 2022 model year and is back for 2023.

Related: 2019 Honda CB500X | First Ride Review

Related: National Cycle Extreme Adventure Gear for Honda CB500X

The 2023 Honda CB500X will come in Pearl Organic Green and will be available in February starting at $7,299.

2023 Honda XR650L

2023 Honda XR650L
2023 Honda XR650L in White.

Honda says that with its Baja heritage, the XR650L continues to be a hit with dual-sport customers, as it “opens doors to adventure on single-track trails, dirt roads and backroads, while also delivering capable and affordable transportation in the city.”

The XR650L has a 644cc SOHC four-stroke engine, Radial Four-Valve Combustion Chamber (RFVC), and 42.5mm constant-velocity (CV) carburetor. It has a Pro-Link Showa single-shock in the rear with spring-preload, 20-position compression- and 20-position rebound-damping adjustability, and 11.0-inch travel rear shock, and in the front is a 43mm Showa fork featuring 16-position compression damping adjustability. 

It has a 21-inch front wheel, an 18-inch rear wheel, a 37-inch seat height, and 13 inches of ground clearance. With a topped off 2.8-gal fuel tank, all standard equipment, and fluids, it comes in at a curb weight of 346 lb.

The 2023 Honda XR650L is now available in White starting at $6,999.

2023 Honda Fury

2023 Honda Fury
2023 Honda Fury in Pearl Yellow.

The 2023 Honda Fury represents Honda’s cruising chopper-style design and features a liquid-cooled 1,312 52-degree V-Twin with a single-pin crankshaft and three-valve dual-plug combustion chamber. It has adjustable front and rear suspension, a 336mm disc with a twin-piston caliper up front, and 296mm disc with single-piston caliper in the rear. ABS is standard. With a 32-degree rake, hard-tail styling, and 26.9-inch seat height, Honda calls the Fury a “rolling work of art.”

Related: Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders: Seat Heights Under 30 Inches

The 2023 Honda Fury is now available in Pearl Yellow starting at $11,499.

For more information, visit the Honda website.

The post Honda Announces More 2023 Returning Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Best Small Motorcycles with Seat Heights Under 30 Inches

2021 Harley Davidson Sportster S Best Small Motorcycles

Choices for smaller, affordable motorcycles are growing, and that’s good news for riders looking for a fun bike that won’t break the bank. Whether you’re new to riding and want something easy to handle or an experienced rider looking for a lighter or shorter bike, you have more options now than ever when it comes to finding the best small motorcycles! 

Below is Rider’s 2022-2023 list of Best Small Motorcycles, an update of the popular post from 2019. Our new list includes motorcycles with seat heights up to 30 inches with an MSRP of $17,000 or less. 

We’ve also curated lists of the best bikes with seat heights between 30.0 and 30.9 inches, as well as a list of bikes with seat heights between 31.0 and 31.9 inches. We’ll include links to those lists soon. 

When possible, we’ve included a link to our test ride reviews so you can get a sense of how each bike performs in action. We’ve also included the 2022-2023 model year’s U.S. base MSRP (as of publication), seat height, and claimed wet or dry weight. On models with options to lower the seat height or suspension, we’ve listed the standard and lowered seat heights. You can also click on a model’s name to go to the manufacturer’s webpage for a full list of specifications and details.  

The models in this list are arranged by seat height, with the first model having the shortest seat height and the last model having the tallest seat height in the list. 


Can-Am Ryker 

Can Am Ryker Best Small Motorcycles

Can-Am Ryker 

$8,999 

23.6-inch seat height

594 lb dry 

Read our 2019 Can-Am Ryker First Ride Review


Indian Scout Bobber Sixty 

Indian Scout Bobber Sixty Best Small Motorcycles

Indian Scout Bobber Sixty 

$10,749 

25.6-inch seat height 

548 lb 


Indian Scout Rogue Sixty 

Indian Scout Rogue Sixty Best Small Motorcycles

Indian Scout Rogue Sixty 

$11,249 

25.6-inch seat height 

540 lb 

Read our 2022 Indian Scout Rogue First Ride Review 


Indian Scout Sixty 

Indian Scout Sixty Best Small Motorcycles

Indian Scout Sixty 

$11,749 

25.6-inch seat height 

543 lb 

Read our 2016 Indian Scout Sixty Road Test Review 


Indian Scout Bobber 

Indian Scout Bobber Best Small Motorcycles

Indian Scout Bobber 

$12,249 

25.6-inch seat height 

553 lb 

Read our 2018 Indian Scout Bobber First Ride Review 


Indian Scout 

Indian Scout Best Small Motorcycles

Indian Scout 

$13,249 

25.6-inch seat height 

561 lb 

Read our 2019 Indian Scout Tour Test Review 


Indian Scout Bobber Twenty 

Indian Scout Bobber Twenty Best Small Motorcycles

Indian Scout Bobber Twenty 

$13,249 

25.6-inch seat height 

563 lb 


Harley-Davidson Iron 883 

Harley-Davidson Iron 883 Best Small Motorcycles

Harley-Davidson Iron 883 

(2022 is the final year for this model) 

$11,249 

25.7-inch seat height 

564 lb 


Harley-Davidson Softail Standard 

Harley-Davidson Softail Standard Best Small Motorcycles

Harley-Davidson Softail Standard 

$14,399 

25.8-inch seat height 

655 lb 


Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114 

Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114 Best Small Motorcycles

Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114 

$16,599 

25.8-inch seat height 

631 lb 


Honda Shadow Phantom 

2023 Honda Shadow Phantom

Honda Shadow Phantom 

$7,999 

25.8-inch seat height 

549 lb 

Read our 2010 Honda Shadow Phantom 750 Road Test Review 


Honda Shadow Aero 

2023 Honda Shadow Aero

Honda Shadow Aero 

$7,799 

25.9-inch seat height 

560 lb 

Read our 2013 Honda Shadow Aero Review 


Indian Chief 

Indian Chief Best Small Motorcycles

Indian Chief 

$14,999 

26-inch seat height 

670 lb 


Harley-Davidson Forty-Eight 

Harley-Davidson Forty-Eight Best Small Motorcycles

Harley-Davidson Forty-Eight 

(2022 is the final year for this model) 

