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Indian Announces 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Challenger Dark Horse

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Indian Motorcycle, America’s first motorcycle company, and Jack Daniel’s, America’s first registered distillery, along with Klock Werks Kustom Cycles, have partnered to create the 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse. Marking the sixth year of the partnership and limited-edition series, the latest model draws inspiration from Jack Daniel’s renowned Tennessee Rye whiskey.

RELATED: Indian Challenger, Rider’s 2020 Motorcycle of the Year

With only 107 available globally, the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse makes a one-of-a-kind statement. Its custom Rye Metallic paint with gold and green accents nod to the high-touch crafting process of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Rye whiskey, while the bike’s premium amenities and state-of-the-art technology deliver unmatched comfort and performance.

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

2022 Indian Challenger | Road Test Review

“We’re proud to continue this unique partnership with Jack Daniel’s and Klock Werks – two respected brands with whom we share the age-old American ethos of uncompromising quality and craftsmanship,” said Aaron Jax, Vice President for Indian Motorcycle. “The Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse takes our award-winning bagger to an even higher level, representing the highest levels of premium technology and craftsmanship – just as Jack Daniel’s has done with its Tennessee Rye whiskey.”

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

With custom-inspired style and technology at the forefront, key features for the 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse include the following:

Bold, Exclusive Design
The attention to detail and spirit of innovation that has made Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Rye whiskey a bold, unique success has been imparted throughout the design of the limited-edition motorcycle. Along with its custom paint, the motorcycle features a numbered Jack Daniel’s Montana Silversmiths badge, custom engraved rider and passenger floorboards, and a genuine leather, Jack Daniel’s custom-stitched seat.

Premium Amenities & Technology
Premium features aboard the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse, include a Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight and Pathfinder S LED Driving Lights, electronically adjustable rear suspension preload, Powerband Audio, a stylish flared windscreen, low-rise handlebar, and more.

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight and Pathfinder S LED Driving Lights
The adaptive headlight from Indian Motorcycle senses the bike’s lean angle and activates individual LED projector beams to provide unprecedented visibility. With 15 individual LED lenses that adjust in real-time to bike lean angle, patent pending technology, and the industry’s first adaptive high-beam feature, the Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight delivers unparalleled illumination of the road ahead – whether upright and traveling in a straight line or leaned over to carve a turn.

Fox Electronically Adjustable Rear Suspension Preload
The Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse has Fox electronically adjustable rear suspension preload which allows riders to adjust their rear suspension preload from the convenience of their infotainment system. To do this, riders will select if there’s a passenger and simply enter the approximate weight of what is being carried on the motorcycle. The electronically adjustable rear suspension preload handles the rest and sets the preload for optimal riding and handling. 

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Powerband Audio
Loud and clear. The Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse features the premier Indian Motorcycle sound system, Powerband Audio. With upgraded fairing speakers and added saddlebag speakers, Powerband Audio is up to 50% louder than stock audio.

Ride Command
Riders will also receive the luxuries of the Indian Motorcycle industry-leading seven-inch display powered by Ride Command with Apple CarPlay, which delivers an easier, more customized level of control for music, navigation preferences, and mobile device information. In addition, Ride Command provides riders with traffic and weather overlays, key vehicle information, and extensive customization capabilities.

PowerPlus Liquid-Cooled V-Twin
Featuring the liquid- cooled, 108-cubic-inch PowerPlus engine, the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse delivers a class-leading 122 horsepower and 128 lb-ft of torque.

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Riders looking to add custom style and improve sound can add a PowerPlus Stage 1 Air Intake with the Indian Motorcycle Stage 1 Oval Slip-On Muffler Kit. To unleash 10% more horsepower and 3% more torque, riders can upgrade to the Indian Motorcycle PowerPlus Stage 2 Performance Cams.

“Just as the Indian Challenger breaks the mold for American baggers, so does our Tennessee Rye for American whiskey with its unique distilling process and bold finish,” said Greg Luehrs, sponsorships and partnerships director for Jack Daniel’s. “This year’s bike perfectly embodies what our rye is all about – innovation and a relentless, uncompromising drive to craft American products of the highest quality.”

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Each Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse will come with a custom, co-branded bike mat with the corresponding motorcycle number (#001-#107).

