Tag Archives: Triumph Reviews

Triumph Trident Design Prototype Unveiled

A design prototype for a new Triumph Trident has been unveiled by the British marque at the London Design Museum, our first peek at a forthcoming middleweight roadster model of the same name. 

2021 Triumph Trident Prototype

Triumph fans will immediately recognize the Trident moniker as an important piece of the brand’s history. Triumph’s first three-cylinder production engine powered the 1968-1975 Triumph Trident, and a full-factory racing Trident known as “Slippery Sam” became legendary, winning five consecutive Isle of Man Production TT races. In the 1990’s, the name resurfaced with the Trident 750 and 900 naked bikes. 

Triumph representatives shared limited information about the prototype in a presentation with select members of the motorcycle press, but did confirm that a 2021 Triumph Trident would be available in early 2021. Technical specifications, pricing, and other information will be revealed in the coming weeks when the production model is officially revealed. 

2021 Triumph Trident Prototype

The all-white prototype gives us a glimpse at this new middleweight roadster, which is aimed at other middleweight naked bikes such as the Honda CB650R, Kawasaki Z650, Yamaha MT-07 / XSR 700 and Suzuki SV650, in terms of pricing and audience. Price is a major consideration for buyers within the middleweight segment and Triumph hopes that the Trident’s to-be-announced competitive MSRP will foster a new generation of riders.

This project is the culmination of a four-year development cycle at Triumph’s UK Hinckley offices, while manufacturing will take place in Triumph’s Thailand plant to maintain a lower MSRP. Italian motorcycle designer Rodolfo Frascoli was tapped and is said to bring an Italian influence to the Trident prototype. Frascoli has worked with Triumph several times in the past and most recently lent a hand in the design of the Triumph Tiger 900 lineup. 

2021 Triumph Trident Prototype

The Trident prototype features many classic design cues that we’ve come to expect from the Hinckley factory, with clean lines from nose to tail reminiscent of the Street and Speed Triple motorcycles, and fuel-tank indents that appear on a variety of Triumph bikes. Of course, the clean lines of the prototype are accentuated by the lack of turn signals and large license plate holder. 

Details such as the round headlight and instrumental panel give the prototype a welcoming roadster appearance. Stylistically, the Trident prototype sits between the brand’s traditional “Modern Classics” and its aggressively styled roadsters and supersports. Riser handlebars and a relatively comfortable looking seat pave the way for what could be a neutral, enjoyable riding position. 

2021 Triumph Trident Prototype

Hinckley engineers were tightlipped about performance figures and displacement of the triple-cylinder powerplant, though they did say that this prototype is a non-running model, as evidenced by the lack of wiring, cables and other plumbing. However, the engine cases and bolt patterns seen here bare a striking resemblance to the original 675 engine used in the Street Triple 675 and Daytona 675 lines, so Triumph may be resurrecting and updating this powerplant for use in the Trident.  

Currently, the middleweight category is populated by parallel and V-twin powered motorcycles, making the Trident’s three-cylinder engine the first of its kind in the class. 

2021 Triumph Trident Prototype

The all-new tubular frame looks like it may be made out of steel, which would certainly lower the overall manufacturing cost of this motorcycle. However, it does boast a cleverly styled swingarm that seems to be cast or machined aluminum. Braking components are dual floating Nissin calipers in the front and a single radially mounted caliper in the rear. 

Unlike many of this motorcycle’s would-be competitors, the Triumph Trident prototype features an inverted fork. In the rear, a single shock takes care of suspension duties. These appear to be non-adjustable suspension parts, which fits with the theme of affordability for the Trident and is common within the class in which it aims to compete.

2021 Triumph Trident Prototype

On the technology front, Triumph engineers have promised “class leading technology as standard.” Whether this means throttle-by-wire, ABS and traction control is unknown. 

We’ll have to sit tight and wait for updates on the Triumph Trident, which is looking to be another enticing addition to a hotly contested segment of motorcycling. For now, feast your eyes on images of the Trident design prototype and allow the wheels of speculation to turn. 

2021 Triumph Trident Prototype

Triumph Trident Design Prototype Photo Gallery:

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Triumph Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition | First Look Review

2020 Triumph Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition.
2020 Triumph Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition.

In December 2019, Triumph announced a partnership with EON Productions, the company behind the forthcoming 25th James Bond Film, “No Time To Die.” To celebrate this iconic collaboration, Triumph is proud to introduce the first ever official motorcycle directly linked to the Bond franchise.

The 2020 Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition is a limited-edition Scrambler 1200 XE motorcycle featuring a unique 007 design scheme and limited to a production of just 250 models worldwide, with only 30 marked for the United States and a mere five for Canada.

Read more about what it’s like to ride the Scrambler 1200 XE here.

The Scrambler Bond Edition features distinctive 007-themed paint and bodywork, including a real leather seat with embossed logo, a unique TFT instrument startup screen, blacked-out finishes with special accents and an Arrow silencer with carbon fiber end caps. As a limited-edition model, it also has a numbered plaque and comes with a special Bond handover pack.

Otherwise, this is a top-spec Scrambler XE model, with six ride modes including Off-Road Pro, IMU-based cornering ABS and traction control, an assist clutch, keyless ignition, heated grips, cruise control and Öhlins suspension with 9.8 inches of travel are all standard.

The 2020 Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition is available at Triumph dealers now at a U.S. retail price of $18,500.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro and Rally Pro | First Ride Review

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro
The 2020 Triumph Tiger 900 is not just an updated model, it’s an entirely new machine. The engine, suspension, chassis, brakes and electronics are all new, with a re-style to boot. Photos by Kingdom Creative.

