Tag Archives: Suzuki Motorcycles

Suzuki Announces 2023 Lineup of Sport, Street, and Adventure Bikes

2023 Suzuki SV650 ABS in Metallic Reflective Blue
2023 Suzuki SV650 ABS in Metallic Reflective Blue.

Following the Suzuki announcement in June of select 2023 sport, dual-sport, supermoto, and off-road motorcycles and its recent announcement of updated V-Strom 1050 models, the company has released information on more sport, street, and adventure bikes that are returning for 2023. Included in the lineup are the high-performance sport GSX-R series, the street-tested and agile GSX-S series, the SV650 standard, V-Strom 650 adventure bikes, and the Burgman 400 scooter.

Read Suzuki’s press release below for details and pricing.


2023 Suzuki GSX-R Series

2023-Suzuki-GSX-R1000R-in-Pearl-Brilliant-White-and-Metallic-Matte-Stellar-Blue
2023 Suzuki GSX-R1000R in Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue.

GSX-R1000R – At the pinnacle of the GSX-R product line of high-performance motorcycles, the 2023 GSX-R1000R’s engine combines high-performance engineering with performance and tractability. Traction control, launch control, and a bi-directional quick shifter help deliver an unparalleled sport riding experience.

The GSX-R1000R offers Showa BFF and BFRC-Lite suspension components delivering a suspension feel that helps riders rule any track day or mountain pass. Up-front, stainless-steel brake lines, radially mounted Brembo Monobloc brake calipers grasp a pair of 320mm Brembo T-drive floating brake rotors for strong stopping power with outstanding braking response and lever feel.

The GSX-R1000R continues its reign as the best liter-class supersport offering excitement with a proven combination of stellar reliability, durability, usability, and overall high performance with excellent racing potential. All delivered in a striking package augmenting the GSX-R’s 35+ year legacy of championship-winning sportbike performance.

2023-Suzuki-GSX-R1000R-in-Metallic-Triton-Blue-and-Metallic-Mystic-Silver
2023 Suzuki GSX-R1000R in Metallic Triton Blue and Metallic Mystic Silver.

Key points of the 2023 Suzuki GSX-R1000R include:

  • A compact inline four-cylinder engine produces an exciting powerband thanks to the Suzuki Variable Valve Timing (VVT) system.
  • Advanced electronics, like Launch Control and the Bi-Directional Quick Shift System, augment riding performance.
  • Twin-spar aluminum frame with adjustable swingarm pivot carrying Showa Balance Free Front Fork (BFF) and rear shock for confident high-performance handling.
  • Stainless steel brake lines feed the ABS-equipped Brembo 4-piston front calipers for extraordinary stopping performance and lever feel.
  • Superb wind protection and aerodynamics with an LED headlight and Suzuki Ram Air Direct (SRAD) ducts.
  • Advance and distinctive LED position lights.
2023-Suzuki-GSX-R1000R-in-Metallic-Matte-Black-and-Glass-Sparkle-Black
2023 Suzuki GSX-R1000R in Metallic Matte Black and Glass Sparkle Black.

For 2023, the GSX-R1000R rules the street or track in three color options. A historic Metallic Triton Blue and Metallic Mystic Silver paint scheme evocative of Suzuki’s MotoGP bikes, a stunning Metallic Matte Black and Glass Sparkle Black, or a Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue paint scheme. MSRP is $18,199. Visit the Suzuki website for more details.

GSX-R1000 – In 1985, Suzuki revolutionized the sportbike category with the introduction of the original GSX-R750, and then created another milestone in 2001 with the introduction of the GSX-R1000. The GSX-R1000 features the lightweight chassis of the GSX-R750 and a 988cc inline four-cylinder engine design.

2023-Suzuki-GSX-R1000-in-Pearl-Brilliant-White-and-Metallic-Matte-Stellar-Blue
2023 Suzuki GSX-R1000 in Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue.

Related Story: 2017 Suzuki GSX-R1000 | First Ride Review

The 2023 Suzuki GSX-R1000’s inline 4-cylinder engine provides power delivered smoothly and controllably across a broad rpm range. Like the original GSX-R1000, the 2023’s compact, light, and strong chassis deliver precise high-performance handling and excellent suspension feel combined with stellar braking control. All combined to help riders conquer a racetrack or a country road with confidence. Advanced electronic rider aids such as Traction Control and a Bi-Directional Quick Shifter augment the riding experience while the distinctive, aerodynamic GSX-R bodywork offers styling that continues to turn heads.

Equipped with Showa’s Big-Piston Fork plus Brembo T-drive rotors and Monobloc brake calipers, the GSX-R1000 help deliver the sort of performance and confidence a sport rider’s favorite canyon road ride or local track day demand.

2023-Suzuki-GSX-R1000-in-Metallic-Matte-Black-No.-2-and-Glass-Sparkle-Black
2023 Suzuki GSX-R1000 in Metallic Matte Black No. 2 and Glass Sparkle Black.

For 2023, the GSX-R1000 is available in Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue or Metallic Matte Black No. 2 and Glass Sparkle Black liveries. MSRP is $16,149. Visit the Suzuki website for more details.

GSX-R750 – On the road or on the track since 1985, the GSX-R750 features a pairing of 750cc performance with the lightweight, compact chassis of a 600cc Supersport, complemented by technologically advanced suspension front and rear. The 2023 GSX-R750 is the latest expression of the GSX-R’s original concept.

2023 Suzuki GSX-R750 in Glass Sparkle Black and Glass Matte Mechanical Gray
2023 Suzuki GSX-R750 in Glass Sparkle Black and Glass Matte Mechanical Gray.

Related Story: Suzuki GSX-R750: The First Generation 1986-1987

Key features for the 2023 Suzuki GSX-R750 include:

  • Iconic, GSX-R aerodynamic styling with three distinctive paint and graphics schemes.
  • Fuel-injected, 750cc, 4-cylinder engine powers a balanced sportbike experience.
  • Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (S-DMS) lets the rider adjust the power delivery.
  • Twin-spar aluminum frame and Showa Big Piston Front Fork (BPF) deliver extraordinary handling.
  • Twin Brembo Monobloc, radially mounted front brakes deliver robust stopping power.
2023 Suzuki GSX-R750 in Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue
2023 Suzuki GSX-R750 in Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue.
2023 Suzuki GSX-R750 in Metallic Triton Blue and Metallic Mystic Silver
2023 Suzuki GSX-R750 in Metallic Triton Blue and Metallic Mystic Silver.

The 2023 Suzuki GSX-R750 is available in Metallic Triton Blue and Metallic Mystic Silver, Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue or Glass Sparkle Black and Glass Matte Mechanical Gray. MSRP is $12,849. Visit the Suzuki website for more details.

GSX-R600 – The 2023 GSX-R600 underscores the GSX-R’s tradition of blending championship-winning track performance with impeccable handling.

The GSX-R600’s compact, four-cylinder engine reacts with vigor when a rider demands it, while its supremely refined suspension and brakes provide precise, responsive confidence-inspiring handling. The superb ergonomics enhance rider control and comfort, and the iconic GSX-R bodywork delivers an agile look.

2023 Suzuki GSX-R600 in Glass Sparkle Black and Glass Matte Mechanical Gray
2023 Suzuki GSX-R600 in Glass Sparkle Black and Glass Matte Mechanical Gray.

