2020 KTM Motocross range | Full specifications

Following on from last year’s introduction of a new KTM SX generation, for model year 2020 the 2-stroke KTM 125 SX, KTM 150 SX and KTM 250 SX, and the 4-stroke KTM 250 SX-F, KTM 350 SX-F and KTM 450 SX-F have received performance enhancing engine updates to ensure they remain at the fore and as battle-ready as ever.

KTM XC F
2020 KTM 450 XC-F

KTM Senior Product Manager Offroad
Joachim Sauer

“To be the consistent performer at any level of racing, you have to continue to progress in development. The work never stops. The KTM SX range model year 2020 has received a number of updates to complement last year’s groundbreaking new generation models, and we can see that our continued efforts in development are paying off – our athletes both in Supercross and Motocross have enjoyed some fantastic results so far this season. Utilising the same R&D team as their bigger brothers, the KTM sportminicycle models remain at the very forefront of junior racing competition with detailed refinements for MY2020. In addition, we are excited for the highly anticipated launch of the all-new KTM SX-E 5 electric minicycle.”

KTM SX E Charger
2020 KTM SX-E 5

These detailed refinements, that have been developed with KTM´s test riders and factory racers around the globe, complement the high-quality serial components that the KTM SX range already boasts. New graphics and colors give the range a fresh look for the new season, while an E-starter and a map select switch with integrated traction control and launch control on 4-stroke machines, premium brakes supplied by Brembo, No-Dirt footpegs are fitted as standard to KTM’s class-leading line-up.

High quality exhaust systems, plastics and seats join the reworked WP XACT suspension with the proven AER technology, which offers enhanced handling for model year 2020.

KTM SX F
2020 KTM 350 SX-F

Designed by the very same engineers that are responsible for the bikes raced by the likes of Jeffrey Herlings, Antonio Cairoli and Cooper Webb, the KTM sportminicycle line-up continues to set the benchmark in out-of-the-crate performance for junior riders. For MY2020 the KTM 50 SX, KTM 65 SX and KTM 85 SX have a new look and feature the WP XACT suspension for precise handling and stability in the toughest motocross terrain.

KTM SX
KTM 50-SX Mini

All of the junior models boast premium components such as high-quality Formula brakes, a high-strength steel frame, ergonomically designed bodywork and high-performance engines.

KTM SX RHF
KTM 85-SX with 19-16 rims

For model year 2020 the KTM 65 SX has a reworked ignition curve for improved performance, while the carburetor has been optimized for better power delivery. Its bigger brother, the KTM 85 SX, has a new transmission drive shaft fixing for safer sprocket fixation. The KTM 85 SX also has a reworked muffler with improved packing wool, which saves weight.

In addition, the KTM SX-E 5 will join the sportminicycles as another competitive option for junior riders.

KTM SX E Above
2020 KTM SX-E

Based on the KTM 50 SX with its high-end chassis, but powered by an electric motor, the KTM SX-E 5 is easy to ride, has zero emissions, low noise and requires minimal maintenance – giving riders more options for places to ride, whilst being easy to use.

KTM SX E Instruments
2020 KTM SX-E 5

The height of the bike is also completely adjustable, and it is aimed at riders aged from 4 to 10 years old, making it an exciting new model in the KTM line-up.

KTM SX E
2020 KTM SX-E 5

Source: MCNews.com.au

Asterisk Ultra Cell 2.0 Knee Braces available in Australia

Asterisk Ultra Cell 2.0 Knee Braces

Product News

McLeod Accessories have announced the availability of the new Asterisk Ultra Cell 2.0 Knee Braces within Australia, combining the best features of the brand’s Ultra Cell and Cell knee braces to make the most comfortable slim line knee brace on the market

Asterisk Ultra Cell . Knee Braces
Asterisk Ultra Cell 2.0 Knee Braces

With the ultimate support as found in the current Ultra Cell, Asterisk have trimmed down the profile of the liners and made getting in and out of the brace very easy with four snap-in strap liner attachments, also allowing independent adjustment for the best comfort and support.

Although many customers have been extremely satisfied with the Ultra Cell with the BOA system, Asterisk also felt it necessary to have a lower profile model with a quick release system available as an option.

See below for the full range of features.

