Tag Archives: Honda Motorcycles

You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda

You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda
Overlooking Rondout Creek in upstate New York on the 2021 Honda Trail 125, and feeling better with each passing mile. Photos by the author.

After almost 25 years of riding, I came to regard my enthusiasm for all things motorcycle as an infinite source of pleasure, but little did I know just how crucial one specific bike – a Honda Trail 125 – would be in helping me recover from the sickest point in my life.

The story begins on the morning of my scheduled Covid-19 vax in February 2021, when, as luck would have it, I awoke with flu-like symptoms. Testing revealed I was positive, so I began my mandatory two-week quarantine at home. It felt just like the flu – no big deal. But 17 days after that positive test – well after the flu symptoms had disappeared – a new wave of symptoms emerged which would change my life indefinitely.

You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda
The author and his bikes.

GOOD READ: “The Long Ride,” by Jamie Elvidge,
about a cleansing solo ride from NYC to Key West

The worst of them was extreme vertigo, an intense feeling of rapid dizziness, confusing disorientation, and a total loss of balance. Sometimes, moving half an inch in any direction would feel like falling off a tall building – my body would tense up, break out in a cold sweat, and then shake uncontrollably, which further exacerbated the vertigo. I was completely incapacitated, unable to perform even the simplest tasks autonomously.

Thus began the arduous journey back to normalcy, starting with learning how to walk again. It sounds farcical now, but walking speed was initially a challenge that took a solid week of practice to overcome. Stumbling forward at 2 mph felt more like warp speed, as my addled mind struggled to process motion like an old bogged down 386 computer. I had to stop every few feet to sustain my balance and reassure myself that, indeed, I was only walking! All the while, a persistent feeling of dizziness dominated every waking hour, punctuated by roiling headaches that could not be appeased.

You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda
Outfitted with a comfy aftermarket seat and a big top box, 12-to 14-hour days on the Trail are not uncommon for me.

These migraines were always aggravated by barometric pressure in the atmosphere, so if it rained, I was completely out of commission. The only escape was sleep. When I closed my eyes, bright bursts of a hot white color would interrupt my rest, like lightning strikes but with more pronounced durations. Any sound, no matter how faint, would immediately wake me. A strange new sensitivity to light compounded the symptoms, making any surroundings other than a soundproof, pitch-black room unbearable. It was a depressing period, to say the least.

During this early stage of the disease, I’d often stagger down to the garage to gaze at my collection of motorcycles. Each one of them triggered an avalanche of memories, beckoning me to recall better times. “Remember all the states we’ve visited together?” queried my BMW R 1200 RT. “Don’t you miss the saucy growl of my small block V-Twin?” purred my Moto Guzzi V7 Racer. “Don’t forget the winter you took me all apart and got me running again!” commanded my Yamaha YSR50.

You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda
My favorite local loops on the Trail always revolve around the Hudson River, seen here from the peaks of Bear Mountain State Park’s Perkins Memorial Drive.

In those early post-infection days, the daydreaming in the garage vacillated between a resolute desire to get back in the saddle and a bleak hopelessness that I would never recover.

Over the course of the next few months, I graduated past walking and onto running, but only in spurts. I could drive my car again, albeit slowly. Eventually I dared to ride my motorcycles for short distances, if only to get the old juices flowing once more. But riding with “long Covid” symptoms was a profound handicap. The headaches and dizziness could burst like a thunderclap in my head, ferocious and debilitating.

You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda
Close to the shore on Henry Hudson Drive. A New York state of mind!

Most worrisome was the “brain fog,” which would appear suddenly, obliterating my ability to focus on anything for more than few seconds. It happened to me once while hustling my 600-plus-pound BMW RT through a mountain sweeper, where I wound up in the opposite lane facing oncoming traffic, unsure of how I got there. Other times, I would suddenly forget the basics, like which side of the handlebars the clutch lever was on. My brain was frustratingly dysfunctional.

Adding to these mental challenges were the physical trials. I’ve been riding successive generations of BMW’s venerable RT Series for over 15 years, but I suddenly felt intimidated by the size, weight, and speed of my 2015 R 1200 RT. Low-speed maneuvering was unsteady at best, and anything quick or technical scrambled my mental processing to the point of paralysis. It was a watershed period in my life.

You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda
Venturing off-road is an entirely new experience for me, but the Trail’s light weight and forgiving nature always encourage further exploration.

It took me many years of dedicated practice to achieve some modicum of riding proficiency, and it was exceedingly difficult for me to accept that many of my abilities had vanished. Riding my full-size motorcycles – once almost the most delightful activity I could imagine – had morphed into something nerve-wracking and dangerous. I knew I wanted to keep riding, but I had to slow down until my symptoms and skills both improved.

Since taming the twisties on my large-displacement bikes was out of the question, I had to find a way to pair what little was left of my riding skills with a suitable machine that was still a motorcycle. (In my mind, riding an automatic twist-and-go scooter would have been acquiescing to defeat.) Enter Honda’s Trail 125, Big Red’s rough-and-ready retro miniMOTO. Simple, lightweight, and slower than a tranquilized sloth, it was the perfect choice for my circumstance.

You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda
Purposefully riding away from the incessant traffic and distractions of modern society, one can find peaceful bliss off the beaten path.

Through persistent searching, I nabbed one and headed off in search of slow lanes through local hamlets and forests. It was here, on these solitary explorations, that the Trail began to nurse me back to health.