The GSX-R600’s race-ready look isn’t manufactured, it’s the byproduct of the GSX-R’s multiple decades of producing road racing dominance. The Suzuki GSX-R600 is designed for riders considering a mid-size supersport bike at home, on the track, or on the street. 

Key features for the 2023 Suzuki GSX-R600 include:

  • Iconic, GSX-R styling with three distinctive paint schemes.
  • Fuel-injected, 599cc, 4-cylinder engine delivering championship-delivering power from idle to redline.
  • Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (S-DMS) lets the rider adjust the power delivery.
  • Twin-spar aluminum frame and Showa Big Piston Fork deliver exceptional handling.
  • Twin Brembo Monobloc, radially mounted front brakes deliver strong stopping power.
2023 Suzuki GSX-R600 in Metallic Triton Blue and Metallic Mystic Silver
2023 Suzuki GSX-R600 in Metallic Triton Blue and Metallic Mystic Silver.
2023 Suzuki GSX-R600 in Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue
2023 Suzuki GSX-R600 in Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue.

Paint options include Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue, Glass Sparkle Black and Glass Matte Mechanical Gray, and Suzuki’s historic Metallic Triton Blue and Metallic Mystic Silver paint scheme. MSRP is $11,699. Click here for more details.

2023 Suzuki GSX-S

GSX-S1000 – The 2023 GSX-S1000 now aims to deliver greater controllability, agility, and power while complying with worldwide emissions standards. The GSX-S1000’s physique comes in a tight and striking package.

2023 Suzuki GSX-S1000 in Glass Sparkle Black
2023 Suzuki GSX-S1000 in new Glass Sparkle Black.

The GSX-S1000’s styling features include stacked LED headlights housed in a minimalistic cowling that resides between a pair of MotoGP-inspired winglets protruding from the angular radiator shrouds.

Related Story: 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 | Road Test Review

Riders can keep that power of the GSX-R-based engine under control with the electronic Ride-by-Wire throttle bodies and the latest version of the Suzuki Clutch Assist System (SCAS) that smooths shifting and engine braking.

There’s more GSX-R DNA in the chassis with its aluminum, twin-spar frame design, and superbike-braced swingarm. The suspension features a fully adjustable, inverted KYB fork and easy-to-adjust rear shock. Stopping performance is stellar via the dual, ABS-equipped, radial-mounted, four-piston Brembo front brake calipers and 310mm floating rotors. Wider than the prior generation model, the cast-aluminum handlebar provides a comfortable reach and the proper leverage to hustle the GSX-S1000 through the corners and maneuver in tight city streets and traffic.

Related Story: 2022 Motorcycle of the Year

The 2023 GSX-S1000 has the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (S.I.R.S.) in its corner. Make this bike your own using the three-mode Suzuki Drive Mode Selector and the five-mode (and OFF) Advanced Traction Control System. Give your clutch hand a rest with the Bi-Directional Quick Shift system. Suzuki’s popular Easy Start and Low RPM Assist systems get the fun started without any hassle.

2023 Suzuki GSX-S1000 in Metallic Triton Blue
2023 Suzuki GSX-S1000 in Metallic Triton Blue.

The 2023 GSX-S1000 comes in Metallic Triton Blue and the new Glass Sparkle Black. MSRP is $11,499. Visit the Suzuki website for more details.

2023 Suzuki SV650 and V-Strom 650 Adventure Series

SV650/SV650 ABS – Since the first SV650 launched in 1999, this iconic middleweight has seen continual improvements while still embodying the sporty ride, precise feel, and riding versatility and prowess only a provocative, mid-sized V-twin roadster delivers. 

2023 Suzuki SV650 ABS in Metallic Reflective Blue
2023 Suzuki SV650 ABS in Metallic Reflective Blue.

The 2023 SV650 and SV650 ABS use an entertaining and refined engine delivering torquey middleweight performance, low emissions, and outstanding fuel economy. This enjoyable V-twin mill is mounted in a trim and lightweight chassis delivering a keen and spirited riding experience.

For 2023, the SV650 is available in Glass Sparkle Black and Solid Iron Gray bodywork, while the SV650 ABS features Metallic Reflective Blue bodywork.

Related Story: 2017 Suzuki SV650 | First Ride Review

Both SV650s’ great looks and sparkling performance deliver sportbike-like handling, exceedingly great value, and riding versatility that a broad range of riders continues to embrace, whether they are new to the sport, growing their riding skills or avid road racers; the confidence-inspiring Suzuki SV650 is their ideal ride.

2023 Suzuki SV650 in Glass Sparkle Black and Solid Iron Gray
2023 Suzuki SV650 in Glass Sparkle Black and Solid Iron Gray.

Key features of the 2023 Suzuki SV650/ABS include:

  • Liquid-cooled, 645cc, 4-stroke, DOHC, V-twin engine delivers inspired performance.
  • Suzuki EFI system with Low RPM Assist makes takeoffs smooth and pleasant.
  • Steel trellis-style frame blends low weight and strength for nimble handling.
  • Slim bodywork is aesthetically pleasing while aiding comfort and maneuverability.
  • Dual 4-piston front brake calipers and compact ABS** system (SV650 ABS) help provide great stopping performance.

V-Strom 650XT Adventure – Point the iconic Suzuki DR-BIG-inspired beak of the V-Strom at the horizon as the 37L quick-release aluminum panniers, rugged accessory bar, handlebar cross-brace, and mirror extensions are standard equipment. Finished with deep, Glass Sparkle Black paint, the 2023 V-Strom 650XT Adventure performs on tubeless-spoke wheels with blue-anodized rims conveying style, strength, and performance.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT Adventure in Glass Sparkle Black
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT Adventure in Glass Sparkle Black.

Loaded with intelligent features and ready for any adventure, the V-Strom 650XT Adventure continues the V-Strom legacy of offering a fun, agile, adventurous motorcycle providing unmatched versatility. The engine delivers stellar performance and great fuel economy while achieving worldwide emission standards. Suzuki’s proven engineering delivers a bike with low weight and a trim chassis, creating a V-Strom 650XT Adventure that does so many things so well, this bike could be called the Swiss Army Knife of motorcycles.

MSRP is $10,799. Visit the Suzuki website for more details.

V-Strom 650XT – Riders love the Suzuki V-Strom 650XT for its unique merger of a lightweight chassis coupled with an exciting liquid-cooled, 90-degree, 650cc, V-twin engine. A merger that creates a perfectly balanced motorcycle capable of delivering excitement, comfort, and confidence on every ride.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT in Pearl Brilliant White
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT in Pearl Brilliant White.

Related Story: 2018 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT vs V-Strom 1000XT | Comparison Review

V-Strom 650XT riders see it delivering on motorcycling adventure while bringing a big dose of intelligence and versatility. The 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT comes in a Pearl Brilliant White livery and is complemented by hand guards, a lower engine cowl, as well as spoke-style gold-anodized wheels mounting tubeless radial dual-sport tires.

MSRP is $9,599. Visit the Suzuki website for more details.