A.R.C. Cuff

  • Adjustable Retention Control
  • Multiform rigid lateral support
  • Built in Anti-Rotation connection
  • Stainless steel retention strips
  • Inverted adjustment increases lateral rigidity
  • Thermo-Formed EV50 shock absorbent foam padding

Tele-Tri Patella Cup

  • Telescoping Three piece design
  • Easily removable
  • High impact Nylon 6 material
  • Full range of motion coverage of the knee cap
  • Thermo-Formed EV50 shock absorbent foam padding
Asterisk Ultra Cell . Knee Braces
Asterisk Ultra Cell 2.0 Knee Braces

A.C.M. Frame

  • Anatomically correct design
  • Carbon fiber epoxy matrix
  • Rigid & lightweight, impact distributing structure

Asymmetri-Glide Hinge

  • Tracks the natural “rolling-gliding” motion of the knee joint
  • Asymmetrical design allows each hinge to set properly
  • Allows for automatic tibia alignment of lower frame
  • Adjustable ext. regulator from 0º to 30º
  • Condyle shims for fine tuning fit

Anti-Rotation Tether

  • Links the brace to the boot, making them as one
  • Transfers forces of a lower leg rotation
  • Adjustable to suit each individual

Thermo-Formed Padding

  • Thermo-Formed for precise fit
  • Forms to leg shape using your body heat
  • Easy cleaning
Asterisk Ultra Cell . Knee Braces
Asterisk Ultra Cell 2.0 Knee Braces

Water Resistant

  • Non-corrosive metals
  • Non-corrosive composites
  • Hand washable soft materials

Undersleeves included with braces

  • Conically tapered cut to match the legs’ natural contour
  • Ventilated mesh promotes air flow
  • Reduces heat build up by wicking moisture away from skin
  • Flat stitched quad seam for a smooth, durable finish
  • Durable fold-over elastic band

Sizing

  • Small – 13″ ~ 14 7/8″; 33.02 ~ 35.7cm
  • Medium – 14 1/4″ ~ 15 3/4″; 36 ~ 39.5cm
  • Large – 15 7/8″ ~ 16 7/8″; 40.2 ~ 42.7cm
  • Extra Large – 17″ ~ 18″; 43 ~ 45.6cm

Source: MCNews.com.au

Poncharal clears up Oliveira rumours

“Miguel is directly under contract with KTM, as is the case with Pol (Espargaro) and Johann (Zarco),” began Poncharal, speaking to motogp.com on Tuesday 30th April. “In this contract, there is indeed an option for Miguel to be renewed one more season at home, says the boss of the team Red Bull KTM Tech3. At this point, KTM and Tech3 are very happy with his debut, Miguel too.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

Jonathan Rea interview: the problem of staying at the top as he bids for an unprecedented fifth consecutive World Superbike title


There is a hint of seriousness, some relish and perhaps a shade of concern as four times FIM Superbike World Champion Jonathan Rea discusses his current position in the 2019 WorldSBK series and the dominant threat of MotoGP-convert and Ducati rival Alvaro Bautista.
Source: Jonathan Rea On Facebook

The History Of Motorcycle Racing Knee Sliders

Roadracers have been scraping tarmac with their knees since the 1970s. American racing legend Kenny Roberts Sr. popularized a new style of riding introduced by Finnish rider Jarno Saarinen, which saw riders lowering their body position and regularly skimming their knees on the ground—on purpose. The result? Faster lap times, bloody limbs, and torn leathers.

In those days, most riders layered the knees of their suits with duct tape, adding extra protection and helping their knees glide along the asphalt. Others were more creative, carefully dissecting plastic milk cartons. It wasn’t until the ’80s that leather manufacturers adopted dedicated knee sliders mounted to the suit via Velcro, like the ones we still see today. Some wood, others leather, and most plastic, these were the first means of purpose-built pucks, and the end of non-incidental road rash.

Steeper lean angles and evolution in riding technique have since added purpose to the role of knee sliders, with racers using the pucks as a feeler gauge on the track. Touching sliders to the asphalt comes with a boost of confidence, providing riders exactness in their perception of lean angles, especially on a wet racetrack. Like tires, knee pucks require a break-in process before they’re optimal. The asphalt carves into the slider, precisely matching the rider’s angle of attack, perfecting the feel as they drag their bodies through corners.

Sliders can also prove vital in saving racers from hitting the deck. Ask MotoGP rider Marc Marquez—a man known for saving crashes on his knee. The seven-time world champion chews through tens of Alpinestars proprietary plastic sliders each year, replacing them nearly every time he exits the pit lane. Imagine how his knees would look in the ­duct-tape days.

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

The History Of Motorcycle Racing Knee Sliders

Roadracers have been scraping tarmac with their knees since the 1970s. American racing legend Kenny Roberts Sr. popularized a new style of riding introduced by Finnish rider Jarno Saarinen, which saw riders lowering their body position and regularly skimming their knees on the ground—on purpose. The result? Faster lap times, bloody limbs, and torn leathers.

