Tag Archives: Honda Motorcycles

2024 Honda Africa Twin Review | First Look

2024 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES
2024 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES with manual transmission

American Honda has announced the return of its flagship Africa Twin adventure lineup, which has been updated for the new model year. The 2024 Honda Africa Twin will be available in in four variants: the off-road focused Africa Twin and the more on-road focused Adventure Sports ES, both of which will be offered in either a manual transmission or Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) model. The DCT models feature automatic shifting or the option to use paddle shifters, as well as four settings: Drive, Sport 1, Sport 2, and Sport 3.

Related: 2020 Honda Africa Twin CRF1100L Adventure Sports ES | Road Test Review

2024 Honda Africa Twin
2024 Honda Africa Twin with manual transmission
2024 Honda Africa Twin DCT
2024 Honda Africa Twin DCT

“The Africa Twin is a mainstay of Honda’s adventure lineup, and we’re happy to bring this platform update to our customers for 2024,” said Brandon Wilson, manager of Racing and Experiential Marketing at American Honda. “With the recent addition of the midsize Transalp, and now this updated Africa Twin, it’s clear that Honda is committed to the adventure category, and to delivering capable machines to fuel enthusiasts’ desire to explore.”

Both the Honda Africa Twin and Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES are powered by a liquid-cooled 1,083 Unicam SOHC parallel-Twin with 4 valves per cylinder and 270-degree crank mated to a 6-speed gearbox and chain final drive. The engine’s intake/exhaust has been redesigned, and compression has been increased to 10.5:1.

2024 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES DCT
2024 Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES DCT

Both bikes also feature cruise control and throttle-by-wire with seven levels of Honda Selectable Torque Control and four power delivery modes: Tour, Urban, Gravel, and user-programmable. The Africa Twins have a new five-position windscreen, tubeless tires, and a revised fairing design, and the Adventure Sports ES features heated grips.

2024 Honda Africa Twin DCT
2024 Honda Africa Twin DCT

Stopping power remains the same on both bikes, with dual 4-piston calipers biting 310mm front discs and a 2-piston caliper and 256mm disc in the rear. Both models have switchable cornering ABS with two modes: on-road or off-road.

For suspension, the Africa Twin still has a 45mm inverted telescopic fork and Pro-Link monoshock, but travel has been reduced to 8.0 inches in front and 8.7 in the back (down from 9.1/8.7, front/rear on the 2022 Africa Twin and Adventure Sports ES). The seat height remains at 34.3 inches for the standard position, with a low position of 33.5 inches. The Africa Twin still rides on 21-inch/18-inch front/rear wheels, and with its 5-gallon tank full, it has a wet weight of 510 lb or 535 lb for DCT.

2024 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES DCT
2024 Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES DCT

The Adventure Sports ES also has a 45mm inverted telescopic fork and Pro-Link monoshock, both now with electronic adjustment offering five suspension damper settings: hard, medium, soft, and off-road, as well as a customizable “user” setting. Travel has been reduced to 7.3 inches/7.9 inches, front/back. Seat height has also been lowered to 33.7 inches for the standard position and 32.9 inches for the low position. The Adventure Sports ES has a new 19-inch front wheel (still 18 inches in the rear), a 6.6-gallon tank, and a wet weight of 535 lb or 559 lb for DCT.

2024 Honda Africa Twin DCT
2024 Honda Africa Twin DCT

The Africa Twins feature a 6.5-inch touch-panel LCD multi-information dash with three display options and compatibility with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and Bluetooth.

2024 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES DCT
2024 Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES DCT

The 2024 Africa Twin will come in Grand Prix Red starting at $14,799 for the manual transmission and $15,599 for the DCT. The Adventure Sports ES will come in Pearl White starting at $17,599 for the manual transmission and $18,399 for the DCT. Both bikes will be available in May.

For more information, visit the Honda Powersports website.

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

The post 2024 Honda Africa Twin Review | First Look appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Returning 2024 Honda Motorcycles | First Look 

2024 Honda CBR600RR Grand Prix Red
The CBR600RR in Grand Prix Red joins the list of returning 2024 Honda motorcycles in the company’s latest announcement.

Joining an already growing list of 2024 Honda motorcycles are 11 returning models. Included in Honda’s latest announcement are color options, pricing, and availability. 

This announcement adds to the list of new, updated, and returning models for 2024, including the new 2024 Honda Transalp middleweight adventure bike, which we tested in November, and the updated 2024 Shadow Phantom bobber-style cruiser, which we tested in September. See the previous Honda announcement for news on other returning models, including the Gold Wing family, the Rebel family, the NC750X, the Fury, and others. 

Related: 2024 Honda Transalp Review | Video 

Related: 2024 Honda Shadow Phantom Review | First Ride 

CBR1000RR | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda CBR1000RR Grand Prix Red
2024 Honda CBR1000RR in Grand Prix Red

The 2024 Honda CBR1000RR sportbike is powered by a 998cc inline 4-cylinder engine with dual-stage fuel injection. The RR also boasts a TFT display, full LED lighting, and your choice of ABS or conventional brakes. 

The 2024 Honda CBR1000RR will be available in Grand Prix Red for $16,699 without ABS and $16,999 with ABS, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in March. 

CBR600RR | 2024 Honda Motorcycles  

2024 Honda CBR600RR Grand Prix Red
2024 Honda CBR600RR in Grand Prix Red

With eight World Supersport titles under its belt, the Honda CBR600RR returns for 2024, ready to take on the racetrack or your favorite canyon roads with its high-revving inline four-cylinder engine and high-performance Showa suspension. 

The 2024 Honda CBR600RR will be available in Grand Prix Red for $12,199 without ABS and $13,199 with ABS, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in March. 

CB1000R | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda CB1000R Black
2024 Honda CB1000R in Black

The CB1000R naked streetfighter is a versatile machine with the power and torque of a liter bike and an open, upright riding position. It’s powered by a 998cc inline four-cylinder engine and has a blacked-out design. 

Related: Honda CB1000R | Road Test Review 

The 2024 CB1000R will be available in Black for $12,999, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in March. 

SCL500 | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda SCL500 Candy Orange
2024 Honda SCL500 in Candy Orange

Released last year, the scrambler-style SCL500 is built for fun and features the same 500cc parallel-Twin from the Rebel 500, an upright riding position, a flat seat, and a high-mounted exhaust. The SCL500 also lends itself to personalization through Honda’s range of SCL500-tailored accessories. 

Related: 2023 Honda SCL500 Review | First Ride 

2024 Honda SCL500 Matte Black Metallic
2024 Honda SCL500 in Matte Black Metallic

The 2024 Honda SCL500 will be available in Candy Orange, Matte Laurel Green Metallic, or Matte Black Metallic (new color for 2024) for $6,799, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in April. 

2024 Honda SCL500 Matte Laurel Green Metallic
2024 Honda SCL500 in Matte Laurel Green Metallic

PCX | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda PCX Matte Brown Metallic
2024 Honda PCX i Matte Brown Metallic

Designed for urban environments, the Honda PCX scooter features a liquid-cooled 157cc Single, convenient underseat storage, and standard front-wheel ABS. 

The 2024 Honda PCX will be available in Matte Brown Metallic with an MSRP of $4,249, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in April. 