V-Strom 650 –The Suzuki V-Strom 650 is the perfect motorcycle for riders looking for versatility, real-world performance, and exceptional value. The 2023 V-Strom 650’s perfect blend of V-twin performance in a strong, yet lightweight chassis that delivers thrilling rides and cost-effective fun like no other adventure tourer on the scene today.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 650 in Pearl Vigor Blue and Metallic Matte Sword Silver
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 650 in Pearl Vigor Blue and Metallic Matte Sword Silver.

Related Story: 2017 Suzuki V-Strom 650 | Road Test Review

The 2023 V-Strom 650 rocks Suzuki’s beautiful Pearl Vigor Blue and Metallic Matte Sword Silver paint complemented with black accents giving this model runway-level attractiveness. The beak-style fairing, with vertically stacked headlights, augments the V-Strom 650’s aerodynamic prowess while protecting the rider in style. Light and strong 10-spoke cast wheels shod with Adventure-spec Bridgestone Battlax 19-inch front and 17-inch rear tubeless radial tires are great for all-around performance.

MSRP is $9,104. Visit the Suzuki website for more details.

2023 Suzuki Burgman 400 Scooter

Already the leader in its category, the 2023 Suzuki Burgman 400 continues with a host of styling, technical, and feature updates galvanizing its reputation as the Elegant Athlete of the scooter world. The Burgman 400’s slim and sharp styling features a new Solid Iron Gray paint scheme combined with blue wheels and seat stitching that pay classy homage to Suzuki’s on-road championship heritage.

2023-Suzuki-Burgman-400-in-Solid-Iron-Gray
2023 Suzuki Burgman 400 in Solid Iron Gray.

The Burgman’s nose and tail blend sophisticated styling with full LED function, as the dual headlights have integrated position lights, while the rear combination taillight elegantly blends with the smooth bodywork. Functional design is brought to the well-thought-out instrument panel. Riding range and real-time fuel consumption indicators also may help the rider conserve fuel.

Related Story: 2018 Suzuki Burgman 400 | First Ride Review

The Burgman’s strong and responsive 400cc engine has a revised camshaft profile and a dual-spark technology ignition system achieving worldwide emissions standards while offering impressive fuel economy and highway riding power.

Similar to systems used on Suzuki’s V-Strom 650 adventure tourer and GSX-S750 street bikes, the Burgman features a rider-selectable Traction Control system offering the rider peace of mind and excellent road-holding ability in a variety of road conditions. Suzuki’s Easy Start System is a standard Burgman feature, so a simple, momentary press of the starter button starts the engine, while the fuel injection maintains a steady, smooth idle under all conditions.

The large-diameter 15-inch cast front wheel helps increase stability while enhancing the Burgman 400’s visual appearance and carries a pair of 260mm disc brake rotors. The 13-inch rear wheel has a 210mm hydraulic disc brake for reliable stopping control. The Anti-lock Brake System (ABS) monitors wheel speeds and hydraulic pressure hundreds of times per second to help provide stopping power that matches the available traction.

MSRP is $8,599. Visit the Suzuki website for more details.

To see Suzuki’s full motorcycle lineup or to find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit the Suzuki website.

The post Suzuki Announces 2023 Lineup of Sport, Street, and Adventure Bikes first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Suzuki: Big Changes Coming to the SV650’s V-Heart

From the MotoGP circuit to her recent about-face into sustainability, Suzuki has been more than a little busy – and now, we’ve just had notice that the Japanese bike marque could be punting out a new engine. 

The updates will likely put her next host smack into the likes of Yammie’s MT-07, KTM’s 790/890, Aprilia’s RS660/Tuono660, and other units in the middleweight sector – so let’s dive under the proverbial hood and get into it. 

Suzuki's SV650. Media sourced from CycleWorld.
Suzuki’s SV650. Media sourced from CycleWorld.

According to a report from RideApart, the piece being tested is a parallel-twin engine, and it’s been seen in the chassis of what appears to be some kind of new SV650. 

This wouldn’t be a bad idea; Suzuki’s SV650 has been stealing hearts across the county for years due to her bulletproof build, her torquey personality, the low seat height and even lower bang-for-buck qualities. 

One thing’s for sure – if they’re going to put a parallel into an SV650, they better do something about the name, and stat.

Parallel650 would be laughable. 

Yamaha's all-new YZF-R1 GYTR/GYTRPro. Media sourced from Motorcycle.com.
Suzuki's SV650. Media sourced from Ultimate Motorcycling.
Suzuki’s SV650. Media sourced from Ultimate Motorcycling.

Expect this bike, when debuted, to bean out a rough 700-800cc’s, which translates to more than 75 pretty ponies.

Like what you see?

Suzuki's SV650. Media sourced from Top Speed.
Suzuki’s SV650. Media sourced from Top Speed.

Be sure to check back for updates; drop a comment below letting us know what you think, and as ever – stay safe on the twisties. 

*Media sourced from Suzuki, as well as Top Speed, Medium and CycleWorld*

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

2023 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

This 2023 motorcycle buyers guide highlights new or significantly updated street-legal models available in the U.S. So far, only a few 2023 models have been announced, mostly adventure bikes, and we’ve had a chance to test several of them. We include a couple of 2024 teasers too. We will continually update the guide as new models are available, so be sure to bookmark this page and check back often.

Related Story: 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

Organized in alphabetical order by manufacturer, our guide includes photos, pricing, key update info, and links to first looks and – when available – first rides, road tests, and video reviews of each motorcycle.

2024 Can-Am Origin

Can-Am Electric Motorcycle Pulse Origin
Can-Am Origin

OK, we’ve gotten a bit ahead of ourselves with this one since the earliest you can buy it will be mid-2024. At the annual Club BRP event in August2, Can-Am unveiled two all-new, all-electric motorcycles – the Origin dual-sport and the Pulse roadster (below). Detailed specs won’t be provided until mid-2023 (at Can-Am’s 50th anniversary celebration), but both will be powered by BRP’s all-new, proprietary Rotax E-Power technology, said to provide “highway-worthy speeds with plenty of horsepower and torque.”

The Can-Am Origin has rally-style bodywork, fork guards, and spoked wheels, in diameters that appear to be 21 inches in front and 18 inches out back, common sizes for off-road tires. The final drive is enclosed, and Can-Am reps would not reveal whether power is sent to the rear wheel via chain (used on nearly all dual-sports) or belt (used on many production electric bikes).

Read our Can-Am Origin and Pulse First Look Review

2024 Can-Am Pulse

Can-Am Electric Motorcycle Pulse Origin
Can-Am Pulse

The Can-Am Pulse has the muscular stance of a streetfighter, with racy-looking cast wheels shod with sportbike rubber and a sculpted “tank” that keeps the bike’s profile in line with conventional gas-powered motorcycles. The Origin dual-sport (above) and Pulse roadster share key design elements: distinctive LED headlights, large TFT displays, edgy white and gray bodywork, a bright yellow panel covering their battery packs, inverted forks, single-sided swingarms, single-disc brakes front and rear, and solo seats. Rear cowls may cover pillion seats; passenger footpegs are not visible on either machine, but production versions will likely have passenger accommodations.

Read our Can-Am Origin and Pulse First Look Review

2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura

2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura T
2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura T

The 2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura is powered by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve 799cc parallel-Twin borrowed from the previous-generation KTM 790 Adventure and makes a claimed 95 hp and 57 lb-ft of torque. Equipped with throttle-by-wire, it has two ride modes (Sport and Rain) and cruise control. It has a chromoly-steel frame, fully adjustable KYB suspension, J. Juan triple-disc brakes with cornering ABS, and a 7-inch TFT display.