Starting at $36,999, the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse is exclusively available through Indian Motorcycle dealerships. The order window opens on October 21, 2021, at 12:00 p.m. EST, and will close once all bikes are sold. Each Indian Motorcycle dealer will have a chance to place orders during the window and will then contact the lucky buyers when the order has been confirmed. To ensure the rider is in contention for a purchase, each customer needs to fill out the form on IndianMotorcycle.com and contact their Indian Motorcycle dealership. Each bike will be built as a model year 2022 with delivery starting October 2021.

The post Indian Announces 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Challenger Dark Horse first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Kawasaki KLX230S | First Look Review

2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The 2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S, shown here in the ABS and Olive Green/Ebony color options.

The 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S is still a durable, simple dual-sport, but now you don’t have to be a giant to get your boots on the ground.

Designed to appeal to novice riders on a budget or experienced riders looking for a lightweight, dual-sport machine, Kawasaki first released the KLX230 in 2020, and in most aspects, it lived up to its design goals. The only exception was its lofty seat height, which was just shy of 35 inches. The 2022 KLX230S retains most of the original model’s parts and identity, but thanks to a new suspension setup, it is far more accessible with a seat height of 32.7 inches.

Watch our video review of the 2021 Kawasaki KLX300

The 230’s softly sprung front fork has been shortened by a total of 2.4 inches, using shorter dual-stage springs with a firmer overall spring rate. The shorter fork on the 230S still provides a respectable 6.2 inches of travel and should reduce front-end dive during firm braking. A revised rear shock, also shorter with a stiffer spring rate provides 6.6 (down from 8.8) inches of travel that Kawasaki says improves handling and bump absorption.

2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The Base and ABS models are available in Kawasaki’s classic Lime Green.

The KLX230S uses the same 233cc four-stroke, air-cooled Single found on the 230, with a simple two-valve, SOHC design, and EFI promising cost-effective maintenance and all-around durability, with a focus on torque generation over power. A close-ratio, 6-speed transmission should handle most trails but still enable the 230S to cruise at a reasonable pace on open roads.

Kawasaki designed the high-tensile steel perimeter frame around the engine, which allowed it to be mounted lower in the chassis to deliver a low center-of-gravity, coupled with a short 53.5-inch wheelbase. The KLX230S should be an easy, nimble bike to ride.

Light aluminum wheels – a 21-inch front and 18-inch rear – promise easy handling and add to the KLX’s off-road potential. Single petal disc brakes measure 240mm at the front, gripped by a 2-piston caliper, and 220mm with a 1-piston caliper at the rear. Optional, factory-fitted ABS is tuned for dual-sport riding.

The new KLX230S benefits from a new suspension setup, reducing seat height to a far more accessible 32.7 inches.

The 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S is fitted with a 1.9-gallon fuel tank and should keep this sipper on the move for as long as you might reasonably expect, although the simple instrument dash also includes a low-fuel warning lamp. The new KLX230S is available in Lime Green with an MSRP of $4,799, while the ABS is available in the Lime and in an Urban Olive Green/Ebony color option, with an MSRP of $5,099.

For more information, visit kawasaki.com

2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S, shown here in the ABS and Olive Green/Ebony color options.
2022 Kawasaki KLX 230S | First Look Review
The base and ABS models are available in Kawasaki’s classic Lime Green.

The post 2022 Kawasaki KLX230S | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is an exciting, affordable addition to the middleweight sport-touring category.

Triumph has released an exciting new middleweight sport-tourer, the 2022 Tiger Sport 660. The new Tiger Sport will share the engine from the new Trident released earlier this year, and Triumph claims this is the first triple to make its way into the middleweight sport-touring segment.

Triumph sees the new model appealing to two groups of motorcyclists, newer riders moving up to a bigger bike, and veteran riders looking for a thrilling all-rounder. It says the new Tiger Sport has a narrow stand-over feel and the seat is on the low side at 32.8 inches, which should make it accessible to a broad range of riders in terms of height and experience.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Triumph hopes the new Tiger will attract rookie riders moving up to a first big bike and veteran riders looking for a thrilling all-rounder.

The 660cc triple-cylinder engine is designed to provide a broad torque band across a wide rev range and strong top-end horsepower.

The 660 Sport has a full-size windscreen that should be ideal for long-haul excursions, whereas the rest of the sleek design has a tall but sporty influence, including a stubby stainless-steel silencer. A slip/assist clutch should make for a slick work of the 6-speed gearbox and an up/down quickshifter is available as a factory option.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Sizable color-matched luggage and cast aluminum rack are optional.