$12,299 

26.2-inch seat height 

556 lb 


Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic

Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic Best Small Motorcycles

Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic 

$8,999 

26.8-inch seat height 

620 lb 

Read our 2013 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic Review


Honda Fury 

Honda Fury Best Small Motorcycles

Honda Fury 

$11,449 

26.9-inch seat height 

663 lb 

Read our 2010 Honda VT13VX Fury Road Test Review 


Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom 

Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom Best Small Motorcycles

Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom 

$9,499 

27-inch seat height 

611 lb 


Yamaha V Star 250 

Yamaha V Star 250 Best Small Motorcycles

Yamaha V Star 250 

$4,699 

27-inch seat height 

324 lb 

Read more about the V Star 250 in our 2008 Motorcycle Fuel Economy Comparison Review


Harley-Davidson Nightster 

Harley-Davidson Nightster Best Small Motorcycles

Harley-Davidson Nightster 

$13,499 

27.1-inch seat height 

481 lb 

Read our 2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster First Ride Review 


BMW R 18 

2023 BMW R 18 in Mineral Motorcycles

BMW R 18 

$14,995 

27.2-inch seat height 

761 lb 

Read our 2021 BMW R 18 First Edition Road Test Review


Honda Rebel 500 

2023 Honda Rebel 500

Honda Rebel 500 

$6,449 

27.2-inch seat height 

408 lb 

Read our 2020 Honda Rebel 500 ABS Road Test Review 


Honda Rebel 300

2023 Honda Rebel 300

Honda Rebel 300 

$4,749 

27.2-inch seat height 

364 lb 


Triumph Bonneville Bobber 

Triumph Bonneville Bobber Best Small Motorcycles

Triumph Bonneville Bobber 

$13,495 

27.6-inch seat height (optional lower seat of 27.2 inches) 

553 lb 

Read our 2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber First Ride Review 


Yamaha Bolt R-Spec 

Yamaha Bolt R-Spec Best Small Motorcycles

Yamaha Bolt R-Spec 

$8,899 

27.2-inch seat height 

542 lb 


 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT 

2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT

Honda Rebel 1100T DCT 

$11,299 

27.5-inch seat height 

524 lb 

Read our 2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT First Look Review 


Honda Rebel 1100 

2023 Honda Rebel 1100

Honda Rebel 1100 

$9,499 

27.5-inch seat height 

487 lb 

Read our 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 First Ride Review 


Suzuki Boulevard C50 

Suzuki Boulevard C50 Best Small Motorcycles

Suzuki Boulevard C50 

$8,609 

27.6-inch seat height 

611 lb 


Suzuki Boulevard C50T 

Suzuki Boulevard C50T Best Small Motorcycles

Suzuki Boulevard C50T 

$10,059 

27.6-inch seat height 

644 lb 

Read our 2007 Suzuki Boulevard C50T Road Test Review 


Kawasaki Vulcan S 

Kawasaki Vulcan S Best Small Motorcycles

Kawasaki Vulcan S 

$7,349 

27.8-inch seat height 

492 lb 

Read our 2015 Kawasaki Vulcan S Road Test Review 


Kawasaki Vulcan S Cafe

Kawasaki Vulcan S Cafe Best Small Motorcycles

Kawasaki Vulcan S Cafe 

$8,099 

27.8-inch seat height 

496 lb 

Read our 2016 Kawasaki Vulcan S Cafe Road Test Review 


Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster 

2023 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster in Jet Black and Fusion White

Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster 

$13,495 

27.8-inch seat height 

580 lb 

Read our 2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster First Ride Review


Harley-Davidson Sportster S 

Harley-Davidson Sportster S Best Small Motorcycles

Harley-Davidson Sportster S 

$16,399 

28.9-inch seat height 

502 lb 

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S First Ride Review 

The post Best Small Motorcycles with Seat Heights Under 30 Inches first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

A Girl and Her Honda Rebel

Allison Parker Honda Rebel 250
The author and her 2014 Honda Rebel 250

When I tell people I have a motorcycle, I get one of three responses. The first is that motorcycles are dangerous and not worth the risk. The second is that a Honda Rebel 250 isn’t a “real” motorcycle. The third response – and my favorite by far – is delivered in the form of a story about someone’s trusty first bike that they’ll never forget.

See all of Rider‘s Honda coverage here.

I’ve heard the horror stories of life-changing accidents. These stories I can respect. They come from a place of caring, sometimes a place of loss. They’re not fun stories, but they are stories that deserve to be heard.

As to the second response, I have lost patience with those who say the Rebel isn’t a real motorcycle. The Rebel 250 is small, that’s true. You won’t find it on a list of the top 10 most powerful motorcycles. You won’t find it on anyone’s list of dream bikes. But if people who tell me the Rebel 250 isn’t a real motorcycle could hear some of the third type of responses, they might have a different perspective.

The third response is my favorite because it is the one that most aligns with my own experience. It comes from riders who have owned a Rebel 250, usually as a first bike. When I tell these people what motorcycle I have, they light up. They tell me about how they learned to ride on a Rebel. Or how they left work in a trail of dust on a Rebel when their spouse was going into labor or taught their sons and daughters to ride on a Rebel. I can relate to these stories because they are fueled by that first joy of sitting on a bike.