CRF300L | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda CRF300L Red
2024 Honda CRF300L in Red

The Honda CRF300L is an approachable dual-sport that provides an entry point for riders new to off-road riding. It’s powered by a liquid-cooled 286cc Single, and it’s available with or without ABS, as well as a low-seat ABS version. 

Related: Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally | First Ride Review 

2024 Honda CRF300LS Swift Gray
2024 Honda CRF300LS in Swift Gray

The 2024 Honda CRF300L will be available in Red with an MSRP of $5,749 with ABS and $5,449 without ABS. The CRF300LS low-seat version will be available in Swift Gray with an MSRP of $5,749. These models will arrive at dealerships in April. 

CRF300L Rally | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda CRF300L Rally Red
2024 Honda CRF300L Rally in Red

The Rally version of the CRF300L dual-sport features comfort-focused enhancements like a windscreen, handguards, and larger fuel tank. Like the CRF300L, the Rally also comes with the option of ABS. 

Related: Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally | First Ride Review 

The 2024 Honda CRF300L Rally will be available in Red with an MSRP of $6,499 with ABS or $6,199 without ABS, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in April. 

XR650L | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda XR650L White
2024 Honda XR650L in White

Introduced in 1993, the Honda XR650L dual-sport features a simple design with a focus on reliability. It’s powered by an air-cooled 644cc Single and features a rugged steel frame and long-travel suspension, built to perform in the dirt while being street-legal for around-town transportation. 

The 2024 Honda XR650L will be available in White with an MSRP of $6,999, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in March. 

XR150L | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda XR150L Black
2024 Honda XR150L in Black

For a more affordable dual-sport option, the XR150L features an air-cooled 149cc Single, an approachable and accessible design, and a convenient rear cargo rack, ideal for around-town commuting or transportation around the campground. 

2024 Honda XR150L White
2024 Honda XR150L in White

The 2024 Honda XR150L will be available in Black or White with an MSRP of $3,099, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in February. 

Trail125 | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda Trail125 Turmeric Yellow
2024 Honda Trail125 in Turmeric Yellow

The Trail125 minimoto nods to Trail models of the 1960s with a classic design, but its current version includes convenient modern features like fuel injection, an electric starter, and front-wheel ABS. 

The 2024 Trail125 will be available in Turmeric Yellow with an MSRP of $4,099, and it’ll arrive in dealerships in March. 

Montesa | 2024 Honda Motorcycles 

2024 Honda Montesa Cota 4RT301RR White
2024 Honda Montesa Cota 4RT301RR in White

The Montesa Cota 4RT trials bike has been tested and proven to perform, capturing an FIM World Trials Championship Crown in the hands of Toni Bou. It features top-shelf Showa suspension, programmed fuel injection, and a dual-map ECU. The Montesa comes in the competition-ready 4RT301RR version and the standard 4RT260R. 

2024 Honda Montesa Cota 4RT260R Red
2024 Honda Montesa Cota 4RT260R in Red

The 2024 Honda Montesa Cota 4RT301RR will be available in White or Red with an MSRP of $11,899, and the Montesa Cota 4RT260R will be available in Red with an MSRP of $9,299. These two models will arrive in dealerships in February. 

For more information, visit the Honda website

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide  

The post Returning 2024 Honda Motorcycles | First Look  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Honda Transalp Review | Video

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
2024 Honda XL750 Transalp (Photos & video by Align Media)

Slotting between the CB500X and Africa Twin, the 2024 Honda Transalp is a new adventure bike powered by a 755cc parallel-Twin. The original Transalp was sold in the U.S. for only two years (1989-1990), but the model continued to evolve in Europe. The iconic bike returns to America to compete in the red-hot middleweight ADV segment.

We put the Transalp through its on-road and off-road paces during a two-day, 250-mile test amidst the vibrant autumn foliage of central Pennsylvania. Our route included the rugged Section 4 of the BDR-X PA Wilds and challenging twists near State College.

Read our full Honda Transalp review and see it in action in this video.

2024 Honda Transalp Specs 

ENGINE 

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, parallel-Twin, Unicam SOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl. 
  • Displacement: 755cc 
  • Bore x Stroke: 87.0 x 63.5mm 
  • Compression Ratio: 11.0:1 
  • Valve Insp. Interval: 16,000 miles 
  • Fuel Delivery: Programmed Fuel Injection, 46mm throttle bodies 
  • Lubrication System: Wet sump, 4.1 qt. cap. 
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch 
  • Final Drive: Chain 

CHASSIS

  • Frame: Steel diamond truss 
  • Wheelbase: 61.5 in. 
  • Rake/Trail: 27 degrees/4.4 in. 
  • Seat Height: 33.7 in. 
  • Suspension, Front: 43mm Showa SFF-CATM telescopic inverted fork w/ spring-preload adjustment, 7.9 in. travel 
  • Rear: Pro-Link system w/ single Showa remote-reservoir shock, 7.5 in. travel 
  • Brakes, Front: Dual 310mm “wave” discs w/ 2-piston calipers & ABS 
  • Rear: Single 256mm “wave” disc w/ single-piston caliper & ABS 
  • Wheels, Front: Stainless steel spoke, aluminum rim, 21 in. 
  • Rear: Stainless steel spoke, aluminum rim, 18 in. 
  • Tires, Front: 90/90-21 
  • Rear: 150/70R-18 
  • Curb Weight: 459 lb 
  • Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gal 

The post 2024 Honda Transalp Review | Video appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

The Long Impact of a Short Ride on a 1980 Honda CM400E

1980 Honda CM400E Scott A Williams
Your humble scribe and his 1980 Honda CM400E on the same day as that ride with Raymond.

My first motorcycle was a 1980 Honda CM400E. It wasn’t fast, and the brakes were lousy, but it delivered some memorable rides. One ride was notably short, but it made a lasting impact on a special family friend.

Raymond was the younger brother of my father’s close friend and colleague. It was challenging for Raymond to communicate with words, but there was one message he always conveyed with crystal clarity: He loved motorcycles.

I discovered this one afternoon when I arrived at my parents’ house riding my Honda CM400E. Raymond was visiting, and he was mesmerized. I shut off the motor, but he kept the motor noises going: “Vroom! Vroom!” We were happy to see each other, but what mattered to him most in that moment was one simple fact: I had arrived on a motorcycle.

Raymond’s big brother James, who had stopped by to talk shop with my dad, came outside too. He directed Raymond to stand back from the bike because it would be hot. Raymond adjusted his distance but not his gaze, and that grin never left his face.

Discreetly, I asked James if I could take his brother for a ride, explaining what Raymond would need to do on a slow ride through my dad’s quiet neighborhood. Recognizing the impact my motorcycle was having on Raymond and placing his trust in me, James agreed.

“Raymond,” I asked, “do you want to go for a ride on the motorcycle?” He literally jumped at the invitation and looked to his brother for approval. James smiled his okay.

My spare helmet fit Raymond just fine. My dad’s leather jacket fit well enough. As we suited up, I talked with Raymond about what I was going to do – drive the motorcycle – and what he was going to do – sit still on the seat behind me. He understood.

While I sat on the front seat and held the bars steady, James helped Raymond grab my shoulders, slide his leg over the seat, and drop into position behind me. Snugged in between my back and the sissy bar (remember those?), Raymond bounced with anticipation.

