Tag Archives: CFMoto Motorcycles

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S | First Look Review

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S Nebula Black
2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S in Nebula Black

At a CFMOTO press launch in late June 2022, we got a few laps in with the Ibex 800 T (formerly the 800 ADVentura T). Information on the bike was embargoed until August, at which point we profiled the Ibex 800 T in our September issue and on the website. At that point, there was mention of an Ibex 800 S, but the bike wasn’t available at the Minnesota press launch. However, details have since been made available on the Street version of the bike.

Related: 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T | First Ride Review

As mentioned in the recap article of the numerous bikes we tried out at the launch, CFMOTO is perhaps most well-known for ATVs and side-by-sides, which it has been selling in the U.S. since 2002. It set up its American headquarters in Plymouth, Minnesota, in 2007. The company established a partnership with KTM in 2014 and soon after began producing KTM 200/390 Dukes for the Chinese market. After a brief stint importing motorcycles such as its 650NK naked bike and the 650TK sport-tourer to the U.S., CFMOTO pulled back from the market but returned recently with a full lineup for 2022.

Related: 2022 CFMOTO Motorcycle Lineup | First Ride Review

As to the Ibex 800 T we tested, our reviewer said it felt “solid, responsive, and – not surprisingly given the origin of its engine – on par with similar offerings from Europe.”

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S

Like its up-spec sibling, the Ibex 800 S is powered by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve 799cc parallel-Twin borrowed from the previous-generation KTM 790 Adventure making a claimed 94 hp and 57 lb-ft of torque and mated to a 6-speed gearbox and slip-assist clutch. The Ibex 800 is equipped with throttle-by-wire and has two ride modes (Sport and Rain) and cruise control.

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S Twilight Blue
2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S in Twilight Blue
2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S Nebula Black
2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S in Nebula Black with optional side and top cases

The Ibex 800 has a chromoly-steel frame, fully adjustable KYB suspension (front/rear travel is 6.3/5.9 inches), 19-inch front and 17-inch rear aluminum alloy wheels, and J. Juan triple-disc brakes (320mm dual discs up front, 260mm single disc in the rear) with cornering ABS. It has full LED lighting, an adjustable windscreen, and a 7-inch TFT display. With a 5-gallon fuel tank, it comes in at curb weight of 509 lb.

Besides the extra bells and whistles on the Ibex 800 T (heated grips, a heated seat, quickshifter, and a USB and 12V port), the main difference in the Ibex 800 S is the aluminum alloy wheels, which are spoked on the 800 T.

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S

The 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S will come in Nebula Black and Twilight Blue starting at $9,499.

For more information, visit the CFMOTO website.

The post 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 CFMOTO 700CL-X | Road Test Review

CFMOTO 700CL-X
The CFMOTO 700CL-X is a naked middleweight with a mix of scrambler, street tracker, and sportbike styling elements, and it’s an absolute hoot to ride. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Last summer I traveled to Minnesota, home of the CFMOTO U.S. headquarters, to test the company’s new lineup of motorcycles. On a flat, paved, tar-snaked road course at the Minnesota Highway Safety & Research Center, about a dozen journalists and influencers buzzed around on bikes ranging from the 125cc Papio minibike to the 800 ADVentura adventure bike.

Related: 2022 CFMOTO Motorcycle Lineup | First Ride Review

Launches featuring multiple bikes are like eating at a buffet: You get to taste a little bit of everything, but you don’t get the full experience of a dedicated entree. After the day at the track, I logged 350 miles on the 650 ADVentura, an affordable, middleweight adventure-styled touring bike with saddlebags, and I got to know the bike better.

But the CFMOTO I kept thinking about was the 700CL-X, a feisty middleweight naked bike with scrambler styling.

CFMOTO 700CL-X

At the end of the trackday, when all the photography was done and we were given free reign, I hopped aboard the 700CL-X and played cat-and-mouse with two of my fellow scribes. John Burns was on the 800 ADVentura, and Ron Lieback was on the 650NK naked bike.

Related: 2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura | First Ride Review

Our bikes were like the Three Bears. Papa Bear was the 800 ADVentura, with a 799cc parallel-Twin that cranks out 95 hp with a curb weight of 509 lb. Mama Bear was the 700CL-X, with a 693cc parallel-Twin that makes 74 hp and weighing 426 lb. Though hardly a toddler like CFMOTO’s Papio, Baby Bear was the 650NK with a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and has a weight of 454 lb.