When I decided I wanted a motorcycle, I searched everywhere. I printed off Craigslist postings and asked my friends and family what they thought of them. I took pictures of motorcycles with “For Sale” signs on the side of the road. I didn’t really know what I was looking for until I saw a posting for a 2014 Honda Rebel 250.

I took my dad with me to look at it the very next week. It was the least intimidating motorcycle I had seen so far. It was gorgeous, with shiny black paint and a stylish “Rebel” sticker on the gas tank. I admit, my enthusiasm about finally finding a motorcycle that was affordable, small enough for me to sit on comfortably, and in great condition might have clouded my judgment, but I still think it’s a beautiful bike. 

Some things are beautiful not because of their complexity but because of their simplicity. The Rebel wasn’t trying to be anything it wasn’t. Likewise, I wasn’t trying to impress anyone with a thundering loud exhaust or state-of-the-art technology. I just wanted to be what I was: a new rider comfortable and happy on her first motorcycle.

Before I ever sat on a motorcycle, I rode horses. My horse is named Chief. I still have him, although now he spends his days grazing through retirement. He is a gentle giant, calm and steady. He stuck with me through thorn briars and winding wooded trails. We even have the same hair color. One thing I learned from Chief was how to trust what carries you. I developed a similar trust with the Rebel.

My Rebel has been my loyal mount for six years. It has carried me from Dover, Tennessee, up to Grand Rivers, Kentucky, a town of about 400 people nestled between the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers with a fantastic restaurant called Patti’s. To get there, I go up the Trace through Land Between the Lakes. I stop for a break in front of the old iron furnace. I ride by the elk and bison range. I swing by the planetarium and watch a Beatles laser show. Before long, I’m dining at Patti’s, chowing down on bread baked in a clay flowerpot and a 2-inch-thick pork chop.

My Rebel has also carried me to Aurora, Kentucky, home of the Hot August Blues Festival and Belew’s Dairy Bar. The memory of a Belew’s double cheeseburger with the patty edges crispy with grill flavor still makes my mouth water. At the Hot August Blues Festival, folks from all walks of life stretch out on the riverbank and catch up while bands get down with it. You never meet a stranger in Aurora, even if you’ve never seen a single person there before. Through all these experiences, my Rebel was with me.

I’m not trying to convince you to go buy yourself a Rebel 250. If you’re new to motorcycles and want one that is easy to ride, dependable, and not very expensive, then a Rebel is a good choice. It’s not flashy or impressive, but it has a character of its own. Nor am I trying to convince myself that I made the right choice. If I could do it over again, I wouldn’t change a thing. All I want is for new riders to cherish their time with their first bike and for experienced riders to take a moment and remember what that felt like.

Allison Parker joined the Rider staff as assistant editor in August 2022. This is her first story for the magazine, and it appeared in the December 2022 issue. –Ed.

The post A Girl and Her Honda Rebel first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

National Cycle Extreme Adventure Gear | Gear Review

National-Cycle-Extreme-Adventure-Gear-XAG 2022 Honda CB500X
2022 Honda CB500X decked out in National Cycle Extreme Adventure Gear

Adventure bike owners love to add “farkles” from companies such as National Cycle to their bikes. A farkle, as many of you know, is an accessory, often a fancy one, that a motorcycle owner is likely to brag about. Some say the word is a mashup of “function” and “sparkle,” but we’ve also heard it’s an acronym for Fancy Accessory, Really Kool, Likely Expensive. (When I Googled “farkle,” the top result was from Dictionary.com: a combination of fart and chuckle, an involuntary fart caused by laughter. Gotta love the internet.)

Best known for its windscreens and windshields, National Cycle also makes accessories for select motorcycle models. As part of its Extreme Adventure Gear (XAG) line, it makes accessories for the ADV-styled Honda CB500X, and we installed some XAG accessories on our 2022 test bike.

Related: 2019 Honda CB500X | First Ride Review

One of the most popular upgrades for adventure bikes is supplemental protection against rocks, road debris, and tip-overs. We started off with National Cycle’s XAG Polycarbonate Headlight Guard (P/N N5400, $84.95), which is made of tough 3.0mm polycarbonate reinforced with the company’s proprietary Quantum hardcoat – said to provide 10 times the strength and 30 times the scratch resistance as acrylic, a claim National Cycle backs up with a three-year warranty against breakage.

National Cycle Extreme Adventure Gear XAG Polycarbonate Headlight Guard 2022 Honda CB500X
National Cycle XAG Polycarbonate Headlight Guard

The guard is thermoformed for an exact fit over the 2019-2022 CB500X headlight, and its crystal-clear optics do not distort or reduce illumination. Installation is simple: Just clean the headlight, remove the adhesive backing on the marine-grade Velcro tabs, and press the guard onto the headlight lens.

Next, to add crash protection as well as a place to mount auxiliary lighting, we installed the XAG Adventure Side Guards (P/N P4200, $429.95), which are also available for the Yamaha Ténéré 700. Made of black powdercoated steel, they complement the CB500X’s styling, especially the Pearl Organic Green/Black color scheme on our 2022 model. The guards are also treated inside and out with an electrophoretic coating to eliminate rust and corrosion.

National-Cycle-Extreme-Adventure-Gear-XAG-Adventure-Side-Guards 2022 Honda CB500X
National Cycle XAG Adventure Side Guards

The installation instructions provide a list of basic tools needed as well as a QR code that links to a helpful video. Installation is straightforward and took about 30 minutes, with the only challenge being a little extra effort needed to line the guards up with the engine mount holes.

The left and right guards attach to the engine in two places, and they bolt together in the middle just below the headlight. Once installed, they provide solid, sturdy protection. A flat metal tab with an open bolt hole that’s welded to the lower part of each guard provides a good attachment point for auxiliary lights.