In those days, most riders layered the knees of their suits with duct tape, adding extra protection and helping their knees glide along the asphalt. Others were more creative, carefully dissecting plastic milk cartons. It wasn’t until the ’80s that leather manufacturers adopted dedicated knee sliders mounted to the suit via Velcro, like the ones we still see today. Some wood, others leather, and most plastic, these were the first means of purpose-built pucks, and the end of non-incidental road rash.

Steeper lean angles and evolution in riding technique have since added purpose to the role of knee sliders, with racers using the pucks as a feeler gauge on the track. Touching sliders to the asphalt comes with a boost of confidence, providing riders exactness in their perception of lean angles, especially on a wet racetrack. Like tires, knee pucks require a break-in process before they’re optimal. The asphalt carves into the slider, precisely matching the rider’s angle of attack, perfecting the feel as they drag their bodies through corners.

Sliders can also prove vital in saving racers from hitting the deck. Ask MotoGP rider Marc Marquez—a man known for saving crashes on his knee. The seven-time world champion chews through tens of Alpinestars proprietary plastic sliders each year, replacing them nearly every time he exits the pit lane. Imagine how his knees would look in the ­duct-tape days.

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

The History Of Motorcycle Racing Knee Sliders

Roadracers have been scraping tarmac with their knees since the 1970s. American racing legend Kenny Roberts Sr. popularized a new style of riding introduced by Finnish rider Jarno Saarinen, which saw riders lowering their body position and regularly skimming their knees on the ground—on purpose. The result? Faster lap times, bloody limbs, and torn leathers.

In those days, most riders layered the knees of their suits with duct tape, adding extra protection and helping their knees glide along the asphalt. Others were more creative, carefully dissecting plastic milk cartons. It wasn’t until the ’80s that leather manufacturers adopted dedicated knee sliders mounted to the suit via Velcro, like the ones we still see today. Some wood, others leather, and most plastic, these were the first means of purpose-built pucks, and the end of non-incidental road rash.

Steeper lean angles and evolution in riding technique have since added purpose to the role of knee sliders, with racers using the pucks as a feeler gauge on the track. Touching sliders to the asphalt comes with a boost of confidence, providing riders exactness in their perception of lean angles, especially on a wet racetrack. Like tires, knee pucks require a break-in process before they’re optimal. The asphalt carves into the slider, precisely matching the rider’s angle of attack, perfecting the feel as they drag their bodies through corners.

Sliders can also prove vital in saving racers from hitting the deck. Ask MotoGP rider Marc Marquez—a man known for saving crashes on his knee. The seven-time world champion chews through tens of Alpinestars proprietary plastic sliders each year, replacing them nearly every time he exits the pit lane. Imagine how his knees would look in the ­duct-tape days.

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

Marquez seeking Jerez redemption

A 55th pole would move him level with Valentino Rossi (Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP) and three behind Mick Doohan, who holds the record with 58 500cc/MotoGP™ pole positions. However, Saturday success hasn’t been a regular feature of the Repsol Honda man’s Jerez weekends, with his last top spot qualifying finish coming back in 2014.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

2020 Husqvarna Motocross Range | Specifications

2020 Husqvarna MX Specifications are bottom of page

Continuing to develop motorcycles that are more agile, more powerful and more ergonomically advanced, the Husqvarna 2020 Motocross range sees upgrades to the FC 250, FC 350, FC 450 4-strokes and TC 125 and TC 250 2-stroke machines, as well as to the TC 50.

Husqvarna FC
2020 Husqvarna FC450

Notably, the entire motocross range features striking new graphics that offer a modern-day salute to the brand’s rich racing history.

Husqvarna TC
2020 Husqvarna TC250

2020 Husqvarna Motocross Range
Technical Highlights

  • Additional interchangeable airbox cover on FC models for optimised airflow
  • Striking new graphics as a modern-day salute to Husqvarna’s racing heritage
  • Progressive bodywork for optimal ergonomics
  • Chromoly steel frame featuring precisely engineered flex characteristics
  • Innovative 2-piece composite subframe design
  • Progressive setting on the WP XACT forks with AER technology
  • WP XACT shock featuring progressive setting
  • CNC machined triple clamps on full-size models
  • Magura hydraulic clutch system offering perfect action in every condition
  • Brembo callipers & high-performance discs combining superior stopping power with great control
  • Traction & launch control with advanced settings [4-strokes]
  • Electric starter for easy starting when time is critical
  • Lightweight Li-ion 2.0 Ah battery
  • ProTaper handlebar
  • Progressive throttle mechanism & ODI grips offering easy grip mounting
  • Laser engraved D.I.D. wheels
  • Gearboxes produced by Pankl
Husqvarna FC
2020 Husqvarna FC350

The list of MY20 technical highlights includes a new additional interchangeable airbox cover for optimised airflow on all FC models.