There was a lot to like about Triumph’s Tiger 800 when it was first released in 2011 in two variations, a standard street-oriented model and an off-road XC variant. As a road-going middleweight ADV tourer the Tiger 800 was formidable and competent, but its rev-happy 799cc triple and tall gearing, especially in first, hobbled its off-road capability, despite numerous changes and adjustments made over the next eight model years. The nomenclature of the ever-expanding lineup got confusing as well — what’s the difference between the XRx and XRT again?

Read our Road Test Review of the 2011 Triumph Tiger 800 here.

Read our Road Test Review of the 2018 Triumph Tiger 800 XCA here.

Thankfully, in addition to a complete overhaul (including a bump in displacement to 888cc — hence the new 900 designation), Triumph has simplified the model names of its five-member 2020 Tiger 900 family. There’s the street-oriented, cast-wheeled base model, plus GT and GT Pro variations of it, and the dirt-oriented, tubeless spoke-wheeled Rally and Rally Pro. After spending two and a half days riding the GT Pro and Rally Pro at the press launch in Morocco, it’s clear that these littermates are actually two very different animals, indicative of each one’s improvement in specializing in its unique mission.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro
The 2020 Tiger 900 lineup, but especially the off-road-oriented Rally and Rally Pro, are set to make quite a splash (get it?) in the middleweight ADV touring market.

All five models share the core changes for 2020, encompassing the engine, chassis, suspension, brakes and electronics. First up is the DOHC, 4-valve-per-cylinder, Euro 5-spec in-line triple, bored out from 74 to 78.0 x 61.9mm and featuring a new “T-plane” triple crankshaft (a first in the motorcycling world, near as we can tell) and a new firing order that bestows the triple with V-twin-like character down low while maintaining its top-end power.

Starting and revving the two engines (in a 2019 Tiger 800 and 2020 Tiger 900 GT Pro) back-to-back, the difference in sound is undeniable, and from the saddle the new 900 has low-end grunt it previously lacked; Triumph claims a 10% increase in peak torque and up to 12% more midrange horsepower.

Tiger 800 vs 900 engine
The new triple has a larger displacement than before, but is physically smaller thanks in large part to a redesigned oil sump that increases ground clearance. Previous-gen Tiger 800 engine shown at left, new Tiger 900 engine at right.
Triumph T-plane crank
The new T-plane crank has a unique firing order (1,3,2 at 180/270/270 degrees) that creates a V-twin-like rumble. While it primarily bestows the Tiger 900 with an awesome soundtrack, it’s also said to provide a small bump in low-end power and thanks to a new balance shaft it’s just as smooth as the previous 800.

Other engine changes include new Nikasil-plated Siamese aluminum cylinder liners, new camshafts, a new balancer shaft for the new firing order, new pistons and con rods, reduced oil volume and lightweight magnesium engine covers. Overall Triumph says the powertrain is 5.5 pounds lighter than before, and thanks to a new split radiator that reduces heat blown onto the rider’s leg (a common complaint with previous-gen Tiger 800s) and improvements to the sump design, the engine sits 1.7 inches lower in the frame and is tilted 6.8 degrees farther forward than before, for a lower center of gravity and increased ground clearance.

Contributing to the new Tiger’s overall weight loss is a new, lighter tubular steel chassis that includes a bolt-on aluminum subframe and pillion footpeg brackets. Triumph’s claimed dry weight figure for the 2020 Tiger Rally Pro is 443 pounds…add about 32 pounds for a full 5.3-gallon gas tank plus other fluids and the new model is considerably lighter than the 505-pound Tiger 800 XCA we tested in 2018.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro
The Tiger 900 GT Pro is the sports car of the lineup, carving corners and chewing up gnarly pavement with equal aplomb.

Apart from the engine, the other major updates are to the suspension and brakes across all five Tiger 900 models. The street-oriented variants (base model, GT and GT Pro) get a 45mm USD Marzocchi cartridge fork with 7.1 inches of travel, non-adjustable on the base model and adjustable for compression and rebound damping on the GT and GT Pro, and a rear 7-inch-travel Marzocchi shock with manual preload adjustment on the base model, full manual adjustment on the GT and electronic preload and rebound damping adjustment on the GT Pro. Four preload settings are available for the GT Pro’s electronic rear shock — rider, rider + luggage, rider + pillion and rider + pillion + luggage — and damping adjusts based on the selected riding mode. More on those below.

The Rally and Rally Pro models get a fully adjustable 45mm USD Showa fork with 9.4 inches of travel and a Showa rear shock adjustable for preload and rebound damping, with 9.1 inches of travel. Swapping back and forth between the GT Pro and Rally Pro during our on-road photo stop, where we rode the same set of corners multiple times, was like riding two completely different motorcycles. The GT Pro, with its 19-inch front wheel and shorter suspension, is lower and sportier, while the Rally Pro, rolling on a 21-inch front wheel, feels like the taller adventure bike that it is — not difficult to handle, but softer and more plush when pushed hard in the turns.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro
The Tiger 900 Rally Pro is no slouch in the corners, but it’s off-road where its updates truly shine. Apart from a clutch lever that engages at the far end of its throw, requiring some acclimation in technical terrain, this new Tiger is a newly potent ADV machine straight off the showroom floor.

Notably, all five models, including the base model, get top-of-the-line Brembo Stylema front calipers, normally only found on flagship-level superbikes, with larger 320mm front discs and a new radial front master cylinder. The base model includes ABS, while the other four have cornering ABS with three settings: Road, Off-Road and Off.