As Reg Kittrelle says in his Triumph Tiger 900 GT Low review in the upcoming February issue, an ADV is a “motorcycle that can comfortably take me to distant places carrying lots of stuff.” The Honda CB500X is comfortable, but in stock form, it doesn’t provide many options for carrying gear, so we installed the XAG Luggage Rack (P/N P9304, $184.95). Like the side guards, the luggage rack is made of black powdercoated steel.

National Cycle Extreme Adventure Gear XAG Luggage Rack 2022 Honda CB500X
National Cycle XAG Luggage Rack

Also like the guards, installation of the rack requires only basic hand tools, takes about 30 minutes, and is clearly demonstrated in the instructions and video. On a stock CB500X, installation requires removal/reinstallation of the passenger grab handles since the mounting brackets share the same bolt holes. On our test bike, the grab handles had already been removed when Honda’s accessory saddlebag mounts were installed. And be advised: National Cycle’s luggage rack is not compatible with Honda’s accessory saddlebags.

The rack is a solid, stylish, practical add-on. It measures 8.625 inches front to back and has a tapered width that narrows from 6.75 inches at the front to 5 inches at the rear. The rack’s slotted surface and two holes on either side provide anchor points for straps or bungee cords. It sits a bit higher than the passenger portion of the seat, but together they provide a platform up to 23 inches in length for carrying a drybag, duffel, or tailbag.

Related: Motorcycle Camping on a Honda CB500X and Husqvarna Norden 901

Although we didn’t request one for our test bike, National Cycle also makes the XAG Lowering Kit and Kickstand (P/N P4900, $119.95) for the CB500X. It includes a shorter sidestand and two aluminum suspension link arms that lower the seat height by about 1.5 inches (from 32.8 to 31.3 inches). Only basic tools are required, installation takes 30-45 minutes, and you’ll need a wheel chock and a hydraulic jack or lift. As with the other accessories, in addition to the step-by-step instructions with photos, there’s a helpful video.

National-Cycle-Extreme-Adventure-Gear-XAG-Lowering-Kit-and-Kickstand 2022 Honda CB500X
National Cycle XAG Lowering Kit and Kickstand

We put as many miles as possible on our test bikes, so we’re always interested in accessories that improve comfort. We’ve tested National Cycle’s VStream windscreens on many different motorcycles over the years, and we’ve consistently been impressed with their ability to improve wind protection while also reducing turbulence and buffeting. With their patented “V” shape, VStream windscreens are made of 3.0mm Quantum-hardcoated polycarbonate – the same durable material used for the headlight guard (and with the same warranty against breakage).

The VStream windscreen comes in three sizes for the CB500X, as seen below.

National-Cycle-Extreme-Adventure-Gear-XAG-Vstream-Windscreen 2022 Honda CB500X

The Low windscreen is 16.75 inches tall, just slightly taller than stock, and it’s available in dark or light tint for $121.95. We opted for the Mid windscreen ($133.95), which is 19.25 inches tall (more than 2.5 inches taller than stock), much wider than stock near the top, and available only in light tint. The Tall windscreen ($139.95) is 21.75 inches tall (more than 5 inches taller than stock), even wider near the top, and available only in clear.

National Cycle Extreme Adventure Gear XAG Vstream Windscreen mid 2022 Honda CB500X
National Cycle VStream Windscreen Mid size

Compared to stock, the Mid-size VStream pushes air higher up and around the rider. Airflow hits at helmet height, but there’s no buffeting. There’s also excellent visibility over the top of the windscreen, providing an unobstructed view of the road ahead.  

Unlike most farkles, National Cycle’s XAG accessories are practical and reasonably priced. If you’ve got a Honda CB500X, check ’em out by clicking on the linked product names above.

The post National Cycle Extreme Adventure Gear | Gear Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Motorcycle Camping on a Honda CB500X and Husqvarna Norden 901

The following motorcycle camping trip story was part of Rider‘s adventure-themed November 2022 issue, which also included stories on the TransAmerica Trail, Trans Canada Adventure Trail, and the Trans Euro Trail.


Motorcycle camping trip
Rider’s editor-in-chief Greg Drevenstedt (left) and American Rider’s editor-in-chief Kevin Duke share a fireside toast. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Buried deep in my iPhone is a text message I sent to my riding buddies on Feb. 29, 2008 (lucky leap day, as it turns out):

I got the job!! I’m Rider’s new Road Test Editor! Woohoo!

I had just returned from my second interview with Mark Tuttle, Rider’s former editor-in-chief. We had met up for a motorcycle ride, and during lunch at a beachside cafe, he offered me the job.

Working full-time at a motorcycle magazine really has been a dream come true. It’s been an honor and a privilege to ride hundreds of new motorcycles and travel all over the world. But one of the most rewarding parts of my job has been getting to know fellow motorcycle enthusiasts who work in the industry – passionate, intelligent, talented individuals who have become not only trusted colleagues but true friends.

The Wingman

One of those friends is Kevin Wing. He’s one of the best motorcycle photographers in the business, and his work has been featured in Rider, Motorcyclist, Sport Rider, Cycle World, and other leading publications since the ’90s. Wing is responsible for countless inspiring covers and vivid images that bring this magazine to life, and he deserves way more credit for his contributions than we could ever give him. 

Motorcycle camping trip
Like many photographers, Kevin Wing avoids the limelight. I managed to capture a selfie with him (right) and Duke during a lunch stop.

Wing was the photographer on my first Rider photoshoot. A month into my new job, Tuttle asked me to photo model on the Buell XB12XT for the June 2008 cover feature. Wing was patient with my inexperience, coaching me on how to ride 2 feet off the back bumper of a minivan for tracking shots. 

Wing is also a perfectionist. He’ll call for as many photo passes as it takes – sometimes dozens of them in a single corner – to get the lighting, focus, angle, and other details just right. On the Buell shoot, I struggled to do repeated U-turns on a steep, narrow road for the cover shot. When I blew it one time and ended up in the weeds, he snagged a few embarrassing frames of me trying to extricate myself.