CFMOTO 700CL-X

Try as we might, with pegs scraped and boot soles beveled, we could not break ranks. We’d bunch up in the corners, but John and I protected our lines so there were no chances to overtake. We’d draft each other heading onto the front straight and then pull three abreast with the throttles pinned, but there was no fighting the displacement advantage. Burns would pull ahead of me, and Lieback would be on my six, filling my mirrors.

Chasing buddies around a track for bragging rights over beers is always fun, but beyond that, I was really digging the 700CL-X. A wide, upright tubular handlebar gives it good steering leverage, and its light weight made it easy to throw into a corner or weave around the chicanes made of traffic cones. The real kicker was the 700CL-X’s throttle response. In Sport mode, giving it the whip revved up the Twin, and at around 7,000 rpm, there was a loud below from the exhaust and a surge in thrust, almost like V-Boost on the old Yamaha V-Max. Having a $6,499 motorcycle deliver that sort of thrill took me by surprise, and I wondered, What is this thing?

CFMOTO 700CL-X

CFMOTO 101

Although well-established in the U.S. market in the ATV and side-by-side segments, CFMOTO is not a familiar brand for most American motorcyclists. Founded in 1989, the Chinese company’s first decade was focused on supplying parts, components, and engines to major powersports manufacturers. In 2000, CFMOTO began building motorcycles, scooters, and off-road vehicles.

Related: Chris Peterman, CFMOTO USA | Ep. 40 Rider Magazine Insider Podcast

CFMOTO has been selling its off-road vehicles in the U.S. since 2002, and after gaining a solid foothold in that market, it established its U.S. headquarters near Minneapolis. In 2012, CFMOTO began importing motorcycles to the U.S., but it met with limited success and pulled out a few years later. Reviews of CFMOTO’s motorcycles were generally positive, but American buyers are averse to new brands. Furthermore, many view Chinese-made motorcycles as being of inferior quality to those made in Japan, Europe, or the U.S.

CFMOTO 700CL-X

Thanks to its well-established production expertise and capacity, in 2014 CFMOTO entered a strategic partnership with KTM and began manufacturing 200 Dukes and 390 Dukes for the Chinese market. In 2018, the two companies started a joint venture that allows CFMOTO to license and manufacture some of KTM’s engines. CFMOTO’s 800 ADVentura is powered by the 799cc LC8c parallel-Twin from KTM’s 790 Adventure. Starting in 2023, KTM’s parent company Pierer Mobility will distribute CFMOTO’s motorcycles in some European markets, an arrangement similar to the recent announcement that KTM North America will soon take over distribution of MV Agusta motorcycles in the U.S.

CFMOTO 700CL-X
The 693cc parallel-Twin is held in place by a tubular chromoly-steel frame. Machined finishes are a nice touch.

While brand or country of origin are important for some buyers, others place a higher priority on style, performance, price, reliability, and dealer experience/proximity. With an MSRP of $6,499, the 700CL-X offers good value and is less expensive than other middleweight naked bikes like the Honda CB650R ($9,299), Kawasaki Z650 ABS ($8,249), Suzuki SV650 ABS ($7,849), Triumph Trident 660 ($8,395), and Yamaha MT-07 ($8,199). The 700CL-X is covered by a two-year, unlimited-mileage warranty, and CFMOTO has about 200 motorcycle dealers in the U.S.

Here’s Lookin’ at You

CFMOTO 700CL-X
A tall, wide tapered aluminum handlebar gives the 700CL-X good steering leverage, and its solid chassis holds a line well.

Through its partnership with KTM, CFMOTO’s motorcycles are styled by Kiska. With its minimalist profile, tubular handlebar, bobtail with a one-piece seat, Y-spoke cast wheels with an 18-inch front, and Pirelli MT60 semi-knobby tires, the 700CL-X has the stance of a street tracker. Retro touches include a round headlight, a round gauge cluster, a single front disc, and a stubby exhaust shaped like a Foster’s Oil Can. One can see hints of the Ducati Scrambler in the 700CL-X’s tubular-steel frame, brushed aluminum tank panels, swingarm-mounted license plate carrier, and machined finishes on its engine’s faux cooling fins.

CFMOTO 700CL-X
Y-spoke cast-aluminum wheels are shod with Pirelli MT60 semi-knobby tires that provide good grip.