The cornering ABS, as well as the rest of the Tiger 900’s electronics, is based around a Continental 5-axis IMU that offers up to six riding modes, each with full power and various throttle response maps and ABS and traction control settings. The base model Tiger 900 gets Rain and Road modes only; the GT and Rally add on Sport and Off-Road. The GT Pro also adds a rider-configurable mode, and the Rally Pro adds Off-Road Pro, which shuts off ABS and traction control entirely and uses a dedicated off-road throttle map. By contrast, the regular Off-Road mode available on the GT, GT Pro and Rally maintains light ABS intervention on the front wheel and controls rear wheel spin, fine for basic dirt or gravel roads but a liability in sand or when climbing steep, loose hills.

Brembo Stylema brakes
“Unobtanium” Brembo Stylema brakes are standard on all Tiger 900 models, including the base model–definitely a category-leading specification.

We rode the Rally Pro on our full day of off-road testing in Morocco, and after briefly experimenting with Off-Road mode, I spent the rest of the day in Off-Road Pro, enjoying the more direct connection I felt with the bike. The new Showa suspension was a revelation: plush and responsive, and it seemed to get better the faster we pushed. Even for this novice-to-low-intermediate ADV rider, the new Tiger 900 Rally Pro was confidence inspiring and remarkably easy to handle on the rough, loose, often-sandy Moroccan trails.

Throttle response was linear and not at all snatchy, and I even felt comfortable enough to purposely break the rear end loose at times in a power slide — something I’ve never wanted to attempt on a big adventure bike in the past. Triumph had spooned a set of chunky Pirelli Scorpion Rally tires onto the tubeless spoked rims, which certainly contributed to my confidence; street-oriented Pirelli Scorpion Trail IIs are equipped as standard.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro
This loose dirt road was among the smoothest we encountered on our Moroccoan adventure ride. I put my Rally Pro into Off-Road Pro mode, disabling ABS and traction control, for optimum feel and hill-climbing ability.

I also found the Rally Pro to be surprisingly comfy for stand-up riding. I’m 5 feet, 9 inches, and its low, forward footpegs (they’re a tad farther back on the base model, GT and GT Pro), new narrower waist and handlebar that’s now nearly half an inch closer to the rider balanced me in a natural standing position that kept my arms relaxed and torso upright. Dropping the seat into the lower of its two positions (33.5/34.2 inches) and dialing some sag into the suspension also let me get the toes of both feet on the ground, or one whole foot with a minor weight shift.

Getting to the off-road riding required 200 miles of on-road adventure though, and in Morocco the emphasis is on “adventure.” Triumph figures most buyers will aim to take these bikes onto the less-beaten path, and the street-oriented GT Pro we rode was up to the challenge. With its seat in the higher of two positions (31.9/32.7 inches — a low ride height variant of the GT is available with a 29.9/30.7-inch seat) and the windscreen, easily adjustable with one hand, in the highest of its five settings, I sat in a buffet-less pocket of air, feeling just a bit of flow on my shoulders and arms.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro
With its seat in the higher of two positions and the windscreen at the top of its five-position range, I found the Tiger 900 GT Pro to be comfortable enough for an all-day ride, and the tall handlebar meant standing to stretch my legs on occasion was easy.

Jenny’s Gear
Helmet: Arai XD4
Jacket: Klim Artemis
Pants: Klim Altitude
Boots: Sidi Adventure Gore-Tex

The Marzocchi suspension soaked up the many pavement irregularities, including one stretch of packed gravel topped with a light coating of mud, yet was confidently sporty when we hit the twisty foothills of the lower Atlas Mountains. Thanks to its new balance shaft, the T-plane crank 900 proved to be just as smooth as I remember the old 800 to be, with no buzziness in the pegs, grips or seat, and only a pleasant growl at idle.

Apart from the minimally-equipped base model, all Tiger 900 models include a wealth of touring creature comforts: a 7-inch full-color TFT display (with Bluetooth connectivity on the GT Pro/Rally Pro), heated grips, cruise control, hand guards and a 12V charging plug. The GT Pro and Rally Pro add a quickshifter, LED fog lights, a centerstand, a tire pressure monitoring system and heated rider and pillion seats. The Rally Pro also includes engine protection bars and an aluminum skid plate. Pricing starts at $12,500 for the base model Tiger 900, with the GT Pro coming in at $15,000 and the top-line Rally Pro at $16,700. 

Tiger 900 TFT screen
The Tiger 900 GT, GT Pro, Rally and Rally Pro get a new 7-inch TFT with four different display styles and Bluetooth connectivity to your phone, GPS and GoPro. It also uses the My Triumph app on your phone to offer turn-by-turn navigation using the innovative new What3Words app.

So just like back in 2011, there’s a lot to like about the new litter of Tiger 900s — more than ever, if you ask us. They’re more capable and mission-specific, and ready to throw down the gauntlet in the popular middleweight ADV ring. As soon as we get our hands on a tester here in the U.S. you can look forward to a more in-depth exploration of these new Tigers’ capabilities.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro (left) and Rally Pro (right).
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro (left) and Rally Pro (right).