Motorcycle camping trip Husqvarna Norden 901 Honda CB500X
Enjoying fresh pavement on Lockwood Valley Road aboard the Husqvarna Norden 901 and Honda CB500X.

If I’m honest, I’ve never felt like the “talent.” I’m a rider with middling skills who is always trying to compensate for a lifelong habit of cocking my head to the left, inspiring a few riding buddies to nickname me “iLean.” The real talent is the guy behind the camera.

The Dukester

Another industry veteran I’m proud to call my friend is Kevin Duke. He started out at Motorcyclist in the late ’90s and was an editor at Roadracing World and Motorcycle Consumer News before taking the helm as editor-in-chief at Motorcycle-USA.com and then Motorcycle.com. When the EIC position opened up at our sibling publication, Thunder Press (which became American Rider last May), I was stoked when Duke landed the job.

Motorcycle camping trip
The Honda CB500X is more at home on the pavement, despite its adventure styling and 19-inch front wheel.

Over the years, I’ve attended dozens of press launches around the world with Duke. He was at my first press launch in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, in the spring of 2008, one that will forever live in infamy after one guy crashed (me), nearly every other journalist got a ticket, and one unlucky soul was hauled off in handcuffs. But that’s a longer story best told over a couple of beers…

In January 2013, Duke and I attended the global launch of the BMW R 1200 GS “water” Boxer in South Africa, an event that got cut short on the first day after a British motojournalist crashed and ultimately succumbed to his injuries.

Following the fatal incident, the mood at the launch was somber. We had a free day before our flight home, and Duke and I decided we needed to do something life-affirming. So we borrowed a BMW X1 and drove to Bloukrans Bridge, which, at 700 feet above the Bloukrans River, is the site of the world’s highest commercial bungee jump.

Motorcycle camping trip
Can you tell which one of us had completed the Bloukrans Bridge bungee jump and which one was awaiting his fate?

I was nervous during the entire two-hour drive there, hoping Duke would chicken out so I could do the same. But he never did, and we went through with it. The jump was two seconds of sheer terror followed by one of the most exhilarating experiences of my life.

The Motorcycle Camping Plan

Duke and I oversee a small editorial team as we work collaboratively on Rider and American Rider. Duke is a former racer and can wheelie anything on two wheels, but now that he runs an American V-Twin publication, his opportunities to ride bikes not made by Harley or Indian are limited.

“Hey Duke, we’re working on this adventure issue for Rider. How about you take the train up here to Ventura, and we’ll go for a ride? Bring your tent and sleeping bag.”

Motorcycle camping trip
As a full-sized adventure bike with long-travel suspension, the Husqvarna Norden 901 is well-suited for stand-up riding off-road.

We both spend way too much time riding a desk chair, so he didn’t hesitate to accept my invitation. We had a pair of adventure bikes – a Honda CB500X and a Husqvarna Norden 901 – in the Rider garage, and we’d be joined by Wing on our Yamaha Tracer 9 GT long-termer.

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You know what they say about the best-laid plans. Duke missed his 6 a.m. train, pushing our departure back by two hours. Deadlines, a bum knee, and aftereffects of a Covid booster slowed down my last-minute packing, so by the time we hit the road it was noon.

Motorcycle camping trip
Introduced last year, the Norden 901 is Husqvarna’s first foray into the adventure/travel segment. Husky is owned by KTM, and the Norden is built on the same platform as the KTM 890 Adventure. It’s powered by an 889cc parallel-Twin that makes a claimed 105 hp at the crank, and it has throttle-by-wire, a 6-axis IMU, and a full suite of electronic rider aids. MSRP is $13,999, and the touring cases with carriers add $1,030.

First, the Ride

From my house, I can hit California Route 33 with a rock. It peels off U.S. Route 101 near the beach, and after winding through small hamlets like Casitas Springs and Oak View, Route 33 passes a biker hangout called the Deer Lodge and becomes one of the best motorcycling roads in Southern California, entering the wide-open spaces of Los Padres National Forest. I even wrote about the 33 in my cover letter when I applied to Rider back in 2008:

A motorcycling treasure sits in Rider’s backyard. The triple-crown of the Jacinto Reyes Scenic Byway (Route 33), Lockwood Valley Road, and Cerro Noroeste Road has it all: breathtaking vistas, peg-scraping switchbacks, fast sweepers, and top-gear straights.

Motorcycle camping trip
In Honda’s lineup since 2013, the CB500X has grown into its role as a light, affordable adventure bike. Built around a 471cc parallel-Twin, in 2019 it got a larger front wheel, more suspension travel, and other upgrades. Updates for 2022 include a lighter front wheel, a lighter swingarm, a new inverted Showa SFF-BP fork, and dual front disc brakes. MSRP is $7,199, and Honda’s accessory tankbag, light bar, and panniers bring the as-tested price to $8,517.

Even better, these roads have minimal traffic, especially on a Tuesday. “The Kevins” and I have ridden together many times, and we enjoy a brisk pace. We pushed our bikes hard and gnawed the chicken strips down to gristle. And then, out of nowhere, we received an unexpected gift.

Covering about 25 desolate miles from its junction with Route 33 to the small community of Lake of the Woods, Lockwood Valley Road has suffered a long history of neglect. It was in rough shape when I first rode it 15 years ago, and over the years, it has only deteriorated further. One tricky section is a tangled knot of first-gear corners that go through narrow desert canyons and washes. On one of my first test rides through Lockwood Valley, I dumped a $20,000 BMW R 1200 HP2 Megamoto in a patch of sand that caught me off-guard, cracking one of the magnesium cylinder heads and nearly putting my dream job at risk.

