Tag Archives: Suzuki Motorcycles

Rider Comparo: 2024 CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX-8S

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
With short wheelbases, sporty geometry, and low curb weights, the CFMOTO 800NK and Suzuki GSX‑­8S hustle through tight corners with ease. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Back in the ’70s, Cycle magazine coined the term “Universal Japanese Motorcycle” to refer to the proliferation of standard bikes built by the Japanese Big Four that adhered to the same formula: air‑cooled inline‑Fours with tubular cradle frames, disc front brakes, telescopic forks, and dual rear shocks.

Much has changed in the last five decades, but manufacturers still stick to tried‑and‑true formulas when designing motorcycles. These days, regardless of where bikes hail from, there has been a convergence in the middleweight class on parallel‑Twin engines because they are cost‑effective to produce, easy to package within a frame, and flexible in terms of tuning. Also known as vertical Twins because the two side‑by‑side cylinders stand upright, modern versions typically have liquid cooling, fuel injection, and a 270‑degree crankshaft that produces a V‑Twin‑like rumble.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
We put the CFMOTO 800NK (left) side-by-side with the Suzuki GSX-8S (right) for this comparo.

Last year, Suzuki, a veteran of the UJM wars, introduced a liquid‑cooled 776cc parallel‑Twin that powered two new models: the GSX‑8S naked sportbike and V‑Strom 800DE adventure bike. The engine has DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, a 270‑degree crank, throttle‑by‑wire, and Suzuki’s patented Cross Balancer system, which minimizes vibration. The GSX‑8S is equipped with several Suzuki Intelligent Ride System electronic rider aids, including throttle response modes (Active, Basic, and Comfort), multi‑mode traction control (1, 2, 3, and Off), an up/down quickshifter, Easy Start, and Low RPM Assist.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
2024 Suzuki GSX-8S

Chinese manufacturer CFMOTO entered the U.S. motorcycle market in 2022 and has expanded its lineup to 11 models for 2024. One of its newest is the 800NK, a naked sportbike powered by a liquid‑cooled 799cc parallel‑Twin that’s a previous‑gen version of the KTM 790 engine, which CFMOTO now builds under a partnership agreement. Similar to Suzuki’s modular approach, the same engine is found in CFMOTO’s Ibex 800 adventure bikes. On the tech front, the 800NK has throttle‑by‑wire, throttle response modes (Sport, Street, and Rain), and cruise control but no traction control or quickshifter.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK
2024 CFMOTO 800NK

Those looking for an affordable, streetfighter‑styled motorcycle would likely cross‑shop these two bikes, especially since there’s just a $500 delta between their MSRPs: $8,999 for the Suzuki and $8,499 for the CFMOTO. To suss out their differences, we tested them back‑to‑back on local freeways and backroads and had our friend John Ethell at Jett Tuning run them on a Dynojet dynamometer.

CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX8S: Wonder Twin Powers, Activate!

Despite just a 23cc difference in displacement between the CFMOTO and Suzuki, there’s a significant difference in engine output. Both Twins rev out to nearly 10,000 rpm, and their dyno curves show fairly linear increases in power and flat torque curves. Past 6,000 rpm, their curves begin to diverge, with the CFMOTO climbing to 93.4 hp at 9,400 rpm while the Suzuki levels out at 75.9 hp at 8,300 rpm. Torque figures are closer, but the 800NK still has the advantage in the upper rev range, maxing out at 57.1 lb‑ft at 6,600 rpm compared to 53.3 lb‑ft at 6,700 rpm on the GSX‑8S.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S dyno

The CFMOTO also has a lower curb weight, giving it a higher power‑to‑weight ratio. It weighs 410 lb with its 4.0‑gallon tank full, whereas the Suzuki weighs 445 lb with 3.7 gallons in its tank.

Differences in power and weight aren’t readily apparent at lower rpm and around‑town speeds, but the Suzuki feels more refined. The GSX‑8S starts easily when cold, idles smoothly, and has spot‑on fueling and throttle response. The 800NK, on the other hand, is slow to warm up, idles like it’s in a bad mood, and exhibits some hesitation when making throttle adjustments between 4,000 to 6,000 rpm, which corresponds to a dip in the horsepower and torque curves.

Above 6,000 rpm, however, the CFMOTO finds its groove, responding cleanly and directly to throttle inputs and making its power and weight advantages readily apparent. It flicks back and forth through tight corners more easily than the Suzuki, and a twist of the wrist catapults the 800NK ahead more rapidly than the GSX‑8S, which falls flat in the upper rev range. Although sound doesn’t necessarily affect performance, it does tap into our emotions. The CFMOTO’s more aggressive exhaust note makes for a more engaging riding experience without being too loud.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK
New for 2024, the CFMOTO 800NK charges forward with a distinctive LED running light and angular bodywork in either Nebula Black (shown) or Nebula White.

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There’s also some daylight between these bikes in terms of shifting. Both are equipped with 6‑speed transmissions with cable‑actuated slip/assist clutches. Neither bike requires much effort to change gears, but the Suzuki’s gearbox is noticeably smoother, and it’s aided by the convenience of a quickshifter. The CFMOTO has an adjustable clutch lever, but the Suzuki does not.

See all of Rider‘s CFMOTO coverage here.

More Bounce to the Ounce

When manufacturers aim for aggressive price targets, one of the most common places to cut costs is with the suspension, particularly in terms of adjustability. Both CFMOTO and Suzuki sourced their components from Japanese suspension maker KYB, and both bikes have inverted forks (43mm on the CFMOTO, 41mm on the Suzuki) and rear monoshocks. The only adjustability on the GSX‑8S is rear preload, but the 800NK offers full adjustability on the fork and rebound and preload adjustability on the shock. Ride quality between the two is fairly similar, with their damping rates calibrated for general use rather than the tautness of more aggressive sportbikes, but the CFMOTO allows riders to dial in their preferences front and rear.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
Yerba Buena Road, which slithers through California’s rugged Santa Monica Mountains, was the perfect place to test these two middleweight streetfighters.

The CFMOTO has a slight edge in terms of braking. With components sourced from J.Juan, a Spanish subsidiary of Brembo, the 800NK has a pair of 4‑piston radial front calipers pinching 320mm discs, a 2‑piston rear caliper pinching a 260mm disc, a radial‑pump front master cylinder, and steel‑braided lines. The 800NK’s brakes provide strong, consistent power with good feedback from the adjustable front lever, but they could use more initial bite.

The Suzuki wears Nissin brakes, with dual 4‑piston radial front calipers squeezing 310mm discs, a 1‑piston rear caliper squeezing a 240mm disc, an axial‑pump front master cylinder, and rubber lines. Stopping power is decent, but the Suzuki’s brakes feel more numb and provide less feedback than the CFMOTO’s. ABS is standard on both bikes.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
The Suzuki GSX‑­8S has a minimalist look, and it’s available in Pearl Cosmic Blue (shown), Glass Matte Mechanical Gray, and Metallic Matte Black No. 2.

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Sit Up and Be Somebody

The 800NK and GSX‑8S are compact machines with short wheelbases, narrow waistlines, and sporty chassis geometry. Both have steel frames, steel subframes, cast‑aluminum swingarms, and tapered aluminum handlebars. From the cockpit, the Suzuki almost disappears beneath the rider thanks to its svelte tank, 1.7-inch narrower handlebar, and slender (but 0.4 inch taller) seat. The CFMOTO’s tank and bodywork flare out more, and its handlebar is wider, giving it more visual presence from the saddle. Its seat is also wider at the back and has thicker, more comfortable foam.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
The CFMOTO’s higher power, lighter weight, and wider handlebar give it an advantage over the Suzuki.