“Now listen, buddy,” I said, “you have to sit tight!” Perhaps interpreting my words as a request for him to hold tightly onto me, he wrapped his arms around my skinny midsection and squeezed. Raymond seemed confident with this approach, and he sure was eager to ride.

I started the motor, gave that little Twin some throttle, and turned onto the street for a leisurely ride with no reason to shift out of 2nd gear. It took the better part of five minutes to make a mile loop, and Raymond howled his excitement the whole time.

As we pulled back into the driveway, my mother snapped a photograph that ended up on the refrigerator at Raymond’s house, where it stayed, gradually fading, for decades. James would tell me how Raymond showed the picture to people who came to visit. “Everyone needs to see Raymond on the motorcycle,” he’d say. When I’d bump into a mutual friend elsewhere, conversations often started like this: “Raymond still won’t let me sit down until I go see the picture of him on that motorbike with you!”

That photo is now gone, and sadly so is Raymond, but his memory helps me hold onto valuable life lessons I learned from his family over many years. He is burned into my heart, notably because of one joyous ride we shared on my old 400. Here’s to short rides with long impact.

See more stories from Scott A. Williams here.

The post The Long Impact of a Short Ride on a 1980 Honda CM400E appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Honda XL750 Transalp Review | First Ride

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
Perfectly tailored to my 5-foot-11 frame, the ergonomics of the 2024 Honda Transalp kept me comfortable throughout 250 miles of mixed terrain riding.

Making its much anticipated debut in the American market is the 2024 Honda XL750 Transalp, fresh off a successful year in Europe. Equipped with off-road features like 21-inch front and 18-inch rear spoked wheels and a quickshifter, the Honda Transalp has inspired debates about whether this bike is a step-up or step-down in adventure capabilities. 

Nestled between the entry-level CB500X and the liter-class Africa Twin in Honda’s current lineup, how does the Transalp fare?  

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
A year after its European debut, the all-new Honda Transalp XL750 finally arrives on American shores.

We took it for a two-day 250-mile test run amidst the vibrant autumn foliage of central Pennsylvania. Our route included the rugged section 4 of the BDR-X PA Wilds and challenging twists near State College – Penn State’s home turf. 

Related: Backcountry Discovery Routes | Ep. 58 Rider Magazine Insider Podcast 

To give the Transalp an off-road credibility check, American Honda fitted our test bikes with Bridgestone Adventurecross AX41 tires, one of my favorite tire sets for ADV riding. This decision enabled me to put the Transalp through its paces on demanding off-road trails. 

Related: Bridgestone Adventurecross AX41 Adventure Tires | Gear Review 

For the consumer version, expect either Metzeler Karoo Street or Dunlop Mixtour tires in sizes 90/90-21 and 150/70R-18. (Take note: They’re not tubeless, which might be a minor drawback for some.) 

Have you ever questioned whether to “step up” your adventure game or “step down” for something more manageable? The Transalp may provide the answer for both. 

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
Despite seeming underpowered and somewhat weak on paper compared to other middleweight ADV bikes, the Transalp excels, particularly shining on section 4 of the BDR-X PA Wilds.

A Storied History and Design 

After a successful year in Europe, the Honda Transalp finally landed on American soil this October, reviving a saga that originally began in 1986.  

While American riders had only a fleeting encounter with this storied machine – curtailed after just two years due to the prevailing motorcycle culture and the bike’s dual-purpose nature – the Transalp has continually evolved overseas. 

Originally debuting in Europe in 1986, the Transalp reached the U.S. for the 1989 model year with a liquid-cooled 600cc 52-degree V-Twin engine, 3 valves per cylinder, a full-cradle frame, and a box-section swingarm. Its 41mm fork offered nearly 8 inches of travel, while the rear featured Honda’s Pro-Link system and provided 7.5 inches of rear-wheel travel – a remarkable feat for its era. 

In the subsequent years, the bike underwent several iterations, morphing into the XL650V in 2000 and later the XL700V in 2008. 

Fast-forward to the present, and the fourth-generation Transalp – now labeled the XL750 – is a modern adventure bike. It inherits its 755cc parallel-Twin engine from the CB750 Hornet, a platform that regrettably remains exclusive to overseas markets. 

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
The bike is powered by a 755cc parallel-Twin. Although it generates “just” 83 hp, it’s an optimal fit for this machine weighing in with a 459-lb curb weight.

Honda Transalp: Engine, Clutch, and Transmission 

Upon starting the Transalp’s 755cc Unicam parallel-Twin with 4 valves per cylinder, the 270-degree crank immediately makes its presence known. This short-stroke crank generates a pulsating effect that optimizes torque distribution across the rev range, making the engine particularly efficient in the mid- to upper range. 

Honda’s new Vortex Airflow Ducting induction system enhances this power range by accelerating the intake-charge airspeed between 3,000 and 8,000 rpm, thereby improving throttle response.  

Making a claimed 83 hp at 8,500 rpm, the engine offers a well-balanced power output suitable for both on-road and off-road riding, and it operates efficiently throughout the rev range. During our two-day test, I preferred keeping the revs high, switching between 3rd and 4th gears in faster BDR sections and dropping to 2nd gear for more technical challenges. 

On Pine Flat Road, an optional rocky and muddy trail, I kept the bike in 2nd gear throughout. During slower sections, I manipulated the clutch for better traction before revving the engine up to 8,000 rpm to accelerate. The bike wheelied best in 2nd gear, either when navigating large obstacles or simply splashing through puddles. 

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
The 21/18-inch front/rear wheel configuration equips the bike to tackle challenging adventures, from deep mud to rocky single-track trails.

Honda’s slip/assist clutch, featuring F.C.C. Leaning Segment discs, reduces clutch drag torque by 30%. The system is especially noticeable in technical terrain, requiring only one finger to operate the clutch. Equally impressive is the quickshifter for clutchless up and downshifts. It operates smoothly, even between 1st and 2nd gears. 

Honda also optimized the bike’s 459-lb curb weight with a 16/45 final drive ratio and a 520 chain. This configuration minimizes high revs while cruising at 75-plus mph and contributes to fuel efficiency. Even after rigorous use, the bike averaged around 46 mph. With a 4.5-gallon tank, expect over 200 miles between fill-ups. 

The engine counterbalancer ensures a smooth ride. It is driven off the crank’s primary gear, reducing weight and complexity while maintaining engine compactness. 

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
The Transalp’s chassis delivers exceptional road performance; even on successive corners, the presence of a 21-inch front wheel goes unnoticed.

The Unicam engine design, like the one used on the Africa Twin’s 1,084cc powerplant, originated from Honda’s CRF450R motocross bikes. To improve reliability, Honda employs nickel-silicon-carbide cylinder plating, which is also used in the CBR1000RR-R and CRF450R. 

Honda Transalp: Electronics 

The Transalp has throttle-by-wire with 46mm throttle bodies and offers five ride modes: Sport, Standard, Rain, Gravel, and a customizable User setting. Each mode allows customization, enabling adjustments to engine power, engine braking, traction control (aka Honda Selectable Torque Control), and ABS. 

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
The Transalp is more than up to the task of long-distance travel, effortlessly traversing noteworthy landmarks like this covered bridge.