With the exception of its switchgear and the layout of its LCD instrument panel, the 700CL-X doesn’t look cheap, and its fit and finish are on par with more expensive bikes. It is illuminated front and rear by LEDs, and it has a unique, bright-white headlight surround shaped like one of those Craftsman four-way flathead screwdrivers I used to have on my keychain. The turnsignals are self-canceling, the clutch and brake levers are adjustable for reach, the brake lines are steel braided, and the cleated footpegs have removable rubber inserts.

CFMOTO 700CL-X
Embedded within the unique star-shaped headlight surround is a white LED daytime running light.

Motorcycles at this price point are usually limited to basic features, but the 700CL-X has throttle-by-wire with two ride modes (Eco and Sport), a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, and cruise control. Most notable, in a class where the most one can typically hope for is spring preload adjustment, often only at the rear, the 700CL-X has a fully adjustable 41mm inverted KYB fork and a linkage-mounted KYB shock with a progressive spring rate and adjustable preload and rebound. Brakes are supplied by J.Juan (a Brembo subsidiary in Spain), with a radial-mount 4-piston front caliper squeezing a 320mm disc and a 2-piston rear caliper pinching a 260mm disc.

CFMOTO 700CL-X
A very tidy tail.

Time to Ride

The 700CL-X is very approachable. Its dished seat is 31.5 inches high and provides decent support. The bike feels compact and light, and the tall handlebar allows the rider to sit mostly upright. Thumb the starter, and the CFMOTO’s 693cc DOHC parallel-Twin burbles to life, settling into a syncopated rumble. The engine compresses fuel and air with forged pistons that move up and down via fracture-split connecting rods.

CFMOTO 700CL-X

Roll on the throttle, and the engine spins up quickly with no drama. Concerns about vibration and heat never crossed my mind, and the throttle-by-wire delivers crisp response without any vagueness or abruptness. When we rolled the 700CL-X into Jett Tuning’s dyno room and John Ethell ran it on the big drum, it sent 62 hp at 9,200 rpm (redline is 9,500) and 41.6 lb-ft of torque at 7,400 rpm to the rear wheel. The dyno curves show a notable bump above 7,000 rpm that corresponds with that boost sensation I mentioned earlier – a little extra kick in the pants to keep things lively.

CFMOTO 700CL-X

Lightweight, modestly powered bikes like the 700CL-X are some of my favorites to ride. Unlike today’s liter-class fire-breathing beasts, I don’t feel any guilt about not being able to use the bike’s full power, nor inadequacy for not being able to exploit its capabilities. I mostly kept it in Sport mode because the milder throttle response of Eco mode felt like a letdown. If I were commuting or taking a weekend escape, then I’d use Eco and cruise control to conserve fuel.

But all I did on this test ride was flog the darn thing – I couldn’t help myself, and my fuel economy suffered accordingly. Pushing the 700CL-X hard through a series of curves was a blast, taking me right back to the fun I had last summer chasing John Burns and outrunning Ron Lieback. Some bikes just bring out my hyperactive inner child.

CFMOTO 700CL-X
We tested a 2022 model. Updates to the 700CL-X for 2023 will include new traction control, some styling changes, and fresh colorways.

While the 700CL-X was solid and responsive and its suspension took a hammering without complaint, the single-disc front brake wasn’t quite up to the task. Stopping power was decent, but feedback at the lever was numb, and it exhibited some fade after repeated hard stops. A second front disc would probably help – or an upgrade like the setup found on CFMOTO’s 700CL-X Sport, a cafe racer version with top-shelf Brembo Stylema front calipers and an MSRP of $6,999.

After logging hundreds of miles on the 700CL-X on city streets, freeways, and winding backroads, there were a few things that left me wanting. The first is the small fuel tank, which holds just 3.5 gallons. (Other bikes in this class have fuel capacities ranging from 3.7-4.1 gallons.) During this test, I averaged 41 mpg, which works out to 143 miles of range. Exhibiting more throttle restraint is the sensible solution, but where’s the fun in that? I’d rather have more fuel to burn.

CFMOTO 700CL-X
Brushed aluminum side panels make the fuel tank appear large, but its capacity is only 3.5 gallons. The 700CL-X runs on regular unleaded.