Triumph says the 660 Sport has exceptional handling, and on paper at least, the bike appears to live up to the claim. The Sport is fitted with Showa’s lightweight 41mm separate function fork (SFF), where each fork leg performs a separate function, one side for damping and the other for spring, and at the rear, a Showa dual-rate monoshock is adjustable for preload. Claimed peak power is 80 horses at  8,750 rpm, 5% more than the V-Strom, and claimed peak torque is 47.2 lb-ft, on par with the Versys, and yet the Tiger Sport weighs 20 pounds less than either.

The Tiger Sport 660 has stats that promise sports performance, but the tall, adjustable screen, 4.7-gallon gas tank, integrated side case mounts, and pillion grab handles cater to riders looking to make longer excursions with or without a passenger. Side cases, with a combined capacity of 57 liters, and a 47-liter top box (and cast aluminum luggage rack) are available options and can be color-matched.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Integrated pillion grab-handles are fitted as standard, as are the mounts for attaching the optional side cases.

Braking is supplied by Nissin, 2-piston calipers on twin 310mm discs, with a single-piston rear caliper on a 255mm disc. Standard tires are Michelin Road 5, which promise versatility in riding conditions and styles. ABS is fitted as standard, and the brake lever is adjustable for reach.

Throttle-by-wire allows for two riding modes, Road and Rain, as well as switchable traction control. A small TFT color display is integrated into a larger LCD and shows all the key information, and allows for menu selections and connectivity. All-around LED lighting, self-canceling indicators, and key fob immobilizer are all standard.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
A small, color TFT is integrated into a larger LCD.
2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Integrated side-case mounts leave a clean look when not in use.

The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is available in three color schemes: Lucerne Blue & Sapphire Black, Graphite & Sapphire Black, or Korosi Red & Graphite (for an extra $125), which also comes with sporty graphics. The standard version has an MSRP of $9,295 and will be available in dealers starting in February 2022.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Specs

Base Price: $9,295
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, inline triple, DOHC w/ 4 vpc.
Displacement: 660cc
Bore x Stroke: 74 x 57.7mm
Horsepower: 80 hp @ 8,750 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Torque: 47.2 lb-ft @ 6,250 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain
Wheelbase: 55.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 23.7 degrees/3.8 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Wet Weight: 454 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gals.

The post 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 KTM 200 Duke, 390 Duke, 890 Duke, and 1290 Super Duke R | Comparison Review

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
KTM’s line of naked bikes has steadily evolved over the past 25 years. We assembled the latest lineup of Dukes (left to right: 200 Duke, 390 Duke, 890 Duke, and 1290 Super Duke R) for a side-by-side evaluation. Photos by Kevin Wing.

KTM rose to prominence with its competition-winning two-stroke dirtbikes, but in 1994 the Austrian manufacturer made its first foray into the four-stroke streetbike market with the 620 Duke. The original Duke arrived on the scene just as supermoto replicas were booming in popularity. The tall, powerful machines with wide bars, much like enduro bikes but running on 17-inch road tires, were a blast to ride. Packing 50 horses, the light and lithe 620 Duke was the most powerful thumper on the street at the time, earning it a hooligan reputation.  

KTM has come a long way since then, but the early Duke DNA – wide bars, a tall stance, and exhilarating power – carries over to the current lineup. Every model – 200 Duke, 390 Duke, 890 Duke (an R model is also available), and 1290 Super Duke R (shown left to right above) – is a naked bike with an upright seating position and a wide, flat seat, and most are versatile enough for urban riding, canyon carving, and even sport-touring. With styling by Kiska, they share bold, angular bodywork and typically favor KTM’s trademark orange on powdercoated frames and bodywork. The split headlight on the three largest Dukes also split the opinion of our test riders. 

What are the four Dukes like, and what sort of buyers will they appeal to? We rode them back-to-back to find out.

200 Duke: Scrappy Underdog 

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
Both the smaller Dukes possess thrilling riding characteristics that belie their diminutive displacements. The 200 has a highway-ready top speed and lightning-quick handling.

Though powered by a 200cc Single that made just 22 horsepower and 13 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel on Jett Tuning’s dyno, the 200 Duke is more substantial than the numbers suggest and didn’t appear out of place among its larger siblings. It has the same physical dimensions and 3.5-gallon tank as the 390, but weighs 20 pounds less and its seat is an inch lower. Like all of the Dukes, the 200 has a chromoly tubular-steel trellis frame, and our test bike had a black main frame, a white subframe, and orange wheels.  