GEAR UP 

In contrast to bikes that reduce power across different modes, all five settings on this bike maintain access to full power. The variability lies in the power delivery. The Transalp yields a more subdued throttle response in Rain and Gravel modes while ramping up responsiveness in Standard and Sport modes. 

Adjustments to these parameters are only possible when the bike is stationary. However, a conveniently located button on the left control panel allows quick mode-switching while in motion. After selecting a mode, simply releasing the throttle engages it. 

During my evaluation, I found each mode to be highly effective in its designated setting. On dirt sections, I primarily used my customized User mode, configured for maximum power, minimal engine braking, and with both TC and ABS deactivated. This setup offered optimal traction and stopping capabilities, aligning perfectly with my riding preferences. 

One issue to note is that turning off the ignition automatically reactivates the TC and ABS settings. To counter this, I left the ignition on for the majority of the day, making exceptions only for stops exceeding 10 minutes. This tactic also had the added benefit of keeping my grips heated during the cold morning hours. The heated grips have four intensity levels, and they’re among the warmest OEM grip warmers I’ve encountered. 

Finally, all this information is prominently displayed on a 5-inch full-color TFT dash. Users can choose four display layouts, including a rally-inspired design featuring bar graphs rather than circular indicators.  

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
The 5-inch digital display panel covers all essential metrics – except ambient temperature.

The dash provides data on speed, rpm, fuel level, engine mode, trip distance, and gear position, as well as levels of TC, ABS, power output, and engine braking. The sole missing element is an ambient temperature readout – a feature I find particularly useful given the significant temperature fluctuations often encountered in backcountry rides. 

Honda Transalp: Suspension and Brakes 

Unfortunately for such a capable middleweight ADV bike, suspension adjustability is limited to spring preload. The Showa system includes a 43mm SFF-CA fork and a Pro-Link rear shock. 

On paved roads, the bike demonstrated admirable stability, even under aggressive throttle and braking inputs. While the suspension felt slightly softer when navigating dirt terrains, it proved capable of handling the most demanding and intricate BDR gravel sections I encountered. 

Suspension travel is 7.9 inches at the front and 7.1 inches at the rear. I weigh 185 lb, and I bottomed out the fork only twice during harsh landings, experiencing no issues with the rear shock. Ground clearance is 8.3 inches. 

My test unit was equipped with an optional skid plate, adding an extra layer of engine protection. Without a skid plate, the bike’s exhaust system would be vulnerable, making off-road travel ill-advised. 

As for the braking, the 2024 Honda Transalp performed flawlessly throughout my test. It employs 2-piston front calipers working in conjunction with dual 310mm “wave” discs and a single-piston rear caliper squeezing a 256mm wave disc. Off-road, with ABS disengaged, these offered a well-balanced braking experience; a single finger sufficed to engage the front brake, and applying ample pressure to the rear brake facilitated effective slowing. 

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
Helping stop the Transalp are dual 310mm “wave” front discs squeezed by hydraulic 2-piston calipers.

On-road and with ABS activated, the system exhibited minimal pulsation during planned emergency braking exercises. It’s important to note that to maintain a competitive price point, the Transalp lacks some preferable on-road amenities, such as cornering ABS and cruise control. However, it does come with the convenience of self-canceling turnsignals! 

Honda Transalp: Ergonomics, Seat Height, and Fairing Protection 

Contrary to its specifications on paper, the Transalp’s ergonomic design performs impressively in real-world conditions. With a seat height of 33.7 inches and an optional lower seat at 32.6 inches, the bike comfortably accommodated my 30-inch inseam. This allowed for confident stops in uneven, rocky off-road terrains where taller bikes often pose the risk of a rider losing footing. 

The seat’s design offers ample room for positional adjustments, even letting me sit close to the gas tank during fast off-road sections to roll my back forward, sit upright, and maintain front tire traction. The handlebar is sufficiently wide, offering good steering leverage. The rider triangle felt just right, and my 5-foot-11 frame never felt cramped.  

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
On twisty asphalt, Sport mode and a bit of concentration are all you need – the Transalp makes cornering a simple and fun task.

The stock footpegs are roomy enough for my size 11.5 boots and provide good grip once the rubber padding is removed. Whether standing or seated during high-speed sections, my feet enjoyed unrestricted movement, avoiding any uncomfortable contact with passenger pegs or engine components. 

Designed by Honda’s Italian R&D team, the Transalp sports an unmistakable Italian flair in its fairing design. Although budgetary considerations led to a nonadjustable windscreen, the aerodynamics are still effective. Throughout my ride, even at speeds exceeding 80 mph, I experienced no head buffeting. 

The Final Tally 

At $9,999, the 2024 Honda XL750 Transalp is competitively priced, undercutting key rivals like the Yamaha Ténéré 700 by $800 and the Suzuki V-Strom 800DE by $1,350. When compared to European models such as the KTM 890 Adventure, the price difference climbs to nearly $4,000, though we’re not necessarily comparing apples to apples anymore. 

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
The fairings exude Italian flair, and despite the windscreen being fixed, there’s almost no buffeting to speak of.

Back to our original question: Is the Honda Transalp built for riders stepping down from a larger adventure bike or for those stepping up from a smaller machine? I’d argue that Honda has navigated this dilemma masterfully, providing one of the most balanced middleweight platforms available.  

The bike lends credence to Honda’s attempt to provide a harmonious blend of features tailored for both the beginner stepping up and the experienced rider who might be looking for a more approachable yet capable alternative.  

2024 Honda Transalp First Ride
This particular Transalp is outfitted with a touring package, adding spacious panniers for added utility.

The step-up or step-down argument is put to rest – not by compromise but by balance. This balance is a hard-fought victory in product development and felt at the heart of the riding experience. In the Transalp, you’ll find a motorcycle that doesn’t ask you to choose between worlds. Instead, it encourages you to explore them all. 

See all of Rider‘s Honda coverage here.

2024 Honda XL750 Transalp Specs 

Engine 

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, parallel-Twin, Unicam SOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl. 
  • Displacement: 755cc 
  • Bore x Stroke: 87.0 x 63.5mm 
  • Compression Ratio: 11.0:1 
  • Valve Insp. Interval: 16,000 miles 
  • Fuel Delivery: Programmed Fuel Injection, 46mm throttle bodies 
  • Lubrication System: Wet sump, 4.1 qt. cap. 
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch 
  • Final Drive: Chain 

Chassis 

  • Frame: Steel diamond truss 
  • Wheelbase: 61.5 in. 
  • Rake/Trail: 27 degrees/4.4 in. 
  • Seat Height: 33.7 in. 
  • Suspension, Front: 43mm Showa SFF-CATM telescopic inverted fork w/ spring-preload adjustment, 7.9 in. travel 
  • Rear: Pro-Link system w/ single Showa remote-reservoir shock, 7.5 in. travel 
  • Brakes, Front: Dual 310mm “wave” discs w/ 2-piston calipers & ABS 
  • Rear: Single 256mm “wave” disc w/ single-piston caliper & ABS 
  • Wheels, Front: Stainless steel spoke, aluminum rim, 21 in. 
  • Rear: Stainless steel spoke, aluminum rim, 18 in. 
  • Tires, Front: 90/90-21 
  • Rear: 150/70R-18 
  • Curb Weight: 459 lb 
  • Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gal 

The post 2024 Honda XL750 Transalp Review | First Ride appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Honda Gold Wing, Rebel, and NC750X Returning Models 

2024 Honda Gold Wing Matte Armor Green Metallic
2024 Honda Gold Wing in Matte Armor Green Metallic

Honda has announced six models returning for 2024, including the Gold Wing family, the Fury, the Rebel family, and the adventure NC750X. These returning models join previously announced 2024 models, including the Ruckus and Metropolitan, the Monkey and Super Cub, the Shadow Phantom, the Shadow Aero, the ADV160, and the XL750 Transalp

The models in this announcement, except for the NC750X, receive new colors for 2024, and the bagger-styled Rebel 1100T will now come in a 6-speed manual transmission version to join last year’s Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) version. 