The second is the instrument panel. When less expensive bikes like the KTM 390 Duke – which CFMOTO builds for the Chinese market – have color TFT displays, the monochrome LCD display on the 700CL-X seems like an unfortunate way to save a few bucks. Other than the road in front of us, the instrument panel is the main thing we look at when riding. The 700CL-X’s gauge provides plenty of info, but the perimeter tachometer is hard to read, the text for some of the info functions is too small, and I couldn’t figure out how to reset the tripmeter without also advancing the clock by one hour. If I didn’t do the time warp again with each fill-up, I had to press the “Adjust” button 23 more times to correct it.

CFMOTO 700CL-X
The LCD display shows speed, gear position, rpm, and other info, but the perimeter tachometer is difficult to read.

Lastly, the self-canceling turnsignals shut off too early. Hit the button and they’ll flash four or five times and then stop, which sometimes happens before the turn is executed.

GEAR UP:

Good Times

Over the past 15 years, I’ve ridden and tested hundreds of new motorcycles of nearly every size, configuration, and style. Because my passion for motorcycles runs deep and my tastes are omnivorous, I can honestly say I’ve enjoyed every motorcycle I’ve ridden. Some aligned with expectations, some fell a bit short, and a few went above and beyond, exceeding expectations because something about their styling, character, or performance – or all three – felt special.

CFMOTO 700CL-X
If you’re looking for a unique, exciting, affordable middleweight, the CFMOTO 700CL-X is worthy of consideration.

That happened to me last summer. As I worked my way up through CFMOTO’s eight-model lineup, the 700CL-X caught my eye because I like scrambler styling and I’m a sucker for gold wheels (which come with the Coal Grey colorway; the Twilight Blue colorway has black wheels). Then I rode it and was surprised by how responsive the engine was, especially that extra kick above 7,000 rpm, and it had a nice bark to its exhaust. It was also light, agile, and fun to ride.

The 700CL-X exceeded my expectations – not just for a motorcycle built in China, but for any motorcycle at this price point.

CFMOTO 700CL-X

2022 CFMOTO 700CL-X Specs

Base Price: $6,499

Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles

Website: CFMOTOusa.com

Engine

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
  • Displacement: 693cc
  • Bore x Stroke: 83 x 64mm
  • Compression Ratio: 11.6:1
  • Valve Insp. Interval: 24,800 miles
  • Fuel Delivery: Bosch EFI w/ throttle-by-wire
  • Lubrication System: Wet sump, 2.3 qt. cap.
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet slip/assist clutch
  • Final Drive: Chain

Chassis

  • Frame: Tubular chromoly-steel trellis w/ cast aluminum swingarm
  • Wheelbase: 56.5 in.
  • Rake/Trail: 24.5 degrees/4.3 in.
  • Seat Height: 31.5 in.
  • Suspension, Front: 41mm inverted fork, fully adj., 5.9 in. travel
  • Rear: Single shock w/ linkage, adj. spring preload & rebound, 5.9 in. travel
  • Brakes, Front: 320mm disc w/ radial-mount 4-piston caliper & ABS
  • Rear: 260mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
  • Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.50 x 18 in. 
  • Rear: Cast aluminum, 4.50 x 17 in.
  • Tires, Front: Tubeless, 110/80-R18
  • Rear: Tubeless, 180/55-R17
  • Wet Weight: 426 lb
  • Load Capacity: 368 lb 
  • GVWR: 794 lb

Performance

  • Horsepower: 62 hp @ 9,400 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
  • Torque: 41.6 lb-ft @ 7,400 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
  • Fuel Capacity: 3.5 gals
  • Fuel Consumption: 41 mpg
  • Estimated Range: 143 miles

The post 2022 CFMOTO 700CL-X | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

This 2023 motorcycle buyers guide highlights new or significantly updated street-legal models available in the U.S. So far, only a few 2023 models have been announced, mostly adventure bikes, and we’ve had a chance to test several of them. We include a couple of 2024 teasers too. We will continually update the guide as new models are available, so be sure to bookmark this page and check back often.

Related Story: 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

Organized in alphabetical order by manufacturer, our guide includes photos, pricing, key update info, and links to first looks and – when available – first rides, road tests, and video reviews of each motorcycle.

2024 Can-Am Origin

Can-Am Electric Motorcycle Pulse Origin
Can-Am Origin

OK, we’ve gotten a bit ahead of ourselves with this one since the earliest you can buy it will be mid-2024. At the annual Club BRP event in August2, Can-Am unveiled two all-new, all-electric motorcycles – the Origin dual-sport and the Pulse roadster (below). Detailed specs won’t be provided until mid-2023 (at Can-Am’s 50th anniversary celebration), but both will be powered by BRP’s all-new, proprietary Rotax E-Power technology, said to provide “highway-worthy speeds with plenty of horsepower and torque.”

