Tag Archives: Honda Motorcycles

2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT and Returning Models | First Look Review

2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT
The 2023 Honda “bagger” Rebel 1100T DCT ($11,299) in Bordeaux Red Metallic

The 2023 Honda lineup is in, including 11 returning models from five categories and the new “bagger” Rebel 1100 trim level. 

In 2023, we’ll see the return of sportbikes like the CBR1000RR, the touring-focused NC750X, the classic Shadow Aero and Shadow Phantom, miniMOTOs like the Super Cub and Monkey, and more. 

The highlight of Honda’s 2023 lineup is the “bagger” Rebel, the 2023 Rebel 1100T DCT. With a dual-clutch transmission, wind protection, and extra cargo space offered in the new hard-shell saddlebags, this model puts a different spin on Honda’s new-school cruiser platform.

And for those who love the Rebel just as it is, the Rebel 1100 will still be available in its non-bagger form, in both manual and dual-clutch transmission versions. 

2023 Honda Rebel 1100
The 2023 Honda Rebel 1100 ($9,499) in Green Metallic

“This announcement covers nearly every category of on-road motorcycle, which is a testament to how deep our product offering is,” says Brandon Wilson, Manager of Sports and Experiential at American Honda. “Whether it’s for the first-time rider or the weekend warrior, we’re committed to delivering the best possible ownership and riding experiences to all of our passionate two-wheel customers.” 

Honda also announced in September that it would be continuing the Gold Wing family for model year 2023. Click here for more information on the 2023 Gold Wings. 

2023 Honda Rebel 1100 

2023 Honda Rebel 1100
The 2023 Honda Rebel 1100 ($9,499) in Iridium Gray Metallic

Watch Rider‘s video review of the 2021 Honda Rebel 1100

Honda introduced the Rebel 1100 two years ago, a bigger-displacement cruiser modeled after the successful Rebel 300 and 500. It’s a capable and comfortable all-around cruiser featuring a liquid-cooled, 1083cc, parallel-Twin engine available with either a manual transmission or DCT (dual-clutch transmission).

The new “T” trim marks the beginning of the “bagger” Rebel, only available with DCT. The Rebel 1100T DCT comes standard with a windscreen and hard-shell saddlebags with a combined 35 liters of space, making it even more practical for longer rides.

2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT
The 2023 Honda “bagger” Rebel 1100T DCT ($11,299) in Metallic Black

The 2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT will come in Metallic Black or Bordeaux Red Metallic starting at $11,299. The Rebel 1100 DCT will come in Iridium Gray Metallic or Green Metallic starting at $10,099. And the Rebel 1100 will start at $9,499 for Iridium Gray Metallic or Green Metallic. 

2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT Front
2023 Honda Rebel 1100R DCT Cockpit

2023 Honda Rebel 500 & Rebel 300 

2023 Honda Rebel 500
The 2023 Honda Rebel 500 ($6,449) in Candy Blue

The Rebel 500 and 300 return as Honda’s most approachable and affordable entry-level cruiser models. The 500 comes with a 471cc, liquid-cooled, parallel-Twin engine, while the 300 has a 286cc, liquid-cooled, single-cylinder engine. These models provide a relaxed riding position with a classic-meets-modern aesthetic.

2023 Honda Rebel 500
The 2023 Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE ($6,949) in Titanium Metallic

Related Story: 2020 Honda Rebel 500 ABS | Road Test Review

Both models are available in standard and ABS versions, and the Rebel 500 ABS SE includes numerous add-ons like a diamond-stitched seat and a headlight cowl. Both models also feature a peanut fuel tank, LED lighting, and blacked-out engine components.  

2023 Honda Rebel 300
The 2023 Honda Rebel 300 ($4,749) in Candy Diesel Red
2023 Honda Rebel 300
The 2023 Honda Rebel 300 ($4,749) in Matte Black Metallic

The 2023 Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE will come in Titanium Metallic starting at $6,949. The Rebel 500 ABS will be available for $6,749, while the 500 without ABS will be available for $6,499, both in Matte Black Metallic or Candy Blue. The Rebel 300 ABS will come in at $5,049, and the 300 without ABS will be $4,649, both in Matte Black Metallic and Candy Diesel Red.

2023 Honda Shadow Aero 

2023 Honda Shadow Aero
The 2023 Honda Shadow Aero ($7,799) in Ultra Blue Metallic

The Shadow Aero returns with its large front fender, chrome headlights, a low-slung seat, spoked wheels, swept-back twin exhausts, and a 745cc V-Twin engine. The Aero has a retro look but comes with modern technology like fuel injection and ABS. It will be available in February 2023. 

Related Story: 2013 Honda Shadow Aero – Review

The 2023 Honda Shadow Aero will be available for $7,799 in Ultra Blue Metallic.

2023 Honda Shadow Phantom 

2023 Honda Shadow Phantom
The 2023 Honda Shadow Phantom ($7,999) in Adventure Green

This bobber-inspired cruiser has a blacked-out engine, short fenders, and black wheels with spokes. The Shadow Phantom is designed for a comfortable riding experience and features the same 745cc V-Twin engine as the Shadow Aero. 