Regardless of our diverse backgrounds and brand preferences, we all recognize the therapeutic value that motorcycles provide. Some refer to what the late psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi famously termed “flow,” or the mental state in which a person is fully immersed in the moment, completely focused and free from all discursive thoughts. The late Rush drummer Neil Peart described the feeling of moto-motion as a subconscious reminder of a mother gently rocking her baby. Every one of us who has swung a leg over the saddle has our own individual reasons why two-wheeled moving mediation therapy just plain works.

You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda
My maiden voyage on the Trail in August 2021, which also marks the first time I ever embarked on a mostly off-road route.

So it was for me on the Trail, ambling down rutted paths in the woods, scooting along serpentine bicycle paths, and focusing only on the basic rudiments of discovering how to ride again. Like relearning to walk, it was initially frustrating, but the diminutive Honda’s mellow personality encouraged me to just keep trying anyway. Wherever we were, it beckoned me to keep pushing: “Let’s go! Just a little further!”

It’s difficult to describe the character of an inanimate object, but the Trail never judged me for my mistakes the way my big bikes seem to do. We started out on local 40- to 50-mile loops, but before long, we were ripping through nearby states for 300- to 400-mile weekends. I felt like a real rider again, enthusiastically kicking the semi-automatic transmission through its four gears and unleashing all eight of the miniscule thumper’s stampeding horses as we bombed down the backroads.

You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda
Accessorizing the Trail to spruce up the appearance and add healthy doses of functionality, comfort, and storage cemented the bond between man and machine.

Granted, all this action was despairingly slow by objective standards – but it was engaging in the way that only a real motorcycle can be. This continuous engagement is what rebuilt my ability to focus on a singular task for prolonged periods of time – the very foundation of riding well. Thanks to the eager Trail, I was still in the game, still moving forward, and gradually building my confidence back up. According to the GPS, I never exceeded 59 mph on the modest Honda, but in terms of fun, I might as well have been leading the pack around the Isle of Man TT!

Encouraged by the progress, I outfitted my Trail with accoutrements to increase functionality and add some flair to its spartan workhorse aesthetic. A cavernous Givi 58-liter top case provides ample storage, while a cushy aftermarket seat, a wireless phone charger, auxiliary LED lighting, an Opmid gauge cluster, and toasty Koso Apollo heated grips make for a more comfortable traveling experience.

You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda

Molding this Trail as uniquely my own cemented the bond between man and machine almost as much as our rides themselves did. Ultimately, I’m certain I wouldn’t have recovered so far, so fast, without this bright red miniMOTO as a willing partner.

Today, I accept that Covid-19 has impaired me, perhaps permanently. My innate senses, mental processing, and physical reaction times still aren’t what they used to be, but I’m confident that over time they can be restored. Indeed, these days I find myself mixing in more rides on my full-sized motorcycles as I relearn how to pilot them competently again.

In the meantime, I want to sincerely thank Honda for imbuing this spunky little Trail with character – one that brings all the essential healing joys of wind therapy to the beginner and expert alike, even if it is in the slow lane.

The post You Meet the Healthiest People on a Honda first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Honda Announces 2022-2023 Returning Models

2022 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP 30th Anniversary
The 2022 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP celebrates the 30th anniversary of the Fireblade. It’s one of 10 returning models Honda has announced for 2022-2023.

Earlier this year, Honda announced some of its returning models for the 2022 model year, including the Africa Twin, Super Cub, Gold Wing, NC750X, Rebels (300, 500, 1100), Fury, CB/R500s (CB500X, CB500F, CBR500R), CBR600RR, and CBR1000RR.

Another crop of returning 2022 models, as well as a couple for 2023, has been announced. Joining those listed above are 10 additional models in four categories, including sport, miniMOTO, dual-sport, and scooter.

Headlining the announcement is the legendary CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP, which in 2022 adopts important new performance upgrades to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Fireblade’s original introduction in Europe (followed a year later in the U.S.).

2022 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP 30th Anniversary
2022 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP and 1992 Honda CBR900RR Fireblade

Also returning for 2022 are the CBR650R sportbike and CB650R naked bike, both of which come standard with ABS. On the miniMOTO front, the 2023 edition of the popular Grom is back, as is the 2022 edition of the retro Trail 125. The PCX also returns for 2022, continuing as the benchmark model among scooters, and joined by the 2023 Ruckus.

Three dual-sport machines were also announced – the popular CRF300L; its adventure-focused sibling, the CRF300L Rally; and the classic XR650L, the latter in a new color.

“We recognize that motorcycling comes in many forms, a fact that is reflected in today’s announcement,” said Brandon Wilson, American Honda Manager of Sports & Experiential. “The models included are each unique, but they share a commitment to delivering the enjoyment of two-wheel recreation. We’re proud of the disparate nature of the motorcycling community, and we’re happy to serve all of its members in 2022 and beyond.”

2022 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP

2022 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP 30th Anniversary
2022 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP 30th Anniversary

Read our 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP review

To celebrate the original, groundbreaking CBR900RR and a record of continuous challenges since the introduction of that game-changer, Honda offers a stunning 30th Anniversary version of the CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP. For 2022, development of this model’s inline four-cylinder engine centers on mid-corner acceleration: the intake ports, airbox, airbox funnels and exhaust mid-section are all revised to deliver extra midrange power. The final-drive sprocket has gone up three teeth for stronger acceleration through each ratio, and quick-shifter performance has been upgraded. Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) has also been optimized, with feedback from HRC’s riders, for refined rear-tire traction management, and throttle feel has improved even further.