As streetfighters, these bikes lend themselves to an aggressive riding style, but they’re comfortable enough for everyday riding or commuting. Their handlebars’ bends and risers allow for an upright seating position, and their footpegs are placed high enough for good cornering clearance but low enough for adequate legroom.

When you exit the highway and find your way to a winding backroad, they are more than happy to display their athleticism. Both roll on 17‑inch cast wheels with 120/70 front and 180/55 rear tire sizes, and their radials – Maxxis Supermaxx ST on the CFMOTO, Dunlop Roadsmart 2 on the Suzuki – provide neutral handling and decent grip. With its additional steering leverage and 35‑lb weight advantage, the CFMOTO is more agile than the Suzuki but not by much.

See all of Rider‘s Suzuki coverage here.

CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX8S: Devil in the Details

In some ways, these are two evenly matched motorcycles, while in others, they diverge. One is built by a well‑established Japanese brand that has been building motorcycles since the early 1950s and selling them in America since 1963. The other is built by an upstart Chinese company that has been building motorcycles only since 2000 but has grown rapidly and not only builds its own engines and motorcycles but also builds them for KTM, Europe’s largest manufacturer.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
Both bikes have similar profiles, with pointy headlight shrouds and dagger‑­like tailsections. Despite the riders’ go‑­fast crouches above, handlebars positioned well above the triple clamp and sensibly placed footpegs allow for comfortable, upright seating positions.

Although the Suzuki GSX‑8S was introduced in 2023 as a new model with a new engine, it feels very refined. It has the build quality and fit and finish one expects from one of the Big Four Japanese manufacturers, and its engine, electronics, and chassis work together harmoniously. The GSX‑8S costs $500 more than the 800NK, but it has standard features that the CFMOTO lacks, such as traction control and an up/down quickshifter. Its bright TFT instrument panel uses a larger, thicker font and is easier to read in all conditions than the one on the 800NK.

As the new kid on the block looking to build trust in the market, CFMOTO’s value proposition is to provide more bang for the buck. For the 800NK, that starts with the tried‑and‑true KTM 790 engine that delivers an additional 17.5 hp and 3.8 lb‑ft of torque over the GSX‑8S motor. It continues with a 35‑lb lower curb weight, suspension with more adjustability, higher‑spec brakes, and features like cruise control and smartphone connectivity. Not only is the base price lower, but it comes with an additional year of warranty coverage. But it also feels rougher around the edges, particularly regarding its low‑rpm fueling.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK
The 2024 CFMOTO 800NK TFT display changes with ride mode, but the text is too small.
2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
The 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S TFT display is easy to read and adjusts to light/dark conditions.

If you’re an experienced rider who wants a light, powerful, somewhat rowdy streetfighter and can live without traction control and a quickshifter, you’ll want the CFMOTO 800NK. But if you’re someone who prioritizes smoothness and refinement over power, or if you’re a newer rider, the Suzuki GSX‑8S is for you.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
Each bike has its strengths and weaknesses, but both provide a respectable mix of performance, technology, and style at a reasonable price.

Spec Comparo: 2024 CFMOTO 800NK vs. 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S

  • Base Price: $8,499 (CFMOTO) — $8,999 (Suzuki)
  • Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles — 1 yr., unltd. miles 
  • Website: CFMOTOusa.comSuzukiCycles.com
  • Engine Type: Liquid‑­cooled, transverse parallel‑­Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl. — Liquid­-cooled, transverse parallel-­Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
  • Displacement: 799cc — 776cc 
  • Bore x Stroke: 88 x 65.7mm — 84.0 x 70.0mm
  • Horsepower (rear-­wheel dyno): 93.4 hp @ 9,400 rpm — 75.9 hp @ 8,300 rpm
  • Torque (rear-­wheel dyno): 57.1 lb‑­ft @ 6,600 rpm — 53.3 lb‑­ft @ 6,700 rpm
  • Transmission: 6‑­speed, cable‑­actuated slip/assist wet clutch — 6‑­speed, cable‑­actuated slip/assist wet clutch 
  • Final Drive: Chain — Chain
  • Wheelbase: 57.8 in. — 57.7 in.
  • Rake/Trail: 24 degrees/3.8 in. — 25 degrees/4.1 in. 
  • Seat Height: 31.5 in. — 31.9 in. 
  • Wet Weight: 410 lb — 445 lb
  • Fuel Capacity: 4.0 gal. — 3.7 gal.
  • Fuel Consumption: 42.9 mpg — 48.7 mpg
2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S

The post Rider Comparo: 2024 CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX-8S appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | Video

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The muffler and catalytic converter are tucked away under the chassis for a cleaner appearance that exposes the 8R’s aluminum swingarm.

The Suzuki GSX-8R is the fully-faired sibling of the Suzuki GSX-8S, which was just released in 2023. Both bikes are powered by an all-new 776cc 4-stroke DOHC parallel-Twin that can also be found in the V-Strom 800 models. The tubular handlebar from the 8S is traded for a pair of clip-ons on the GSX-8R that are about 2 inches lower and a smidge farther away from a rider, and the KYB suspension on the 8S has been replaced with Showa suspension on the 8R.

To demonstrate the breadth of capabilities offered by the GSX-8R, Suzuki invited us to Palm Desert in California for a ride on rural and mountain roads, followed the next day by sessions at a racetrack. Watch the video below to see the 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R in action, and read our full review here.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Specs 

  • Base Price: $9,439  
  • Website: SuzukiCycles.com  
  • Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles  
  • Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.  
  • Displacement: 776cc  
  • Bore x Stroke: 84.0 x 70.0mm  
  • Horsepower: 82.0 @ 8,500 rpm (factory claim)  
  • Torque: 57.5 lb-ft @ 6,800 rpm (factory claim)  
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch  
  • Final Drive: Chain  
  • Wheelbase: 57.7 in.  
  • Rake/Trail: 25.0 degrees/4.1 in.  
  • Seat Height: 31.9 in.  
  • Wet Weight: 452 lb (factory claim)  
  • Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gal 

GEAR UP

The post 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | Video appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

21 Cool New Motorcycles at AIMExpo 2024

We’re at the 2024 American International Motorcycle Exposition (AIMExpo) in Las Vegas, where nearly 200 vendors from around the world are displaying the latest motorcycles and products to dealers, media, and other industry insiders. Here are 21 cool new motorcycles we’ve seen at the show.

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C
2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C

2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450
2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450

2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450 Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 CFMOTO Papio SS
2024 CFMOTO Papio SS

2024 CFMOTO 800NK, 450NK, and Papio CL/SS Announced


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 GasGas ES 500
2024 GasGas ES 500

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS
2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS and Z7 Hybrid ABS Review | First Look 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 KTM 890 SMT
2024 KTM 890 SMT

2024 KTM 890 SMT Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 KTM 1390 Super Duke R Evo
2024 KTM 1390 Super Duke R Evo

2024 KTM 1390 Super Duke R Evo Review | First Look 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Moto Guzzi Stelvio
2024 Moto Guzzi Stelvio

2024 Moto Guzzi Stelvio Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Moto Morini Calibro
2024 Moto Morini Calibro

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 Moto Morini Corsaro Sport
2025 Moto Morini Corsaro Sport

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 Moto Morini X-Cape 1200
2025 Moto Morini X-Cape 1200

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 MV Agusta LXP Orioli
2024 MV Agusta LXP Orioli

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 MV Agusta Rush 1000
2024 MV Agusta Rush 1000

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 MV Agusta Superveloce 98
2024 MV Agusta Superveloce 98

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
2024 Suzuki GSX-8R

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | First Ride 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Review | First Ride 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Suzuki Hayabusa 25th Anniversary Edition
2024 Suzuki Hayabusa 25th Anniversary Edition

2024 Suzuki Hayabusa 25th Anniversary Model | First Look Review


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Triumph Scrambler 400 X
2024 Triumph Scrambler 400 X

2024 Triumph Speed 400 and Scrambler 400 X | First Look Review


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Triumph Speed 400
2024 Triumph Speed 400

2024 Triumph Speed 400 and Scrambler 400 X | First Look Review


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Triumph TF 250-X
2024 Triumph TF 250-X

2024 Triumph TF 250-X Review | First Look 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo Yamaha Tricera Concept
Yamaha Tricera Concept

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide 

The post 21 Cool New Motorcycles at AIMExpo 2024 appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | First Ride 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
An aggressive rider posture adapts the ergonomics on the 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R from open and comfy to quite sporty when required.