The base-model 800 ADVentura S (for Street) has cast wheels and an MSRP of $9,499. The up-spec 800 ADVentura T (for Terrain, shown above) has spoked wheels, a quickshifter, a tire-pressure monitoring system, a steering damper, a skid plate, crash bars, handguards, and a centerstand. MSRP is $10,499. They should be available in late 2022 or early 2023.

Read our 2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura First Ride Review

2023 KTM 450 SMR

2023 KTM 450 SMR
2023 KTM 450 SMR

Designed for the track only, the 2023 KTM 450 SMR has a 449.9cc liquid-cooled, SOHC Single putting out a claimed 63 hp, and the engine weighs just 59.5 lb, nearly a pound lighter than the previous model. In addition to the features riders already love about the KTM 450 SMR (read our review of the 2021 model here), the 2023 model includes a redesigned Pankl Racing Systems 5-speed gearbox and a new Quickshift sensor on the shift drum for clutchless upshifts, which can be disabled through the handlebar switch.

Other updates for the 2023 KTM 450 SMR include a revised shock mount, redesigned high-grade aluminum CNC-machined triple clamps offering increased grip surface, altered longitudinal and torsional flex and frame-wall thickness, suspension updates, revised ergonomics, and more. KTM is still only listing the 2022 model pricing of $11,999.

Read our 2023 KTM 450 SMR First Look Review

2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar

2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar
2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar

Harley-Davidson and its LiveWire brand have introduced the second all-electric model, the 2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar, which is smaller, lighter, and less expensive than the LiveWire ONE.

Related Story: 2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire | First Ride Review

The street-tracker is said to produce 80 hp and weigh less than 440 lbs, yielding a 0-60-mph time of just 3.5 seconds. City range is said to be 100 miles, and highway range will be significantly lower.

LiveWire offered 100 serialized “Del Mar Launch Edition” models (shown above) with an exclusive paint scheme and a unique wheel design for $17,699, but all were sold out in the first 18 minutes. Those who missed the opportunity can get their name on a waiting list for when regular production models ($15,000) are available in the spring of 2023.

Read our 2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mark First Look Review

2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411

2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411
2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411

The 2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411 brings scrambler styling to the Himalayan adventure bike platform, which was updated for 2022. It’s powered by an air-cooled 411cc single-cylinder engine carried in a Harris Performance chassis. Royal Enfield says the Scram 411’s versatile geometry and comfortable ergonomics give the lightweight bike a unique combination of on-road agility and capability on trails. It’s available in nine different color/style configurations, and MSRP is $5,099.

Read our 2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411 First Ride Review

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050

The 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 has a liquid-cooled, 1,037cc 90-degree V-Twin. When we tested the 2020 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT, it made 96 hp at 8,500 rpm and 66 lb-ft of torque at 6,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno. The 2023 V-Strom 1050 has a 6-speed gearbox with higher 1st and 6th ratios, an updated throttle-by-wire system, a new ABS control unit, a new CAN (Controller Area Network) wiring system, and a new 32-bit ECM (Engine Control Module).

The new V-Strom 1050 also includes many features previously only available on the XT models, including a 6-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (SIRS) electronics suite – which includes ride modes, cornering ABS, multimode traction control, cruise control, and braking systems that compensate for hill starts, slope, and load – as well as an up/down quickshifter, a new 5-inch TFT display, a new windscreen, and more. Pricing has yet to be announced.

Read our 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 1050DE First Look Review

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE and V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

The 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE and 1050DE Adventure share the same engine as the 2023 Suzuki V-Strom, as well as the new and updated features of the V-Strom (see above) and will replace the previous V-Strom 1050XT and V-Strom 1050XT Adventure models.

However, the DE models are more geared toward off-road adventures, featuring a 21-inch front wheel with a tube-type rim for maximum durability, a 17-inch tubeless rear wheel, and Dunlop Trailmax Mixtour adventure tires. They also add a new Gravity (G) traction control option in the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, the ability to switch off ABS at the rear wheel, their own dedicated chassis geometry and suspension system, a longer swingarm, and other adventure motorcycle-specific offerings. The DE Adventure adds a set of 37-liter aluminum panniers with an anodized silver finish that attach to powdercoated, stainless-steel carriers. Pricing has yet to be announced.

Read our 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 1050DE First Look Review

2023 Triumph Tiger 1200

2023 Triumph Tiger 1200 GT Pro
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200 GT Pro. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

The folks in Hinckley have been busy. They’ve shaved 55 pounds off the new 2023 Triumph Tiger 1200, given it a 147-hp Triple, and equipped it with an all-new chassis and electronics.⁠ Five variants are available: the street-focused GT ($19,100), GT Pro ($21,400), and GT Explorer ($23,100) and the off-road-ready Rally Pro ($22,500) and Rally Explorer ($24,200).⁠

Read our 2023 Triumph Tiger 1200 First Ride Review

The post 2023 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 1050DE | First Look Review

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE

Following the June announcement of returning sport, dual-sport, supermoto, and off-road motorcycles for 2023, Suzuki has announced new and updated models in its V-Strom adventure lineup: the 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050, 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE, and 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure.

Suzuki’s 2022 lineup included the standard V-Strom 1050 and the up-spec V-Strom 1050XT and V-Strom 1050XT Adventure, with the Adventure version featuring aluminum panniers, fog lamps, and heated grips.

Related Story: Suzuki Announces 2022 Returning Models

For 2023, the V-Strom 1050 returns with numerous updates, and the V-Strom 1050XT and V-Strom 1050XT Adventure will be replaced by the V-Strom 1050DE and V-Strom 1050DE Adventure.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

Previously available only on the XT models, all V-Strom 1050 models now feature a 6-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (SIRS) electronics suite, which includes ride modes, cornering ABS, multimode traction control, cruise control, and braking systems that compensate for hill starts, slope, and load. Supporting these electronic systems are an updated throttle-by-wire system, a new ABS control unit, a new CAN (Controller Area Network) wiring system, and a new 32-bit ECM (Engine Control Module).

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 (with optional accessories)

Other changes common to all V-Strom 1050 models include an up/down quickshifter, a new 5-inch TFT display, a new windscreen that’s hand-adjustable to 11 different positions over a 2-inch height range, a new 12-volt power outlet under the passenger seat, revised mirrors, and revised LED turnsignals and taillight.

The standard V-Strom 1050 features a new dual-height seat (33.7/34.5 inches), while the V-Strom 1050DE and V-Strom 1050DE Adventure models feature a new fixed-height seat (34.6 inches).

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050

Inside the engine are new sodium-filled exhaust valves, which reduce temperature in the combustion chamber for improved flow efficiency and durability. The 6-speed transmission has higher ratios for 1st and 6th gears that smooth the shift action into second and higher gears and contribute to smooth operation of the quickshifter.