The 2022 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP will be available in Pearl White with an MSRP of $28,900, and it will be in dealerships in July 2022.

2022 Honda CBR650R

2022 Honda CBR650R
2022 Honda CBR650R

Designed to be appreciated on the street, but drawing inspiration from the supersport realm, the CBR650R excites riders with its sharp lines, complete bodywork, and corner-carving abilities, but it also delivers comfort, practicality, and value. A full-fairing sport variant of the standard CB650R, this model has a high-quality Showa Separate Function Big Piston fork, stylish aesthetics and excellent emissions performance. With a finely tuned chassis delivering light, responsive handling, and a high-revving inline 4-cylinder engine that offers enjoyable power, the CBR650R is exciting to ride and a pleasure to own, a gratifying intersection of values for the modern sportbike rider.

The 2022 Honda CBR650R will be available in Matte Black Metallic with an MSRP of $9,799, and it will be in dealerships in August 2022.

2022 Honda CB650R

2022 Honda CB650R
2022 Honda CB650R

Honda’s iconic CB moniker evokes a proud legacy of middleweight machines that boast user-friendly four-cylinder engines mated to nimble, confidence-inspiring chassis. That’s also an accurate description of the CB650R, which features a Showa Separate Function Big Piston fork, excellent emissions performance, striking aesthetics, and comfortable ergonomics. Showcasing Honda’s Neo Sports Café design theme through its smooth lines and compact packaging, the CB650R is a popular and enjoyable naked bike that builds on the CB history of catering to diverse riding experiences, from daily commutes to exhilarating outings on tight, twisting backroads.

The 2022 Honda CB650R will be available in Matte Black Metallic with an MSRP of $9,299, and it will be in dealerships in September 2022.

2023 Honda Grom

2023 Honda Grom
2023 Honda Grom

Read our 2022 Honda Grom review

The undisputed emperor of the miniMOTO world and the spawner of a vibrant subculture of fun-seekers, Honda’s Grom inspires a cross-demographic army of enthusiasts who embrace the diminutive model with remarkable passion. Its low seat height and approachability make it an unintimidating option for new riders to learn with, while its modular styling and peppy performance make it an entertaining plaything for experienced riders and a customization platform for those looking for an amusing project. It’s no wonder that the Grom continues to be one of the powersports industry’s most popular motorcycle models.

The 2023 Honda Grom will be available in Matte Black Metallic, Cherry Red, and Force Silver Metallic for the non-ABS model (MSRP is $3,499) and Pearl White for the ABS model (MSRP is $3,799). It will be in dealerships in April 2022.

2022 Honda Trail 125

2022 Honda Trail 125
2022 Honda Trail 125

Read our 2021 Honda Trail 125 review

When it comes to fun, approachable, popular miniMOTO models, no manufacturer even comes close to Honda, and the Trail 125 is a prime example of one such machine that also pays tribute to the past. The model harkens back to a golden era of motorcycling when there was seemingly a CT model on the bumper rack of every motor home but, like Honda’s nostalgic Monkey and Super Cub, it also incorporates the modern joys of practical design and hassle-free technology. Compared to the urban-focused Super Cub on which it is based, the Trail 125 has a number of rugged upgrades, making it ideal for casual trekking on- and off-road.

The 2022 Honda Trail 125 will be available in Glowing Red with an MSRP of $3,999, and it will be in dealerships in April 2022.

2022 Honda CRF300L

2022 Honda CRF300L
2022 Honda CRF300L

Read our 2021 Honda CRF300L / CRF300L Rally review

The motorcycle industry’s top-selling dual-sport model, the CRF300L boasts strong power, low weight and excellent on- and off-road performance, while also delivering unparalleled value, reliability, and styling. The model has a broad powerband, predictable handling, and aesthetic cues that are carried over from Honda’s CRF Performance line, and it’s available in standard and ABS versions, both of which are ready to provide low-cost transportation and true dual-sport adventure.

The 2022 Honda CRF300L will be available in Red with an MSRP of $5,349 without ABS and $5,649 with ABS. It will be in dealerships in April 2022.

2022 Honda CRF300L Rally

2022 Honda CRF300L Rally
2022 Honda CRF300L Rally

Read our 2021 Honda CRF300L / CRF300L Rally review

Based on the standard CRF300L, but with comfort-focused upgrades including handguards, more fuel capacity, and a frame-mounted windscreen, the CRF300L Rally evokes images of the Dakar Rally while delivering practicality and value. More suitable for long-distance adventuring than its standard sibling, the Rally version is also a stellar commuter.

The 2022 Honda CRF300L Rally will be available in Red with an MSRP of $6,099 without ABS and $6,399 with ABS. It will be in dealerships in April 2022.

2022 Honda XR650L

2022 Honda XR650L
2022 Honda XR650L

Yes, the XR650L has been a familiar part of Honda’s lineup for many years, but there’s a reason the tried-and-true dual-sport model continues to be popular with customers. It’s highly adaptable, opening the door to adventure on single-track trails, dirt roads, and backroads, while also delivering capable transportation in the city. The natural result of those characteristics – plus a proud Baja heritage – is a diehard following of riders, who will be pleased to know that the model has received a styling facelift for 2022.

The 2022 Honda XR650L will be available in White with an MSRP of $6,999, and it will be in dealerships in April 2022.