2023 Honda Shadow Phantom
The 2023 Honda Shadow Phantom ($7,999) in Matte Black Metallic

The 2023 Honda Shadow Phantom will be available for $7,999 in Adventure Green or Matte Black Metallic. 

2023 Honda CBR1000RR

2023 Honda CBR1000RR
The 2023 Honda CBR1000RR ($16,599) in Grand Prix Red

The CBR1000RR sportbike is built to perform, featuring a light 432-lb curb weight and a powerful 998cc inline 4-cylinder engine with dual-stage fuel injection. The RR also boasts a TFT display, a full LED lighting package, and your choice of ABS or conventional brakes.  

Related Story: 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP | Road Test Review 

The 2023 Honda CBR1000RR will be available in Grand Prix Red with ABS for $16,899 or without ABS for $16,599. 

2023 Honda CBR600RR 

2023 Honda CBR600RR
The 2023 Honda CBR600RR ($12,099) in Grand Prix Red

With eight World Supersport titles, the CBR600RR is a tried-and-true supersport. Two sets of injectors per cylinder ensure both low- and high-rpm performance, while the Honda Electronic Steering Damper detects vehicle speed and adjusts damping to stable handling. The 4.8-gallon fuel tank is centered and low in the frame, allowing for a compact design and making the bike more responsive to rider input. 

Related Story: 2013 Honda CBR600RR | First Ride Review

The 2023 Honda CBR600RR will be available in Grand Prix Red for $13,099 with ABS or $12,099 without ABS.

2023 Honda CBR300R ABS

2023 Honda CB300R
The 2023 Honda CB300R ABS ($5,049) in Pearl Dusk Yellow

This entry-level sport-naked bike features a friendly 286cc, liquid-cooled, single-cylinder engine designed for use in real-world riding situations. The CBR300R is light weight at 316 lb wet and features standard ABS, blacked-out engine components, and a cafe style. New for 2023 is a gear-position indicator on the LED instrument panel.

2023 Honda CB300R
The 2023 Honda CB300R ABS ($5,049) in Matte Black Metallic

Related Story: 2019 Honda CB300R | First Ride Review 

The 2023 Honda CBR300R ABS will be available for $5,049 in Pearl Dusk Yellow or Matte Black Metallic.

2023 Honda NC750X 

2023 Honda NC750
The 2023 Honda NC750X ($9,399) in Matte Nightshade Blue

Honda built the NC750X to create a motorcycle that can “do it all and do it well.” This commuter bike features a liquid-cooled, SOHC 8-valve parallel-Twin engine, a large front storage compartment big enough to store most helmets, an upright riding position, and a dual-clutch transmission. It also features the Honda Selectable Torque Control, allowing riders to choose between some rear-wheel spin for gravel and dirt or reduced spin for slippery roads. 

Related Story: 2019 Honda NC750X | Long-Term Report

The 2023 Honda NC750X will be available for $9,399 in Matte Nightshade Blue.

2023 Honda Super Cub C125 ABS

2023 Honda Super Cub
The 2023 Super Cub C125 ($3,849) in Pearl Gray

The original Cub sold 100 million units worldwide since 1958, and this reimagined Cub is powered by a 124cc four-stroke engine that zips around town while sipping fuel. The Super Cub features modern technology like fuel injection, front-wheel ABS, and an electric starter, offering convenience for everyday riding. 

Related Story: 2019 Honda Super Cub C125 ABS | First Ride Review 

The 2023 Honda Super Cub C125 ABS will be available for $3,849 in Pearl Gray.

2023 Honda Monkey ABS

2023 Honda Monkey
The 2023 Honda Monkey ($4,249) in Banana Yellow

Related Story: Honda Monkey: Super-Spreader of Happiness 

Since its development in 1961, the Monkey has retained its vintage-inspired styling while evolving into a practical and fun pint-sized machine. It features the same 124cc air-cooled engine as the Honda Grom with a five-speed transmission and standard ABS. With a claimed 169 mpg, a wet weight of 231 lb, 12-inch wheels, and chunky tires, the Monkey is built for urban riding. 

2023 Honda Monkey
The 2023 Honda Monkey ($4,249) in Pearl Nebula Red

The 2023 Honda Monkey ABS will be available for $4,249 in Pearl Nebula Red and Banana Yellow.

2023 Honda ADV150

2023 Honda ADV150
The 2023 Honda ADV150 ($4,349) in Candy Rose Red

The ADV150 is a mix of adventure and urban riding. This “Africa Twin of the scooter world” features a 149cc, liquid-cooled, 4-stroke engine in a steel frame.

Related Story: 2021 Honda ADV150 | First Ride Review 

At 134 mpg, this scooter is practical for getting around town while also being able to handle scenic dirt roads. It also features an automatic transmission, an adjustable windscreen, and under-seat storage. 

The 2023 Honda ADV150 will be available for $4,349 in Candy Rose Red.

Find out more at Powersports.Honda.com 

The post 2023 Honda Rebel 1100T DCT and Returning Models | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Honda Announces 2023 Gold Wing Family

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT in Candy Ardent Red

Despite concerns by some that Honda would be discontinuing its popular flagship Gold Wing motorcycle – perhaps precipitated by the announcement in July that the Gold Wing Road Riders Association was closing its doors – the company recently announced the return of the Gold Wing family for 2023.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT

Slated to be available in November, the new Gold Wings will comes in four different trims, three of which feature Honda’s exclusive Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT).