The Can-Am Origin has rally-style bodywork, fork guards, and spoked wheels, in diameters that appear to be 21 inches in front and 18 inches out back, common sizes for off-road tires. The final drive is enclosed, and Can-Am reps would not reveal whether power is sent to the rear wheel via chain (used on nearly all dual-sports) or belt (used on many production electric bikes).

Read our Can-Am Origin and Pulse First Look Review

2024 Can-Am Pulse

Can-Am Electric Motorcycle Pulse Origin
Can-Am Pulse

The Can-Am Pulse has the muscular stance of a streetfighter, with racy-looking cast wheels shod with sportbike rubber and a sculpted “tank” that keeps the bike’s profile in line with conventional gas-powered motorcycles. The Origin dual-sport (above) and Pulse roadster share key design elements: distinctive LED headlights, large TFT displays, edgy white and gray bodywork, a bright yellow panel covering their battery packs, inverted forks, single-sided swingarms, single-disc brakes front and rear, and solo seats. Rear cowls may cover pillion seats; passenger footpegs are not visible on either machine, but production versions will likely have passenger accommodations.

Read our Can-Am Origin and Pulse First Look Review

2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura

2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura T
2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura T

The 2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura is powered by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve 799cc parallel-Twin borrowed from the previous-generation KTM 790 Adventure and makes a claimed 95 hp and 57 lb-ft of torque. Equipped with throttle-by-wire, it has two ride modes (Sport and Rain) and cruise control. It has a chromoly-steel frame, fully adjustable KYB suspension, J. Juan triple-disc brakes with cornering ABS, and a 7-inch TFT display.

The base-model 800 ADVentura S (for Street) has cast wheels and an MSRP of $9,499. The up-spec 800 ADVentura T (for Terrain, shown above) has spoked wheels, a quickshifter, a tire-pressure monitoring system, a steering damper, a skid plate, crash bars, handguards, and a centerstand. MSRP is $10,499. They should be available in late 2022 or early 2023.

Read our 2023 CFMOTO 800 ADVentura First Ride Review

2023 KTM 450 SMR

2023 KTM 450 SMR
2023 KTM 450 SMR

Designed for the track only, the 2023 KTM 450 SMR has a 449.9cc liquid-cooled, SOHC Single putting out a claimed 63 hp, and the engine weighs just 59.5 lb, nearly a pound lighter than the previous model. In addition to the features riders already love about the KTM 450 SMR (read our review of the 2021 model here), the 2023 model includes a redesigned Pankl Racing Systems 5-speed gearbox and a new Quickshift sensor on the shift drum for clutchless upshifts, which can be disabled through the handlebar switch.

Other updates for the 2023 KTM 450 SMR include a revised shock mount, redesigned high-grade aluminum CNC-machined triple clamps offering increased grip surface, altered longitudinal and torsional flex and frame-wall thickness, suspension updates, revised ergonomics, and more. KTM is still only listing the 2022 model pricing of $11,999.

Read our 2023 KTM 450 SMR First Look Review

2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar

2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar
2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar

Harley-Davidson and its LiveWire brand have introduced the second all-electric model, the 2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mar, which is smaller, lighter, and less expensive than the LiveWire ONE.

Related Story: 2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire | First Ride Review

The street-tracker is said to produce 80 hp and weigh less than 440 lbs, yielding a 0-60-mph time of just 3.5 seconds. City range is said to be 100 miles, and highway range will be significantly lower.

LiveWire offered 100 serialized “Del Mar Launch Edition” models (shown above) with an exclusive paint scheme and a unique wheel design for $17,699, but all were sold out in the first 18 minutes. Those who missed the opportunity can get their name on a waiting list for when regular production models ($15,000) are available in the spring of 2023.

Read our 2023 LiveWire S2 Del Mark First Look Review

2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411

2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411
2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411

The 2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411 brings scrambler styling to the Himalayan adventure bike platform, which was updated for 2022. It’s powered by an air-cooled 411cc single-cylinder engine carried in a Harris Performance chassis. Royal Enfield says the Scram 411’s versatile geometry and comfortable ergonomics give the lightweight bike a unique combination of on-road agility and capability on trails. It’s available in nine different color/style configurations, and MSRP is $5,099.