2024 Honda Gold Wing 

2024 Honda Gold Wing Tour Pearl White
2024 Honda Gold Wing Tour in Pearl White

The ultimate touring motorcycle returns for 2024. Powered by a liquid-cooled 1,833cc opposed 6-cylinder engine with a 7-speed manual transmission or DCT, the Gold Wing family includes touring accommodations and conveniences for the most comfortable long-distance ride available. Technologies include throttle-by-wire, four ride modes, Honda Selectable Torque Control (Tour models only), Hill Start Assist, optimized cruise control, and electronically controlled combined braking system with ABS. Android Auto and Apple CarPlay allow riders to take advantage of the 55-watt speakers, and 121 total liters of storage provide plenty of space for long-haul travel needs. 

2024 Honda Gold Wing Dash
2024 Honda Gold Wing Dash

Related: 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT | Road Test Review 

The 2024 Honda Gold Wing will arrive in November 2023, and the base model will have an MSRP of $24,700 and come in Matte Armored Green Metallic. The Gold Wing DCT in the same color will be priced at $25,700. The Gold Wing Tour will be $28,700 in Gray Metallic/Black or Pearl White, and the Tour DCT will be $29,700 in the same color. The top-line Gold Wing Tour Airbag DCT will have an MSRP of $33,000 and come in Pearl White. 

2024 Honda Fury 

2024 Honda Fury in Adventure Green
2024 Honda Fury in Adventure Green

The Honda Fury is a chopper-styled cruiser powered by a liquid-cooled 1,312cc V-Twin. The front is raked out to 32 degrees, and the hard-tail styling and low seat height complete the look. It has adjustable front and rear suspension, a 336mm front disc with a twin-piston caliper, and a 296mm disc with single-piston caliper in the rear. ABS comes standard. 

The 2024 Honda Fury will be available in December 2023 in a new Adventure Green color with an MSRP of $11,499. 

2024 Honda Rebel 1100 

2024 Honda Rebel 1100T Matte Armored Green Metallic
2024 Honda Rebel 1100T in Matte Armored Green Metallic

Introduced for 2021, the Rebel 1100 cruiser is the next step up from the popular Rebel 500. It’s powered by a liquid-cooled 1,083cc parallel-Twin with a 6-speed transmission available in either manual or DCT. Last year, the bagger-styled 1100T DCT joined the family with hard saddlebags with a combined 35 liters of storage and a fairing with a short windscreen. For 2024, Honda has added a 1100T with a manual transmission. 

2024 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT Metallic Blue
2024 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT in Metallic Blue

Related: 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 | First Ride Review 

The 2024 Honda Rebel 1100 will arrive in January 2024. The base model with a manual transmission will come in Gray Metallic or Metallic Blue with an MSRP of $9,549. The 1100 DCT will come in the same colors with an MSRP of $10,149. The bagger-styled 1100T with a manual transmission will come in Metallic Black or Matte Armored Green Metallic for $10,699, and the DCT version will come in the same colors for $11,349. 

2024 Honda Rebel 500 

2024 Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE Pearl Smoky Gray
2024 Honda Rebel 500 ABS SE in Pearl Smoky Gray

The Rebel 500 is Honda’s highly popular modern cruiser and is powered by a liquid-cooled 471cc parallel-Twin. It features a peanut fuel tank, LED lighting, and blacked-out engine components. It’s available in standard and ABS versions, as well as the ABS SE version, which includes add-ons like a diamond-stitched seat and a headlight cowl.  

2024 Honda Rebel 500 Matte Laurel Green Metallic
2024 Honda Rebel 500 in Matte Laurel Green Metallic

Related: 2020 Honda Rebel 500 ABS | Road Test Review 

The 2024 Honda Rebel 500 will be available in January 2024 in Matte Laurel Green or Pearl Black. The standard model will have an MSRP of $6,499, and the ABS will be priced at $6,799. The Rebel 500 ABS SE will come in Pearl Smoky Gray with an MSRP of $6,999. 

2024 Honda Rebel 300 

2024 Honda Rebel 300 Nitric Orange
2024 Honda Rebel 300 in Nitric Orange

The Rebel 300 is Honda’s most approachable and affordable cruiser. With a low seat height, comfortable ergonomics, and predictable power delivery, the Rebel 300 is designed to provide new riders with confidence and fun without breaking the bank. It’s powered by a liquid-cooled 286cc Single and, like the Rebel 500 and 1100, includes a peanut fuel tank, blacked-out components, and LED lighting. 

2024 Honda Rebel 300 Pearl Black
2024 Honda Rebel 300 in Pearl Black

The 2024 Honda Rebel 300 will be available in January 2024 in Pearl Black or Nitric Orange. The standard model will have an MSRP of $4,849, and the ABS version will be priced at $5,149. 

2024 Honda NC750X 

2024 Honda NC750X Matte Nightshade Blue
2024 Honda NC750X in Matte Nightshade Blue

The do-it-all Honda NC750X commuter bike is powered by a liquid-cooled 745cc parallel-Twin and comes standard with DCT. It features an upright riding position and a large front storage compartment. Also included is the Honda Selectable Torque Control, which allows riders to choose between some rear-wheel spin for gravel and dirt or reduced spin. 

Related: 2019 Honda NC750X | Long-Term Report 

The 2024 Honda NC750X will be available in January 2024 in Matte Nightshade Blue with an MSRP of $9,499. 

For more information, visit the American Honda website

See all of Rider’s Honda coverage here. 

The post 2024 Honda Gold Wing, Rebel, and NC750X Returning Models  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom Review | First Ride

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
The 2024 Honda Shadow Phantom celebrates its 41st birthday this year with updates to both its bobber styling and performance. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

When something has been around for four decades, it’s usually because of a combination of inherent quality and general likability. Take a look at Rider magazine, for example. Next year, we celebrate our 50th birthday. There’s a reason for that. But quality doesn’t live in a vacuum. To survive – and even better, to thrive – there has to be change. Honda has succeeded in finding the next step in the evolution of the Honda Shadow Phantom, and the company hopes the changes, combined with a 40-year history, will help the bobber-style bike succeed in the middleweight cruiser market.

The Spirit of 750

The Honda Shadow was introduced in 1983 with two options. The larger of the two cruisers featured a liquid-cooled 745cc 45-degree V-Twin with SOHC and 3 valves per cylinder. It had a 6-speed gearbox, a slipper clutch, and shaft final drive. More than 19,000 Shadow 750s were sold that year.