Suspension is proficiently handled by a non-adjustable WP Apex inverted fork and a preload-adjustable rear shock. Single-disc brakes front and rear include Bybre (an abbreviation of “by Brembo,” a subsidiary focused on smaller machines) calipers, and ABS is standard and can be disabled at the rear wheel. The monochrome LCD instrument panel looks dated, and the one on our test bike needed to be unplugged and reset to fix a glitch. The 200 is the only Duke with a non-LED headlight and the only one that doesn’t have the split design.  

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
The 200 Duke’s exhaust exits from a box below the swingarm pivot, distinguishing it from the traditional mufflers on the larger Dukes.

It’s only natural to label the 200 as an entry-level bike, and it’s well-suited for that role with unintimidating power and brakes that aren’t grabby and won’t easily lock up. With a flat torque curve and six gears, the 200 is more than capable of cruising at over 70 mph on the freeway, with a top speed approaching 85 mph. The chassis and suspension are well matched, and the 200 is light and exceptionally agile, making it exciting on curvy roads. At full tilt, the brakes could do with more muscle, and aggressive or larger riders will yearn for more power, especially going uphill. Our testing team was unanimous in concluding that the 200 exceeded expectations, especially on the fun scale.  

The 200 is a perfect first motorcycle, and it offers more performance than entry-level bikes like the Honda Grom (see test on page 58) and the Royal Enfield Meteor 350. But new riders may outgrow the 200 quickly and trade up to – or even start off with – the 390.  

390 Duke: Fierce Featherweight 

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
In the right hands, the 390 will readily embarrass larger, more powerful machines on tight, technical roads.

The 390 is a considerable step up from the 200, and the extra $1,700 is worth the investment. Despite its small size, the 390 is a rider’s motorcycle. Its 373cc Single pumps out 42 horsepower and 27 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel. The suspension and brakes have a similar specification as the 200, but the fork and shock have about an inch more travel and feel better damped, and with its larger front rotor (320mm vs. 300) the 390’s brakes feel stronger and more precise. An LED headlight, a color TFT display with Bluetooth connectivity, and adjustable levers are welcome upgrades over the 200. 

The 390 Duke is a blast to ride and punches well above its weight class. Tipping the scales at  just 359 pounds wet and offering outstanding maneuverability and usable performance, the 390 will appeal to a broad spectrum of riders and was universally loved by our testers. Despite its power deficit, the 390 was able to keep up with the larger Dukes on tight, twisty sections of road, only falling behind when the pavement straightened out.  

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
As with the 200, the 390 has a single-disc brakes on both wheels, but with a larger 320mm rotor. ABS is standard and can be switched off at the rear wheel (Supermoto mode).

New riders, including those who want to go fast, will have years of enjoyment ahead of them on the 390 Duke. This is the sleeper bike, the one that might get overlooked by seasoned riders but packs a ton of fun into a small, affordable package. It can be a carefree, fuel-efficient commuter during the week, and on weekends it’s just a throttle twist away from being a canyon-carving dragon slayer.  

890 Duke: Super Middleweight 

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
The 890 channels the hooligan attitude of the original 620 Duke.

Nicknamed the “Scalpel,” the 890 Duke hews closest to the original Duke formula: light, agile, and capable of hair-on-fire thrills. Its 889cc parallel-Twin is good for 111 horsepower and 67 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel in a bike that weighs just 405 pounds wet. Compared to the 390, you get 164% more power and just 13% more weight, but you’ll pay nearly twice as much in the bargain.  

That’s a big jump in price, but everything is better. The WP Apex suspension, with a non-adjustable inverted fork and a preload-adjustable rear shock, offers better damping and more travel. (The 890 Duke R is equipped with higher-spec adjustable suspension.) The triple-disc brakes with multi-mode cornering ABS are precise and reassuring. It also has riding modes, multi-level traction control, and wheelie control, allowing our testers to tailor the riding experience as desired. Our test bike was fitted with the dealer-installed Tech Pack ($750), which includes the Track Pack (Track mode, 9-level TC, anti-wheelie off, and launch control), Motor Slip Regulation, and up/down Quickshifter+. 