Read our 2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411 First Ride Review

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050

The 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 has a liquid-cooled, 1,037cc 90-degree V-Twin. When we tested the 2020 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT, it made 96 hp at 8,500 rpm and 66 lb-ft of torque at 6,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno. The 2023 V-Strom 1050 has a 6-speed gearbox with higher 1st and 6th ratios, an updated throttle-by-wire system, a new ABS control unit, a new CAN (Controller Area Network) wiring system, and a new 32-bit ECM (Engine Control Module).

The new V-Strom 1050 also includes many features previously only available on the XT models, including a 6-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (SIRS) electronics suite – which includes ride modes, cornering ABS, multimode traction control, cruise control, and braking systems that compensate for hill starts, slope, and load – as well as an up/down quickshifter, a new 5-inch TFT display, a new windscreen, and more. Pricing has yet to be announced.

Read our 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 1050DE First Look Review

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE and V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure
2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE Adventure

The 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE and 1050DE Adventure share the same engine as the 2023 Suzuki V-Strom, as well as the new and updated features of the V-Strom (see above) and will replace the previous V-Strom 1050XT and V-Strom 1050XT Adventure models.

However, the DE models are more geared toward off-road adventures, featuring a 21-inch front wheel with a tube-type rim for maximum durability, a 17-inch tubeless rear wheel, and Dunlop Trailmax Mixtour adventure tires. They also add a new Gravity (G) traction control option in the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, the ability to switch off ABS at the rear wheel, their own dedicated chassis geometry and suspension system, a longer swingarm, and other adventure motorcycle-specific offerings. The DE Adventure adds a set of 37-liter aluminum panniers with an anodized silver finish that attach to powdercoated, stainless-steel carriers. Pricing has yet to be announced.

Read our 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 1050DE First Look Review

2023 Triumph Tiger 1200

2023 Triumph Tiger 1200 GT Pro
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200 GT Pro. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

The folks in Hinckley have been busy. They’ve shaved 55 pounds off the new 2023 Triumph Tiger 1200, given it a 147-hp Triple, and equipped it with an all-new chassis and electronics.⁠ Five variants are available: the street-focused GT ($19,100), GT Pro ($21,400), and GT Explorer ($23,100) and the off-road-ready Rally Pro ($22,500) and Rally Explorer ($24,200).⁠

Read our 2023 Triumph Tiger 1200 First Ride Review

The post 2023 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

CFMoto Returns to U.S. with 7 Models for 2022

2022 CFMoto 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMoto 650 ADVentura

After a short hiatus, CFMoto is again importing its motorcycles to the U.S. It is offering seven bikes as part of its 2022 lineup. With a range of small and middleweight motorcycles, CFMoto continues its reputation for reasonable price points for both novice and advanced riders.

The 2022 models include the Papio minibike ($2,999), the 300NK naked bike ($3,999) and 300SS sportbike ($4,299), the naked 650NK ($6,499) and 650 ADVentura adventure bike ($6,799), and the classic series 700CL-X ($6,499) and 700CL-X Sport ($6,999).

2022 CFMoto 300NK
2022 CFMoto 300NK

CFMoto Comes of Age

Following the creation of a trademarked liquid-cooled 4-stroke engine in Hangzhou, China, CFMoto was founded in 1989. It has been a supplier of engines, parts, and components for some of the biggest brands in powersports. In 2002, the company entered the U.S. market. In 2005, it built the company’s U.S. headquarters in Plymouth, Minnesota.

In the early years, the company produced mostly small-displacement models. In 2012, CFMoto introduced the parallel-Twin 650NK, followed shortly after by the 650TK tourer. While there were a few superficial details that raised an eyebrow, overall the bike performed very well considering its $6,999 price point.

2022 CFMoto 300SS
2022 CFMoto 300SS

After the 2016 model year, CFMoto stopped importing bikes to the U.S. The company continued to make motorcycles, and in 2017 CFMoto signed a joint venture agreement with KTM, according to the CFMoto website.

“The joint venture will bring CFMOTO’s R&D and manufacturing capability to a whole new level,” Minjie Lai, CFMoto general manager, said at the groundbreaking ceremony for the joint venture production facility in March 2018. “CFMOTO will benefit from KTM’s advanced technology and profound experience from years of being a leader in the power sports industry. KTM recognized how our manufacturing capacity, supply chain management, and channel development could help implement their global strategy.”