2022 Honda PCX

2022 Honda PCX
2022 Honda PCX

Honda’s PCX is the ultimate tool for tackling urban environments in style, continuing to set the standard for scooter design and technology. Equipped with a freeway-capable engine, the PCX is equally suitable for new riders and more experienced customers, delivering performance, fuel economy, great handling, a comfortable ride, and simple operation – all attributes that are vital in the scooter category.

The 2022 Honda PCX will be available in Pearl White with an MSRP of $3,899 without ABS and $4,099 with ABS. It will be in dealerships in April 2022.

2023 Honda Ruckus

2023 Honda Ruckus
2023 Honda Ruckus

When it comes to little two-wheelers that ooze personality and attitude, it’s tough to top Honda’s unique Ruckus, the model that launched an entire scooter-customization subculture. With an exposed frame and dual round headlights contributing to an industrial-looking design, plus practical features like reliability, fuel efficiency, and nimble handling, the Ruckus a great choice as a platform for personalization or affordable, around-town transportation.

The 2023 Honda Ruckus will be available in Gray, White/Metallic Blue, and Metallic Blue/Tan with an MSRP of $2,899, and it will be in dealerships in April 2022.

For more information or to find a Honda dealer near you, visit powersports.honda.com.

The post Honda Announces 2022-2023 Returning Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Retrospective: 1990-2002 Honda ST1100

1990-2002 Honda ST1100

YEAR/MODEL: 2002 Honda ST1100

OWNER: Clement Salvadori

HOMETOWN: Atascadero, California

Back in the late 1980s, the European market was as important to Honda as the American one. And motorcycles were popular, as cars and car insurance were more expensive than they were here. The demand was quite different, with Yanks liking big cruisers and narrowly focused sporting machines, while those east of the Atlantic had more of a practical approach, favoring motorcycles that could be used to commute on workdays, and then go two-up on a vacation.

Each motorcycle company is constantly looking around to see what the competition is doing. The Japanese Big Four undoubtedly have their own domestic spying networks, trying to keep track of each other’s doings, but there are also the local manufacturers. In the U.S., the only indigenous competition was from Harley-Davidson, but in Europe numerous homegrown marques were taking their share of the market.

1990-2002 Honda ST1100

In the late 1980s, BMW, with its new four-cylinder K-bikes, was doing quite well in the touring market. The head of Honda Germany decided he wanted a piece of that action and got permission from Japan to design his own bike, a sport-touring model, with emphasis on touring but still agile.

Hence the ST1100, introduced in Europe in 1990 as the Pan-European, with a wind-protecting fairing, removable saddlebags, and shaft drive. Ride to work in the rain, load the bags for a trip, and never have to worry about cleaning and adjusting a chain. This was an all-new machine, with a transverse-mounted (meaning the crankshaft was at a right angle to the axles) V-4 engine, putting out close to 100 rear-wheel horses.

1990-2002 Honda ST1100

This was no lightweight, as the ST weighed about 700 pounds with the huge 7.4-gallon gas tank filled. But the blessing was that the tank was beneath the seat, keeping the weight down low, which is where many sensible touring riders like to have it. That required a fuel pump pushing the gas up to the four 34.5mm Keihins – carburetors in the coming age of fuel injection. No matter, as the carbs did an excellent and trouble-free job of keeping the engine spinning. A choke lever on the handlebar was a reminder of the carburetors.

The liquid-cooled V-4, with a bore of 73mm and a stroke of 64.8mm, had a total capacity of 1,084cc. It used double overhead camshafts, with a single timing belt running all four camshafts and four valves per cylinder. Valve adjustment was by shims, not always appreciated by home mechanics, but service intervals were set at a fairly lengthy 16,000 miles. Ignition was transistorized, with electronic advance. And the oversquare engine pulled strong all the way from 2,000 to the 8,000-rpm redline.

1990-2002 Honda ST1100

Down in the bowels of the wet-sump engine, everything was built to last, with almost four quarts of oil capacity and a cooler up front. It sat in a full-cradle steel frame (contributing to the bike’s hefty weight), which gave confidence to the rider when leaning hard into the curves at considerable speeds. Up front was a 41mm Showa cartridge fork, with Honda’s TRAC anti-dive mechanism and allowing nearly 6 inches of travel. No adjustments here. At the back, a single Showa shock, with adjustability for rebound damping and spring preload, offered nearly 5 inches of travel.

The longitudinal power ran back through a wet clutch and a cassette-style 5-speed transmission to the driveshaft. Aluminum three-spoke wheels used an 18-inch 110/80 tire on the front, a 160/70 17-incher on the back, with a shade over 61 inches between the axle centers.

The Europeans loved it – perhaps for no better reason than it was a good alternative to the BMWs, along with a bit more power. The American market got to see this bike a year or so after it was released east of the Atlantic. Several improvements were made after that first version, including raising the alternator output from 28 to 40 amps and offering a combined ABS and traction control system. The initial ABS, running from 1992 to ’95, had separate systems on the front and rear wheels, but an upgrade for ’96 used linked brakes. A mild upgrade of the windscreen arrived for the 1995 model year.

Most important for a motorcycle of this design is comfort. On this ’02 model, which belongs to yours truly, a Laminar Lip was added to the top of the windscreen to smooth airflow around my helmet, since I’m taller than average. A nice addition is over to the left of the instruments, where a hand-turned knob can alter the angle of the dual halogen lights; very simple, very useful. Fitting a tankbag on the plastic cover over the engine was simplified by a company called Bagster that makes Naugahyde covers for over 200 motorcycle models, to which a bag can be neatly clipped. That bag has logged a lot of miles, as I had it on my ’92 model, which was sold after 93,000 miles, and then on my then-new ’02 ST1100, which has 103,000 miles and counting.