V-Strom 1050 models use durable steel sprockets and feature a new stronger and longer O-ring drive chain. Under the bike is a new cowl that protects the oil filter, exhaust header, and engine, as well as a more sure-footed centerstand.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050

All V-Strom 1050 models are powered by a liquid-cooled, 1,037cc 90-degree V-Twin. When we tested the 2020 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT, it made 96 hp at 8,500 rpm and 66 lb-ft of torque at 6,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno. The 1050XT has a 5.3-gallon fuel capacity, and during our 2020 test, we averaged 49.8 mpg and 264 miles of range.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE and V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE

Joining the standard V-Strom 1050 are the new V-Strom 1050DE and V-Strom 1050DE Adventure, which are geared toward more off-road-oriented adventures. The DE models feature a 21-inch front wheel for rolling over obstacles with a tube-type rim for maximum durability. The 17-inch rear wheel is tubeless, and the DE models are shod with Dunlop Trailmax Mixtour adventure tires.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

To improve control and handling off-road, the DE models have unique features in the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (SIRS), including new Gravel (G) traction control and the ability to switch off ABS at the rear wheel. They also get their own dedicated chassis geometry with a longer wheelbase (62.8 inches vs. 61.2 on the standard V-Strom 1050), longer rake (27.3 degrees vs. 25.4 degrees), more trail (4.96 inches vs. 4.33), more ground clearance (7.5 inches vs. 6.5), and a handlebar grip that is 1.6 inches wider.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

To further enhance their off-road capabilities, the DE models get a dedicated suspension system with unique spring rates, damping force valving, and piston settings. The adjustable 43mm inverted fork and rear monoshock also have more suspension travel than the standard V-Strom 1050, with 6.7 inches of front travel (vs. 6.3) and 6.6 inches of rear travel (vs. 6.3).

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE

For added stability, the DE models also have a longer swingarm with 10% more torsional rigidity. They also feature a new three-piece front fender assembly that combines the effectiveness of a conventional fender with the protection of fork guards like those used on a motocross bike.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

To maximize visibility during off-road riding, the V-Strom 1050DE and V-Strom 1050DE Adventure have a unique smaller windscreen, which is more than 3 inches shorter and slightly narrower than the V-Strom 1050 windscreen. The wider handlebar on the DE models is cast in thicker tubing from a softer grade of aluminum than the V-Strom 1050 handlebar, which allows more flex and better shock absorption.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

The DE models feature a new, more durable fixed-height seat (34.6 inches) with a new bottom shape that increases rigidity while reducing weight by 1.5 lb (a 37% reduction in mass). According to Suzuki, the rider and pillion seats provide a comfortable upright riding position, and the sides of both seats are covered with high-grip texture material to help the rider and passenger stay connected to the motorcycle.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

Given their higher stance, the V-Strom 1050DE and the V-Strom 1050DE Adventure feature longer, model-specific sidestands and centerstands. They also feature a new engine protector made of 3mm-thick aluminum plate that shields the front and bottom of the frame, exhaust header, and engine from trail debris.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE

Unique to the V-Strom 1050DE Adventure are a set of 37-liter aluminum panniers with an anodized silver finish that attach to powdercoated, stainless-steel carriers. Constructed from 1.5mm-thick aluminum plates with strong, no-pierce rivet technology, the panniers feature hinged lids that stay in place when open, internal and external tie-down points, keyed stainless-steel latches, and quick-release hardware. Built to be waterproof with rubber-sealing lids, the panniers have powdercoated interiors that avoid transferring aluminum stains to cargo.

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

The 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 will be available in Metallic Reflective Blue / Metallic Matte Black with black wheels, the 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE will be available in Pearl Vigor Blue / Pearl Brilliant White with blue rims, and the 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure will be available in Champion Yellow No. 2 / Metallic Matte Sword Silver with gold rims.

Pricing and availability have not yet been announced. For more information, visit the SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 1050DE | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

This ‘SuperBusa’ is “The Fastest Hayabusa You Can Buy Today”

TTS Performance has collaborated with KarDesignConcepts to bring you the ultimate ‘Busa – and considering the former is a specialist in superchargers, you can imagine the pony power to play with in the final project. 

For this kit, the two teams took a factory ‘Busa and added forged engine parts and a full-system Brocks exhaust to a TTS Rotrex supercharger conversion package, bumping the power up from 187bhp to a stunning 370bhp, or 375hp. 

A view of the SuperBusa, a new machine with a bonkers supercharger conversion kit+. Media courtesy of Top Speed.
A view of the SuperBusa, a new machine with a bonkers supercharger conversion kit+. Media courtesy of Top Speed.

The masterminds also added CF winglets, CF intercooler tank vents, a CF drive cover and a revalved front suspension with titanium clippers. 

All of this rides on 330mm StopTech front discs (and a lightweight TTS rear disc), with the report from Top Speed pointing out the obvious perk of a build like this:
“What’s even more impressive is the fact that everything is tightly wound together and the Hayabusa appears rather normal from most angles.”

“To achieve this, TTS has housed the intercooler under the stock fuel tank while directing the air via carbon fiber ducts integrated in the fuel tank.”

A view of the SuperBusa, a new machine with a bonkers supercharger conversion kit+. Media courtesy of Top Speed.
A view of the SuperBusa, a new machine with a bonkers supercharger conversion kit+. Media courtesy of Top Speed.

Naturally, the SuperBusas will also feature carbon wheels. A single-sided swingarm, and a taller windscreen to keep aerodynamics playing nicey-nice. 

Marc Marquez with his Honda racebikje in the background. Media sourced from The Guardian.

Curious what this kit will cost you?

A view of the SuperBusa, a new machine with a bonkers supercharger conversion kit+. Media courtesy of Top Speed.
A view of the SuperBusa, a new machine with a bonkers supercharger conversion kit+. Media courtesy of Top Speed.

According to TTS, you’re looking at $35,500 USD, which excludes the price of the bike; given the teams’ prerogative to make only 40 of these beautiful beasts, we’re expecting the limited run to run out soon, so be sure to head over to their website and take a gander at what’s left. 

Drop a comment below letting us kow what you think, and as ever – stay safe on the twisties. 

*Media sourced from Top Speed*

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT | Road Test Review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Suzuki’s all-new GSX-S1000GT+ is a street-tuned sportbike that’s outfitted for touring with a fairing and windscreen, comfortable rider and passenger accommodations, and 36-liter side cases. Photos by Kevin Wing.

Suzuki is helping sport-tourers make a comeback. With the rise of adventure bikes over the past decade, sport-tourers got shoved aside, relegated to the dark corners of showroom floors. Development cycles stretched out, and model updates became few and far between. That’s a shame. Not everyone wants a motorcycle with a 19-inch front wheel, a 34-inch seat height, and a jungle gym’s worth of crash bars.

Check out Rider‘s 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

As the name implies, sport-tourers combine go-fast performance and touring prowess into a single package. What’s not to love about a superbike engine tuned for the street, a chassis built for both speed and comfort, and ergonomics that won’t make you cry uncle after an hour in the saddle? With their 17-inch wheels shod with grippy radials, sport-tourers love to lean, and modern electronic rider aids help keep things in check.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The GSX-S1000GT and GT+ are available in Metallic Reflective Blue or Glass Sparkle Black.