Related: Retrospective – 1988 Honda VT800C Shadow

There were several other chapters in the Shadow story, but if we’re following the lineage to the Phantom, significant mileposts included the shift to a 52-degree V-Twin in 1988 with the 583cc Shadow VLX. The 52-degree V found its way to the larger displacement 750cc Shadow ACE in 1998, which dropped down to a 5-speed gearbox, chain final drive, and no slipper clutch. The Shadow Phantom was introduced in 2010 with blacked-out styling (the exhaust was still chrome), the introduction of fuel injection, and a return to shaft drive.

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
The 2024 Phantom carries the blacked-out styling through the exhaust, which was still chrome for 2023.

The 2024 Honda Shadow Phantom sees the blacked-out styling now carried through the exhaust – a good look that represents a more modern appeal. It still features a liquid-cooled 745cc 52-degree V-Twin, but machine-cut cylinder head fins add a nice visual contrast that makes the engine pop. There’s also a new two-tone paint scheme on the tank (Deep Pearl Gray or Orange Metallic), LED turnsignals, fork boots, shortened fenders, and a new single seat (a passenger seat and footpegs are available as accessories).

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
The 41mm fork on the new Phantom provides 5.1 inches of travel, a .5-inch increase over the 2023 model.

Colin Miller, American Honda assistant manager of public relations, said members of Generations Y and Z are more attracted to Honda’s Rebel platform, partially because of its more aggressive styling, and Honda is leveraging some of that style with the Shadow Phantom. Whereas the Shadow Aero still has the more laid-back appearance of a traditional cruiser with a swept-back handlebar and more relaxed seating, the revamped Phantom takes a more contemporary approach, with a new handlebar and clamp that puts the rider in more aggressive forward position. A graphic during the presentation showed the handlebar position close to that of the Harley-Davidson Forty-Eight.

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
An undeniable part of the cruiser appeal is the appearance, and the new styling of the Phantom is definitely eye-catching.

And from a customization standpoint, while the previous model’s rear fender and license plate holder was one piece that had to be cut if a customer wanted to make changes, the holder on the new model can be unbolted to aid customization.

Another significant update to the Phantom is its stopping power. Braking in the front is still provided by a 2-piston caliper gripping a 296mm disc, but the previous rear brake drum has been replaced by a 276mm disc and 2-piston caliper, and a new ABS version is available for an extra $300.

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
Instrumentation on the Phantom is minimal – about on par with the older cruiser in my stable, but at least it has a low-fuel light. And while there is no gear indicator, I appreciated the green neutral light.

Front suspension travel has been increased by half an inch (to 5.1 inches) but remains the same 3.5 inches in the rear courtesy of dual shocks with five-position spring-preload adjustability. Otherwise, seat height is essentially the same at a very cruiser-like 25.6 inches. Even though fuel capacity has been bumped 0.2 gallon to 3.9, curb weight of the 2024 model is 6 lb lighter at 543 lb.

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
The Phantom may not be a sportbike, but with a 543 pound curb weight, it doesn’t mind being flopped through corners.

Unlocking the Phantom Zone

The middleweight cruiser market exploded during the Covid pandemic. The wave crested in 2021, but Miller said Honda is hoping the Shadow Phantom will bring in both new riders and existing cruiser fans looking for something new. I don’t know about the younger generation – in more ways than just their riding preferences – but I can say this Gen X cruiser guy sure enjoyed the ride.

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
The Phantom returns with a liquid-cooled 745cc 45-degree V-Twin with SOHC and 3 valves per cylinder.

The first thing I noticed when firing up the bike was the rumble, which was surprisingly satisfying for a Japanese bike with the stock exhaust. The Phantom continued to impress as we rolled through the streets of San Dimas, California. When we tested the 2013 Shadow Aero, it made 44.7 lb-ft of peak torque at the rear wheel, with more than 40 lb-ft available between 2,200 and 5,000 rpm. I appreciated that level of low-end grunt when pulling away from intersections in town, and it held its own as we climbed 6,000 feet on State Route 39 to Crystal Lake.

Related: 2013 Honda Shadow Aero Review

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
The rear fender on the 2024 Phantom is shorter than the previous model. Also note the three bolts (with three corresponding on the other side) to remove the rear portion for customizing.

The rear suspension was a little squishy in some of the bumpier parts, but that was likely a result of the preload being set for someone a little lighter than my two-plus bills. Fortunately, the new saddle is nice and cushy and didn’t give me any grief during the four hours I was on it.   

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
2024 Honda Shadow Phantom

GEAR UP

The pull on the clutch lever was a little heavy, and I would rate it “medium.” Since I own an older cruiser, it’s not anything new to me, but many bikes today are equipped with slip/assist clutches, and once you get used to this feature, you notice when it’s not there. I was okay with the lever pull – although a slip/assist clutch would’ve lightened it – but there was a moment going up the twisty, narrow one-way route to Crystal Lake where a quick downshift, combined with some debris in the road, gave a hop of the rear wheel on a curve that was a little bracing.

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
My only gripe with the Phantom is that I had to ride with my right heel on the footpeg instead of my arch if I didn’t want to rest my foot on the brake pedal or drag my boot on tight right corners.

At just $8,399 ($8,699 for the ABS version), the 2024 Honda Shadow Phantom may not have all the bells and whistles, but it is a very attractive proposition for either a new rider or someone looking to add another steed to their stable from a segment without a lot of competition.

Only Breath and Shadow

I had only one other issue with the Phantom. The bike has a decent 27.4-degree lean angle. However, when I put the arch of my boot on the forward-mount footpegs, if I didn’t want my toe resting on the brake pedal, the heel of my boot found the road surface before the pegs did. This required a shifting of my right boot to various positions, none of which were as comfortable or confidence-inspiring as having the peg positioned directly under my arch.

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
The Phantom sticks with its shaft drive roots, which has lower maintenance costs, a factor Honda says is appealing to new riders. I liked the clean look but wish they could’ve found someplace else for that sticker.

This is not to say that I was high-speed slaloming up the canyon. In fact, I was the most conservative of the riders that day on the winding SR-39. As to those peg scrapes, I was once advised by my colleague and editor-in-chief of our sibling publication American Rider, Kevin Duke: “Ride your own ride, but challenge your limits when your confidence grows.”

So I did. Most riders won’t treat the Honda Shadow like a sportbike, but it certainly responded to my prodding enough to make it a spirited ride up the winding SR-39. When it comes to riding my own ride, I like to cruise, take in the scenery, breathe the air, and get my heart pumping enough to remember I’m alive.

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
The curving, climbing ride on State Route 39 to Crystal Lake was a great mix of man versus nature.

If you are of a like mind, you’ll be very happy with the Phantom. And for those of you wondering if it’ll haul a little ass, the Phantom has something for you as well, as I can attest based on the taillights winking in the distance ahead of me from some of the other riders in my group.

The new Phantom has brought the Shadow into the light, and it looks to be a bright future indeed.

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom
The 2024 Honda Shadow Phantom comes in the two-tone Orange Metallic or Deep Pearl Gray.