Husqvarna FC
2020 Husqvarna FC250

Focused on delivering optimum efficiency, all models enjoy progressive bodywork for optimised ergonomics together with chromoly steel frames that ensure precisely engineered flex characteristics and Husqvarna Motorcycles’ innovative 2-piece composite subframe.

Husqvarna Motocross Frame
2020 Husqvarna Motocross Range

WP XACT suspension ensures accurate and responsive handling in all conditions thanks to progressive settings and the AER front fork technology.

Husqvarna Motocross WP XACT Shock
2020 Husqvarna Motocross Range

High-end components guarantee all models deliver class leading performance with CNC machined triple clamps on all full-size models.

Husqvarna Motocross Triple Clamps
2020 Husqvarna Motocross Range

Magura hydraulic clutch system, ProTaper handlebars, Brembo brake callipers and high-performance discs as standard.

Husqvarna Motocross Bars
2020 Husqvarna Motocross Range

All 4-stroke models are equipped with electric start as well as traction and launch control.

Husqvarna Motocross Brake
2020 Husqvarna Motocross Range

Featuring the same level of quality and much of the same technology found in the successful full-size motocross models, Husqvarna Motorcycles’ minicycle range continues to offer up-and-coming youngsters of all skill levels a comprehensive line-up of premium quality bikes.

Husqvarna TC
2020 Husqvarna TC65

Giving all new minicycles striking new graphics, for MY20 Husqvarna Motorcycles engineers also focused their attentions on the TC 50, fitting it with a new lightweight, cast aluminium swingarm.

Husqvarna TC
2020 Husqvarna TC50

Husqvarna MX Range Wide
2020 Husqvarna Motocross Range

2020 Husqvarna Specifications
2020 Husqvarna FC, TX and TC

Source: MCNews.com.au

Shinko 700 Series Dual-Sport Tires | Gear Review

Shinko 700 series dual-sport tires
Shinko’s 700 series dual-sport tires are suitable for light or heavier dual-sport and ADV machines.

When it comes to dual-sport tires, there’s a sliding ratio based on their intended on-road vs. off-road use. Most adventure touring bikes are fitted with 90/10 tires as original equipment, on the assumption (backed up by market research) that most owners do 90 percent or more of their riding on pavement and only about 10 percent off-road.

Such tires typically have large, closely-spaced tread blocks with a tread pattern that has more in common with a sport-touring tire than a knobby, and the tire compound(s) favor on-road grip and longevity. Most 90/10 tires work great on the street or well-graded dirt roads, but you’ll want to avoid sand or mud.

But in the case of an aggressive dual-sport bike like my 2017 KTM 690 Enduro R, its OE tires were 10/90 knobbies with small, widely spaced tread blocks. (Unable to bear parting with the 690-R at the end of our long-term test, I bought it from KTM.) They hummed and squirmed on the street, but were fantastic off-road. The biggest downside of 10/90 tires is that they don’t last long–the rear was shagged after 1,600 miles, and the front tread blocks had become wedge-shaped due to aggressive braking on pavement.

Needing fresh buns for the KTM, I opted for the middle ground. About two-thirds of my miles are devoted to commuting or just getting to/from off-road riding areas, so tires with a slight on-road bias should be quieter, provide more grip on the street and last longer than the 10/90 knobbies.

Shinko’s 700 Series tires have a 60/40 on-/off-road ratio and a heavy-duty four-ply carcass. The tread is made up of irregularly shaped blocks arranged in an interlocking pattern, with larger tread blocks in the center of the tire, smaller blocks on the shoulder and half-depth reinforcements connecting the blocks on the shoulder for cornering stability.

At freeway speeds, the Shinko 700s are quiet and smooth, and on dry and wet twisty roads they lay down a well-planted footprint with minimal squirm. Off-road they perform admirably, scrambling over rough, rocky terrain, dirt tracking around corners and slicing lines through muddy sections with confidence. 

With nearly 600 miles on the Shinko 700s, they’re well scrubbed-in but show little wear. It’s too early to tell how many miles I’ll get out of them, but other Shinko dual-sport tires we’ve tested have lasted at least as long as major competing tires.

One of the most attractive features of Shinko tires is their price: 700s retail for $61.95 for the front (one size: 3.00-21) and $73.95-$85.95 for rears (four sizes: 4.60-17, 5.10-17, 4.60-18, 130/80-18). With a load index of 51 (430 pounds) for the front and 62-67 (584-677 pounds) for the rears, Shinko 700 Series tires are suitable for heavy adventure bikes as well as lighter dual-sports. 

For more information, see your dealer or visit shinkotireusa.com.

Source: RiderMagazine.com