Related Story: 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT | Road Test Review

2023 Honda Gold Wing Family

With its hefty liquid-cooled 1,833cc horizontally opposed 6-cylinder engine, the 2023 Honda Gold Wing still boasts all the features touring riders have grown to love, including throttle-by-wire, four riding modes (Tour, Sport, Econ, and Rain), Honda Selectable Torque Control (Gold Wing Tour models only), Hill Start Assist, optimized cruise control, and electronically controlled combined braking system with ABS. Gold Wing DCT and Tour DCT models feature Walking Mode for creeping forward and backward and saving curb weight through the absence of a reverse idle shaft.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour in Black

In 2021, a number of audio improvements were incorporated, including richer sound, optimized automatic volume-adjustment level, and a standard XM radio antenna, and Android Auto integration joined Apple CarPlay integration. Speakers that had been upgraded to 45 watts in 2021 were bumped again in 2022 to a 55-watt rating.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT

The Gold Wing’s trunk was also upgraded in 2021 and now holds 61 liters – enough for two full-face helmets – which makes for a combined 121 liters of storage including the saddlebags.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing DCT in Matte Gray

Pricing and color options for the 2023 Honda Gold Wing are summarized below:

  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT: Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $32,900)
  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour DCT: Black, Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $29,600)
  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour: Black, Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $28,600)
  • 2023 Gold Wing DCT: Matte Gray (MSRP $25,600)

For more information, visit the Honda website.

The post Honda Announces 2023 Gold Wing Family first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Honda Announces 2023 Gold Wing Family

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT in Candy Ardent Red

Despite concerns by some that Honda would be discontinuing its popular flagship Gold Wing motorcycle – perhaps precipitated by the announcement in July that the Gold Wing Road Riders Association was closing its doors – the company recently announced the return of the Gold Wing family for 2023.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT

Slated to be available in November, the new Gold Wings will comes in four different trims, three of which feature Honda’s exclusive Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT).

Related Story: 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT | Road Test Review

2023 Honda Gold Wing Family

With its hefty liquid-cooled 1,833cc horizontally opposed 6-cylinder engine, the 2023 Honda Gold Wing still boasts all the features touring riders have grown to love, including throttle-by-wire, four riding modes (Tour, Sport, Econ, and Rain), Honda Selectable Torque Control (Gold Wing Tour models only), Hill Start Assist, optimized cruise control, and electronically controlled combined braking system with ABS. Gold Wing DCT and Tour DCT models feature Walking Mode for creeping forward and backward and saving curb weight through the absence of a reverse idle shaft.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour in Black

In 2021, a number of audio improvements were incorporated, including richer sound, optimized automatic volume-adjustment level, and a standard XM radio antenna, and Android Auto integration joined Apple CarPlay integration. Speakers that had been upgraded to 45 watts in 2021 were bumped again in 2022 to a 55-watt rating.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT

The Gold Wing’s trunk was also upgraded in 2021 and now holds 61 liters – enough for two full-face helmets – which makes for a combined 121 liters of storage including the saddlebags.

2023 Honda Gold Wing
2023 Honda Gold Wing DCT in Matte Gray

Pricing and color options for the 2023 Honda Gold Wing are summarized below:

  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT: Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $32,900)
  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour DCT: Black, Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $29,600)
  • 2023 Gold Wing Tour: Black, Candy Ardent Red (MSRP $28,600)
  • 2023 Gold Wing DCT: Matte Gray (MSRP $25,600)

For more information, visit the Honda website.

The post Honda Announces 2023 Gold Wing Family first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Honda: Gold Wing Family Returns for 2023

Honda‘s legendary flagship tourer is back for 2023 – and the semi-centennial celebration of substantial scoots continue!

The goals on the Gold Wing docket for this year are “comfort, smoothness, technology and surprisingly nimble handling,” along with the addition of Honda’s Dual Clutch Transmission on three (of the four) trim levels. 

The Honda Gold Wing, which is returning for 2023. Media sourced from Honda.
The Honda Gold Wing, which is returning for 2023. Media sourced from Honda.

The new 2023 machine will be available as of November of this year, with the following obligatory perks (as per the official press release): 

  • Substantial luggage capacity
  • Premium sound system
  • Convenient navigation software
  • Suspension performance
  • Available DCT gearbox
The Honda Gold Wing, which is returning for 2023. Media sourced from Honda.
The Honda Gold Wing, which is returning for 2023. Media sourced from Honda.

Colors continue to skip this side of the rainbow, with the following schemes available in the following variants: 

Candy Ardent Red

  • Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT
  • Gold Wing Tour DCT
  • Gold Wing Tour
A view of the bikes (and riders) connected with the Vintage Motor Cycle Club. Media sourced from the VMCC's Facebook page.

Black

  • Gold Wing Tour DCT
  • Gold Wing Tour

Matte Grey

  • Gold Wing DCT
The Honda Gold Wing, which is returning for 2023. Media sourced from Honda.
The Honda Gold Wing, which is returning for 2023. Media sourced from Honda.

For other related news, be sure to check back at our shiny new webpage; subscribe for the best of the latest ifyou’d rather a curated list be sent to your inbox twice  week, and until next time – stay safe on the twisties. 