Check out more new bikes in Rider‘s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

2024 Honda Shadow Phantom Specs

  • Base Price: $8,399
  • Website: Powersports.Honda.com
  • Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles
  • Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 52-degree V-Twin, SOHC w/ 3 valves per cyl.
  • Displacement: 745cc
  • Bore x Stroke: 79.0 x 76.0mm
  • Transmission: 5-speed, cable-actuated clutch
  • Final Drive: Shaft
  • Wheelbase: 64.6 in.
  • Rake/Trail: 34 degrees/6.4 in.
  • Seat Height: 25.6 in.
  • Wet Weight: 543 lb
  • Fuel Capacity: 3.9 gal.
  • Fuel Consumption: 56 mpg (claimed)

See all of Rider‘s Honda coverage here.

The post 2024 Honda Shadow Phantom Review | First Ride appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 Honda XL750 Transalp Review | First Look

2024 Honda XL750 Transalp
2024 Honda XL750 Transalp in Matte Black Metallic

American Honda has announced that the highly anticipated Honda XL750 Transalp is coming to the U.S. market for the 2024 model year.

2024 Honda XL750 Transalp

The Transalp was originally introduced in Europe in 1986, first showing up in the U.S. for the 1989 model year with a liquid-cooled, 600cc 52-degree V-Twin with 3 valves per cylinder bolted into a full-cradle frame with a box section swingarm. A 41mm fork provided almost 8 inches of travel up front, and Pro-Link suspension offered 7.5 inches of rear-wheel travel.

Unfortunately, timing and American attitudes about motorcycles, combined with the on-road/off-road orientation of the bike, meant the Transalp only lasted two years in U.S. market.

Related: Retrospective: Honda XL600V Transalp: 1989 – 1990

However, fast forward three decades, and not only have times changed, but so has the Transalp, and after seeing considerable success in the European market, U.S. buyers are clamoring to give this new-generation middleweight adventure bike another spin.

2024 Honda XL750 Transalp

“As the adventure category continues to thrive and evolve, customers are more eager than ever to get out and explore,” said Brandon Wilson, American Honda manager of Racing & Experiential Marketing. “The all-new, midsize XL750 Transalp joins Honda’s iconic Africa Twin and pocket-adventurer CB500X to complete our popular True Adventure lineup, ready to deliver unforgettable outdoor experiences to U.S. ADV enthusiasts from coast to coast.”

In the company’s announcement, Honda called the XL750 Transalp, “friendly but tough—perfect for extended touring trips, as well as the urban cut and thrust, and all points in between.”

2024 Honda XL750 Transalp

See all of Rider‘s Honda coverage here.

The 2024 Honda XL750 Transalp features a liquid-cooled 755cc parallel-Twin with Honda’s Unicam design, 4 valves per cylinder, and 270-degree crank. It has a 6-speed gearbox, throttle-by-wire, a slip/assist clutch, and a standard quickshifter. The bike now comes with five ride modes – Sport, Standard, Rain, Gravel, and rider-customizable – that regulate power delivery, engine braking, and ABS intervention. It also has Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) for increased or decreased rear-wheel spin.

2024 Honda XL750 Transalp

Speaking of wheels, the 2024 Honda XL750 Transalp rides on 21/18-inch front/rear spoked wheels. For stopping power, gone is the rear drum brake, replaced by a 256mm disc, and the front now has dual discs (310mm) instead of the previous single. ABS is standard and can be turned off for the rear wheel. Suspension travel is still comparable, with a 43mm Showa SFF-CA inverted fork offering 7.9 inches of travel and Showa Pro-Link rear shock providing 7.5 inches.

2024 Honda XL750 Transalp

The seat height is 33.7 inches, and Honda offers an available 32.6-inch accessory seat. It has 8.3 inches of clearance, a 4.5-gallon fuel tank, and a curb weight of 459 lb.

2024 Honda XL750 Transalp

The Transalp has a 5.0-inch full-color LCD display with four display options, self-canceling turnsignals, and a USB-C port under the passenger seat. The 2024 Honda XL750 Transalp will be available in October in Matte Black Metallic starting at $9,999.

2024 Honda XL750 Transalp

For more information, visit the Honda Powersports website.

Check out more new bikes in Rider‘s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide

The post 2024 Honda XL750 Transalp Review | First Look appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 Honda SCL500 Review | Video

2023 Honda SCL500
Good times on the 2023 Honda SCL500. (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

It’s been a few weeks since our test ride on the 2023 Honda SCL500, and we still have a smile on our face. The SCL500 doesn’t make much power (about 46 hp at the rear wheel) and it doesn’t have any fancy features, and that’s what we love about it. Like the ’60s-era Honda scramblers that inspired the SCL500, it’s a basic, cool-looking runabout that is ideal for cruising around town or taking short jaunts on backroads. Its simplicity is its virtue. Just pure, uncomplicated fun.

Watch the video to see the 2023 Honda SCL500 in action and read our full review.

2023 Honda SCL500 Specifications 

  • Base Price: $6,799 
  • Website: Powersports.Honda.com 
  • Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles 
  • Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl. 
  • Displacement: 471cc 
  • Bore x Stroke: 67.0 x 66.8mm 
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch 
  • Final Drive: Chain 
  • Wheelbase: 58.4 in. 
  • Rake/Trail: 27 degrees/4.3 in. 
  • Seat Height: 31.1 in. 
  • Wet Weight: 419 lb 
  • Fuel Capacity: 3.2 gal. 
  • Fuel Consumption: 60.6 mpg (per bike’s instruments) 

GEAR UP

The post 2023 Honda SCL500 Review | Video appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

20 Iconic Motorcycles at the New American Honda Collection Hall

American Honda Collection Hall
There are 20 iconic Honda motorcycles on display at the American Honda Collection Hall in Torrance, California.

We were honored to attend the grand opening of the American Honda Collection Hall, a 20,000-square-foot museum dedicated to Honda’s rich history in the United States. It is serves as an extension of the massive, multistory Honda Collection Hall located on the grounds of the Twin Ring Motegi racetrack in Tochigi, Japan. American Honda’s press release below provides more details, including how the public can visit the museum. Scroll down to see photos of all 20 iconic motorcycles currently on display in the hall. –Ed.


American Honda Collection Hall
The American Honda Collection Hall is located off the main lobby in Honda’s U.S. headquarters in Torrance, California.

The new American Honda Collection Hall officially opened its doors on Sept. 12, 2023, in Southern California. The hall offers visitors a glimpse of more than 60 historic and significant Honda and Acura automobiles, motorcycles, power equipment, race machines, engines, and concept models, as well as images, graphics, and video presentations. The products on display represent the more than six decades since American Honda Motor Co., Inc. was established in 1959 as the first Honda company outside of Japan.

Related: Honda Celebrates 60 Years in America

American Honda Collection Hall Soichiro Honda quote
“Always make your products customer friendly. When you are making something, think about the person who’ll be spending the most time with it.” – Soichiro Honda, co-founder, Honda Motor Company Ltd.

Community leaders joined Honda officials, associates, and retirees for the grand opening, celebrating the new 20,000-square-foot display connected to the main lobby of American Honda headquarters in Torrance, California.

American Honda Collection Hall Noriya Kaihara
Noriya Kaihara, President & CEO and director of American Honda Motor Co., Inc., and chief officer of Regional Operations (North America), speaking at the grand opening of the American Honda Collection Hall.

“Our new American Honda Collection Hall reflects the important connection between the dreams and passion of Honda associates and the joy experienced by customers who love their Honda products and racing fans thrilled by our checkered flag successes,” said Noriya Kaihara, President & CEO and director of American Honda Motor Co., Inc., and chief officer of Regional Operations (North America). “Everyone at Honda is honored to share the expressions of our history in America that are on display in the form of products and technology that have helped move people and society forward.”