Enter the new-for-2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT ($13,149) and GSX-S1000GT+ ($13,799), the latter distinguished by its color-matched side cases. Color options are the Metallic Reflective Blue of our test bike or Glass Sparkle Black. The GT is built on the same platform as the GSX-S1000 naked sportbike we tested recently. But unlike the GSX-S1000F that was in Suzuki’s lineup until 2020, which was little more than a GSX-S1000 with a fairing bolted on, the GT is a true grand tourer.

Look Good, Feel Good

The GT’s bodywork is distinctive and angular, with a wedge-shaped front fairing that juts sharply forward and houses a V-shaped LED position light and a pair of mono-focus LED headlights (for low beam, only the right lamp is illuminated). Attached to the top of the fairing are mirrors perched on the ends of long stalks and a nonadjustable windscreen. Lower fairing panels keep the radiator and much of the engine hidden, and they are vented to pull hot air out and away from the cockpit.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Compared to the GSX-S1000F, the GSX-S1000GT’s handlebar is 0.9 inch wider and 0.6 inch closer to the rider.

GEAR UP:
Helmet: Scorpion EXO-R1 Air
Jacket: Scorpion Optima
Gloves: Scorpion Havoc
Pants: Scorpion Covert Pro Jeans
Boots: Sidi Gavia Gore-Tex

Two-up comfort was an important consideration in the GT’s development. All the rider and passenger touchpoints – the handlebar, footpegs, and rear grab handles – are rubber-damped to minimize vibration. Compared to the GSX-S1000F, the handlebar is 0.9 inch wider and 0.6 inch closer to the rider, allowing for more steering leverage and a nearly upright seating position. The wide, slightly dished rider’s seat sits 31.9 inches off the deck and is comfortable enough for long days in the saddle. A sporty amount of cornering clearance necessitated high placement of the footpegs, sacrificing some legroom, and they are positioned just below the rider’s hips.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The $650 upcharge for the GT+ adds lockable, removable, weather-proof, color-matched saddlebags.

Seat height for the passenger is 34.2 inches, and the 2.3-inch boost in height provides a better view over the rider’s shoulders. Large grab handles allow the passenger to hold on securely to the bike rather than just a strap on the seat or the rider’s hips. Both the front and rear seats have thick, supportive foam and are covered in a slightly grippy weather-resistant material.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Each 36-liter saddlebag is large enough to hold most full-face helmets.

To accommodate the added weight of a passenger and luggage, the GT has a trellis-style subframe that provides both strength and visual flair. The GSX-S1000GT+ comes standard with side cases that hold 36 liters (and up to 11 lbs) on each side, and they’re large enough to fit most full-face helmets. The saddlebags are easy to open, close, lock, remove, and reinstall, and they are keyed to the ignition. The only downside is that they cannot be left unlocked for quick access.

Paying the $650 premium for the GT+ is money well-spent. High-quality, lockable, removable, weatherproof saddlebags are undeniably convenient and practical. And buying the cases and necessary hardware as standalone accessories will set you back more than $1,000.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The GT is the first Suzuki to be offered with a TFT display. The default screen has an analog-style tach, digital speedo, and other info.

To further enhance the GT’s touring ability, Suzuki gave the bike a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display, all-new switchgear, and Bluetooth connectivity. The TFT has a large analog-style tachometer, a digital speedometer, and a fuel gauge on the left side, as well as an array of bike and trip info on the right. It also has a sensor that automatically switches the background from white in bright light to black in low light.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Pairing Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app provides access to contacts, phone, maps, music, and calendar.
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The mySPIN app enables turn-by-turn navigation using REVER and other apps.

Buttons on the left switchgear allow the rider to adjust settings and navigate menus. Installing the Suzuki mySPIN smartphone app and pairing via Bluetooth provides access to contacts, phone, maps, music, and calendar functions, which are displayed on the TFT screen. You’ll need a Bluetooth helmet headset to make/receive calls, listen to music, or hear turn-by-turn directions. A USB port on the dash provides on-the-go charging for devices.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The GSX-S1000GT’s new switchgear is user-friendly.

In Thrust We Trust

Like the GSX-S1000, the GT is powered by a 999cc in-line Four adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5 (2005-2008). It’s been retuned to make the engine more suitable for the street, but there’s still plenty of heat in the kitchen. On Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno, the GSX-S1000 churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm. Updates to the engine include new camshaft profiles, new valve springs, new throttle bodies, a revised airbox, and a Euro 5-compliant 4-2-1 exhaust. Together, they result in an extra 2 hp at the peak and smoother horsepower and torque curves.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably. Slaloming back and forth on a series of curves with grace and confidence requires accurate additions and subtractions of fuel and air, and the Suzuki mixes them perfectly. Using a throttle-by-wire system, turning the right grip directly activates the throttle position sensor, which sends instantaneous signals to a servo motor that precisely moves the throttle plates. Throttle response is further enhanced by a long, tapered intake tract that is narrower at the bottom where the 10-hole injectors are located.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
Bending the GSX-S1000GT+ through a series of fast curves is pure pleasure.

The GT’s throttle-by-wire also enables the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes (Active, Basic, and Comfort) that adjust throttle response and power delivery, 5-level traction control, cruise control, and Suzuki’s Easy Start, Low RPM Assist, and Bi-Directional Quick Shift systems. ABS is also part of the electronics package, but with no IMU, neither it nor the TC are lean-angle adaptive. The 6-speed transmission has a cable-actuated slip/assist clutch. Gear changes using the quickshifter are fast and smooth, and clutch action is light with predictable engagement. Both the clutch and brake levers are adjustable for reach.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

Being derived from a Superbike championship-winning sportbike like the GSX-R1000, the GSX-S1000GT has a massive twin-spar cast-aluminum frame that surrounds the engine and attaches to a cast-aluminum swingarm. KYB suspension – a fully adjustable 43mm inverted fork and a link-type rear shock that’s adjustable for preload and rebound – is taut yet comfortable.

Brembo 4-piston radial-mount monoblock front calipers are mated to fully floating 310mm rotors, and they offer strong power and precise feedback. A Nissin 1-piston rear caliper squeezes a 240mm disc. The GT rolls on six-spoke, 17-inch cast-aluminum wheels shod with Dunlop Roadsmart 2 sport-touring radials that deliver reliable grip and neutral cornering behavior.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review
The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT is a finely tuned instrument of performance. Its in-line Four is uncommonly smooth with a linear powerband, its throttle-by-wire system provides a tight, direct connection between the right grip and the rear wheel, and the quickshifter is one of the slickest we’ve ever used

On the Road Again

Suzuki hosted a two-day press launch for the GSX-S1000GT+, with a test route that started and ended at its U.S. headquarters in Brea, California. Back-to-back 300-mile days gave us a chance to thoroughly evaluate the GT in a wide range of conditions, including traffic-choked freeways, wide-open highways, and tight, technical backroads. We followed that up with more miles on a test bike over several weeks on home turf.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

The qualities that impressed us about the GSX-S1000 – impeccable smoothness, predictable handling, unflappable stability, and linear power delivery – carry over to its GT sibling. Likewise, its braking and suspension components and electronic rider aids were selected to deliver sporting performance without inflating the retail price.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

Where the GT really stands out is its rider and passenger comfort, cruise control, instrumentation and connectivity, and, on the GT+, stylish and useful saddlebags. Weighing in at 521 lbs with its 5-gal. tank full, the GT+ is much lighter than open-class sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT (615 lbs), Yamaha FJR1300ES (644 lbs), and Kawasaki Concours 14 (691 lbs). It weighs more than the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT (503 lbs) but makes significantly more rear-wheel horsepower (136 vs. 108). With its cornering ABS and TC and semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT also costs $1,200 more than the GSX-S1000GT+ ($14,999 vs. $13,799).