The flattish saddle is comfortable for long two-up days, or even longer solo days, allowing the rider to move back and forth. The saddlebags are locked onto the bike, but they can be removed with only minor fuss. However, it is far more useful to have liners in the bags; just open the bags, take out the liners, and you are on your way.

1990-2002 Honda ST1100

A convenient frill on the ST is the handle under the left side of the saddle, which folds against the bike until pulled out 90 degrees to be very useful when lifting the bike onto the centerstand. Another much appreciated addition is the concealed crash bars on the fairing, allowing for a slow fall without doing any damage.

Big smiles could be seen at Honda Germany after the ST1100 appeared. They had given the competition a good kick in the old wazoo, with the ST soon winning all sorts of awards. And it was pretty much left unchanged for the next dozen years until the ST1300 debuted in 2003.

Throw a leg over that saddle, turn the key, push the button, clutch in, click into first, and the sheer, silent rush of power is exhilarating. And 500 miles with one fuel stop in between is always a temptation.

The post Retrospective: 1990-2002 Honda ST1100 first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 Electric Dirtbike Unveiled

Greenger and Honda CRF-E2 Electric Dirtbike

Electric dirtbikes became a realistic option for kids and their families today with Greenger Powersports’ unveiling of the Greenger x Honda CRF-E2, resulting from a new collaboration with American Honda.

Representing a practical-but-exciting doorway to the world of powersports, the CRF-E2 brings the motorcycling experience to a new pool of customers, whose lives are already increasingly powered by electricity. On the one hand, the bike is a fun training tool for young new riders, as it eliminates the need to operate a clutch or shift lever. For kids who already have two-wheel experience, the CRF-E2 is a reasonably priced step up to real dirtbikes. For either group, it’s a quiet, environmentally responsible form of powered recreation that can be enjoyed in more places than traditional mini dirt bikes.

Greenger and Honda CRF-E2 Electric Dirtbike

Driven by a low-voltage (48-volt) BLDC electric motor with an inner rotor, the CRF-E2 produces a maximum output of 3.4 horsepower and 18.4 lb-ft of torque. Its lithium-ion battery has a best-in-class range of approximately two hours in ideal conditions with a full charge. The battery can be fully charged in four hours, or two-and-a-half hours with the optional quick-charge system. With an available spare battery, it can be swapped out in seconds – a Greenger exclusive feature in this class.

The CRF-E2 boasts high-quality components like a twin-spar aluminum frame, tapered aluminum handlebar, front and rear hydraulic disc brakes with petal-style rotors, adjustable aluminum brake levers, and 12-inch aluminum wheels with Kenda Millville K771 knobby tires. Suspension components comprise a 33mm telescopic hydraulic fork and a DNM shock with adjustable preload and rebound damping; front- and rear-wheel travel are 3.9 and 8.3 inches, respectively. Thanks to red plastic bodywork and blue-and-white graphics mimicking those of Honda Performance dirt bikes like the CRF450R and CRF250R, kids can make believe they’re a Team Honda HRC Champion.

Greenger and Honda CRF-E2 Electric Dirtbike

With adjustable hand levers and the ability to alter seat height between 24.8 and 25.5 inches, the CRF-E2 physically accommodates a range of riders weighing 99 pounds or less. In addition, maximum power output can be switched between two levels in order to adapt for varying skill and experience levels.

“The CRF-E2 will expand the enjoyment of riding off-road on two wheels to more families,” said Brad Chapman, Greenger Powersports Manager of Sales & Marketing. “The appeal to traditional enthusiasts is obvious, as it’s just a cool little dirtbike. At the same time, it breaks down barriers with people who wouldn’t otherwise consider powersports, but who are already comfortable with electricity’s increasingly ubiquitous role in our society. We can’t wait to see more kids getting the chance to discover what dirtbikes are all about.”

Through this new collaboration, the CRF-E2 is available exclusively through American Honda’s nationwide network of participating Powersports dealerships.

Greenger and Honda CRF-E2 Electric Dirtbike

“We’re pleased to partner with Greenger Powersports to offer an innovative, approachable electric dirt bike to our customers and dealers,” said Bill Savino, American Honda Senior Manager of Customer Engagement. “One of Honda’s mission statements is ‘ensuring the joys for the next generation,’ and the CRF-E2 clearly aligns with that objective. We look forward to working together with Greenger to grow motorcycling well into the future.”

MSRP for the CRF-E2 is $2,950.

The CRF-E2 is an officially licensed product of American Honda and is not produced or manufactured by Honda.

The post Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 Electric Dirtbike Unveiled first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Minibikes Draw Maxi-Attention at Barrett-Jackson Auction

Barrett-Jackson Auction
This Honda CB175 was one of many small-displacement bikes sold at the Barrett-Jackson auction in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 22-30, 2022. Photos by the author.

The Barrett-Jackson automobile auction is an annual extravaganza with a major stop staged at Westworld in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 22-30, 2022. This year’s 50th anniversary iteration was a sensory overload of rare, antique, classic, and exotic cars and trucks. However, there was also a shiny, tidy collection of motorcycles at the expansive event.

Rare vintage motorcycles, classic dirtbikes, and moto-themed art and memorabilia were all featured. However, by far the largest representation of motorcycle history was of the minibike variety. Based on the fan and bidder attention that the large stable of minis garnered, car enthusiasts have a serious soft spot (and deep pockets) for the little rides of their youth.