*Media sourced from Honda’s press release*

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year

For the past 32 years, Rider has selected a Motorcycle of the Year. With the exception of two years when we made a People’s Choice selection by popular vote among readers (the Honda F6B in 2013 and the BMW R 1200 RT in 2014), it has been up to the Rider editorial team to choose a winner based on our collective experience with the year’s eligible contenders.

We ride as many of the new or significantly updated motorcycles released over the past year as possible, and we evaluate them within the context of their intended use.

Since we announced last year’s winner, we’ve tested cruisers, baggers, sportbikes, adventure bikes, naked bikes, minibikes, sport-tourers, luxury-tourers, cafe racers, standards, dual-sports, and even an electric dirtbike for kids.

Narrowing down such a diverse range of motorcycles into a single “best” isn’t easy. Our goal is to identify the one that best fulfills its intended purpose and advances the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

We haven’t always hit the mark. The BMW K1 we selected as our first MOTY in 1990 proved to be a flop, and the forkless Yamaha GTS1000 we selected in 1993 was the answer to a question no one asked.

Even if some of the selections we’ve made don’t stand the test of time, we stand by them because they were impressive motorcycles within the context of their eras. Others are easier to defend, like the 2001 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, the 2002 Suzuki V-Strom 1000, the 2005 BMW R 1200 GS, and the 2017 Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight Touring lineup. 

For 2022, there were more than 60 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one ultimate winner. 

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists

1. BMW K 1600 GTL

2022 Motorcycle of the Year BMW K 1600 GTL
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Winner of Rider’s 2012 MOTY award, BMW’s top-of-the-line luxury-tourer got its most significant update yet for 2022. Its ultra-smooth 1,649cc inline-Six makes 160 hp and 133 lb-ft of torque, its full suite of electronic rider aids was upgraded, and it has a huge 10.25-inch TFT, an air-conditioned smartphone compartment, and other new comfort and convenience features. 

2. CFMOTO 650 ADVentura

2022 Motorcycle of the Year CFMOTO 650 ADVentura
2022 CFMOTO 650 ADVentura. Photo by Gary Walton.

Competing head-to-head with the Kawasaki Versys 650LT, the all-new 650 ADVentura is powered by a 649cc parallel-Twin that makes 60 hp and 41 lb-ft of torque. It has an adjustable windscreen, a TFT display, LED lighting, a slip/assist clutch, standard ABS, Pirelli Angel GT sport-touring tires, and hard-shell saddlebags. At $6,799, it undercuts the Kawasaki by $3,200.

3. Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak
2022 Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak. Photo by David Schelske.

The range-topping Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak’s 1,158cc Grandturismo V4 cranks out 170 hp and 92 lb-ft of torque, and its apex-strafing game gets elevated with a new Race mode and revised quickshifter. It’s equipped with a full electronics package (including adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection), Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 suspension, Brembo Stylema calipers, and more.

4. Harley-Davidson Nightster

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Harley-Davidson Nightster
2022 Harley-Davidson Nightster. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The spiritual successor to the air-cooled Evo-powered Sportster, the all-new Nightster is a performance cruiser built on Harley’s modular liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine platform, in this case with a 975cc V-Twin with variable valve timing that produces 90 hp. Classic styling cues include a peanut “tank” (actually an airbox cover), a round air intake cover, and exposed rear shocks.

5. Honda Navi

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Honda Navi
2022 Honda Navi. Photo by Drew Ruiz.

Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and a step-over motorcycle, the all-new Honda Navi borrows the fan-cooled 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G scooter and the Grom’s popular design language. The 8-hp Navi weighs just 236 lb, has a 30-inch seat height, and is priced at just $1,807, making it an ideal gateway to the world of motorcycling.

6. Indian Pursuit Limited

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Indian Pursuit Limited
2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Indian’s Challenger bagger, powered by the liquid-cooled PowerPlus 108 V-Twin that makes 108 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, was Rider’s 2020 MOTY. Touring capability gets a boost on the Pursuit Limited (or Dark Horse), which adds fairing lowers, a tall adjustable windscreen, a Touring Comfort seat, heated grips, and a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

7. KTM 1290 Super Duke R Evo

2022 Motorcycle of the Year KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo
2022 KTM 1290 Super Duke Evo. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Known as “The Beast,” the 1290 Super Duke R added “Evo” to its name and was updated with WP Semi-Active Technology (SAT) suspension available with six modes and automatic preload adjustment, a revised throttle-by-wire system, and more. Its 1,301cc V-Twin cranks out 180 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque, and its electronics allow riders to tame or unleash The Beast as they see fit.

8. Royal Enfield Classic 350

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Royal Enfield Classic 350
2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350. Photo by Brandon Bunch.

The Classic 350 brings back the styling that made the Royal Enfield Bullet – built from 1931-2020 – such an iconic bike and pairs it with a 349cc air-/oil-cooled, SOHC, 2-valve, fuel-injected Single with a 5-speed gearbox. Available in nine color-style combinations and priced as low as $4,599, the Classic 350 is the embodiment of simple, fun, affordable motorcycling.

9. Triumph Tiger 1200

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Triumph Tiger 1200
2023 Triumph Tiger 1200. Photo by Kingdom Creative.