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
The 890 embodies the essential qualities of KTM’s naked bike philosophy: raw power coupled with sharp handling and equally sharp styling.

None of us were immune to the 890’s charms. We praised its dart-like handling, eager yet smooth power delivery, strong, progressive brakes, and sure-footed chassis. The Twin’s 270-degree firing order delivers a broad spread of torque for blasting out of corners and adds a pleasing crackle on downshifts. The 890 is a standout machine that encourages you to test its handling and your nerve, and it consistently rewards the rider with confidence-inspiring feel and agility or a gentle prod where lesser machines fall short.  

The 890 is no show pony. It is a mustang, wild at heart, straining at the bit, and embodies the essence of the Duke series: immediate power and razor-sharp cornering stripped down to the barest of essentials. When it comes to performance and handling, nothing is superfluous in the 890, and nothing is wanting. Experienced riders with even the slightest inclination toward spirited riding will never tire of putting the 890 Duke through its paces, and yet it remains friendly and forgiving enough for jaunts around the city or sport-touring with some soft luggage. Just point it at the twistiest road you can find and open the throttle.  

1290 Super Duke R: When Too Much is Not Enough

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
The 1290 Duke turns the knob up to 11 and makes itself heard in the sporty streetfighter category.

Introduced in 2014, the 1290 Super Duke R – known as “The Beast” – is the pointy end of KTM’s streetbike spear. Updated last year, it’s more powerful and lighter than ever, with its 1,301cc V-Twin churning out an asphalt-buckling 166 horsepower and 94 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel.  

Fully adjustable WP Apex suspension is tuned to handle the Super Duke’s immense power, and it delivers a firm but confident ride. Brembo Stylema front brake calipers feel like they came off an airliner, such is their awesome strength, and while some in the test group felt they had too much initial bite, others raved about them. Riding modes and a full suite of six-axis IMU-enabled electronic riding aids allow The Beast to be tamed or unleashed, and our test bike was equipped with the dealer-installed Tech Pack ($750). The LED headlight incorporates an air intake, but overall styling remains much the same – angular, aggressive, looking for a fight. Creature comforts include self-canceling turnsignals, cruise control, and keyless ignition, steering lock, and gas cap. 

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
The 1290 Duke is imposing, but is undeniably nimble.

The Super Duke elicited the most controversy when it came to the post-riding discussions. Like a silver-backed gorilla, it packs serious punch, but if you treat the 1290 with respect, it will respond in kind. The ocean of torque allows for lazy meandering along open roads, as well as controlled spurts of acceleration and braking demanded by dense traffic. But should you decide to be aggressive with the Super Duke, be sure to have your senses, skills, and reactions at peak readiness, as it comes by its Beast moniker honestly.  

The bike feels tall and, with its humpback tank, a little imposing, but its 441-pound curb weight is quite manageable. Although the steering is heavier than on the 890 due to its lazier rake and slightly longer wheelbase, the 1290 is nonetheless nimble and responsive. For a couple of our testers, the difference was partly psychological. Whereas the 890 felt in alignment with their skill set, the 1290’s capabilities felt beyond them. Part of the excitement of riding a motorcycle is the ability to give it full throttle, but doing so on the 1290 is short-lived at best and more appropriate for wide-open roads or even the racetrack.  

When considering potential owners for this exceptional machine, it is best suited for those with a high level of riding skills and experience. Some buyers just want the best, or the most, or both, and the 1290 Super Duke R will deliver on those promises. This horse will carry like a Clydesdale and run like a thoroughbred. Beyond that, the KTM 1290 Super Duke R defies reason, in the sense that it offers almost too much of everything, which you could argue is precisely what a Super Duke should do. For most riders, however, the 890 is probably a better fit and will be more enjoyable to ride. Like Dirty Harry said, riders must know their limitations.  

All in the Family  

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
Their styling may be polarizing, but KTM’s ability to maximize performance and minimize weight ensures that the current crop of Dukes are worthy successors to the name.

Within the KTM Duke range, from the $3,999 200 Duke to the $18,699 1290 Super Duke R, there is a bike for nearly every rider, from those just starting out to those at the top of their game, from commuters to weekend warriors to track-day junkies. While only the 200 and 390 are likely to be cross-shopped by potential buyers, we found the 390 and 890 to be the most broadly appealing of the four. For experienced riders, the 200 may be too little, and for some, the 1290 may be out of reach, but every bike here earned the respect of our testing team.