Barrett-Jackson Auction
Classic dirtbikes like this 1978 Yamaha YZ125 were hot sellers at the auction.

The Hondas of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s made up the lion’s share of the minbike contingent at the auction. Dozens of diminutive Z50s, step-through Trail 90s, and the once ubiquitous CT70s were offered in both original form and correctly restored examples. The “you meet the nicest people on a Honda” advertising slogan from the bellbottom era has clearly transcended to a modern movement of sentimentality and financial means.

So what did the small-displacement Honda bikes garner at the Barrett-Jackson auction? Here is just a sampling.

1969 Honda Z50 – $6,600
1970 Honda CT90 – $6,600
1971 Honda Trail CT70 – $11,000
1972 Honda Trail CT70 – $7,150
1977 Honda CT70 – $6,050
1986 Honda Z50RD – $13,200

Barrett-Jackson Auction
This 1948 Indian Chief sold for $57,200.

Other notable sales:
1948 Indian Chief – $57,200
1971 Triumph T120-R with Sidecar – $9,900
1971 Rupp Scrambler – $7700
1976 Montesa 247 Cota – $4,950

Barrett-Jackson Auction

The post Minibikes Draw Maxi-Attention at Barrett-Jackson Auction first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Honda CB/R500 Lineup | First Look Review

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
The Honda CBR500R (upper left), CB500X (lower left), and CB500F (right) have been updated for 2022.

If you’re looking for a light, dependable, affordable middleweight motorcycle, then Honda has several options to choose from. In addition to its Rebel 500 cruiser, there are three models in the Honda CB/R500 lineup that have been updated for 2022. The CB500X ABS adventure bike, CB500F ABS naked bike, and CBR500R ABS sportbike offer improvements in suspension, braking, and handling.

“It’s hard to find more versatile motorcycles than Honda’s 500cc CB/R models, and if you factor in affordability and reliability, nothing else even compares,” said Brandon Wilson, American Honda Manager of Sports & Experiential. “Each of these machines has been successful at addressing riders’ wide-ranging practical and recreational needs and tastes, and we’re pleased to offer them to U.S. customers in 2022, with improved performance for the new model year.”

Honda also confirmed the 2022 return of two additional street models – the CB1000R ABS naked bike and the CBR300R sportbike. All models in this announcement are available now.

2022 Honda CB500X ABS

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
2022 Honda CB500X

Honda’s middleweight adventure bike is powered by a liquid-cooled 471cc parallel-Twin with PGM-FI and DOHC with 4 valves per cylinder. The CB500X ABS benefits from a 5-pound weight reduction thanks to a lighter front wheel and a lighter swingarm (curb weight is 439 pounds). Other upgrades for 2022 include a new inverted 41mm Showa SFF-BP (Separate Function Fork-Big Piston) fork and dual front disc brakes. The CB500X ABS has a 32.8-inch seat height and a 4.7-gallon fuel capacity. It’s available in Pearl Organic Green/Black with an MSRP of $7,199.

2022 Honda CB500F ABS

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
2022 Honda CB500F

For those who prefer the sporty look of a motorcycle with minimal bodywork, the CB500F ABS naked bike fits the bill. Like the CB500X, for 2022 it gets an inverted 41mm Showa SFF-BP fork. It also gets dual front disc brakes with radial-mounted Nissin 4-piston calipers and lighter wheels. Curb weight has been reduced by 4 pounds, to 416 pounds. The CB500F ABS has a 31.1-inch seat height and a 4.5-gallon fuel capacity. It’s available in Matte Gray Metallic with an MSRP of $6,699.

2022 Honda CBR500R ABS

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
2022 Honda CBR500R in Grand Prix Red

Honda’s CBR sportbikes have always offered a balance between performance and practicality. For 2022, the CBR500R gets an inverted 41mm Showa SFF-BP fork, dual front disc brakes with radial-mounted Nissin 4-piston calipers, and lighter wheels. Curb weight remains the same at 423 pounds. The CB500F ABS has a 31.1-inch seat height and a 4.5-gallon fuel capacity. It’s available in Grand Prix Red or Silver Sword Metallic with an MSRP of $7,199.

2022 Honda CB1000R ABS

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
2021 Honda CB1000R Black Edition

Honda’s CB1000R ABS is the flagship model in the Neo-Sports Café lineup, blending aggressive naked-bike style with apex-strafing performance. It’s powered by a 998cc inline-Four derived from Honda’s CBR100RR line and features fully adjustable Showa suspension. It returns for 2022 in a menacing Black Edition with Graphite Black bodywork. MSRP is $12,999.

2022 Honda CBR300R

Honda CB/R500 Lineup
2022 Honda CBR300R in Grand Prix Red

The CBR300R offers the look of a fully faired sportbike in an accessible package that’s perfect for new riders. It’s powered by a liquid-cooled 286cc single-cylinder engine with DOHC and four valves. There are single-disc brakes at both ends and compliant suspension with adjustable rear preload. Seat height is just 30.7 inches and curb weight is 354 pounds. Fuel capacity is 3.4 gallons, and the CBR300R gets an EPA-tested 71 mpg. It’s available without ABS for $4,899 or with ABS for $5,099, in Grand Prix Red or Matte Gray Metallic.

For more information or to find a Honda dealer near you, visit powersports.honda.com.