The Suzuki GSX-8R takes an ironic turn in the evolution of motorcycles. For decades we’ve extolled the virtues of sporty standard-style motorcycles over dramatically more aggressive pure sportbikes, but American riders largely turned up their collective nose at naked bikes and ignored them in favor of swoopier sportbikes.  

The Honda 599 and 919 came and went seemingly without notice. Same for Kawasaki’s Z750, BMW’s F 800 R, Yamaha’s FZ8, and Aprilia’s Shiver. The only really successful naked bikes were the Ducati Monster and Suzuki SV650.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
A set of forged-aluminum handlebar clamps provide a sportier riding position than the naked 8S, with the bars 60mm lower and 6mm forward.

But now the script has been flipped, and sales of pure sportbikes are but a blip on the radar, while every manufacturer successfully sells sporty nakeds. A recent example is Suzuki’s GSX-8S that debuted last year. Powered by a new 776cc parallel-Twin also found in the V-Strom 800, the 8S proved to be both sporty and utilitarian, capable of nearly any type of riding. 

Related: Suzuki GSX-8S Review | First Ride 

And now here we are with the new GSX-8R, which is a slightly sportier version of the 8S, but it’s a far cry from something like a GSX-R. You’ll notice the new fairing, but you might not notice the new Showa suspension, accounting for the $440 price increase over its stablemate’s $8,999 MSRP.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The GSX-8R is available in Metallic Matte Sword Silver and Pearl Ignite Yellow, as well as the Metallic Triton Blue of our test bike.

“We wanted,” says Suzuki, “to create a new middle-class standard in the sport segment that achieves high levels of practicality and rider-friendliness.” 

Road and Track | Suzuki GSX-8R Review

To demonstrate the breadth of capabilities offered by the GSX-8R, Suzuki invited us to Palm Desert in California for a ride on rural and mountain roads, followed the next day by sessions at a racetrack.  

First impressions were favorable, as the 8R displays nice fit and finish details that belie its sub-$10K price tag. Three colorways are available, and I think they all look great. For my steed, I chose the Metallic Triton Blue version that best represents Suzuki’s heritage. Scaling in at 452 lb with its 3.7-gal. tank full, it’s easy enough to wheel around but not exactly light. The seat is placed at 31.9 inches. 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The GSX-8R carves corners like a sportbike but without the punishing ergonomics of a sportbike.

Our street ride took place on a chilly and damp day, climbing out of town from 440 feet above sea level on the Palms to Pines Scenic Byway, cresting at nearly 5,000 feet. I was grateful to be aboard the 8R rather than the 8S, as its fairing provided welcome shelter from the elements. The windscreen is low but reasonably effective, and I was also pleased with the airflow deflection offered by the fairing, which kept my legs shielded from the wind.  

On a typically sunny California day, this road invites horizon-tilting lean angles, but damp sections and automobile bottle-ups thwarted sporting maneuvers. It was difficult to determine if the Dunlop Roadsmart 2 tires lacked grip or if it was simply the fault of the cool pavement. I switched the bike’s ride mode from A (active) to B (basic) to help moderate throttle response in conjunction with the traction-control system, which can be set independently if desired.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
An attractive fairing is the key distinction between the GSX-8R and its naked sibling, the GSX-8S.

GEAR UP

Antilock brakes provide another level of security, although the system doesn’t benefit from an IMU, so it doesn’t feature a cornering ABS function. Regardless, the triple-disc brakes are precise, allowing a rider to deftly apply just a hint of application to scrub off 1 or 2 mph while angling into corners. The Nissin radially mounted front calipers deliver a firm lever feel despite not using braided-steel lines.  

The most frequently used rider assist on the 8R is the standard quickshifter, which allows clutchless upshifts and auto-blipping downshifts. It works reasonably well but not with the seamlessness as experienced with other quickshifters that benefit from data gathered by IMUs.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The muffler and catalytic converter are tucked away under the chassis for a cleaner appearance that exposes the 8R’s aluminum swingarm.

After descending the mountain road, we were faced with a boring straight one that provided the opportunity to settle in and evaluate the 8R’s cockpit and ergonomics.  

The tubular handlebar from the 8S is traded for a pair of clip-ons that are about 2 inches lower and a smidge farther away from a rider. They deliver a sportier riding position but one that’s a mile away from truly aggressive, similar in ergos to the GSX-S1000GT sport-tourer. A moderately tight seat-to-footpeg distance might cramp riders long of leg, but the seat proved to be comfortable after hour-long stints in the saddle. 

Related:  Suzuki GSX-S1000GT Review | Road Test 

The 5-inch TFT instrumentation from the 8S is also used on the 8R, providing a bright and readable display with a large analog tachometer. It’s a modern but basic system that is easy and intuitive to navigate via switches on the left handlebar.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The GSX-8R uses the same highly readable 5-inch color TFT instrument panel as the 8S. The lower portion can be toggled to display coolant temperature, ambient air temperature, dual tripmeters, fuel consumption, and fuel range.

Motor’n | Suzuki GSX-8R Review 

This was my first chance to sample Suzuki’s first all-new engine, and the 776cc parallel-Twin proved to be amiable and sweetly tuned. It uses the Low‐RPM Assist System that automatically increases engine speed as the clutch lever is released for smooth getaways. The patented Suzuki Cross Balancer mechanism, consisting of two counterbalancers, tames vibration beyond what’s experienced from most parallel-Twins.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The 8R’s clutch cover and magneto cover have dark gray finishes that complement the body colors, with the Suzuki name revealed in a contrasting machined silver. Note the stubby outlet from the stainless-steel exhaust system that muffles and cleans in a chamber below the chassis.

The engine is friendly and vibe-free, but what it isn’t is thrilling. It makes accessible and usable power, supplying the necessary grunt to elicit satisfaction while performing most street duties, but when pointed down a deserted road, it feels a little strangled at its top end. Power hounds will wish for more.

Suspenders Surprise | Suzuki GSX-8R Review

An upgrade from the 8S is the Showa suspension that replaces the Kayaba components. There are two surprises here. First, there isn’t any suspension adjustability other than rear preload. Second, it’s remarkable how well it works at providing comfortable bump absorption as well as respectable chassis composure.  

The 41mm Separate Function Fork-Big Piston inverted fork nicely holds up its end of the bargain with 5.1 inches of travel. The SFF-BP design uses an oil-bathed spring in one fork leg, while the other leg uses a big-piston damping circuit, which saves a bit of weight while delivering more precise damping characteristics. The link-type rear suspension incorporates a Showa shock that has a single-rate spring rather than the progressive coil on the 8S. It uses a cam-style spring-preload adjuster for easier adjustments than the more basic locking-ring design. 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The 41mm Showa SFF-BP inverted fork provides excellent front-end feedback despite its lack of adjustability. Nissin radial-mount brake calipers deliver reassuring feedback via 310mm rotors.