As the Kevins and I turned onto Lockwood Valley Road, we saw that the top layer of pavement had been scraped off. A few miles later, we came upon the paving crew. And then … nirvana!

Motorcycle camping trip
The recently repaved Lockwood Valley Road was a delight.

All the twists and turns that were such a challenge when the pavement was cracked, patched, potholed, and strewn with sand and rock-slide debris became a jet black, eerily smooth roller coaster like those plastic Hot Wheels tracks you could twist into acrobatic shapes and loops. We were gobsmacked.

The Actual Motorcycle Camping

An army marches on its stomach, and so does a crew on a photoshoot ride. We’re all remote workers these days, so rides like these give us a chance to see each other face-to-face and have some laughs. While we sat around a picnic table and scarfed down an XL combination pie at Mike’s Pizza, Duke revealed that Wing had also been the photographer on his first shoot – 25 years ago to the month. We commiserated about the recent heat wave, inquired about Duke’s and Wing’s kids, and discussed the length of my beard. By December, I should be eligible for a part-time gig as Santa.

Motorcycle camping trip
As California Route 33 follows the winding path of the Ventura River through Wheeler Gorge, it passes through a pair of tunnels built in 1931.

We waddled out to the bikes rubbing our distended bellies, saddled up, and made our way through the alpine community of Pine Mountain Club before spiraling our way up Cerro Noroeste Road to the top of its namesake mountain. Cerro Noroeste is surrounded by the Chumash Wilderness, and sprawled across its 8,300-foot summit under the shade of enormous Jeffrey pines is Campo Alto Campground.

Motorcycle camping trip

When my brother and I first camped at Campo Alto back in ’06, we had embraced our Tennessee heritage, bringing little more than a box of fried chicken, a bottle of Jack Daniel’s, and bed rolls tossed in the bed of my F-150. We’ve taken Rider staff camping trips to Campo Alto, so it seemed a fitting location for our most recent escape. A week after Labor Day on a Tuesday, it was deserted.

Motorcycle camping trip
Shaded by enormous Jeffrey pines, Campo Alto Campground is perched atop Cerro Noroeste at 8,300 feet in Los Padres National Forest.

As the Kevins set up camp, I rode down to the general store in Pine Mountain Club and stocked up on beer, chips, sandwich fixin’s, and firewood. We soon had a toasty blaze going and cold cans of IPA in our hands. Heavy rains had spun off from Cyclone Kay and soaked the mountains only a day or two before, and the petrichor mixed with the smell of pine and wood smoke.

“Hard to believe we’re so close to home,” Wing said. “Feels like we’re a million miles away.”

We had ridden less than 100 miles since leaving Ventura, and it was probably half that to the campground as the crow flies. But we were on the top of a mountain surrounded by wilderness, and there was no one around but us.

Motorcycle camping trip
“Trust me, Duke, if we just bomb down this hill, go over the river, and through the woods, we’ll get home an hour earlier.”

After the sun went down, it dropped into the 40s, so we huddled close to the fire, sipped some 10-year-old Henry McKenna bourbon, and told war stories about press launches, photoshoots, close calls, and embarrassing moments. (Yes, I told the Gatlinburg story.)

Motorcycle camping trip

Ours was an adventure with a little “a.” We didn’t do much preparation or planning, nothing went wrong, and we were back home in less than 36 hours. But we slept in tents under the stars, had fun, and asked, “Why don’t we do this more often?” Even a brief escape with good friends does wonders for the soul.

The post Motorcycle Camping on a Honda CB500X and Husqvarna Norden 901 first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT and Returning Models | First Look Review

2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT
The 2023 Honda “bagger” Rebel 1100T DCT ($11,299) in Bordeaux Red Metallic

The 2023 Honda lineup is in, including 11 returning models from five categories and the new “bagger” Rebel 1100 trim level. 

In 2023, we’ll see the return of sportbikes like the CBR1000RR, the touring-focused NC750X, the classic Shadow Aero and Shadow Phantom, miniMOTOs like the Super Cub and Monkey, and more. 

The highlight of Honda’s 2023 lineup is the “bagger” Rebel, the 2023 Rebel 1100T DCT. With a dual-clutch transmission, wind protection, and extra cargo space offered in the new hard-shell saddlebags, this model puts a different spin on Honda’s new-school cruiser platform.

And for those who love the Rebel just as it is, the Rebel 1100 will still be available in its non-bagger form, in both manual and dual-clutch transmission versions. 

2023 Honda Rebel 1100
The 2023 Honda Rebel 1100 ($9,499) in Green Metallic

“This announcement covers nearly every category of on-road motorcycle, which is a testament to how deep our product offering is,” says Brandon Wilson, Manager of Sports and Experiential at American Honda. “Whether it’s for the first-time rider or the weekend warrior, we’re committed to delivering the best possible ownership and riding experiences to all of our passionate two-wheel customers.” 

Honda also announced in September that it would be continuing the Gold Wing family for model year 2023. Click here for more information on the 2023 Gold Wings. 

2023 Honda Rebel 1100 

2023 Honda Rebel 1100
The 2023 Honda Rebel 1100 ($9,499) in Iridium Gray Metallic

Watch Rider‘s video review of the 2021 Honda Rebel 1100

Honda introduced the Rebel 1100 two years ago, a bigger-displacement cruiser modeled after the successful Rebel 300 and 500. It’s a capable and comfortable all-around cruiser featuring a liquid-cooled, 1083cc, parallel-Twin engine available with either a manual transmission or DCT (dual-clutch transmission).

The new “T” trim marks the beginning of the “bagger” Rebel, only available with DCT. The Rebel 1100T DCT comes standard with a windscreen and hard-shell saddlebags with a combined 35 liters of space, making it even more practical for longer rides.