Triumph completely revamped its Tiger 1200 adventure bike platform for the 2023 model year, shaving off 55 lb of weight, bolting in a 147-hp Triple from the Speed Triple, and equipping it with a new chassis and upgraded electronics. Five variants are available: the street-focused GT, GT Pro, and GT Explorer and the off-road-ready Rally Pro and Rally Explorer.

10. Yamaha MT-10

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Yamaha MT-10
2022 Yamaha MT-10. Photo by Joseph Agustin.

At the top of Yamaha’s Hyper Naked pecking order is the MT-10, a descendent of the FZ1 that was Rider’s 2006 MOTY. This “Master of Torque” is powered by a 160-hp crossplane inline-Four derived from the YZF-R1. It was updated for 2022 with new R1-derived electronics, upgraded brakes, revised styling and ergonomics, a new TFT display, and more.


And the 2022 Motorcycle of the Year Winner is…

SUZUKI GSX-S1000GT+

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Here at Rider, we’re big fans of performance. That’s an often overused and general term, but it encapsulates so much of what we love about motorcycles. Powerful, thrilling engines. Strong, responsive chassis – everything from the frame to the suspension, brakes, and tires. And these days, electronic rider aids that allow responses to be tailored to different conditions or rider preferences.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

We’re street riders. We may do the occasional track day or school, but it’s usually to help us sharpen our skills so we can ride more confidently and safely on the street. We want performance that is exciting yet still manageable on public roads.

At the same time, we like to go the distance. Rider was started in 1974 just as the touring segment was taking off, and motorcycle travel has been one of the magazine’s hallmarks. We’ve tested thousands of motorcycles over the years, and we gravitate toward bikes that are comfortable, reliable, and versatile yet still get our performance juices flowing.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

Our 2021 Motorcycle of the Year was the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, an adventure-style sport-tourer that’s lighter and more affordable than traditional heavyweight sport-tourers like the BMW R 1250 RT, Yamaha FJR1300, and Kawasaki Concours 14 – every one of which has worn Rider’s MOTY crown at some point. In fact, eight of our 32 previous MOTY winners have been sport-tourers.

And now, make that nine. The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (the ‘+’ denoting the model with standard saddlebags, whereas the base GT model goes without) delivers all the performance a street rider needs in a refined, comfortable, sophisticated package at a reasonable MSRP of $13,799. It checks all the right performance boxes while also being practical and providing – as George Carlin would say – a place for our stuff.

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S’s 999cc inline-Four is adapted from the GSX-R1000 K5, a bulletproof, championship-winning engine. Tuned for street duty, it churned out 136 hp at 10,200 rpm and 73 lb-ft of torque at 9,300 rpm on Jett Tuning’s rear-wheel dyno.

As we said in our road test in the July issue, “The GSX-S engine is a gem with no rough edges. From cracking open the throttle above idle to twisting the grip to the stop, power comes on cleanly and predictably.”

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, which includes three ride modes that adjust throttle response, power delivery, traction control, cruise control, and other systems. It has the best up/down quickshifter we’ve ever tested, and thanks to its street-tuned, sportbike-spec chassis, the GT+ offers predictable handling, unflappable stability, and impeccable smoothness.

Touring amenities include comfortable rider and passenger seating, 25.7-liter side cases that can accommodate most full-face helmets, and a 6.5-inch full-color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity via Suzuki’s mySPIN smartphone app. With its angular sportbike styling, the GSX-S1000GT+ looks as fast as it goes, and the side cases can be easily removed for an even sportier look.

As we concluded in our road test, “The GSX-S1000GT+ strikes an excellent balance between performance, technology, weight, comfort, and price. Life is good when the scenery is a blur.”

Congratulations to Suzuki for the GSX-S1000GT+, Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year!

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+. Photo by Kevin Wing.

To find a Suzuki dealer near you, visit SuzukiCycles.com.

The post 2022 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Honda Announces Goal of Carbon-Neutrality by 2050

Honda electric motorcycles

The world is changing, and motorcycles continue to change with it. While some riders maintain a love for the classics, many are hungry for the next big advancements and innovations in the industry. In response to what Honda says are the needs and desires of riders around the world, the company has released a briefing containing plans for the next three decades focused on the electrification of its motorcycle models, including more than 10 new electric motorcycle models by 2025.

Related Story: 2022 Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 | First Ride Review

Honda claims it will “continue to lead the industry in this ‘era of carbon neutrality,’” aiming to achieve carbon neutrality for all its products and activities by 2050. The company will continue advancing its ICE (internal combustion engines) while it roles out new electric models.

Honda Electric Line

According to the press briefing, the new electric motorcycle product launch will involve commuter motorcycles, commuter scooters, and electric bicycles in China, Asia, Europe, and Japan, as well as the “FUN” lineup, which will include adult and kids models, in the U.S., Japan, and Europe.

Honda plans to introduce two commuter EV models between 2024 and 2025 in Asia, Europe, and Japan, and the company is exploring a range of future personal-use models, including ones equipped with a power source besides swappable batteries.  