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Specs

Base Price: $12,500
Price as Tested: $15,000 (GT Pro)/$16,700 (Rally Pro)
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse in-line triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 888cc
Bore x Stroke: 78.0 x 61.9mm
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically-actuated wet assist-and-slipper clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 61.3 in. (GT Pro)/61.1 in. (Rally Pro)
Rake/Trail: 24.6 degrees/5.25 in. (GT Pro)/24.4 degrees/5.74 in. (Rally Pro)
Seat Height: 31.9/32.7 in. (GT Pro)/33.5/34.2 in. (Rally Pro)
Claimed Dry Weight: 437 lbs. (GT Pro)/443 lbs. (Rally Pro)
Fuel Capacity: 5.3 gals.
MPG: NA

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 / GT / Rally | First Look Review

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro and Tiger 900 Rally Pro
For 2020 Triumph has thoroughly updated its middleweight adventure platform, now called the Tiger 900, with a larger engine, a new chassis, new technology, new styling and more. The lineup includes five models; shown on the left is the Tiger 900 GT Pro and on the right is the Tiger 900 Rally Pro.

For the 2011 model year, Triumph launched two all-new models – the Tiger 800 and more off-road-oriented Tiger 800 XC, both powered by a 799cc in-line triple – in what was then a much smaller and less competitive middleweight adventure bike segment, with competition coming primarily from BMW’s F 650 GS and F 800 GS.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro engine
The 2020 Triumph Tiger 900 platform is powered by a larger 888cc in-line triple that makes more power and torque than its 799cc predecessor.

Adventure bikes have been a rare bright spot of growth in
what has been a stagnant decade in terms of motorcycle sales since the Great
Recession. And where there’s growth, competition flows in like the tide in the
hopes of raising more boats. We’ve seen a proliferation of new models and new
technology in the segment, with adventure bikes all but displacing traditional
sport- touring motorcycles and some offering nearly superbike levels of power
and specification.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro in Korosi Red

Triumph added a 1,215cc triple-powered Tiger Explorer for 2012, it updated and expanded its Tiger 800 lineup to four models (XR, XRx, XC and XCx) for 2015 and it rolled out no fewer than six Explorer models for 2016. By the time the 2018 model year rolled around, both the Tiger 800 and Tiger 1200 (formerly Explorer) families were comprised of six models each – XR, XRx, XRx Low Ride Height (LHR), XRT, XCx and XCA – offering varying levels of specification and on-/off-road worthiness.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro wheel
All 2020 Triumph Tiger 900 models feature top-of-the-line Brembo Stylema monoblock front calipers. Wheels, ABS/TC, suspension, ride modes, etc. differ by model.

Triumph decided to simplify things somewhat for 2020, with five middleweight Tiger models: Tiger 900, Tiger 900 GT, Tiger 900 GT Pro, Tiger 900 Rally and Tiger 900 Rally Pro. If you’re keeping tabs on the progression of model designations, the Tiger 900 and Tiger 900 GT/Pro models replace the more street-oriented XR models, and the Tiger Rally/Pro models replace the more off-road-oriented XC models.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro in Matte Khaki

The Tiger 900 lineup is powered by a larger 888cc, DOHC, 4-valves-per-cylinder in-line triple that makes a claimed 94 horsepower and 64 lb-ft of torque, with more midrange power and 10% higher peak torque than its 799cc predecessor. Widening the triple’s bore from 74 to 78mm (stroke is unchanged at 61.9mm) yielded an 89cc increase in displacement. The updated engine gets a new 1-3-2 firing order for more character, and Triumph says the Tiger 900 offers class-leading acceleration and a distinctive soundtrack.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro cockpit
The 2020 Triumph Tiger 900 has a 5-inch TFT display, whereas all other models (such as the Tiger 900 GT Pro shown) have a 7-inch TFT display.

Triumph revised the Tiger 900 platform from the ground up,
with a new modular, tubular-steel main frame and a bolt-on subframe, top-of-the-line
Brembo Stylema monoblock front calipers, new bodywork and new LED lighting.

Other new features vary by model:

2020 Triumph Tiger 900
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 in Pure White

Tiger 900

  • Cast wheels, 19-in. front, 17-in. rear
  • Marzocchi 45mm USD fork, non-adj., 7.1-in. travel
  • Marzocchi shock, adj. for spring preload, 6.7-in. travel
  • Seat height: 31.9/32.7 in.
  • Standard ABS
  • Ride modes: Road, Rain
  • 5-inch TFT display
  • Fuel capacity: 5.3 gals.
  • Dry weight (claimed): 423 lbs.
  • Color options: Pure White

Tiger 900 GT

  • Cast wheels, 19-in. front, 17-in. rear
  • Marzocchi 45mm USD fork, adj. for compression & rebound, 7.1-in. travel
  • Marzocchi shock, adj. for spring preload & rebound, 6.7-in. travel
  • (GT Low Ride Height: 5.51/5.95 in. travel)
  • Seat height: 31.9/32.7 in. (GT LRH: 29.9/30.7 in.)
  • Radial front master cylinder
  • Cornering ABS and traction control with IMU
  • Ride modes: Road, Rain, Sport, Off-Road
  • 7-inch TFT display
  • Illuminated switches with a 5-way joystick
  • Electronic cruise control
  • Heated grips
  • Secure mobile phone storage with USB charging port
  • Fuel capacity: 5.3 gals.
  • Dry weight (claimed): 428 lbs. (GT LRH: 426 lbs.)
  • Color options: Korosi Red, Sapphire Black and Pure White, all featuring premium tank badges and contemporary new decals
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro in Korosi Red