As set up, I noticed the rear end lacked a bit of rebound damping and consulted with Suzuki engineers. They told me the 8R is sprung for a 165-lb rider, so to accommodate for weightier American physiques, they added a step of preload on all the test bikes. My geared-up 155-lb mass doesn’t require as much spring, so I backed off the preload one position and enjoyed better rebound-damping balance.  

The final portion of our street ride was accompanied by sunny skies and dry roads that culminated in a fun descent on Montezuma Grade into Borrego Springs. Finally, we could push the 8R like a sportbike, leaning into corners briskly enough to skim the pavement with footpegs. Good front-end feedback had me salivating for exploring the bike’s limits at the twisty Chuckwalla Valley Raceway.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
A position light is placed above the stacked headlights rather than to the sides as on the 8S. A duct below the windscreen was incorporated to reduce turbulence hitting riders.

Chucky Cheese | Suzuki GSX-8R Review 

When we arrived at Chuckwalla, I smiled as I saw a row of GSX-8Rs ready for flogging and fitted with Dunlop Sportmax Q5+ tires. With warm pavement and grippier rubber, I donned my leathers and soon began dragging knees.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
Streetbike, commuter, lightweight sport-tourer, and trackday toy, the GSX-8R can do it all.

Sportbike snobs have disdain for motorcycles without aluminum frames, but just like the Kawasaki ZX-4RR I tested last year, motorcycles with steel frames have nothing to be ashamed of aside from some extra poundage. The 8R demonstrates its GSX-R heritage and provides a capable and secure platform to explore sporting limits. 

I didn’t expect a 452-lb sportbike with sport-touring ergos to comport itself so well on the racetrack, but it wasn’t the first time I’ve been mistaken, as the missus often reminds me. A firm set of trustworthy brakes combines with neutral steering responses for trustworthy composure when leaned over all the way to – and sometimes beyond – the footpegs decking out and grinding on the tarmac.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
A close look at the footpegs reveals beveled nubs, an indication of the fun that was had on the 8R as well as its racetrack limits.

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It’s only on the straightaways where the 8R comes up a bit short. The 776cc Twin that works so well in the V-Strom 800 and in most street scenarios with the 8S and 8R feels a bit breathless when exploring the upper reaches of the tachometer. Its redline is just shy of 10,000 rpm, but it’s claimed to produce peak power at 8,500 revs, so there’s no advantage to screaming it out. When we dyno’d the identically tuned GSX-8S, it spat out 76 hp to its rear wheel at 8,300 rpm. I discovered the 8R gathers speed better when leaving some revs on the table and shifting at 9,000 rpm.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The 8R’s speed on a racetrack is limited only by cornering clearance and mundane engine output.

Regardless, I can attest that if you took a GSX-8R to a trackday, you’d be impressed by its composure and sure-footedness while scratching pegs. Chuckwalla has a fairly smooth surface, so the rudimentary suspension wasn’t greatly taxed and held up both ends without complaint.

Sum Up | Suzuki GSX-8R Review 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The GSX-8R isn’t a fire-breathing dragon like its GSX-R siblings, but it has plenty of sporting potential.

The GSX-8R’s best attribute is that it straddles a wide line in the world of motorcycling – an all-in-one machine. It’s docile and friendly for commuting duties, but it’s also fun and engaging when ridden like a sportbike. Strap on some luggage, and it can be a reasonably comfy and capable sport-touring rig. Suzuki’s accessory line offers side cases, tankbags, a taller windscreen, and heated grips to help transport you to the next horizon in style and comfort. 

Complaints about the 8R are few. I would’ve liked to have seen a mildly hot-rodded motor to up the ante from the 8S, and an aluminum frame would’ve trimmed a few pounds from a moderately portly curb weight. An IMU and fuller suspension adjustability would be welcome additions.  

But all those things would add to Suzuki’s build costs, resulting in a bike that would likely push past $12K. In this era of ever-increasing prices, the GSX-8R’s MSRP of $9,439 hits a sweet spot of value and capabilities that set it apart from similar offerings on the market. To ease the way into 8R ownership, Suzuki is offering 1.98% introductory financing for it.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
The GSX-8R is designed to appeal to riders across a wide range of ages and levels of experience.

Prior to testing the bike, the jaded and expert journalists at the launch didn’t seem terribly excited about riding what seemed to be a relatively tame motorcycle. After two days experiencing the GSX-8R on road and track, our preconceptions had been banished. It proved to be one of those rare machines that feel greater than the sum of its parts.

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Specs 

  • Base Price: $9,439  
  • Website: SuzukiCycles.com  
  • Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles  
  • Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.  
  • Displacement: 776cc  
  • Bore x Stroke: 84.0 x 70.0mm  
  • Horsepower: 82.0 @ 8,500 rpm (factory claim)  
  • Torque: 57.5 lb-ft @ 6,800 rpm (factory claim)  
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch  
  • Final Drive: Chain  
  • Wheelbase: 57.7 in.  
  • Rake/Trail: 25.0 degrees/4.1 in.  
  • Seat Height: 31.9 in.  
  • Wet Weight: 452 lb (factory claim)  
  • Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gal 

See all of Rider‘s Suzuki coverage here.

The post 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | First Ride  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Review | Video

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Action
2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+

Suzuki’s new GSX-S1000GX+ is further evidence of the evolution in the sport-touring class. The marketing materials for ADVs regularly show the bikes being ridden in desolate areas on unpaved terrain, inspiring our sense of adventure. However, ADVs are often used like crossover SUVs, with personas of rugged adventure but most often used on paved roads. Hot on the heels of Suzuki’s GSX-S1000GT+, our 2022 Motorcycle of the Year, is the new GX+ version that has a more open riding position, blending attributes of an ADV with a sport-tourer. Suzuki calls it the “supreme sport crossover.”

Suzuki didn’t have to start from scratch to create the GSX-S1000GX+. In a nutshell, the GX is a GT with a longer-travel suspension that automatically adjusts damping settings based on IMU-informed electronics. It has 1.2 inches more fork travel relative to the GT and 0.8 inches extra shock stroke – both just 0.4 inch less than the V-Strom 1050 adventure bike. Add in some new bodywork and a stronger subframe, and you’ve got the GX. Watch the video to see the 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ in action and read our full review here.

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Specs

  • Base Price: $18,499 
  • Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles 
  • Website:SuzukiCycles.com 

ENGINE 

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl. 
  • Displacement: 999cc 
  • Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm 
  • Compression Ratio: 12.2:1 
  • Valve Insp. Interval: 15,000 miles 
  • Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ throttle-by-wire, 40mm throttle bodies x 4 
  • Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.6 qt. cap. 
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch 
  • Final Drive: Chain

CHASSIS 

  • Frame: Twin-spar cast-aluminum frame & swingarm 
  • Wheelbase: 57.9 in. 
  • Rake/Trail: 25.5 degrees/3.8 in. 
  • Seat Height: 33.3 in. 
  • Suspension, Front: 43mm inverted fork, electronically adj., 5.9 in. travel 
  • Rear: Single linkage shock, electronically adj., 5.9 in. travel 
  • Brakes, Front: Dual 310mm floating discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS 
  • Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS 
  • Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.5 x 17 in. 
  • Rear: Cast, 6.0 x 17 in. 
  • Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17 
  • Rear: 190/50-ZR17 
  • Wet Weight: 511 lb (factory claim, without saddlebags)

PERFORMANCE 

  • Horsepower: 150 hp @ 11,000 rpm (factory claim) 
  • Torque: 78.2 lb-ft @ 9,250 rpm (factory claim) 
  • Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gal

GEAR UP

The post 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Review | Video appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Suzuki Motorcycles, Cars, and Coffee | Saturday, Dec. 9

Suzuki Motorcycles, Cars, and Coffee is back. On Saturday, Dec. 9, the Suzuki Motor USA headquarters in Brea, California, will provide donuts, coffee, and water, and there will be new models and Suzuki race machines on display. The event takes place from 7:30-10 a.m.