Currently, EMs and EBs account for more than 90% of industry-wide global electric motorcycle unit sales (approximately 50 million units). In China, the world’s largest electric motorcycle market, they are widely adopted as a convenient form of everyday mobility, and Honda has been offering such products by leveraging its local supplier infrastructure and development/manufacturing operations. With the expectation that demand for EMs/EBs will be expanding globally, Honda plans to introduce a total of five “compact and affordable” EM and EB models between now and 2024 in China, Asia, Europe, and Japan.

In addition to commuter EVs, Honda is actively developing electrified models in the “FUN” category and plans to introduce a total of three adult FUN EV models in the U.S., Japan, and Europe between 2024 and 2025. Honda will also introduce the Kids Fun EV model, designed to pass on the joy of riding to the next generation.

Honda electric motorcycles
Honda “FUN’ EV models

Honda to Continue Internal Combustion Engine Advancements

Carbon neutral doesn’t necessarily mean electric. In an attempt to reduce CO2 emissions, Honda is working on models that use ethanol-heavy fuel. In Brazil, 100% ethanol models are already available. Honda plans to release a 20% ethanol model in India as soon as the beginning of next year with 100% ethanol models following.

Smoothing Out the Kinks

While electric motorcycles might be imminent, there are quite a few challenges to iron out first. One of those challenges is the lack of charging stations and battery charge capacity. To address this problem, Honda is working on a battery sharing service. Battery sharing services will be even more practical with Honda’s swappable batteries on its electric commuter bikes. Honda is also working on the standardization of swappable batteries in Japan, Europe, and India to make battery sharing even more accessible for motorcyclists.

Innovative Software

Honda is looking at more than just how a motorcycle runs. It’s also considering software advances to help meet the needs of riders. Starting with the electric commuter models schedule to be released in 2024, Honda will offer software with capabilities like optimal route options that consider remaining range, charging spot notifications, and after-sales support. As the world adapts toward electric transportation, it may take time for charging stations or battery sharing services to become more available on roadsides. These software advancements will be instrumental in providing stress-free riding on its electric models.

To read the full press briefing, visit Honda’s website.

The post Honda Announces Goal of Carbon-Neutrality by 2050 first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 | First Ride Review

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
August Beck, who is 6 going on 7 and had never ridden a motorcycle before, helped us test the 2022 Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike. Photos by Kevin Wing.

Do you remember the pure joy of your first motorcycle ride? If you started young, you probably have magical memories of ripping around your neighborhood on a Honda Mini Trail, a Rupp Dart Cycle, or some other minibike.

Or if you had trails or a track nearby, maybe you rode a little dirtbike like a Yamaha PW50 or Honda Z50R.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
Weighing 106 lb and with a max load of 99 lb, the CRF-E2 is the electric equivalent to a 50cc dirtbike.

If you were lucky, you got a minibike for your birthday or Christmas. If you weren’t, you nagged your parents incessantly to buy one or befriended the kid down the street who had one.

Childhood isn’t as carefree as it used to be, and neighbors aren’t as forgiving of noise. Minibikes and peewee dirtbikes are still sold at local dealerships and outdoor retailers, but there are fewer places to ride them – and fewer parents willing to let their kids do so.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
The CRF-E2 has red plastic bodywork, as well as blue and white graphics mimicking those of Honda Performance dirtbikes like the CRF450R and CRF250R.

Stepping Stones

My buddy Paul Beck and I met on monthly adventure rides hosted by our local BMW dealership. His wife, Allison, became friends with my wife, Carrie, and in 2015, soon after Paul and Allison had their first child, August, they bought a house down the street from us.

Carrie and I don’t have kids of our own, and we enjoy being “aunt and uncle” to August and his younger brother, Wolfgang. When August was 18 months old, we got him a bright-red Strider balance bike and a matching stars-and-stripes helmet for Christmas.

Strider balance bike
August getting the hang of the Strider. Photo by Allison Beck.

Since he started so young, it took August a while to get the hang of the Strider. He mostly paddle-walked it, and he wasn’t a fan of the helmet. But before we knew it, he was zipping around with his feet up on the footrests, coasting and balancing on two wheels with an ear-to-ear grin on his face.

From the Strider he graduated to a BMX bike, which he picked up quickly.

When the Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike was announced back in March, I knew it would be perfect for August.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
Built by Greenger Powersports, the CRF-E2 is officially licensed by American Honda.

Knobby Tires but No Noise

Designed and manufactured by Greenger Powersports, the CRF-E2 is an officially licensed product of American Honda and only available through Honda powersports dealers (MSRP is $2,950). The electric equivalent of a 50cc dirtbike, it’s powered by a 48-volt brushless DC electric motor that produces up to 3.4 hp and 18.4 lb-ft of torque and has two power modes.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
The CRF-E2 is powered by an air-cooled 48-volt brushless DC motor with an inner rotor that’s rated at 25 kW.

With a full charge, the CRF-E2’s lithium-ion battery lasts up to two hours. Using a 110V outlet, the battery can be fully charged in four hours – or 2.5 hours with the optional quick-charge system ($250). It also has a swappable battery, and a spare battery costs $1,000.

For American Honda to license something made by another company, the build quality and reliability had to meet exacting standards. The CRF-E2 has a twin-spar aluminum frame, a tapered aluminum handlebar, front and rear hydraulic disc brakes with petal-style rotors, adjustable aluminum brake hand levers, and 12-inch spoked aluminum rims with Kenda Millville K771 knobby tires.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
The CRF-E2 rolls on 12-inch wheels with Kenda knobbies.