Tiger 900 GT Pro

  • Cast wheels, 19-in. front, 17-in. rear
  • Marzocchi 45mm USD fork, adj. for compression & rebound, 7.1-in. travel
  • Marzocchi shock, electronically adj. for spring preload & rebound, 6.7-in. travel
  • Seat height: 31.9/32.7 in.
  • Radial front master cylinder
  • Cornering ABS and traction control with IMU
  • Ride modes: Road, Rain, Sport, Off-Road, Rider-configurable
  • Triumph Shift Assist (up/down quickshifter)
  • 7-inch TFT display
  • Illuminated switches with a 5-way joystick
  • Electronic cruise control
  • Heated grips
  • Heated seats
  • Tire-pressure monitoring system
  • LED auxiliary lights
  • Secure mobile phone storage with USB charging port
  • My Triumph Bluetooth connectivity
  • Fuel capacity: 5.3 gals.
  • Dry weight (claimed): 437 lbs.
  • Color options: Korosi Red, Sapphire Black and Pure White, all featuring premium tank badges and contemporary new decals

Tiger 900 Rally

  • Spoked tubeless wheels, 21-in. front, 17-in. rear
  • Showa 45mm USD fork, fully adj., 9.5-in. travel
  • Showa shock, adj. for spring preload & rebound, 9.1-in. travel
  • Seat height: 33.5/34.3 in.
  • Radial front master cylinder
  • Cornering ABS and traction control with IMU
  • Ride modes: Road, Rain, Sport, Off-Road
  • 7-inch TFT display
  • Illuminated switches with a 5-way joystick
  • Electronic cruise control
  • Heated grips
  • Secure mobile phone storage with USB charging port
  • Fuel capacity: 5.3 gals.
  • Dry weight (claimed): 432 lbs.
  • Color options: Matte Khaki, Sapphire Black and Pure White, all featuring contemporary new decals and a distinctive white frame inspired by the Tiger Tramontana rally bike
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro in Matte Khaki

Tiger 900 Rally Pro

  • Spoked tubeless wheels, 21-in. front, 17-in. rear
  • Showa 45mm USD fork, fully adj., 9.5-in. travel
  • Showa shock, adj. for spring preload & rebound, 9.1-in. travel
  • Seat height: 33.5/34.3 in.
  • Radial front master cylinder
  • Cornering ABS and traction control with IMU
  • Ride modes: Road, Rain, Sport, Off-Road, Rider-configurable, Off-Road Pro
  • Triumph Shift Assist (up/down quickshifter)
  • 7-inch TFT display
  • Illuminated switches with a 5-way joystick
  • Electronic cruise control
  • Heated grips
  • Heated seats
  • Tire-pressure monitoring system
  • LED auxiliary lights
  • Secure mobile phone storage with USB charging port
  • My Triumph Bluetooth connectivity
  • Fuel capacity: 5.3 gals.
  • Dry weight (claimed): 443 lbs.
  • Color options: Matte Khaki, Sapphire Black and Pure White, all featuring contemporary new decals and a distinctive white frame inspired by the Tiger Tramontana rally bike

The 2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally and Tiger 900 Rally Pro
will be available in March. The Tiger 900, Tiger 900 GT and Tiger GT Pro will
be available in April. Pricing for the Tiger 900 starts at $12,500; pricing for
the other models is TBD.

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2020 Guide to New Street Motorcycles

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Triumph Bobber TFC | First Look Preview

2020 Triumph Bobber TFC
2020 Triumph Bobber TFC. Images courtesy Triumph.

When the original Bonneville Bobber launched back in 2017, we were smitten. True, it had some quirks — not enough front brake and a limited fuel range being the most noticeable — but overall we loved what Triumph had created: a factory bobber that delivered in both looks and performance.

Then the following year we got the Bobber Black, with dual front brake discs mounted to its fat front tire — quirk number one, check. In the meantime, Triumph released its first Triumph Factory Custom (TFC) model, the Thruxton TFC, and we swooned. Then earlier this year we got a look at the new Rocket 3 TFC and we salivated.

Now Triumph has announced its third TFC model, and guess what? It’s the Bobber.

The 2020 Triumph Bobber TFC will sport more power across the powerband, with 39% lower engine inertia resulting in a 500 rpm-higher rev limit. It’s also a claimed 11 pounds lighter (although that number is subject to change as the bike is homologated for the U.S. market).

2020 Triumph Bobber TFC engine
2020 Triumph Bobber TFC. Images courtesy Triumph.

As with all TFC models, the Bobber TFC is dripping with high-end components, including fully-adjustable Öhlins suspension front and rear, Arrow exhaust, dual front brake discs with Brembo M50 monobloc calipers and MCS radial master cylinder, an additional Sport riding mode (joining the standard Road and Rain) and an LED headlight with distinctive light pattern.

It gets unique clip-ons rather than a traditional one-piece handlebar, carbon fiber bodywork, a billet top and bottom yoke with numbered plaque, a real leather seat and special TFC badging throughout.

Only 750 Bobber TFCs will be built and sold worldwide, and like all TFC models it comes with paperwork signed by Triumph CEO Nick Bloor, a personalized custom build book, a Bobber TFC bike cover, a TFC document wallet and a leather TFC branded backpack.

More details will follow the Bobber TFC’s homologation in January 2020. U.S. pricing is also TBD.

2020 Triumph Bobber TFC
2020 Triumph Bobber TFC. Images courtesy Triumph.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Triumph T120 and T100 Bud Ekins Edition | First Look Preview

2020 Triumph Bonneville T100 and T120 Bud Ekins Editions
2020 Triumph Bonneville T100 and T120 Bud Ekins Editions. Images courtesy Triumph.