2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT
The 2023 Honda “bagger” Rebel 1100T DCT ($11,299) in Metallic Black

The 2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT will come in Metallic Black or Bordeaux Red Metallic starting at $11,299. The Rebel 1100 DCT will come in Iridium Gray Metallic or Green Metallic starting at $10,099. And the Rebel 1100 will start at $9,499 for Iridium Gray Metallic or Green Metallic. 

2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT Front
2023 Honda Rebel 1100R DCT Cockpit

2023 Honda Rebel 500 & Rebel 300 

2023 Honda Rebel 500
The 2023 Honda Rebel 500 ($6,449) in Candy Blue

The Rebel 500 and 300 return as Honda’s most approachable and affordable entry-level cruiser models. The 500 comes with a 471cc, liquid-cooled, parallel-Twin engine, while the 300 has a 286cc, liquid-cooled, single-cylinder engine. These models provide a relaxed riding position with a classic-meets-modern aesthetic.

2023 Honda Rebel 500
The 2023 Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE ($6,949) in Titanium Metallic

Related Story: 2020 Honda Rebel 500 ABS | Road Test Review

Both models are available in standard and ABS versions, and the Rebel 500 ABS SE includes numerous add-ons like a diamond-stitched seat and a headlight cowl. Both models also feature a peanut fuel tank, LED lighting, and blacked-out engine components.  

2023 Honda Rebel 300
The 2023 Honda Rebel 300 ($4,749) in Candy Diesel Red
2023 Honda Rebel 300
The 2023 Honda Rebel 300 ($4,749) in Matte Black Metallic

The 2023 Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE will come in Titanium Metallic starting at $6,949. The Rebel 500 ABS will be available for $6,749, while the 500 without ABS will be available for $6,499, both in Matte Black Metallic or Candy Blue. The Rebel 300 ABS will come in at $5,049, and the 300 without ABS will be $4,649, both in Matte Black Metallic and Candy Diesel Red.

2023 Honda Shadow Aero 

2023 Honda Shadow Aero
The 2023 Honda Shadow Aero ($7,799) in Ultra Blue Metallic

The Shadow Aero returns with its large front fender, chrome headlights, a low-slung seat, spoked wheels, swept-back twin exhausts, and a 745cc V-Twin engine. The Aero has a retro look but comes with modern technology like fuel injection and ABS. It will be available in February 2023. 

Related Story: 2013 Honda Shadow Aero – Review

The 2023 Honda Shadow Aero will be available for $7,799 in Ultra Blue Metallic.

2023 Honda Shadow Phantom 

2023 Honda Shadow Phantom
The 2023 Honda Shadow Phantom ($7,999) in Adventure Green

This bobber-inspired cruiser has a blacked-out engine, short fenders, and black wheels with spokes. The Shadow Phantom is designed for a comfortable riding experience and features the same 745cc V-Twin engine as the Shadow Aero. 

2023 Honda Shadow Phantom
The 2023 Honda Shadow Phantom ($7,999) in Matte Black Metallic

The 2023 Honda Shadow Phantom will be available for $7,999 in Adventure Green or Matte Black Metallic. 

2023 Honda CBR1000RR

2023 Honda CBR1000RR
The 2023 Honda CBR1000RR ($16,599) in Grand Prix Red

The CBR1000RR sportbike is built to perform, featuring a light 432-lb curb weight and a powerful 998cc inline 4-cylinder engine with dual-stage fuel injection. The RR also boasts a TFT display, a full LED lighting package, and your choice of ABS or conventional brakes.  

Related Story: 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP | Road Test Review 

The 2023 Honda CBR1000RR will be available in Grand Prix Red with ABS for $16,899 or without ABS for $16,599. 

2023 Honda CBR600RR 

2023 Honda CBR600RR
The 2023 Honda CBR600RR ($12,099) in Grand Prix Red

With eight World Supersport titles, the CBR600RR is a tried-and-true supersport. Two sets of injectors per cylinder ensure both low- and high-rpm performance, while the Honda Electronic Steering Damper detects vehicle speed and adjusts damping to stable handling. The 4.8-gallon fuel tank is centered and low in the frame, allowing for a compact design and making the bike more responsive to rider input. 

Related Story: 2013 Honda CBR600RR | First Ride Review

The 2023 Honda CBR600RR will be available in Grand Prix Red for $13,099 with ABS or $12,099 without ABS.

2023 Honda CBR300R ABS

2023 Honda CB300R
The 2023 Honda CB300R ABS ($5,049) in Pearl Dusk Yellow

This entry-level sport-naked bike features a friendly 286cc, liquid-cooled, single-cylinder engine designed for use in real-world riding situations. The CBR300R is light weight at 316 lb wet and features standard ABS, blacked-out engine components, and a cafe style. New for 2023 is a gear-position indicator on the LED instrument panel.

2023 Honda CB300R
The 2023 Honda CB300R ABS ($5,049) in Matte Black Metallic

Related Story: 2019 Honda CB300R | First Ride Review 

The 2023 Honda CBR300R ABS will be available for $5,049 in Pearl Dusk Yellow or Matte Black Metallic.

2023 Honda NC750X 

2023 Honda NC750
The 2023 Honda NC750X ($9,399) in Matte Nightshade Blue

Honda built the NC750X to create a motorcycle that can “do it all and do it well.” This commuter bike features a liquid-cooled, SOHC 8-valve parallel-Twin engine, a large front storage compartment big enough to store most helmets, an upright riding position, and a dual-clutch transmission. It also features the Honda Selectable Torque Control, allowing riders to choose between some rear-wheel spin for gravel and dirt or reduced spin for slippery roads. 

Related Story: 2019 Honda NC750X | Long-Term Report

The 2023 Honda NC750X will be available for $9,399 in Matte Nightshade Blue.