Suspension is handled by a 33mm telescopic fork with 3.9 inches of travel and a rear monoshock with 3.8 inches of travel and adjustable preload and rebound. The shock’s top mounting bolt has two positions that alter the seat height from 24.8 to 25.5 inches. The CRF-E2 accommodates riders up to 99 lb.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
The top mounting bolt for the DNM has two positions to adjust seat height. The included standard charger plugs into a 110V outlet.

August’s First Ride

To get August ready for his first ride, Fly Racing sent us a full set of youth dirtbike gear: a Formula Carbon Prime Rush helmet with Adaptive Impact System; Zone goggles; Kinetic Wave jersey, pants, and gloves; Maverik motocross boots; and a Barricade jersey and knee/shin guards. August said he felt like a superhero when he put everything on.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
Wearing his Fly Racing gear, August says he feels like a superhero.

GEAR UP
Helmet: Fly Racing Youth Formula CP Rush
Goggles: Fly Racing Youth Zone
Jersey: Fly Racing Youth Kinetic Wave
Protection: Fly Racing Youth Barricade Long Sleeve Suit
Gloves: Fly Racing Youth F-16 Gloves
Pants: Fly Racing Youth Kinetic Wave Pants
Knee Guards: Fly Racing Youth Barricade Flex Knee Guards
Boots: Fly Racing Youth Maverik Boots


His first ride was on a Thursday afternoon in a little pocket park in the back of our neighborhood. With no transmission, the CRF-E2 has simple twist-and-go operation. His dad and I gave him pointers on how to gradually roll on the power, to squeeze rather than grab the brakes, and to give the nearby trees plenty of space.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
The CRF-E2 has reach-adjustable brake hand levers. The digital display on the left side of the handlebar shows remaining charge and other info.

August picked it up in no time. He turned lap after lap after lap, then he did figure-8s. He practiced stopping and starting. He tumbled a couple times when coming to a stop on uneven ground, but he got back up and kept going.

One of the most appealing aspects of the CRF-E2 is its nearly silent operation. Residents and dog walkers in our suburban neighborhood didn’t notice or didn’t care that a kid was having fun on a dirtbike within eyesight.

It was a family affair. Dad was coaching. Mom and Grandpa Rolf were watching. Little brother Wolfgang was jealous. Carrie and I clapped and cheered.

On one lap, August yelled to Wolfgang, “This is my favorite motorcycle ever!” Wolfgang yelled back, “It’s my favorite too!” (Wolfgang still needs more Strider practice.)

Two hours later, Carrie and I went home for dinner, and August was still riding. Paul said he would stay out there with his son until it got dark or the battery ran out.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
Geared up and ready to ride.

Hitting the Dirt

After morning and afternoon practice sessions in the park, it was time to hit the dirt. Paul and I lifted the 106-lb CRF-E2 into the bed of his Ford F-150, ratchet-strapped it in place, and drove with August up to the Hungry Valley OHV area in Gorman, California.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
Practicing starting and stopping on loose dirt and gravel, which August had never ridden on.

August felt confident riding on the grass in our neighborhood park because it provided good traction, but he struggled with the loose sand and gravel of the OHV area’s parking area. With coaching help from photographer Kevin Wing, we worked our way up gradually, having August ride back and forth in straight lines from Paul to me, practicing smooth starts and stops.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
Getting some coaching from dad.

After 20 minutes or so, we took a break in the shade. It was a hot day, and August wasn’t accustomed to the heat in full riding gear. A cold, wet towel, some iced-down Gatorade, and a bag of peanut M&Ms revived him.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
August adapted quickly to the loose sand and bermed turns on the mini track.

Next, we moved to a mini track limited to bikes 90cc or smaller. Luckily, we had it to ourselves, and August started turning laps. He struggled with some of the bermed turns that had deep sand and rocks at the bottom. He fell down a lot, and each time Paul or I helped pick up the bike and provided some coaching and encouragement.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
When things got wobbly, August struggled to keep his feet on the pegs.

August no doubt felt the pressure of having three adults watching him, but he never gave up. Every time he toppled over, he’d jump up and say, “I’m okay!” and try again.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
“I’m okay!”

It was amazing to see how quickly August progressed. Intuitively, he started to learn throttle control, body position, and line selection, avoiding some of the larger rocks or tricky spots.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
On his own, August discovered side trails that allowed him to get some relief by riding around some of the most challenging turns.

Best of all, he had fun. When he got tired and started making mistakes, we’d take a break in the shade. But he was always eager to go again. And Paul was a proud papa.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
When riding through deep sand, August learned to throttle his way out of trouble.

After a few hours of alternating between riding sessions and breaks, August’s enthusiasm outstripped his energy. He wanted to keep riding, but he kept dropping the bike because he was too exhausted.

Even after all that riding, the battery level had only dropped by one bar out of five. Most kids will run out of gas before the CRF-E2 runs out of charge.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike
Happy lad and proud dad.

August was bummed when we loaded the CRF back in the truck, but he was passed out asleep before we left the OHV park.