American Honda Collection Hall
1962 Honda C102 Super Cub

Open to the public free of charge during scheduled public “Cars, Bikes & Coffee” events, the American Honda Collection Hall pays tribute to Honda’s unique contributions to American’s lives and highlights significant milestones in the history of Honda in the U.S.

Some examples of products currently on display:

Motorcycles at American Honda Collection Hall:

  • 1962 Honda 50/Super Cub – One of the first three models Honda sold in the U.S. The Super Cub is now the overall bestselling vehicle globally with over 100 million sold to date.

Related: 2019 Honda Super Cub C125 ABS | First Ride Review

American Honda Collection Hall
1970 Honda CB750. In the background is a poster from Honda’s wildly successful “You meet the nicest people on a Honda” ad campaign from the 1960s.
  • 1970 Honda CB750 – Widely considered the first superbike and called “the Motorcycle of the Century” by Motorcyclist magazine.
  • 1973 Honda CR250 Elsinore – Honda’s first production motocross motorcycle and the first product Honda manufactured in the U.S., named after the famous Elsinore Grand Prix.
  • 1975 Honda GL1000 Gold Wing – Redefined long distance touring motorcycles with a revolutionary horizontally opposed 4-cylinder engine.
American Honda Collection Hall
1976 Honda GL1000 Gold Wing

Related: 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT | Road Test Review

  • 1981 Honda CBX1000 Super Sport – Honda’s first motorcycle with over 100 hp, powered by a 1000cc 6-cylinder engine.
  • 1983 Honda VF750F – The revolutionary VF750F used a liquid-cooled DOHC V4 engine and a stiff square-tube frame that also helped it dominate superbike racing in the mid ‘80s.
  • 1990 Honda VFR750R/RC30 – A homologation special created for competition in the World Superbike Championship.
  • 1992 Honda NR750 – The most technically advanced motorcycle at the time, iconic for its oval-piston engine design and other innovations. 
  • 2004 Honda RVT1000R/RC51 – A street version of Honda’s championship winning V-twin superbike.
American Honda Collection Hall
1992 Honda NR750. The only motorcycle ever made that used oval-shaped pistons.

(Scroll down to see more motorcycles in the American Honda Collection Hall.)

Cars:

  • 1965 Honda N600 Coupe – The first Honda automobile sold in the U.S. used an air-cooled 600cc 2-cylinder engine and retailed for just $1,395.
American Honda Collection Hall
1965 Honda S600
  • 1975 Honda Civic CVCC Hatchback – The first car to meet the emissions standards of the 1970 U.S. Clean Air Act without the need for a catalytic converter.
  • 1979 Honda Accord CVCC Hatchback – The first Accord debuted in 1976 as a three-door hatchback powered by Honda’s revolutionary Compound Vortex Controlled Combustion (CVCC) 4-cylinder engine.
  • 1985 Honda CRX Si – The first performance Honda Si model sold in America, a sporty 2-seat coupe with Honda’s advanced PGM-FI fuel injection.
  • 1986 Acura Legend – The performance luxury touring sedan that launched the Acura brand alongside the Integra.
  • 1991 Acura NSX supercar – The revolutionary hand-built, exotic mid-engine sports car that showcased Honda’s technical prowess.
  • 1997 Honda CR-V – Honda’s first in-house SUV helped establish a new breed of compact sport utility vehicle with car-like ride and handling.
  • 2006 Honda Insight – Introduced in 2000, Insight was the first mass-produced gasoline-electric hybrid passenger vehicle sold in the U.S.
American Honda Collection Hall
1960s-era Honda Cuby engine

Power Equipment:

  • 1964 Honda CB30 Marine Outboard Engine – Honda’s first outboard marine engine featured a revolutionary four-stroke design.
  • 1965 Honda E300 Generator – The first generator to combine 300-watt output with quiet and easy-to-use operation in a compact enclosure that could be carried with one hand.
  • 2023 Honda GF5 Marine Outboard Engine – Compact and lightweight portable outboard engine provides a complete performance package for small boats and dinghies.
American Honda Collection Hall
Three racebikes (front to back): 1970 Honda CR750, 1997 Honda CBR600F, 2000 Honda XR650 Baja Racer

Racecars:

  • 1992 Acura Spice GTP-Lights – Powered by a modified Acura NSX V6 engine, carried veteran driver Parker Johnstone to the Drivers’ championship in the IMSA Camel GT Lights series.
  • 1996 Reynard 961-031 Indy Car – Honda/Reynard driven by Indy Car Drivers’ Champion Jimmy Vasser and Rookie of the Year Alex Zanardi.
  • 1997 Acura Integra Realtime – RealTime Racing and the Acura Integra Type R forged a race-winning record that remained unbroken after nearly two decades.
American Honda Collection Hall
1966 Honda CL77 Scrambler

Related: 2023 Honda SCL500 Review | First Ride

The display at the American Honda Collection Hall will be updated several times a year to showcase different products and themes.

The Collection will serve as an educational and cultural hub for the Southern California community. Honda will begin hosting regular “Cars, Bikes & Coffee” events at its Torrance campus on the third Saturday of every other month, with attendees welcome to tour the American Honda Collection Hall.

American Honda Collection Hall reproduction of original Los Angeles location sign
The American Honda Collection Hall includes a reproduction of the sign on American Honda’s first location in Los Angeles, which opened in 1959.
American Honda Collection Hall original 1959 Honda location in Los Angeles
Honda’s U.S. operations began in 1959 at a modest storefront on West Pico Boulevard in Los Angeles, California. (Photo courtesy Honda)

The inaugural event will take place Saturday, October 21, and will include special activities, such as giveaways, special displays, vendors, food trucks, music and more. All interesting automobiles and motorcycles from all manufacturers and eras are welcome for attendees to display. To learn more about the Collection Hall and event information, visit HondaCollectionHall.com.

Public “Cars, Bikes & Coffee” Event Schedule

  • Saturday, Oct. 21, 2023, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
  • Saturday, Dec. 16, 2023, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
  • Saturday, Feb. 17, 2024, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
  • Saturday, April 20, 2024, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
  • Saturday, June 15, 2024, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
  • Saturday, Aug. 17, 2024, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

More Motorcycles on Display at American Honda Collection Hall

American Honda Collection Hall
1965 Honda CB160
American Honda Collection Hall
1967 Honda CA78 Dream
American Honda Collection Hall
1970 Honda ATC90
American Honda Collection Hall
1973 Honda CR250 Elsinore
American Honda Collection Hall
1978 Honda Express
American Honda Collection Hall
1981 Honda CBX1000 Super Sport
American Honda Collection Hall
1982 Honda MB5
American Honda Collection Hall
1983 Honda CF750F Interceptor
American Honda Collection Hall
1990 Honda VFR750R RC30
American Honda Collection Hall
1991 Honda CBR600F2
American Honda Collection Hall
1997 Honda CBR900RR
American Honda Collection Hall
2000 Honda Rune
American Honda Collection Hall
2004 Honda RVT1000RR RC51
American Honda Collection Hall
2010 Honda GL1800 Gold Wing

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