Suzuki Motorcycles, Cars, and Coffee December 9, 2023
Flyer for Suzuki Motorcycles, Cars, and Coffee event on Dec. 9

All brands of cars and motorcycles are welcome. Suzuki USA headquarters is located at 3251 E. Imperial Hwy, Brea, CA 92821.

To enter the Suzuki Motor USA campus from the 57 Freeway, go east on Imperial Highway, turn left on Valencia Street, then turn left on Nasa Street, and pull into the parking lot. The parking lot has enough room for more than 300 motorcycles and cars.

Ride down and spend Saturday morning with other enthusiasts!

See all of Rider‘s Suzuki coverage here.

The post Suzuki Motorcycles, Cars, and Coffee | Saturday, Dec. 9 appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Review | First Ride 

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Action
Suzuki brings us a “sport crossover” in the form of the new GSX-S1000GX+ we tested in Portugal. (Photos by Ula Serra & Amylee Photography)

Suzuki’s new GSX-S1000GX+ is further evidence of the evolution in the sport-touring class. Formerly, the class consisted of big, heavy machines and sportier but less luxurious ones. Then came the influx of adventure bikes, which offered roomier riding positions and have become dominant in the marketplace. 

The marketing materials for ADVs regularly show the bikes being ridden in desolate areas on unpaved terrain, inspiring our sense of adventure. However, ADVs are often used like crossover SUVs, with personas of rugged adventure but most often used on paved roads. So now we have crossovers that have spacious riding positions beyond what’s offered from traditional sport-tourers. Of note are BMW’s powerful S 1000 XR, Kawasaki’s capable Versys 1000 SE LT+, and our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year, Yamaha’s Tracer 9 GT, which was recently updated to the GT+.   

Related: 2024 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ Review 

Hot on the heels of Suzuki’s GSX-S1000GT+, our 2022 Motorcycle of the Year, is the new GX+ version that has a more open riding position, blending attributes of an ADV with a sport-tourer. Suzuki calls it the “supreme sport crossover.”  

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ beauty
The Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ glows in the shadows.

Related: 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ Review 

GT To GX | 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ 

Suzuki didn’t have to start from scratch to create the GSX-S1000GX+. In a nutshell, the GX is a GT with a longer-travel suspension that automatically adjusts damping settings based on IMU-informed electronics. It has 1.2 inches more fork travel relative to the GT and 0.8 inches extra shock stroke – both just 0.4 inch less than the V-Strom 1050 adventure bike. Add in some new bodywork and a stronger subframe, and you’ve got the GX.  

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Nose
Other markets will receive the blue colorway depicted in the action photos, but the U.S. will receive only this Pearl Matte Shadow Green version.

The GT+ is the version of the GSX-S1000GT with hardshell saddlebags ideal for touring. Suzuki will offer a base GX in some markets, but only the GX+ version will be available on our shores. It includes saddlebags and a centerstand as standard equipment.  

The GX further sets itself apart from the GT by the addition of a 6-axis Inertial Measurement Unit, which informs all the electronic systems of the bike’s acceleration, braking, and lean angles. The IMU not only allows for cornering ABS and advanced traction control, it’s also the key ingredient in Suzuki Advanced Electronic Suspension, the company’s first semi-active suspension. 

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ front suspension
Suspension damping on the GSX-S1000GX+ is automatically controlled by electronics.

SAES automatically adjusts damping rates depending on road conditions and how aggressively the bike is ridden, and riders can tailor it to their preferences by selecting Hard, Medium, and Soft modes or by customizing settings in a User mode. Moreover, the system also automatically adjusts rear preload via an electric motor to suit various loads of rider and luggage.  

“These technologies,” says Suzuki, “combine to make the GX comfortable and controllable on various road surfaces, ranging from urban asphalt and cobblestones to paved country and twisted winding mountain roads while also providing an engaging and sporty riding experience.”  

Sounds good, right? Not a lot of cobblestones on our shores, so Suzuki sent us off to Portugal for a riveting riding experience on its new GX.

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ action
The Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ is perfectly suited to twisty coastal roads.

Revved Up | 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ 

The GX’s cockpit is familiar to anyone who has straddled the GT, with the same user-friendly switches that navigate the various electronic settings on the 6.5-inch color TFT instrument panel. Happily, the TFT screen is mounted much higher than it is on the GT, which makes it far easier to see and use. Smartphone connectivity is enabled with Suzuki’s mySPIN app and can display maps, phone calls, and music. 

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ TFT
The vibrant TFT instrument panel is easy to navigate and switches automatically to a dark background in low-light conditions.

The longer travel suspension of the GX bumps the seat height to 33.3 inches, 1.4 inches taller than the GT. However, the seat’s narrow front section gives legs a straight shot to the ground and wasn’t a problem for my 30-inch inseam.  

At the heart of the GX is the revered K5 GSX-R1000 engine that has a bottomless well of power and an arm-ripping 150 hp up top. The 999cc inline-Four originally powered the 2005-2008 Gixxers, and Suzuki says more than 180,000 of the bulletproof K5 mills have been produced in various guises over the years. Suzuki claims 70% of max torque is available from just 3,000 rpm, with peak twist of 78 lb-ft arriving at 9,250 rpm.   

While the K5 has old roots, it remains a stellar powerplant, firing up with a guttural rumble that can willingly shriek to 11,750 rpm when you’re in a hurry. Throttle response is perfectly smooth in the B ride mode but still acceptable in A mode, albeit sharper. Clutch actuation is exceedingly linear, and pulling away from stops is aided by Suzuki’s Low-RPM Assist System that automatically increases engine speed as the clutch lever is released.  

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Action
With 150 hp on tap, the GSX-S1000GX+ blurs the scenery.

Kudos to Suzuki for producing one of the most seamless transmissions on the market, with a bi-directional quickshifter that fluidly swaps gears up and down without the rider needing to touch the clutch lever. A feint stab on the shifter automatically matches revs to the lower gear with a smoothness few riders can match manually. This updated system can also shift gears without interrupting the cruise-control speed setting.  

The riding position of the GX is quite agreeable, with the handlebar 1.7 inches closer to the rider and 1.5 inches taller than the GT’s sportier crouch. The seat-to-peg distance expands by 0.6 inch, but legroom remains more cramped than most ADVs.  

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Action
The GX+ has a comfortably upright riding position, but riders with long legs might feel cramped.

Gear Up 

The GX’s seat isn’t as comfortable as we’d expect from a touring bike. The forward section is too narrow for long-range support, so it’s best to sit as far rearward as arms will allow. The solution is the Premium seat from Suzuki’s accessory catalog, which proved to be much more supportive. The $399.95 saddle uses double-layer padding, and its upper section has heat-shedding material to avoid toasted buns after sitting in the sun. It’s not only far more comfortable, its red stitching and tuck-and-roll surface look sharp. And the included passenger section is highlighted by a snazzy GSX-S logo. If you have short legs, opt for the accessory low seat ($175) which is narrower and 0.6 inch closer to the ground.  