2023 Honda Super Cub C125 ABS

2023 Honda Super Cub
The 2023 Super Cub C125 ($3,849) in Pearl Gray

The original Cub sold 100 million units worldwide since 1958, and this reimagined Cub is powered by a 124cc four-stroke engine that zips around town while sipping fuel. The Super Cub features modern technology like fuel injection, front-wheel ABS, and an electric starter, offering convenience for everyday riding. 

Related Story: 2019 Honda Super Cub C125 ABS | First Ride Review 

The 2023 Honda Super Cub C125 ABS will be available for $3,849 in Pearl Gray.

2023 Honda Monkey ABS

2023 Honda Monkey
The 2023 Honda Monkey ($4,249) in Banana Yellow

Related Story: Honda Monkey: Super-Spreader of Happiness 

Since its development in 1961, the Monkey has retained its vintage-inspired styling while evolving into a practical and fun pint-sized machine. It features the same 124cc air-cooled engine as the Honda Grom with a five-speed transmission and standard ABS. With a claimed 169 mpg, a wet weight of 231 lb, 12-inch wheels, and chunky tires, the Monkey is built for urban riding. 

2023 Honda Monkey
The 2023 Honda Monkey ($4,249) in Pearl Nebula Red

The 2023 Honda Monkey ABS will be available for $4,249 in Pearl Nebula Red and Banana Yellow.

2023 Honda ADV150

2023 Honda ADV150
The 2023 Honda ADV150 ($4,349) in Candy Rose Red

The ADV150 is a mix of adventure and urban riding. This “Africa Twin of the scooter world” features a 149cc, liquid-cooled, 4-stroke engine in a steel frame.

Related Story: 2021 Honda ADV150 | First Ride Review 

At 134 mpg, this scooter is practical for getting around town while also being able to handle scenic dirt roads. It also features an automatic transmission, an adjustable windscreen, and under-seat storage. 

The 2023 Honda ADV150 will be available for $4,349 in Candy Rose Red.

Find out more at Powersports.Honda.com 

The post 2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT and Returning Models | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Honda Announces 2023 Gold Wing Family

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT in Candy Ardent Red

Despite concerns by some that Honda would be discontinuing its popular flagship Gold Wing motorcycle – perhaps precipitated by the announcement in July that the Gold Wing Road Riders Association was closing its doors – the company recently announced the return of the Gold Wing family for 2023.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT

Slated to be available in November, the new Gold Wings will comes in four different trims, three of which feature Honda’s exclusive Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT).

Related Story: 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT | Road Test Review

2023 Honda Gold Wing Family

With its hefty liquid-cooled 1,833cc horizontally opposed 6-cylinder engine, the 2023 Honda Gold Wing still boasts all the features touring riders have grown to love, including throttle-by-wire, four riding modes (Tour, Sport, Econ, and Rain), Honda Selectable Torque Control (Gold Wing Tour models only), Hill Start Assist, optimized cruise control, and electronically controlled combined braking system with ABS. Gold Wing DCT and Tour DCT models feature Walking Mode for creeping forward and backward and saving curb weight through the absence of a reverse idle shaft.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour in Black

In 2021, a number of audio improvements were incorporated, including richer sound, optimized automatic volume-adjustment level, and a standard XM radio antenna, and Android Auto integration joined Apple CarPlay integration. Speakers that had been upgraded to 45 watts in 2021 were bumped again in 2022 to a 55-watt rating.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT

The Gold Wing’s trunk was also upgraded in 2021 and now holds 61 liters – enough for two full-face helmets – which makes for a combined 121 liters of storage including the saddlebags.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing DCT in Matte Gray

Pricing and color options for the 2023 Honda Gold Wing are summarized below:

  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT: Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $32,900)
  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour DCT: Black, Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $29,600)
  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour: Black, Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $28,600)
  • 2023 Gold Wing DCT: Matte Gray (MSRP $25,600)

For more information, visit the Honda website.

The post Honda Announces 2023 Gold Wing Family first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Honda Announces 2023 Gold Wing Family

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT in Candy Ardent Red

Despite concerns by some that Honda would be discontinuing its popular flagship Gold Wing motorcycle – perhaps precipitated by the announcement in July that the Gold Wing Road Riders Association was closing its doors – the company recently announced the return of the Gold Wing family for 2023.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT

Slated to be available in November, the new Gold Wings will comes in four different trims, three of which feature Honda’s exclusive Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT).

Related Story: 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT | Road Test Review

2023 Honda Gold Wing Family

With its hefty liquid-cooled 1,833cc horizontally opposed 6-cylinder engine, the 2023 Honda Gold Wing still boasts all the features touring riders have grown to love, including throttle-by-wire, four riding modes (Tour, Sport, Econ, and Rain), Honda Selectable Torque Control (Gold Wing Tour models only), Hill Start Assist, optimized cruise control, and electronically controlled combined braking system with ABS. Gold Wing DCT and Tour DCT models feature Walking Mode for creeping forward and backward and saving curb weight through the absence of a reverse idle shaft.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour in Black

In 2021, a number of audio improvements were incorporated, including richer sound, optimized automatic volume-adjustment level, and a standard XM radio antenna, and Android Auto integration joined Apple CarPlay integration. Speakers that had been upgraded to 45 watts in 2021 were bumped again in 2022 to a 55-watt rating.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT

The Gold Wing’s trunk was also upgraded in 2021 and now holds 61 liters – enough for two full-face helmets – which makes for a combined 121 liters of storage including the saddlebags.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing DCT in Matte Gray

Pricing and color options for the 2023 Honda Gold Wing are summarized below:

  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT: Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $32,900)
  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour DCT: Black, Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $29,600)
  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour: Black, Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $28,600)
  • 2023 Gold Wing DCT: Matte Gray (MSRP $25,600)

For more information, visit the Honda website.

The post Honda Announces 2023 Gold Wing Family first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com