2021 KTM Duke Lineup Specs

2021 KTM 200 Duke Specs

Base Price: $3,999
Warranty: 2 yrs., 24,000 miles
Website: ktm.com  

Engine
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse Single, DOHC w/ 4 valves
Displacement: 200cc Bore x Stroke: 72.0 x 49.0mm
Compression Ratio: 11.5:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 9,300 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI, 38mm throttle body 
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 1.6 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain  

Chassis
Frame: Chromoly steel trellis & cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 53.4 in. ± 0.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.7 in.
Seat Height: 31.6 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm inv. fork, no adj., 4.6 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, adj. preload, 5.0 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Single 300mm disc w/ radial 4-piston caliper & ABS
Rear: Single 230mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.00 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 4.00 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 110/70-ZR17
Rear: 150/60-ZR17 Wet Weight: 339 lbs.  

Performance
Horsepower: 22 hp @ 10,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 13 lb-ft @ 7,900 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 3.5 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 68 mpg
Estimated Range: 238 miles 

2021 KTM 390 Duke Specs

Base Price: $5,699
Warranty: 2 yrs., 24,000 miles
Website: ktm.com  

Engine
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse Single, DOHC w/ 4 valves
Displacement: 373ccBore x Stroke: 89.0 x 60.0mm
Compression Ratio: 12.6:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 9,300 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI, 46mm throttle body
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 1.8 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-act. slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain  

Chassis
Frame: Chromoly steel trellis & cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 53.4 in. ± 0.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.7 in.
Seat Height: 32.7 in
Suspension, Front: 43mm inv. fork, no adj., 5.6 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, adj. preload, 5.9 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Single 320mm disc w/ radial 4-piston caliper & ABS
Rear: Single 230mm disc w/ 1-piston caliper & ABS Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.00 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 4.00 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 110/70-ZR17
Rear: 150/60-ZR17 Wet Weight: 359 lbs.  

Performance
Horsepower: 42 hp @ 8,800 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 27 lb-ft @ 7,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 3.5 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 56 mpg
Estimated Range: 196 miles 

2021 890 Duke Specs

Base Price: $10,999
Warranty: 2 yrs., 24,000 miles
Website: ktm.com  

Engine
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 889cc
Bore x Stroke: 90.7 x 68.8mm
Compression Ratio: 13.5:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 18,600 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI, 46mm throttle body x 2
Lubrication System: Semi-dry sump, 3.0 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain  

Chassis
Frame: Chromoly steel trellis & cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 58.3 in. ± 0.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.3 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm inv. fork, no adj., 5.5 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, adj. preload, 5.9 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 300mm discs, w/ radial 4-piston monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.50 × 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 5.50 × 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 180/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 405 lbs.  

Performance
Horsepower: 111 hp @ 9,500 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 67 lb-ft @ 7,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 44 mpg
Estimated Range: 163 miles  

2021 KTM 1290 Super Duke R Specs

Base Price: $18,699
Warranty: 1 yr., 12,000 miles
Website: ktm.com  

Engine
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 75-degree V-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,301cc
Bore x Stroke: 108.0 x 71.0mm
Compression Ratio: 13.5:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 18,600 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI, 56mm throttle body x 2
Lubrication System: Dry sump, 3.7 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain  

Chassis
Frame: Chromoly steel trellis & c/a single-sided swingarm
Wheelbase: 58.9 in. ± 0.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 25.2 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Suspension, Front: 48mm inv. fork, fully adj., 4.9 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, fully adj., 6.1 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm discs w/ radial 4-piston monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 240mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.50 × 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 6.00 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 190/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 441 lbs.  

Performance
Horsepower: 166 hp @ 10,100 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 94.1 lb-ft @ 8,300 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 4.2 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 38 mpg
Estimated Range: 196 miles  

2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review
2021 KTM Dukes (200, 390, 890, 1290) | Comparison Review

The LCD on the 200 (top left) falls short of the full-color TFTs on the larger Dukes, which provide clear, readable information, with a tach, speedo, gear position, and more. In low light, the displays change from a white background (shown on the 390) to black (shown on the 890) or orange (only on the 1290). 

The post 2021 KTM 200 Duke, 390 Duke, 890 Duke, and 1290 Super Duke R | Comparison Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR | First Look Review

2022 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR review
The 2022 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR is a more track-focused, higher-spec, partially faired sportbike than the Speed Triple 1200 RS. It arrives in January.