The GX exhibits neutral steering, tipping into corners gracefully if not quickly. It’s a lightweight sport-tourer relative to open-class bikes that typically exceed 600 lb, but it’s not light. It scales in at 511 lb with its 5-gallon tank full but without the saddlebags. A half-inch wider handlebar aids leverage, but the relatively flat profile of the 50-series rear tire inhibits the roll rate relative to more modern 55-series rubber.  

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Action
The GSX-S1000GX+ is fitted with a pair of LED headlights flanked by LED position lamps that resemble eyes.

Grip from the Dunlop Roadsport 2 tires seemed only average on some of the tricky road conditions we encountered on our two-day ride. The IMU-based traction control saved my bacon more than once, mediating at different levels of intervention based on the selected ride mode or by manually adjusting TC via intuitive menus. A light on the TFT illuminates when TC is operating, and the system also controls wheelies to varying levels. 

Active Duty | 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ 

The balance offered by semi-active suspension deserves high praise. The automatically adjusted damping keeps the GX’s suspension well-controlled at all times. On city streets and boring highways, I set it to Soft mode for a plush ride. When a twisty canyon road presented itself, I toggled to Hard mode for sportbike levels of tautness.  

The adaptability of the suspension is a boon to riders who travel on all types of roads. While we appreciate fully adjustable manual suspensions, their settings are always a compromise. More problematic is that most riders don’t (or don’t know how to) properly adjust them to suit their weights and riding styles. With the GX, rear preload is automatically set without tools, and it can be increased to a stiffer setting if you prefer. Damping settings can also be increased or decreased from the presets to suit preferences, and it can all be done by a few button pushes while riding. Magic!  

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Rear suspension
The GX uses the same aluminum frame as the GT but has a longer and more robust steel-trellis subframe. Note the wires leading to the gold-colored semi-active rear shock that features automatic preload adjustment.

Less magical are a few aspects of the GX that come up a little short. The windscreen is adjustable to three positions but not without unbolting four screws, thwarting on-the-fly adaptability. Tool-less systems have been available on other bikes for more than a decade, so its absence here is annoying.  

In the windscreen’s low setting, airflow is smooth up to 70 mph, but higher speeds induce head buffeting. Wind protection improves with the screen in its highest setting, but then it’s stuck there until you bring out the tools again. Digits are sheltered by handguards, but they’re not warmed without ordering heated grips from the accessory catalog. And while I’m feeling disappointed, I’ll note the lack of self-canceling turnsignals.  

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Action
The layered design of the fairing manages airflow nicely, but we wish it had a hand-adjustable windscreen.

Ride On – And On | 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ 

The idea of a sport crossover may seem odd, but it comes together nicely in the GSX-S1000GX+, which shines brightest by its capabilities to fulfill many roles. It’s docile and manageable in the city, and it’s reasonably comfortable and can carry a bunch of luggage on the highway. Open roads are quickly eaten up by superbike levels of power, and big speeds are shed by a competent set of Brembo front brakes and the security of cornering ABS. 

Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Action
The Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ is ready for sport-touring anywhere you want to point it.

The GX+ might induce sticker shock. Priced at $18,499, it’s the most expensive Suzuki you can buy. Price creep has affected similar Japanese bikes with IMUs and semi-active suspensions: Kawaski’s 567-lb Versys 1000 SE LT+ retails for $18,899, while Yamaha’s less powerful but lighter 492-lb Tracer 9 GT+ has a $16,499 MSRP.  

Is the Suzuki $2,000 better than the Yamaha? We’ll report back to you in the springtime when the GX arrives in dealers and we can take them both on a tour for a comparison test. Both are likely contenders for our 2024 Motorcycle of the Year crown.   

Check out more new/updated bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide   

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Specs 

  • Base Price: $18,499 
  • Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles 
  • Website:SuzukiCycles.com 

ENGINE 

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl. 
  • Displacement: 999cc 
  • Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm 
  • Compression Ratio: 12.2:1 
  • Valve Insp. Interval: 15,000 miles 
  • Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ throttle-by-wire, 40mm throttle bodies x 4 
  • Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.6 qt. cap. 
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch 
  • Final Drive: Chain 

CHASSIS 

  • Frame: Twin-spar cast-aluminum frame & swingarm 
  • Wheelbase: 57.9 in. 
  • Rake/Trail: 25.5 degrees/3.8 in. 
  • Seat Height: 33.3 in. 
  • Suspension, Front: 43mm inverted fork, electronically adj., 5.9 in. travel 
  • Rear: Single linkage shock, electronically adj., 5.9 in. travel 
  • Brakes, Front: Dual 310mm floating discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS 
  • Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS 
  • Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.5 x 17 in. 
  • Rear: Cast, 6.0 x 17 in. 
  • Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17 
  • Rear: 190/50-ZR17 
  • Wet Weight: 511 lb (factory claim, without saddlebags) 

PERFORMANCE 

  • Horsepower: 150 hp @ 11,000 rpm (factory claim) 
  • Torque: 78.2 lb-ft @ 9,250 rpm (factory claim) 
  • Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gal.

The post 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Review | First Ride  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Returning 2024 Suzuki Motorcycles Announced

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles SV650 ABS
2024 Suzuki Motorcycles SV650 ABS

Following Suzuki’s announcements earlier this month of the all-new 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ crossover sport-tourer and the 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R, the fully-faired and just slightly younger sibling of the GSX-8S, the company has announced more returning 2024 Suzuki motorcycles. Included in the announcement are the returning V-Strom 800DE and 800DE Adventure, SV650 ABS naked bike, GSX-250R ABS sportbike, and Boulevard C50 and M109R cruisers.  

See all of Rider’s Suzuki coverage here. 

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles: Adventure 

2024 Suzuki V-Strom 800DE and 800DE Adventure 

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles V-Strom 800DE Pearl Tech White
2024 Suzuki Motorcycles V-Strom 800DE in new Pearl Tech White

At the beginning of October, Suzuki announced two new V-Strom 800 models with a more street-oriented focus: the V-Strom 800 and 800 Touring. Returning for 2024, the off-road-ready V-Strom 800DE and 800DE Adventure are powered by the same 776cc parallel-Twin with a 270-degree firing order and Suzuki’s exclusive Cross Balancer system for smooth operation. 

Related: 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 800DE | First Ride Review 

The V-Strom 800DE has a chassis with the most ground clearance and longest suspension travel of any V-Strom, and its suspension is fully adjustable. The 21-inch front and 18-inch rear spoked wheels are shod with the latest Dunlop ADV tires (tubes required). The V-Strom 800DE Adventure comes equipped with quick-release black-anodized aluminum 37-liter side cases, a sturdy accessory bar, and a skid pan to further extend riding adventures. 

The Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (S.I.R.S.) includes traction control with a trail-oriented Gravel mode plus rider-adjustable ABS with two levels of sensitivity and the ability to switch off the rear wheel ABS when riding off-road. 

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles V-Strom 800DE Champion Yellow #2
2024 Suzuki Motorcycles V-Strom 800DE in Champion Yellow #2

Other features include a bidirectional quickshifter, a full-color TFT instrument panel, and mono-focus LED headlights vertically stacked with a position light below a height-adjustable windscreen. 

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles V-Strom 800DE Adventure
2024 Suzuki Motorcycles V-Strom 800DE Adventure

The 2024 Suzuki V-Strom 800DE is available in either Champion Yellow #2 or new Pearl Tech White starting at $11,599. The V-Strom 800DE Adventure comes in new Metallic Matte Steel Green starting at $13,049. 