Bud Ekins was a motorcycling icon, a top motocross and desert racer and professional Hollywood stunt man. You might remember him best as the guy who stood in for his buddy Steve McQueen, landing what became possibly the most famous motorcycle jump in film history in The Great Escape.

Now Triumph has announced two special edition Bonnevilles, a T100 and T120, to commemorate Bud’s legacy. Both models will come with a special two-color paint scheme and hand-painted coach lines with heritage Triumph logo. They will also feature a unique California “flying globe” Bud Ekins logo on the tank and front fender.

Other special details include a Monza fuel filler cap, higher-spec LED indicators, diamond knurled grips, bar end mirrors and special black engine badges.

Each bike will come with a certificate of authenticity that includes Bud’s incredible story, and signed by Triumph CEO Nick Bloor and both of Bud’s daughters, Susan Ekins and Donna Ekins.

Pricing and availability on the 2020 Triumph Bonneville T100 Bud Ekins Edition and T120 Bud Ekins Edition is TBD.

2020 Triumph Bonneville T100 and T120 Bud Ekins Editions
2020 Triumph Bonneville T100 and T120 Bud Ekins Editions. Images courtesy Triumph.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition | First Look Review

Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition
The new Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition is the first-ever official Moto2 Dorna Sports-licensed motorcycle. (Photos courtesy of Triumph)

Last month, we posted a sneak peek of the new Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition, an all-new sportbike from the British manufacturer that serves as the exclusive engine supplier to the FIM Moto2 World Championship. The new Daytona was officially unveiled at the GoPro British Grand Prix at the Silverstone circuit in England.

Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition
Gripping those fetching Öhlins NIX30 fork tubes is a billet aluminum top yoke with a laser-etched limited-edition badge.

With a limited production run of 765 units for the U.S. and Canada, and another 765 for the rest of the world—each individually numbered with a laser-etched badge on the machined-from-billet aluminum top yoke—the Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition will be powered by a Moto2-derived 765cc in-line triple with an Arrow titanium race-style exhaust that makes a claimed 128 horsepower at 12,250 rpm and 59 lb-ft of torque at 9,750 rpm, with a 13,250 rpm redline.

Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition
Behind the full carbon fiber bodywork is a Moto2-derived 765cc triple good for 128 horsepower and 59 lb-ft of torque at the crank.

Based on the Street Triple RS engine, the Daytona version features components and performance upgrades derived from the Moto2 engine development program, including titanium inlet valves, stronger pistons and MotoGP-spec DLC-coated wrist pins; new cam profiles and intake trumpets; modified con rods, intake port, crank and barrels; and a higher compression ratio (12.9:1). Equipped with throttle-by-wire, the Daytona offers five riding modes (Rain, Road, Rider Configurable, Sport and Track), all of which adjust the throttle map, traction control and ABS settings. The 6-speed transmission has track-optimized gear ratios and an up/down quickshifter.

Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition
This Triumph gets the goodies, including Öhlins suspension, Brembo brakes with Stylema front calipers and lightweight wheels with Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP track-ready tires.

The new Daytona shares the same cast-aluminum frame and swingarm as the Moto2 engine development prototype and the British Superbike Championship-winning, multi-time Isle of Man TT Supersport race-winning Daytona R. Of course, components attached to the chassis are top-of-the-line, including Brembo Stylema monoblock front calipers, a Brembo rear caliper, fully adjustable Öhlins suspension (a 43mm NIX30 USD fork and TTX36 rear shock) and lightweight cast aluminum wheels shod with Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP go-fast tires.

Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition
Arrow titanium race-style exhaust, chassis from the championship-winning Daytona R, premium components, carbon fiber everywhere. Premi-YUM!

In the cockpit
there’s a full-color TFT display with a Moto2 Triumph co-branded start-up
graphic and lap timer. The new Daytona also has multifunction ergonomically
optimized switch cubes with five-way joystick control. On the outside is
lightweight carbon fiber bodywork, including a single-piece cockpit, full
fairing, tail section, front and rear fenders, upper chain guard and race-spec
lower chain guard. Inspired by the Union Jack livery of the Moto2 engine
development bike, the Daytona features official Moto2 branding and a unique
paint scheme in Carbon Black, Graphite Grey and Aluminum Silver, punctuated
with an exposed carbon fiber effect.

Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition
Full-color TFT display looks similar to what’s used on many of Triumph’s recent, high-end models.

The Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition will be available in March 2020. Pricing is TBD.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2019 Triumph Rocket 3 R/GT | First Look Review

Triumph Rocket 3 R and Rocket 3 GT
Triumph has given its Rocket 3 muscle bike a major makeover, with the new Rocket 3 GT touring cruiser (left) and Rocket 3 R roadster (right) both powered by a 2,458cc in-line triple. (Photos courtesy Triumph)

In the late ’90s
and early aughts, there was a displacement war going on among cruisers, with
engine sizes growing from 1,449cc (Harley-Davidson Twin Cam 88) to 1,510cc
(Victory 92C), then up to 1,670cc (Yamaha Star Road Star), 1,795cc (Honda
VTX1800) and finally, breaking the two-liter barrier, 2,053cc in the Kawasaki
Vulcan 2000, which debuted for 2004.

Triumph Rocket 3 R
Both Triumph Rocket 3s roll on new lightweight cast aluminum wheels shod with Avon Cobra Chrome tires. The rear is 240mm wide.

The following year, Triumph came along and topped them all with the Rocket III, which got its thrust from a massive 2,294cc in-line triple, albeit with an extra cylinder compared to the more traditional V-twins. But, just as a hippopotamus doesn’t have many teeth but the ones it does have are truly impressive, the Rocket III’s 4-inch cylinders were the same size as those in a Chevy 350ci V-8.