The post 2022 Honda CB/R500 Lineup | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Honda Lineup | First Look Review

2022 Honda Africa Twin
Honda has announced its returning motorcycles for 2022, which includes four versions of the Africa Twin adventure bike.

We’ve seen (and tested) two 2022 Hondas already, both in the miniMOTO family: the updated Grom and the all-new Navi, an affordable, user-friendly motorcycle for commuters and new riders. The 2022 Honda lineup includes another miniMOTO, the Super Cub C125, as well as Africa Twin, Gold Wing, Rebel, Fury, CBR, and NC750X models.

2022 Honda Super Cub C125

Honda’s Super Cub is a living legend. Introduced in 1958, more than 100 million have been built, making it the most produced motor vehicle in history. It’s also the inspiration for the wildly successful “You meet the nicest people on a Honda” advertising campaign.

2022 Honda Super Cub C125
2022 Honda Super Cub C125

For 2022, the Super Cub’s new SOHC, 124cc, single-cylinder engine benefits from a longer stroke, which delivers more useable power while also improving fuel economy. Honda also managed to shave off 2 pounds, reducing curb weight to just 238 pounds. Offered in a new Matte Gray Metallic colorway, the 2022 Super Cub starts at just $3,799.

2022 Honda Africa Twin

Since its 2016 reintroduction, the legendary Africa Twin proven itself to be a highly capable adventure bike both on- and off-road, and the platform has grown to include four models. For 2022, the sporting- and off-road performance-oriented standard version now comes with the same rear carrier as its more distance riding-oriented Adventure Sports ES sibling. Meanwhile, that version gets a shorter windscreen for improved visibility.

2022 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports
2022 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES

Both Africa Twin versions are compatible with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and both are available with either a manual gearbox or Honda’s advanced automatic Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT), which has a program change for 2022, delivering smoother shifting in the lower gears.

2022 Honda Africa Twin
2022 Honda Africa Twin
2022 Honda Africa Twin
2022 Honda Africa Twin

The standard Africa Twin comes in Grand Prix Red, with an MSRP of $14,499 for the manual transmission version and $15,299 for the DCT version. The Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES comes in Pearl White, and MSRP is $17,299 for the manual and $18,099 for the DCT.

2022 Honda Gold Wing

Now in its sixth generation, Honda’s flagship Gold Wing caters to long-distance tourers with an ultra-smooth opposed six-cylinder engine, spacious cockpit, and ample storage capacity. Despite it’s 1,833cc mill and 804-pound running weight, it delivers sporty performance and handling that belies its size. The Gold Wing delivers style and luxury for multi-day road trips with comfortable seating options, cutting-edge rider aids, and a top-of-the-line infotainment system.

2022 Honda Gold Wing DCT
2022 Honda Gold Wing DCT

Last year, Honda updated the Gold Wing Tour with a larger trunk and more comfortable passenger accommodations, and all Gold Wing models got updated audio and Android Auto integration in addition to Apple Car Play.

2022 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT
2022 Honda Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT

In 2022, the Gold Wing DCT trim comes in Nightshade Blue and retails for $25,300. At $28,500, the trunk-equipped Gold Wing Tour now sports Ultra Blue Metallic and Metallic Black colorways. The Gold Wing Tour DCT offers the same paint schemes but with an MSRP of $29,500 and the 2022 Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT rounds out the range with a $32,800 sticker price and Ultra Blue Metallic livery.

2022 Honda NC750X

For commuters covering longer distances, the Honda NC750X has become one of the top picks in the adventure category. The fuel-sipping 745cc parallel-Twin isn’t all business though. Its low to midrange torque makes it a great option for backroad weekend excursions as well.

2022 Honda NC750X
2022 Honda NC750X

The standard NC750X remains affordable in 2022 with a $8,699 sticker price. The Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) trim comes in close behind at $9,299. Honda’s Selectable Torque Control is available in both trims, reassuring the rider that the NC750X is just as practical as it is versatile.

2022 Honda Rebel 1100

Introduced last year, the Rebel 1100 returns for 2022. Don’t let its cruiser stance fool you. With a liquid-cooled, 1,084cc parallel-Twin derived from the Africa Twin, a solid chassis, and electronic rider aids, it delivers both style and performance.

2022 Honda Rebel 1100 ABS
2022 Honda Rebel 1100 ABS

The Metallic Black and Bordeaux Red Metallic paint options carry over from 2021, but a stunning new Pearl Stallion Brown makes the Rebel stand out from the crowd. Honda offers the 2022 Rebel 1100 at $9,399 while the DCT version comes in at $9,999. Regardless of the trim, both Rebel 1100 models include ABS as standard.

2022 Honda Rebel 300/500

Also returning for 2022 are two of the industry’s most popular entry-level cruisers, Honda’s Rebel 300 and Rebel 500. They combine user-friendliness with stylish, minimalist design, including a peanut fuel tank, LED lighting, and blacked-out finishes.

2022 Honda Rebel 300
2022 Honda Rebel 300
2022 Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE
2022 Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE

The Honda Rebel 300 is available in Matte Gray Metallic and Pearl Blue, with an MSRP of $4,699, or $4,999 with ABS. The Honda Rebel 500 is available in Matte Gray Metallic and Matte Pearl White, with an MSRP of $6,399, or $6,699 with ABS. The Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE ($6,899) comes in a new Matte Silver and has select accessories preinstalled.

2022 Honda Fury

The Rebel may bring cruiser performance and aesthetics into the 21st century, but the 2022 Honda Fury sticks to its chopper roots. With a long and lean stance, aggressive styling, and 1,312cc V-Twin, the factory-direct custom lives up to its name.