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles: Street 

2024 Suzuki SV650 ABS 

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles SV650 ABS
2024 Suzuki Motorcycles SV650 ABS

The middleweight Suzuki SV650 has a liquid-cooled 645cc 90-degree V-Twin with DOHC. Suzuki’s Low RPM Assist feature adjusts engine speed during takeoff and low-speed operation for smoother power delivery and to help reduce the chance of a rider stalling the motorcycle on difficult starts. 

Related: Suzuki SV650 | First Ride Review 

The trellis-style frame is constructed of high-strength steel tubes, contributing to the motorcycle’s low weight and trim chassis, and braking is provided by a pair of Tokico 4-piston front calipers grasping 290mm stainless-steel discs. ABS is standard.   

The 2024 Suzuki SV650 ABS has Glass Sparkle Black bodywork, a gold frame, and matching gold cast-aluminum wheels, and pricing starts at $7,949. 

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles: Sportbike 

2024 Suzuki GSX250R ABS 

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles GSX250R ABS
2024 Suzuki Motorcycles GSX250R ABS

The fully-faired GSX250R ABS returns with a liquid-cooled 248cc parallel-Twin and offers stellar gas mileage, with a claimed fuel economy of 73.6 mpg. The GSX250R ABS’s slim fuel tank helps riders easily plant their feet on the ground when stopped. It features Nissin petal-style brake rotors with ABS, KYB suspension components, and 10-spoke cast aluminum wheels. The bike has a reverse-lit LCD instrument panel and a bright halogen headlight. The position lamps and taillight use surface-emitting LEDs. 

The 2024 Suzuki GSX250R ABS comes in the two-tone Metallic Diamond Red and Pearl Nebular Black paint scheme starting at $5,099. 

Related: Small Bikes Rule! Honda CRF250L Rally, Suzuki GSX250R and Yamaha TW200 Reviews 

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles: Cruisers 

2024 Suzuki Boulevard C50 

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles Boulevard C50
2024 Suzuki Motorcycles Boulevard C50

The 2024 Suzuki Boulevard C50 gives its own style to traditional cruisers, featuring a kicked-out front fork, valance-style fenders hovering over 16-inch front and 15-inch rear tires, each mounted on spoke-style chrome wheels, and staggered, chromed dual exhausts. The C50’s liquid-cooled 50ci (805cc) 45-degree V-Twin is mated to a 5-speed gearbox. A hidden, link-style rear shock smooths the ride while giving the bike an old-school, hardtail look, and the bike has wide, buckhorn-style handlebars, forward-mount floorboards, a 27.6-inch seat height. 

The 2024 Suzuki Boulevard C50 comes in Candy Daring Red starting at $9,199. 

2024 Suzuki Boulevard M109R 

2024 Suzuki Motorcycles Boulevard M109R
2024 Suzuki Motorcycles Boulevard M109R

The Boulevard M109R’s liquid-cooled 109ci (1,783cc) 45-degree V-Twin is mated to a 5-speed gearbox and shaft final drive, all wrapped with aggressive styling cues like slash-cut mufflers, drag-style handlebars, a supplied solo seat cowl, a 240mm wide rear tire, and a distinctively shaped headlight nacelle that is uniquely Suzuki.  

Like the brakes from a GSX-R1000R, the M109R’s radial-mounted, dual-front brake calipers deliver ample stopping performance, and suspension comes from a large-diameter inverted fork and a link-style rear shock. 

The 2024 Suzuki Boulevard M109R comes in Glass Sparkle Black starting at $15,699. 

For more information, visit the Suzuki website

Check out more new bikes in Rider‘s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide 

The post Returning 2024 Suzuki Motorcycles Announced appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | First Look 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R in Metallic Triton Blue
2024 Suzuki GSX-8R in Metallic Triton Blue

One year after Suzuki released the GSX-8S middleweight naked bike, the company has announced a fully faired sibling for 2024. The GSX-8R sportbike joins the lineup with the same 776cc parallel-Twin, slim chassis geometry, and Suzuki’s Intelligent Ride System rider aids, but with sporty ergonomics and styling that draws on the 35-year GSX-R heritage with a modern interpretation. 

Related: 2023 Suzuki GSX-8S | First Ride Review 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R in Pearl Ignite Yellow
2024 Suzuki GSX-8R in Pearl Ignite Yellow

The 776cc parallel-Twin DOHC premiered in 2023 in the GSX-8S and the V-Strom 800DE with a claimed 83 hp peaking at 8,500 rpm and 57.5 lb-ft of torque at 6,800 rpm. A 270-degree crankshaft configuration gives the engine a rumbly exhaust note, and the Suzuki Cross Balancer system allows for a compact and lightweight design.

When we tested the new engine in the 2023 V-Strom 800DE, our reviewer said, “When a twist of the throttle requests more power, the engine responds with a torquey forward rush, and the Suzuki Cross Balancer system does a great job of quelling any excessive engine vibration.” 

Related: 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 800DE | First Ride Review 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Cross Balancer
Suzuki’s Cross Balancer system helps minimize vibrations.

The 8R’s has a steel-pipe frame and a cast-aluminum swingarm. The wheelbase is 57.7 inches, and the seat height is 31.9 inches. Suzuki describes the 8R’s ergonomics as “an upright, forward-leaning riding position.” The 8R has a 3.7-gallon fuel tank and a claimed curb weight of 452 lb. 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R

The GSX-8R gets a different suspension setup than the GSX-8S to better suit sport riding. Up front is a 41mm Showa SFF-BIP fork, and out back is a Showa monoshock with a spring preload adjuster. There are 5.1 inches of travel both front and rear.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Seat

Braking comes in the form of dual 310mm front discs paired with radial-mounted Nissin 4-piston calipers and a single 240mm rear disc with a Nissin single-piston caliper. ABS is standard on both front and rear brakes, and the front brake lever is adjustable. The 8R rides on 17-inch cast aluminum wheels wrapped in Dunlop Roadsport 2 radial tires. 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Front Wheel and Brakes

See all of Rider‘s Suzuki coverage here.

Like the GSX-8S, the 8R comes standard with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System’s suite of rider aids, including a quickshifter, traction control, ride modes, and more. 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
A look from above shows the GSX-8R’s slim design.

The Suzuki Drive Mode Selector allows riders to choose three engine power output modes called A, B, and C, with A delivering the sharpest throttle response and C providing the gentlest throttle response, and ride modes can be changed while riding with mode and select switches on the left handlebar.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Dash

The Suzuki Traction Control System gives riders four traction control options. Mode 1 has the lowest sensitivity and allows rear wheel spin best suited for good road conditions. In Mode 2, traction control engages sooner for average conditions, and Mode 3 eliminates wheel spin for riding on wet or slippery roads. Additionally, STCS can be turned off altogether, and STCS modes can also be changed while riding.  

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Dash

The bi-directional Quick Shift System allows the rider to shift up or down without operating the clutch or throttle, and the Low RPM Assist System increases engine speed for smoother power delivery when taking off from a stop or while riding at low speeds. The 8R also comes equipped with the Suzuki Clutch Assist system that allows a small amount of clutch slip for smooth downshifts and increases plate pressure under acceleration. 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Headlight

The 5-inch TFT instrumentation displays ride modes and traction control modes. It also shows speed, a gear indicator, tachometer, fuel level, and a clock. The TFT can be set to automatically shift between Day Mode and Night Mode or can be switched manually, and the brightness can be adjusted. The bottom of the display can be set to show coolant temperature, ambient air temperature, odometer, dual tripmeters, fuel consumption, or riding range. The GSX-8R also comes with full LED lighting, including a stacked pair of hexagonal headlights supplied by Koito. 