Read: 2014 Triumph Rocket III Touring Road Test Review

The Rocket III’s was – and continues to be – the largest engine of any mass-produced motorcycle, and when we strapped it to the dyno back in 2005, it spun the drum to the tune of 127 horsepower and 141 lb-ft of torque – an unheard-of amount of grunt that has only been beaten by a more recent version of the Rocket III. The 2010 Rocket III Roadster made more than 160 lb-ft of torque.

Triumph Rocket 3 R engine
Arranged longitudinally, the Rocket 3’s liquid-cooled 2,458cc in-line triple has three massive cylinders, three hydroformed exhaust headers exiting on the right side and a pair of howitzer-sized mufflers.

Of course, if you’ve been paying attention, then you know that Triumph recently unveiled the Rocket 3 TFC, a $29,000 limited-edition Triumph Factory Custom that was a major reboot for the Rocket 3 platform, and it’s powered by an even bigger in-line triple displacing 2,458cc and making a claimed 168 horsepower and 163 lb-ft of torque. At nearly 2.5 liters, the new Rocket 3’s engine is larger than that of many automobiles. The Rocket 3 TFC is also a much more modern platform than its predecessor (which is probably why the “III” was replaced by “3”), with updated styling, an aluminum frame, a single-sided swingarm, carbon fiber bodywork and a full suite of electronics.

Read: 2019 Triumph Rocket 3 TFC (Triumph Factory Custom) First Look Review

Now Triumph has
unveiled two production models, the Rocket 3 R and the Rocket 3 GT, the latter
aimed at those who like to travel longer distances, with or without a
passenger. Claimed engine output is 165 horsepower and 168 lb-ft of torque, in
a package that weighs nearly 90 pounds less than the previous-generation Rocket
III.

Triumph Rocket 3 R
The Triumph Rocket 3 R is a roadster with height-adjustable midmount foot controls.

Mass-optimized performance enhancements to the liquid-cooled engine include a new crankcase assembly, a new lubrication system with a dry sump and integral oil tank and new balancer shafts, which makes the new, larger engine 40 pounds lighter than its predecessor. On the right side is one of the Rocket 3’s most eye-catching styling elements – a trio of hydroformed exhaust headers leading to a pair of howitzer-sized mufflers, which Triumph says produce a “unique deep growling triple” soundtrack.

Triumph Rocket 3 GT
The Triumph Rocket 3 GT is a touring cruiser with a lower seat height, fore-aft adjustable feet-forward controls and a standard passenger backrest.

The engine is mated to a 6-speed transmission with a torque-assist clutch, and all that asphalt-buckling power reaches the rear wheel through a stout driveshaft. Throttle-by-wire and an IMU support a host of electronic features, including four riding modes, cornering optimized ABS and traction control, cruise control and hill hold control.

Triumph Rocket 3 R Brembo brakes
Big bikes need big brakes, and the Rocket 3s have a pair of top-shelf Brembo Stylema monoblock calipers up front, and cornering ABS is standard.

Slowing down the
Rocket 3 are top-of-the-line Brembo Stylema monoblock front calipers, and its
adjustable fork and rear shock are made by Showa. New lightweight cast aluminum
wheels are shod with Avon Cobra Chrome tires, and the rear a full 240mm in
width.

Triumph Rocket 3 R TFT display
Fully modern in every sense, the new Triumph Rocket 3s have TFT instrument displays and a full suite of electronics. Monza-style gas cap is one of many premium styling touches.

The Rocket 3 leads the way with a pair of round headlights that have been a signature styling feature of many Triumphs since the Speed Triple was introduced in the mid ’90s. Lighting is fully LED with daytime running lights. Other standard features include a TFT display, a USB charging port and keyless ignition and steering lock.

Triumph Rocket 3 R headlights
Like many Triumph models, the Rocket 3s have the distinctive twin round headlights that became iconic on the Speed Triple in the mid ’90s. These are LEDs with daytime running lights.

Both Rocket 3 models feature sculpted rider and passenger saddles, and an accessory in-fill pad makes it easy to switch between two-up and solo seating configurations. Seat height for the rider is 30.4 inches on the Rocket 3 R. At 29.5 inches, it’s even lower on the Rocket 3 GT, which comes standard with a brushed aluminum passenger backrest. As a roadster, the Rocket 3 R has midmount foot controls with two vertical position settings (0 inch / -0.59 inch). The touring-oriented Rocket 3 GT has feet-forward foot controls with three horizontal positions (-0.98 inch / 0 inch / +0.98 inch), and the passenger backrest is also height adjustable.

Triumph Rocket 3 GT with luggage
For the long haul, both Rocket 3 models can be accessorized with soft saddlebags, a tank bag and/or a tail bag.

A wide range of
accessories are available for both models, including heated grips (standard on
the GT, optional on the R), a quickshifter, GoPro integration, turn-by-turn
navigation via the My Triumph app, Bluetooth connectivity, tire-pressuring
monitoring, luggage (soft saddlebags, tank bag and tail bag), a sport windscreen
and various handlebar and seat accessories.

The 2019 Triumph Rocket 3 R will be available in Korosi Red (shown) or Phantom Black, and the Rocket 3 GT will be available in Two-tone Silver Ice and Storm Grey with Korosi Red pinstripe decal (shown) or Phantom Black. Pricing and availability will be announced at the Rocket 3 press launch, which is scheduled for November.

Read: Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 LE Sneak Peek

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition | Sneak Peek

Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition
Illustration of the forthcoming Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition.