2022 CFMoto 700CL-X Sport
2022 CFMoto 700CL-X Sport

As of 2022, the company states it has more than 500 dealers in the U.S. Read on to learn more about the new models for 2022.

2022 CFMoto Papio

2022 CFMoto Papio
2022 CFMoto Papio

The CFMoto Papio features a 126cc air-cooled 4-stroke Single with a 6-speed gearbox that kicks out 9.3 hp at 8,500 rpm and 6.1 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm. The telescopic fork provides approximately 4.3 inches of travel, and the rear monoshock has five-click preload adjustability. Both ends employ lightweight 12-inch alloy wheels paired to 130/70 rear and 120/70 front street tires. Stopping power comes from a 2-piston caliper and 210mm disc up front and a 1-piston caliper grabbing a 190mm disc in the rear.

2022 CFMoto Papio
2022 CFMoto Papio

The Papio has a 30.5-inch seat height, a 1.9-gallon fuel capacity, and a 251-lb curb weight. It has LED lighting all around and a multifunction LCD instrument panel. It comes in Yellow or  Gray/Red Dragon for $2,999.

2022 CFMoto 300NK and 300SS

2022 CFMoto 300NK
2022 CFMoto 300NK

Both the 300NK naked bike and 300SS sportbike come with a liquid-cooled 292cc DOHC 4-valve Single that makes a claimed 29 hp at 8,750 rpm and 18.7 lb-ft of torque at 7,250 rpm. Both bikes have Bosch EFI, dual-channel ABS, and a 6-speed gearbox with a slip/assist clutch.

Braking is handled by a radially mounted 4-piston front caliper with a 300mm disc and a 1-piston rear caliper with a 245mm disc. The 300NK and 300SS also both have an inverted fork and internal-floating-piston monoshock in back with five clicks of preload adjustability.

2022 CFMoto 300SS
2022 CFMoto 300SS

The differences between the two are primarily curb weight and dimensions. The naked 300NK weighs 333 lb, has a 31.2-inch seat height, and a 3.3-gallon tank. The fully faired 300SS weighs 364 lbs, has a 30.7-inch seat height, and a 3.3-gallon tank.

The 300NK comes in Athens Blue and Nebula Black for $3,999, and the 300SS is offered in Nebula White and Nebula Black for $4,299.

2022 CFMoto 650NK and 650 ADVentura

2022 CFMoto 650NK
2022 CFMoto 650NK

Moving up to the middleweight class, CFMoto offers the naked 650NK and 650 ADVentura adventure bike. Both bikes feature a 649cc DOHC liquid-cooled parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp at 8,750 rpm and 41.3 lb-ft of torque at 7,000 rpm.

Both bikes have dual-channel ABS, a 6-speed gearbox with a CF-SC slip/assist clutch, and a 2-into-1 tuned exhaust. Brakes are by J.Juan, with dual 300mm discs in front with 2-piston calipers and a single 245mm rear disc with a 1-piston caliper.

The naked 650NK weighs 454 lb, and the 650 ADVentura weighs 480 lb. But the bigger difference in the bikes comes from their intent. As an adventure bike, the 650 ADVentura comes factory-equipped with progressive-rate inverted fork with 12-click rebound adjustability, and the rear cantilever swingarm utilizes an internal-floating-piston monoshock with stepless preload and eight-click rebound adjustment.

2022 CFMoto 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMoto 650 ADVentura

The ADVentura has LED lighting all around, a 5-inch color TFT display, and 4.75-gallon tank. It is also equipped with removable hard-sided panniers, handguards, and an adjustable windscreen.

The sporty 650NK has a KYB telescopic fork with 4.7 inches of travel and a preload-adjustable KYB rear monoshock with 1.8 inches of travel. It has LED lighting all around, a 5-inch color TFT display, and rolls on Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires. Seat height is 30.7 inches and fuel capacity is 4.5 gallons.

The 650NK is offered in Nebula White and Nebula Black for $6,499, and the 650 ADVentura comes in Nebula White and Athens Blue for $6,799.