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

If the GT has one notable shortcoming, it’s the nonadjustable windscreen. Though Suzuki says it and the bodywork were developed in a wind tunnel, airflow over the windscreen hit me square in the chest and created a lot of turbulence around my helmet. Of course, the size of the rider plays a role in aerodynamics (I’m 6 feet tall), but the lack of height adjustability means you get what you get. Suzuki makes an accessory touring windscreen ($169.95) that is 2.75 inches taller and has a more vertical pitch near the top, but one was not available during our test.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

Other available accessories include heated grips, a two-tone rider’s seat with a suede-like cover embossed with the GSX-S GT logo, axle sliders, ring-lock tankbags (small and large), tank pads and protectors, and wheel rim decals.

We’re glad to see Suzuki helping bring the sport-touring class to its former glory. The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ Specs

Base Price: $13,149 (GT)
Price as Tested: $13,799 (GT+ w/ 36L side cases)
Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
Website: suzukicycles.com
ENGINE
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse in-line Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 999cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm
Compression Ratio: 12.2:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 15,000 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ throttle-by-wire, 40mm throttle bodies x 4
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.6 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
CHASSIS
Frame: Twin-spar cast aluminum frame & swingarm
Wheelbase: 57.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm inverted fork, fully adj., 4.7 in. travel
Rear: Single linkage shock, adj. spring preload & rebound, 5.1 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 310mm floating discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.5 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast, 6.0 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 190/50-ZR17
Wet Weight: 521 lbs (as tested)
Load Capacity: 405 lbs (as tested)
GVWR: 926 lbs
PERFORMANCE
Horsepower: 136 hp @ 10,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 73 lb-ft @ 9,300 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 35.5 mpg
Estimated Range: 178 miles

The post 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 | Road Test Review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
The updated 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 received engine updates, new electronics, all-new styling, improved ergonomics, and more. Photos by Kevin Wing.

Engine development is the costliest aspect of designing a new motorcycle. Manufacturers, always vigilant about the bottom line, sometimes spread out these costs by using the same engine in multiple models. The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is built around the 999cc inline-Four originally from the GSX-R1000 K5 (2005-2008), which won multiple AMA Superbike championships. Advantages of the K5 engine include a long-stroke design that delivers strong low and midrange power, a crankshaft/gearbox configuration that allows the twin-spar frame to run directly from the steering head to the swingarm pivot, and a proven track record of performance and reliability.

Check out Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is available in Metallic Matte Mechanical Gray with black wheels (on left) and in a Metallic Triton Blue paint scheme inspired by Suzuki’s MotoGP race livery with color-matched wheels.

When the GSX-S1000 debuted for 2016, it was available in a naked version and a faired “F” version. Because the GSX-S was a sportbike designed for the street rather than the track, its detuned engine made less peak power than the GSX-R it was based on. Cam profiles and valve timing were mellower. Valves and the exhaust were made of steel rather than titanium. The tradeoff was a less expensive bike that was easier to live with thanks in large part to its more relaxed ergonomics.

Over time, successful spin-off models – like the Suzuki V-Strom 650 that was derived from the SV650 – take on a life of their own and follow their own development path. That’s the case with the GSX-S1000, which has been thoroughly overhauled for 2022 and is joined by two new sport-touring models, the GSX-S1000GT and saddle-bags-equipped GSX-S1000GT+ (we’ll have a test of the latter soon).

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Steering leverage and comfort are aided by a handlebar that’s wider and closer to the rider.

Visually, the new GSX-S1000 has much more aggressive, sharp-edged bodywork than its predecessor. It has angular panels flanking the larger fuel tank (5 gals., up from 4.5) and radiator, small MotoGP-style winglets, and a stacked headlight array that juts forward like a beak. It also has a slimmer tailsection and LED lighting all around. But the GSX-S received more than just a facelift.

New camshaft profiles, valve springs, throttle bodies, and airbox, and a revised 4-2-1 exhaust contribute to a 2-hp bump in peak power, a broader, smoother torque curve, and Euro 5 emissions compliance. On Jett Tuning’s dyno, the GSX-S1000 sent 136 hp and 73 lb-ft of torque to the rear wheel. Power climbs linearly to its peak at 10,200 rpm while torque spreads out wide like a mesa, with more than 60 lb-ft on tap from 4,300 rpm to 11,300 rpm. (See dyno chart at end of post.)

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Despite its aggressive stance, the new GSX-S1000 has a larger fuel tank, more comfortable ergonomics, engine
refinements, and other changes that make it a well-rounded streetbike.

A new throttle-by-wire system enables three ride modes (Active, Basic, and Comfort) that adjust throttle response and power delivery. The GSX-S1000 is equipped with switchable, five-level traction control, a new up/down quickshifter, and Suzuki’s Easy Start and Low RPM Assist. And the 6-speed transmission is mated to a new slip/assist clutch.

From the first few moments in the GSX-S1000’s saddle until the last time I dropped the kickstand, the word that kept popping into my head was “smooth.” At idle, the engine hums dutifully, and spent gasses exiting the stubby exhaust seem to barely disturb the surrounding air. The riding position is pleasantly neutral, with a damped-mount aluminum handlebar that is 0.9 inch wider and 0.8 inch closer to the rider than on the previous model. The seat has been revised with more comfortable padding and a dished shape that cradles the rider.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Precise fueling and throttle response, linear power delivery, a rapid-fire quickshifter, and quality components help keep the GSX-S1000 cool and composed on curvy roads.

Greg’s Gear
Helmet: Fly Racing Sentinel
Jacket: Fly Racing Strata
Gloves: Fly Racing Brawler
Pants: Fly Racing Resistance Jeans
Boots: Fly Racing Milepost

Pulling away from stops and rowing up and down through the gears feels effortless. Like other slip/assist clutches, the Suzuki Clutch Assist System uses interlocking ramps that increase plate pressure during acceleration and provide slip as needed during aggressive deceleration and downshifts. The clutch requires only a light pull, and feel and engagement are spot-on. Both the clutch and brake levers are adjustable for reach.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
A twin-spar aluminum frame wraps around a 999cc inline-Four derived from the GSX-R1000 K5.

Suzuki’s Bi-Directional Quick Shift system uses a gear-position sensor near the shifter that provides more precise response than quickshifters incorporated into the shift rod. Of the many quickshifters I’ve tested on a variety of different motorcycles, none have responded with such crisp, immediate engagement, especially in lower gears and on downshifts. No vagueness, no hiccups, just smooth, accurate gear changes.

Fueling and power delivery are close to faultless. Even the slightest movements in the throttle translate to small adjustments in speed with no hesitation or electronic delay. The connection between the rider’s right wrist and the rear wheel feels direct, almost intuitive. Likewise, large handfuls of throttle produce a rapid surge in thrust with no ap-parent peaks or valleys, the exhaust delivering a satisfying wail as the inline-Four spins up quickly.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Coming to a curve near you….