When we got home, Paul and I had a couple beers while we supervised August washing down the bike, cleaning his gear, and putting everything away so it would be ready for his next ride. Learning good habits is part of growing up.

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike

Paul plans to buy the CRF-E2 so August can keep riding, and in a year or two, Wolfgang will inherit his brother’s gear and pick up the baton.

Welcome to the moto tribe, August. You have a lifetime of fun ahead of you.

For more information, visit GreengerPowersports.com.

The post 2022 Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Honda’s Lane-Keeping Assist System (LKAS)

Honda is making ‘vehicles that think’ by working on a bit of safety tech to act as a last-ditch emergency step.

The goal? Keeping our roads as safe as humanly possible – and Honda is borrowing from their auto lineup for the challenge.

The incubating Lane Keeping Assist System (LKAS) is already something that exists in Honda’s cars; a forward-facing camera mounted above the inside rearview mirror ‘works proactively to keep the vehicle centered in a detected lane.’ (via Honda)

A view of Honda's Lane-Keeping Assist (LKAS) technology, currently present in her cars. Media sourced from Honda (Sioux City).
A view of Honda’s Lane-Keeping Assist (LKAS) technology, currently present in her cars. Media sourced from Honda (Sioux City).

“If the LKAS system has been engaged and you start to drift away from the middle of the lane, it will gently apply steering torque and help guide the car back to the center of the lane,” adds the brand.

Now, recently surfaced patent applications show the two-wheeled version of the same system in all her glory, with MCN detailing how her new bit of tech will influence our daily scoot.

Images from Honda's recent patent application. Media sourced from MCN.
Images from Honda’s recent patent application. Media sourced from MCN.

“The system is tied in with sensors including a front radar and camera to keep an eye on the white lines and the traffic ahead, but the main element is an actuator that looks rather like a rotary steering damper,” states the report.

“Inside, there’s a magnetostrictive torque sensor that monitors changes in magnetic flux to tell whether the rider is making steering inputs and an electric motor to introduce inputs of its own.”

Images from Honda's recent patent application. Media sourced from MCN.
Images from Honda’s recent patent application. Media sourced from MCN.

(If you’re worried you’re about to mount a moto-robot nightmare, you can rest easy; the system DOES use countersteering to suggest a change of direction, but only very briefly – and it doesn’t take over entirely.)

We’ve also got some extra tidbits of how the system works with the rider;

A view of new concept images proving that Lightnign Motorcycles is working on an adventure motorcycle for its ranks. Media sourced from Top Speed.
  1. If you resist the system, it will stop trying to suggest its algorithm
  2. It’s designed to only operate in emergencies, acting as a safety net
  3. When in use, it will work alongside the bike’s radar and ABS
A Honda supersport model.
A Honda supersport model. Media sourced from Honda.

Bottom line, we’re eager to see how Honda’s newest tech addition works in daily life and will be keeping an ear down for updates as they trickle down the proverbial grapevine.

Given Honda’s goal to ‘slash car and motorcycle deaths by half in the next eight years and bring the number to zero by 2050,’ we’re anticipating the system will be introduced on the front end of the forecasted 2030s.

For other news like this, be sure to check back at our webpage; drop a comment below letting us kow what you think, and as ever – stay safe on the twisties.

*Media sourced from RideApart, Honda and MCN*

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Vote for Europe’s Best Custom Honda

Thanks to 2022’s iteration of the France-based ‘Wheels and Waves’ Festival, we have 10 gorgeous customized CMX1100 / CMX500’s in the community proper; now, Honda herself is asking us to vote for the best of the bunch – and spoiler, you can pick more than one if you’re indecisive. 

Entries for this year's iteration of "Best Custom Honda Rebels" for Europe. Media sourced from Honda EU.
Four of the entries for this year’s iteration of “Best Custom Honda Rebels” for Europe. Media sourced from Honda EU.

The bikes hail from all over Europe – Spain, Portugal, England and France – with the majority showing off handmade, premium components. 

“We’d like you to help us choose Europe’s favourite…simply give each bike a thumbs up, or a thumbs down, or swipe left or right,” says Honda on their Honda Customs EU webpage

“At the end, you’ll be able to download the bikes you like as a desktop or a mobile wallpaper, complete with close-up details shots.”

Entries for this year's iteration of "Best Custom Honda Rebels" for Europe. Media sourced from Honda EU.
“Akaimoto.” Entries for this year’s iteration of “Best Custom Honda Rebels” for Europe. Media sourced from Honda EU.

We’re pretty attached to the flat track-esque ‘5Four Honda Rebel Street’ created by UK’s own Guy Willison, though the Spain-based ‘Akaimoto’ gives us the perfect lean into cafe racer territory, and FCR’s Honda CMX500 Rebel Waves takes the cake for the ultimate ride into the weekend. 

Entries for this year's iteration of "Best Custom Honda Rebels" for Europe. Media sourced from Honda EU.
“5Four Honda Rebel Street.” Entries for this year’s iteration of “Best Custom Honda Rebels” for Europe. Media sourced from Honda EU.

What do you think? Be sure to head over to Honda Customs to ‘thumb up’ your favorites (and grad some of the wallpapers after), and as always – stay safe on the twisties. 

*Media sourced from Honda Customs EU*

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com