Triumph has released details about the 2022 Speed Triple 1200 RR, which its says will deliver “the most focused and exhilarating Speed Triple ride ever.” The new RR shares the 1,160 cc liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple engine powering the 2021 Speed Triple RS we recently tested, and the same aluminum twin-spar frame and subframe. But under the skin, and there is a skin, the new RR takes the Speed Triple in a new direction.

Styling cues that combine “distinctive British elegance with exhilarating real-world performance” are influenced by Triumph’s Modern Classic lineup. The RR has a single round headlight and a partial fairing. It’s the first liter-class Triumph sportbike to get a fairing since the Daytona 955i, which was discontinued in 2006.

2022 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR | First Look
Under the skin, the new RR is a cutting-edge track rocket.

The Speed Triple RR is identical to the RS in terms of performance, rake, trail, seat height, and wheels. but the RR’s clip-on handlebars are 5 inches lower and 2 inches further forward, and coupled with the new footpeg position foretell aggressive race-bred ergonomics. If the RS is a streetbike for the track, the 2022 Speed Triple RR has all the makings of a track bike for the street.

Equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 electronically adjustable semi-active suspension, which works in tandem with the IMU sensor to manage traction in real-time, automatically adjusting compression and rebound damping. The sticky Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP V3 tires fitted to the cast aluminum wheels are about as close as you can get to slicks on a street-legal bike. The Brembo Stylema monobloc front calipers over 320mm floating discs, and the 2-piston caliper and 220mm single disc at the rear are now linked on the RR, and an adjustable Brembo MCS lever is fitted as standard.

2022 Triumph Speed Triple RR | First Look
Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 electronically adjustable semi-active suspension automatically adjusts compression and rebound damping.
2022 Triumph Speed Triple RR | First Look

The RR also shares the RS’s stacked 6-speed gearbox designed to maximize power transfer from engine to gearbox when accelerating, but still allow clutch slip during aggressive downshifting, providing improved rear wheel control. An innovative up/down quickshifter features Moto2-derived technology and can map gear shifts against real-time parameters. Optimized cornering ABS and switchable cornering traction control systems utilize roll, pitch, yaw, and acceleration data, to calculate the lean angle and actively control ABS and TC according to the chosen riding mode.

Additional rider aids include switchable wheelie control, cruise control, and five riding modes – Road, Rain, Sport, Rider-configurable, and a Track mode, which limits ABS and traction control intervention. The riding modes have multiple levels of intervention to choose from and are selected and adjusted via a five-inch optically bonded TFT display. Featuring full connectivity, turn-by-turn navigation, GoPro control, and a lap timer for use on track. As with the RS, the RR has LED lighting throughout, including a DRL, a rear light integrated into the tail unit, LED self-canceling turnsignals, and a full keyless ignition/fuel cap system.

2022 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR | First Look

The RS we recently tested was a huge leap forward for the Speed Triple. The new chassis and engine combination made for sublime handling, precise agility, and immense performance. Carbon-fiber infill panels incorporated into the new RR’s tank, fairing, and cockpit, combined with carbon-fiber side panels and front mudguard, help to explain the minimal difference in weight between the two Speed Triples. The RR is just 2 pounds heavier, ensuring that the immense performance of the Speed Triple 1200 RS developed by its lightweight, low-inertia engine (with a claimed 177 horsepower and 92 lb-ft of torque) will not be lost on the RR.

Triumph is eager to point out the unique nature of the new Speed Triple RR, and to some extent, it’s difficult to pin it to an existing class. It’s no longer a naked, obviously, and although it shares the performance figures and components of the current class of MotoGP-inspired sportbikes, it doesn’t share their styling. No wings or aero adorn its smooth lines, which are more familiar to the retro designs. Regardless of classification, on paper, at least the new Speed Triple RR looks like it will ride like an Exocet missile on wheels.

Two color schemes come as standard: Red Hopper and Storm Grey or Crystal White and Storm Grey with gold detailing.

This new model comes in two paint schemes: Red Hopper and Storm Grey or Crystal White and Storm Grey with gold detailing. Both schemes are available as standard and include a color-coded belly pan and seat cowl, supplied in addition to the pillion seat. The RR has a two-year unlimited mileage warranty and service intervals of 10,000 miles or 12 months, whichever comes first, and over 30 genuine Triumph accessories for customizing your RR. Available in dealerships from January 2022, MSRP is $20,950.