2022 Honda Fury
2022 Honda Fury

However, with dual counter-balancers, fuel injection, and shaft drive, the Fury delivers a smooth ride. In Pearl Yellow paint, the 2022 Fury is sure to turn heads, and at $11,499, it’s priced to take on all competitors.

2022 Honda CBR600RR

Honda’s CBR600RR is back in 2022, offering the utmost supersport performance for spirited road riders and track day enthusiasts. With eight World Supersport titles under its belt, the CBR600RR retains its championship pedigree in 2022 with full Showa suspension and a high-revving inline-four engine.

2022 Honda CBR600RR
2022 Honda CBR600RR

Resplendent in Grand Prix Red, the base 2022 Honda CBR600RR has an MSRP of $11,999 and the ABS-equipped model goes for $12,999.

2022 Honda CBR1000RR

Last year Honda introduced the exclusive, track-focused CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP, a premium, World Superbike-caliber machine that cost $28,500.

2022 Honda CBR1000RR
2022 Honda CBR1000RR

For those seeking liter-class performance on a more affordable scale, Honda’s legendary CBR1000RR is available for 2022 in Grand Prix Red for $16,499, or $16,799 with ABS.

For more information or to find a dealer near you, visit powersports.honda.com.

The post 2022 Honda Lineup | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Honda Navi | Video Review

2022 Honda Navi miniMOTO review
Cruising on the all-new 2022 Honda Navi. (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

We test the 2022 Honda Navi, the latest addition to Honda’s miniMOTO lineup. Toeing the line between a twist-and-go scooter and step-over motorcycle, the latest mini borrows the fan-cooled, 109cc Single and CVT transmission from the Activa 6G and the Grom’s popular design language. And with an MSRP of just $1,807, it fits within any budget.

We spent a day cruising around Costa Mesa, California, on the Navi and found it to be a fun, user-friendly machine, the perfect gateway to the world of motorcycling.

Check out our video review:

2022 Honda Navi Specs

Base Price: $1,807
Website: powersports.honda.com
Engine Type: Fan-cooled Single, SOHC w/ 2 valves
Displacement: 109.2cc
Bore x Stroke: 55.0mm x 55.6mm
Horsepower: 7.8 hp @ 9,500 rpm
Torque: 6.6 lb-ft @ 5,500 rpm
Transmission: Automatic CVT
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 50.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 27.5 degrees/3.2 in.
Seat Height: 30.1 in.
Wet Weight: 236 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 0.9 gals.

The post 2022 Honda Navi | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Honda NC750X DCT Recalled To Fix Stalling Issue

The American Honda Motor Company has issued a recall of all 2021 Honda NC750X bikes equipped with the DCT (Dual Clutch Transmission). A total of 357 bikes sold in America are affected by this recall. 

Asphalt and Rubber mentions in its report that the fuel injection control module software on the affected motorcycle may be programmed incorrectly, resulting in insufficient fuel when stopping or accelerating from a stop. This can cause the bike to stall unexpectedly and abruptly, increasing the risk of a crash. This bulletin affects 357 units from American Honda.

Honda first discovered the issue on a fleet vehicle in February 2021 in Japan. After initially determining that it was not a safety issue, Honda later issued the recall after reports of the problem and resulting injuries from Europe and America. 

Honda will notify owners whose vehicles are a part of this recall before January 7, 2022. Dealers will update the fuel injection and DCT software free of charge to rectify the issue. 

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

EICMA 2021: The Honda Hornet Is Set to Return

Honda was one of the first manufacturers to showcase what it has in store for 2022 at EICMA 2021. Apart from the updated CBR1000RR-R and the new ADV350 scooter, the Japanese manufacturer also showcased a concept that we will see a production iteration of very soon. What makes this an exciting story is that Honda has confirmed the upcoming bike will mark the resurrection of the Hornet moniker. 

The manufacturer said, “Honda is also pleased to confirm that the illustrious Hornet name will return to its lineup soon. The Hornet has been renowned for delivering exhilarating engine performance, and agility matched to cutting edge street-fighter styling since the model was first introduced in Europe in 1998.”

Motorcycle.com reports that the upcoming concept has been showcased in a special area within the Honda stand, in a vivid 3D display of light and sound. The article also mentions that the concept draws inspiration from design house KISKA, with sharp lines akin to what we’ve seen on the KTM Duke lineup. This is still a concept early in the design process, and elements like the raked fork won’t likely make it to the final product.

While Honda released no official information on the upcoming motorcycle, there is speculation that it will feature an iteration of the engine from the Africa Twin. This is mainly because the engine appears to feature a similar layout and a Unicam valve cover.

The 1,084cc engine from the Rebel 1100

That said, the engine looks shorter than the 1,084cc unit that powers the Africa Twin and the Rebel 1100, so this may be a downsized version with a smaller displacement. This is very likely the case considering that Honda released a video on YouTube mentioning that it is “bringing back the illustrious Hornet name, with a middle class naked of ultra-modern design and high-revving engine character, through the new Hornet Concept.”

An image of the engine from the new Hornet concept

CycleWorld has mentioned in its report that Japanese sources have referred to the new model as the CB750S and that a 755cc parallel-twin engine will power it. These rumors also suggest that this engine will eventually move onto the highly anticipated mid-sized ADV, the Transalp. 

Only time will tell what Honda has in store for us, and we might just have to wait until EICMA or Intermot next year for more details. 

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com