In keeping with its Superbike pedigree, the GSX-S1000 has a massive twin-spar cast-aluminum main frame that wraps around the engine, as well as a robust cast-aluminum swingarm. Suspension is by KYB, with a fully adjustable 43mm inverted fork and a link-type monoshock that’s adjustable for preload and rebound. With damping tuned for the street, the suspension is responsive at speed and provides reassuring compliance on irregular pavement.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Part of the GSX-S1000’s redesign includes MotoGP-style winglets.

A pair of Brembo 4-piston radial-mount monoblock calipers provide stopping power at the front, squeezing fully floating 310mm rotors. They have good initial bite and progressive feel at the lever, slowing the 472-lb bike and its rider with authority. Out back, a Nissin 1-piston caliper squeezes a 240mm disc. ABS is standard but, like the traction control system, it is not lean-angle sensitive.

The GSX-S1000 rolls on Dunlop Roadsmart 2 sport-touring tires that walk a middle ground between grip and mileage. Their Intuitive Response Profile (IRP) provides a large, reassuring contact patch when leaned over in corners. The rubber is wrapped around six-spoke, 17-inch cast-aluminum wheels. On bikes with the Metallic Triton Blue paint scheme inspired by Suzuki’s MotoGP race livery, the wheels are color-matched to the bike; the wheels are black in the Metallic Matte Mechanical Gray colorway.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
Mono-focus LED headlights shine light through convex lenses to create a bright, broad spread of light.

While negotiating one challenging series of corners after another, I continued to be impressed with how smooth and composed the GSX-S1000 felt. Its agreeable rider tri-angle, easy-to-operate controls, predictable handling, and silky power delivery help the bike work with the rider, not against them. There are no frustrating quirks, no “if only” caveats. But the GSX isn’t dull, either. It’s a well-engineered, precision-crafted perfor-mance machine that is a genuine pleasure to ride.

If there’s one area that left me wanting, however, it’s the instrumentation. The GSX’s monochrome LCD display is cluttered with information and, despite the screen’s adjust-able brightness, was difficult to read in direct sunlight. With vivid, easy-to-read TFT displays being the norm on many modern bikes, the GSX’s instrument panel looks dated. And while I appreciate the simplified switchgear, with a single mode button and a large up/down toggle on the left side to adjust settings, it isn’t intuitive.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
The cockpit is minimalist, while the LCD display is overly busy and difficult to read in bright light.

It’s clear the GSX-S1000 was designed to meet an aggressive price target. The LCD instrument panel, the simplified electronic riding aids, the lack of cruise control, and other cost-saving measures enabled Suzuki to achieve an MSRP of $11,299. Other liter-class naked sportbikes from Japan cost significantly more – the Honda CB1000R retails for $12,999, and the Yamaha MT-10 is priced at for $13,999.

Suzuki has been smart about updating the GSX-S1000. It gave it a distinctive new look, improved power delivery, more comfortable ergonomics, and useful new features like throttle-by-wire, ride modes, and a fantastic quickshifter. Some manufacturers go all-in on IMU-enabled electronics, but they ratchet up the price. The GSX-S1000 is much improved from its predecessor yet still delivers solid value. Smooth is as smooth does.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review

2022 SUZUKI GSX-S1000 SPECS
Base Price: $11,299
Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
Website: suzukicycles.com

ENGINE
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 999cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm
Compression Ratio: 12.2:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 15,000 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ throttle-by-wire, 40mm throttle bodies x 4
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.6 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain

CHASSIS
Frame: Twin-spar cast aluminum frame & swingarm
Wheelbase: 57.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm inverted fork, fully adj., 4.7 in. travel
Rear: Single linkage shock, adj. spring preload & rebound, 5.1 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 310mm floating discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.5 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast, 6.0 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 190/50-ZR17
Wet Weight: 472 lbs.
Load Capacity: 408 lbs.
GVWR: 880 lbs.

PERFORMANCE
Horsepower: 136 hp @ 10,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 73 lb-ft @ 9,300 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 33.4 mpg
Estimated Range: 167 miles

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review dyno

The post 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Suzuki Announces 2022 Returning Models

Last year, Suzuki announced several new or significantly updated motorcycles, including the third-generation Hayabusa hyper-sportbike, the revamped GSX-S1000 naked bike, and the all-new GSX-S1000GT sport-tourer. We’ve tested the Hayabusa, and we’ll get a chance to ride the GSXs soon.

Meantime, Suzuki has announced the return of several popular models for 2022, including the V-Strom 1050XT, V-Strom 1050XT Adventure, Boulevard C50, Boulevard C50T, and GSX250R ABS.

2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT

2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT
2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT

The V-Strom 1050XT is a perennial favorite in the adventure-touring segment, powered by a 1,037cc 90-degree that sends 96 hp and 66 lb-ft of torque to the rear wheel, according to our 2020 tour test. It’s also equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which uses a 6-axis IMU to inform a full suite of electronics, including ride modes, cornering ABS and traction control, cruise control, and more. The V-Strom 1050XT also has an adjustable windscreen, handguards, a two-piece seat with height adjustability for the rider’s section, an accessory bar, a centerstand, and much more. It’s available in a cool Metallic Oort Gray with Glass Sparkle Black color scheme with blue-anodized tubeless spoked wheels. MSRP is $14,849.

2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT Adventure

2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT Adventure
2022 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT Adventure

The V-Stroke 1050XT Adventure makes a statement with its Suzuki Champion Yellow and Glass Sparkle Black colorway with silver and blue accents as well as gold-anodized tubeless spoked wheels. Added to the 1050XT’s impressive standard equipment list is a set of Suzuki’s quick release 37-liter aluminum panniers, LED fog lights, and heated grips. MSRP is $17,049.

2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50

2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50
2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50

Suzuki’s Boulevard line of cruisers has delivered solid value, reliability, and style for years. The Boulevard C50 is powered by a liquid-cooled 805cc (49ci) 45-degree V-Twin that delivers plenty of low-end torque. The C50’s traditional styling includes a kicked-out fork, valance-style fenders, and a staggered, chromed, dual exhaust system. The Boulevard C50 is available in Candy Daring Red (shown) or Solid Iron Gray, and MSRP is $8,609.

2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50T

2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50T
2022 Suzuki Boulevard C50T

If you’re interested in a touring cruiser, the Boulevard C50T should be right up your alley. Travel-ready features include a spacious riding position, an aerodynamic windshield, and custom studded saddlebags that match the studded rider and passenger seats. The C50T is available in Pearl Brilliant White with classic whitewall tires. MSRP is $10,059.

2022 Suzuki GSX250R ABS

2022 Suzuki GSX250R ABS
2022 Suzuki GSX250R ABS

An entry-level sportbike doesn’t have to look like it. The GSX250R ABS has an aerodynamic full fairing that fits right in with full-sized sportbikes. It’s powered by an approachable but exciting 248cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin, and it has ABS-equipped single-disc brakes front and rear. Riders of any age and experience level will appreciate the GSX250R’s fuel efficiency, nimble handling, and comfortable riding position. It’s available in Crystal Blue with Pearl Nebular Black. MSRP is $4,999.

For more information or to find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit suzukicycles.com.

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Source: RiderMagazine.com