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R in Metallic Matte Sword Silver
2024 Suzuki GSX-8R in Metallic Matte Sword Silver

The 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R will be available in Metallic Triton Blue, Metallic Matte Sword Silver, or Pearl Ignite Yellow with an MSRP of $9,439 and a 12-month, unlimited mileage warranty. Visit the Suzuki website for more information. 

Check out more new/updated bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide.  

The post 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | First Look  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Review | First Look

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
The 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ is a new sport-tourer that will compete with the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ and Kawasaki Versys 1000 SE LT+.

The 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ is a new “crossover” motorcycle that combines the engine performance and chassis of a sport-tourer with the upright stance and long-travel suspension of an adventure bike. Think of it as the love child of a GSX-S1000GT+ and a V-Strom 1050. It’s also a direct competitor for the BMW S 1000 XR, Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ and Kawasaki Versys 1000 SE LT+.

Related: Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ Review | Road Test

Related: Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT Review | Tour Test

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
The Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ has more suspension travel than a GSX-S1000GT but less than a V-Strom 1050. The taller suspension and lower footpegs increase legroom.

The GSX-S1000GX+ features Suzuki’s first electronic suspension system, which is integrated into the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (S.I.R.S.) electronics suite. Available in the spring of 2024, the GSX-S1000GX+ will retail for $18,499.

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
The GSX-S1000GX+ is the first Suzuki to offer electronically adjustable suspension. The system is made by Showa.

Sharing an engine with the GSX-S1000 sportbike and GSX-S1000GT+ sport-tourer, the GX+ is powered by a long-stroke 999cc in-line Four adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5 (2005-2008) and retuned to make it more suitable for the street. When we tested a 2022 GSX-S1000, it made 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno. Camshaft profiles were revised to decrease lift and valve overlap in an effort to reduce emissions and improve rideability.

Equipped with throttle-by-wire and a six-axis IMU, the GSX-S1000GX+ features the most comprehensive Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (S.I.R.S.) electronics suite yet. It includes Suzuki Drive Mode Selector Alpha (SDMS-α) with three ride modes (Active, Basic, and Comfort) that have presets for throttle response, traction control, and suspension damping.

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
As fetching as the Triton Blue color is (European model shown), the only color option in the U.S. is Pearl Matte Shadow Green. Handguards are standard.

Developed by Showa, the new the Suzuki Advanced Electronic Suspension (SAES) combines the SFF-CATM inverted telescopic fork, BFRC-lite link-style rear shock, and electronic damping control with four modes (Hard, Medium, Soft, and a customizable User mode) as well as incremental adjustability. Spring preload is adjusted manually on the fork but electronically on the rear shock. There are several proprietary algorithms programmed into the SAES system, including Suzuki Floating Ride Control, Suzuki Velocity Dependent Control, and Suzuki Deceleration Damping Control, which are designed to improve ride quality and chassis stability.

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
Behind the windscreen is a 6.5-inch color TFT display, which shows pertinent info and controls all of the electronics as well as Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. The handlebar is rubber-mounted to reduce vibration.

The S.I.R.S. electronics suite also includes the five-mode Suzuki Traction Control System with wheelie control and Roll Torque Control (adjusts engine output during cornering), an up/down quickshifter, Smart Cruise Control (which can be used with the quickshifter), cornering ABS, rear lift mitigation, the Suzuki Easy Start System, and Low RPM Assist. Everything is managed via menus on the 6.5-inch color TFT display, which also controls the Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app to display maps, phone calls, contacts, and music.

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
Height of the rider seat is 33.3 inches, but a 32.7-inch low seat is available as an accessory. The rear luggage rack is standard.

Holding the GSX-S1000GX+ together is a GSX-R-derived twin-spar cast-aluminum frame and cast-aluminum swingarm, along with a tubular-steel trellis subframe. Suspension travel is 5.9 inches front and rear, which is more than the GSX-S1000GT (4.7/5.1 inches) but less than the V-Strom 1050 (6.3/6.3 inches). The taller suspension and lower footpegs increase the distance between the rider’s hip and foot by 0.6 inch, and seat height is 33.3 inches. For added comfort, the passenger seat is 1 inch wider and 0.4 inch thicker than the one on the GSX-S1000GT.

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
No, we don’t get the color-matched wheels either. U.S. bikes will have black wheels. The 17-inchers are shod with Dunlop Roadsmart 2 tires.

Up front, a pair of Brembo radial-mount monoblock 4-piston calipers squeeze 310mm discs, and at the rear is a Nissin 1-piston caliper squeezing a 240mm disc. Cornering ABS is standard.

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
The Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ has a three-position windscreen.

Similar to its GT stablemate, the GSX-S1000GX+ has a sharply pointed front fairing with a pair of stacked LED headlights in the center and a pair of “cat eye” LED position lights. It also has angular side panels and radiator shrouds that match the sharply creased fuel tank, which holds 5.0 gallons of fuel. The wheels, engine, components, frame, swingarm radiator shrouds, low-slung exhaust pipe, handlebar, seat, and most of the side cases are finished in black. The front fender, front fairing, fuel tank, and top side case panels are finished in a dark Pearl Matte Shadow Green, which contrasts with the silver on the side panels and rear luggage rack and the gold fork tubes.

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
The Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ has a tall pillion seat so the passenger can see over the rider. The pillion seat is also wider and thicker than the one on the GSX-S1000GT+.

Touring amenities include standard handguards, a three-position windscreen, a rubber-mounted handlebar, a luggage rack that holds up to 13.2 lb, a pair of 25.7-liter side cases that hold up to 11 lb each, and a centerstand. Available accessories include heated grips, premium seats, a low seat (rider seat height 32.7 inches), small and large tankbags, axle sliders, frame sliders, billet levers, logoed tank pads, and tank protection foil.

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
Standard equipment on the 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ includes 25.7-liter side cases.

We selected the Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ as our 2022 Motorcycle of the Year, and the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT was our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year. We look forward to seeing how the GSX-S1000GX+ stacks up against the latest Yamaha Tracer 9 GT+ and Kawasaki Versys 1000 SE LT+.

Check out more new/updated bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide.

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Specifications

ENGINE

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse in-line Four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
  • Displacement: 999cc
  • Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm
  • Horsepower: 151 hp @ 11,000 rpm (factory claim)
  • Torque: 78.2 lb-ft @ 9,250 rpm (factory claim)
  • Compression Ratio: 12.2:1
  • Valve Insp. Interval: 15,000 miles
  • Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ throttle-by-wire, 40mm throttle bodies x 4
  • Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.6 qt. cap.
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
  • Final Drive: Chain

CHASSIS

  • Frame: Twin-spar cast-aluminum frame, cast-aluminum swingarm, tubular-steel trellis subframe
  • Wheelbase: 57.9 in.
  • Rake/Trail: N/A
  • Seat Height: 33.3 in.
  • Suspension, Front: 43mm inverted fork, electronically adj., 5.9 in. travel
  • Rear: Single linkage shock, electronically adj., 5.9 in. travel
  • Brakes, Front: Dual 310mm floating discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS
  • Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS
  • Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.5 x 17 in.
  • Rear: Cast, 6.0 x 17 in.
  • Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
  • Rear: 190/50-ZR17
  • Wet Weight: 511 lb (factory claim, excluding side cases)
  • Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gal.

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Source: RiderMagazine.com