Triumph, exclusive engine supplier to the FIM Moto2 World Championship, has announced a forthcoming limited-production model, the Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition. It will be officially unveiled at the GoPro British Grand Prix at Silverstone on Friday, August 23, 2019.

The new Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition will be powered by a Moto2-derived 765cc in-line triple that Triumph says offers the highest levels of power and torque to date from the engine that was originally adapted from the Street Triple RS. In official Moto2 tune, the triple delivers 138 horsepower.

Triumph says the
new Daytona is the first-ever official Moto2 Dorna Sports.SL licensed
motorcycle, with the highest level of specification and rider technology available
on a Triumph, as well as a championship-winning sports-focused chassis. Its
bodywork will feature a limited-edition race paint scheme.

The new Daytona
Moto2 765 Limited Edition, which Triumph says is the “closest you can get to a
genuine Moto2 factory ride for the road,” will be built as part of a limited
run of individually numbered motorcycles, with only 765 for Europe and Asia,
and 765 for the United States and Canada.

As part of its
official unveiling, the Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition will be showcased in
a parade lap during the British GP weekend, ridden by two former motorcycle
world champions.

The Triumph
Daytona Moto2 765 Limited Edition will be available in March 2020. Pricing and
full details to be released on August 23rd.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2019 Triumph Rocket 3 TFC | First Look Review

Triumph Rocket 3 TFC
Be still our beating hearts: the 2019 Triumph Rocket 3 TFC is a drastic departure from the previous Rocket 3. Images courtesy Triumph.

Since its launch in 2004, Triumph’s Rocket 3 has boasted a lot of “mosts”: most torque, most muscle, most…well…for lack of a better word, presence. With its signature three exhaust header pipes curving off the right side of the massive 2,294cc in-line triple, hulking 6.3-gallon gas tank and gaping twin megaphone silencers, nothing about the Rocket 3 has ever been subtle.

It was always essentially an overgrown cruiser, however, and the lone traditional cruiser in Triumph’s 2019 lineup. But now there’s a new Rocket 3 in town, badged as a limited edition Triumph Factory Custom, or TFC model, and rather than being just an accessorized version of the existing bike, the 2019 Rocket 3 TFC is an entirely new machine.

It boasts an all-new 2,458cc liquid-cooled in-line triple, the largest production motorcycle engine in the world, with the highest peak torque at a claimed 163 lb-ft and the most horsepower of any Triumph to date, a claimed 168. Details so far are scarce, but we do know that it features state-of-the-art components like titanium intake valves that allow for quicker, higher revving, and new Arrow silencers.

Triumph Rocket 3 TFC
Lighting is all-LED, including the stubby tail. Single-sided swingarm and rear hugger license plate holder are new.

Final drive is via shaft, housed in a new single-sided aluminum swingarm that, combined with the all-new aluminum frame, engine refinements, carbon fiber bodywork and other lightweight bits, make the new Rocket 3 TFC a whopping 88 pounds lighter than the standard 2019 Rocket 3. If Triumph’s figures are correct, that would put its dry weight in the neighborhood of just 648 pounds.

Helping to make such a beast a bit more rideable, the Rocket 3 TFC includes some modern tech like cornering ABS and traction control, four ride modes (Road, Rain, Sport and Rider-Configurable)–notably these all appear to be full-power and only adjust throttle mapping and traction control settings–Triumph Shift Assist (clutchless up- and downshifting) and Hill Hold Control to prevent the bike from rolling backwards when stopped on an incline.

Other features include full LED lighting, electronic cruise control, keyless ignition, a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) and a USB charging socket. The display is a new TFT instrument that is rider-configurable and can be optionally set up with Bluetooth connectivity for GoPro integration, turn-by-turn navigation and music/phone operation.

Triumph Rocket 3 TFC
TFT instrument is new and looks to be lifted from the new Speed Triple. Display is rider-configurable and can be upgraded with Bluetooth connectivity.

Suspension is by Showa front and rear, with an adjustable 47mm cartridge-style USD fork and adjustable single shock with piggyback reservoir. Brakes are high-spec Brembo M4.30 Stylema 4-piston radial-mount calipers gripping 320mm discs up front and a Brembo M4.32 4-piston caliper in back squeezing a 300mm disc, and new wheels are twenty-spoke cast aluminum with a beefy 240mm rear tire.

As a TFC model, premium details abound, including plenty of carbon fiber, a leather interchangeable solo and twin seat, and TFC badging with gold accents.

Only 750 Rocket 3 TFCs will be produced worldwide, with 225 slated for North America. Each will be individually numbered and will include a letter signed by Triumph CEO Nick Bloor, a personalized custom build book, a leather TFC rucksack and a Rocket 3 TFC branded indoor bike cover.

The 2019 Rocket 3 TFC won’t be available until December, but orders are being taken now at your nearest Triumph dealer. One can be yours for an MSRP of $29,000 ($33,000 in Canada).

Keep scrolling for more images:

Triumph Rocket 3 TFC
Twin LED headlights with DRL are new, as is the carbon fiber flyscreen.
Triumph Rocket 3 TFC
The new Rocket 3 TFC is sleeker, meaner and sportier than before…and we like it!
Triumph Rocket 3 TFC
Left side of the massive engine has premium badging details.
Triumph Rocket 3 TFC
Every Rocket 3 TFC will come with a numbered plaque and gold detailing.
Triumph Rocket 3 TFC
New aluminum single-sided swingarm houses the driveshaft.

Source: RiderMagazine.com