2022 CFMoto 700CL-X and 700CL-X Sport

2022 CFMoto 700CL-X
2022 CFMoto 700CL-X

Taking it up a notch, the 700CL-X and 700CL-X Sport motorcycles both feature a 693cc DOHC liquid-cooled parallel-Twin that makes 74 hp at 8,500 rpm and 47.9 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm. Both bikes have throttle-by-wire, dual-channel ABS, a 6-speed gearbox with a CF-SC slip/assist clutch, 2-into-1 tuned exhaust, a fully adjustable KYB 41mm inverted fork, and a linkage-mounted, progressive-rate KYB rear shock with rebound adjustability.

The 700CL-X and 700CL-X Sport also offer Economy and Sport riding modes and one-touch cruise control. For braking power, the 700CL-X has a J.Juan 320mm single disc and radially mounted 4-piston caliper in the front, while the 700CL-X Sport has a Brembo Stylema 4-piston front calipers with dual 320mm discs. In the rear, both bikes have a 2-piston caliper with a 260mm disc. The 700CL-X rolls on Pirelli MT60 tires, while the Sport is fitted with Maxxis SuperMaxx ST tires.

2022 CFMoto 700CL-X Sport
2022 CFMoto 700CL-X Sport

As premium models, the 700CL-X and 700CL-X Sport feature LED lighting all around, daytime running lights, self-canceling turnsignals, and a 3.5-gallon tank. The 700CL-X has a single upright handlebar with dual mirrors on top, while the Sport features clip-on handlebars with bar-end mirrors.

Both models have a 31.5-inch seat height. Curb weight is 432 lb for the 700CL-X and 451 lb for the 700CL-X Sport.The 700CL-X comes in Twilight Blue and Coal Gray for $6,499, and the 700CL-X Sport comes in Nebula White and Velocity Gray for $6,999.

For more information or to find a CFMoto dealer near you, visit CFMotoUSA.com.


Rider Motorcycle Buying Program. Get up front prices on local inventory. View Inventory 

The post CFMoto Returns to U.S. with 7 Models for 2022 first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

An Aussie Debut For CFMoto 700 CL-X Sport

When CFMoto’s 700 CL-X Sport, Heritage, and Adventure premiered at the  2019 EICMA Motorcycle Show, the Chinese bike made waves with the company’s clever sourcing of inspiration.

A view of the CFMoto 700 CL-X Series: The Sport, Adventure, and Heritage.

CFMoto was already well-known in the industry for a series of smart bikes that lived up to their spec sheet, the most notable being the 800 MT – an adventure bike based on the KTM 790 Adventure.

A view of the CFMoto 800 MT

For the 700 CL-X series, CFMoto created a surprisingly compact bike with a KTM-inspired design, transmission gleaned from BMW roots, and architecture inspired by the engine of the Kawasaki Z650

The result? A veritable chimera of style, speed, and sound that has kept the masses eager for access. 

A view of the CFMoto 700 CL-X Series: The Sport, Adventure, and Heritage.

Now, we’ve just gotten wind from RideApart that the 700 CL-X Sport variant is on its way to the Central and Eastern Hemispheres – specifically, Australia and Europe.

A view of the CFMoto 700 CL-X Sport Variant, soon to be made available in Australia and the Central and Eastern Hemispheres.

Riding on the successes of the CL-X Classic released to the global market last year, the Sport variant will purportedly showcase a sharper style marrying retro to the modern via a newer aesthetic and a more aggressive riding position (courtesy of clip-on handlebars and rear set controls).

A view of the unique headlight on the all-new CFMoto 700 CL-X Sport Variant, soon to be made available in Australia and the Central and Eastern Hemispheres.

The bike will also sport (pun intended) 17-inch cast-aluminum wheels, as well as a very nice set of Brembo brakes, Adjustable front and rear suspension, and an aluminum alloy swingarm designed to keep things light. 

A view of the gas tank details on the CFMoto 700 CL-X Sport Variant, soon to be made available in Australia and the Central and Eastern Hemispheres.

With the bike tipping the scales at 196 kg and CFMoto’s 693cc parallel-twin engine sporting a neat 73 horsepower, the bike is a solid steal at $9490 AUD or the equivalent of $6,939 USD – a factor that has played big into the series’s popularity, and one that could be extremely profitable, should CFMoto ever decide to expand to the Western Hemisphere and include US Dealerships in their contracts. 

A view of the CFMoto 700 CL-X Sport

The 700 CL-X Sport variant will likely see its Australian debut in the fourth quarter of this year. Make sure to stay tuned for further releases, and stay safe on the twisties!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com