2022 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR Specs

Base Price: $20,950
Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com

ENGINE
Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,160cc
Bore x Stroke: 90.0 x 60.8mm
Compression Ratio: 13.2:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 20,000 miles
Fuel Delivery: Multipoint sequential EFI w/ throttle-by-wire
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.5 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6 speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain

CHASSIS
Frame:
 Aluminum twin-spar frame, bolt-on aluminum rear subframe & single-sided cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 56.6 in.
Rake/Trail: 23.9 degrees/4.1 in
Seat Height: 32.7 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm inverted fork, electronically fully adj., 4.7 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, electronically fully adj., 4.7 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm floating discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 220mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 3.50 x 17 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 6.00 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 190/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 439 lbs.

PERFORMANCE
Horsepower:
177 @ 10,750 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 92 lb-ft @ 9,000 rpm (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 4.0 gals.

The post 2022 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT | Road Test Review

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
With its front fairing
and headlights shaped like the spread wings of the Gold Wing logo, it’s easy to identify Honda’s flagship
touring bike coming
your way. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Honda’s first complete motorcycle, the D-Type, was built in 1949, just four years after the end of World War II. The D-Type was also known as the Dream, and although the exact origins of that name are unknown, the new motorcycle was a significant step toward realizing Soichiro Honda’s vision for the company that bore his name.

A former race-car driver and brilliant engineer, Mr. Honda was the charismatic, outspoken leader of Honda Motor Company, Ltd. for decades. From humble beginnings, Honda became the world’s largest engine and motorcycle manufacturer, as well as one of the world’s largest automobile manufacturers. The company also makes ATVs, power equipment, aircraft, and robots, and it has competed in and won championships in nearly every form of motorcycle and car racing.

Honda has created many groundbreaking motorcycles in the 72 years since the D-Type first emerged, from the Super Cub C100 – with more than 100 million units built since 1958, it’s the most produced motor vehicle in history – to the CB750 to the Gold Wing.

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
The 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour is available in Candy Ardent Red (above) and Metallic Black.

A Wing Fit for a King…

As one of Honda’s most long-lived models, the Gold Wing has been critical to the company’s success, particularly in the U.S. Inspired by Honda’s “King of Kings” M1 prototype, the first Gold Wing – the 1975 GL1000 – was the second most powerful production motorcycle at the time, edged out by the Kawasaki Z-1. The GL1000’s flat-Four engine layout and liquid cooling set a precedent for smooth, quiet performance.

The Gold Wing created a new market, meeting pent-up demand for dependable, luxurious long-distance motorcycle touring. Its comfort and reliability made it easy for more people to ride more miles, and Honda’s new touring customers became an integral part of the design and development process. Owners were willing to trade top-end power for better midrange performance, so as the GL evolved, peak torque rpm moved closer to cruising rpm.

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
When Honda’s GL1000 Gold Wing debuted for 1975, it had no bodywork or luggage, weighed 650 pounds, and cost $2,895 ($14,649 in today’s dollars). Our sixth-generation GL1800 test bike, a 2021 GL1800 Gold Wing Tour DCT, has a full fairing, trunk, and integrated saddlebags, weighs 838 pounds, and costs $29,300.

When Honda introduced the GL1100 in 1980, it offered an Interstate version with a fairing, windscreen, saddlebags, a trunk, and a plush king-and-queen seat. Two years later, Honda brought out an even more luxurious version called the Aspencade. You could still buy a naked version of the Gold Wing when the GL1200 was introduced for 1984, but by 1985 the only models available were the Interstate, Aspencade, and Limited Edition. The market had spoken, and from then until now Gold Wings have been outfitted for touring.

As long-time readers know, Rider’s history parallels that of the Gold Wing. Denis Rouse founded Rider in 1974, the same year the GL1000 was introduced (for the 1975 model year). The success of the magazine and the Gold Wing grew in parallel as the touring market grew rapidly in the late ’70s and ’80s. Over the years, we’ve published dozens of tests and features that showcase the Gold Wing. Including this issue, it has been on our cover numerous times, and it won Rider’s Motorcycle of the Year award in 2001 and 2018.

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
This winged Honda badge is reserved for its flagship models, like the Gold Wing and the CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP.

… And a Queen

Many Gold Wing owners can and do ride solo – in fact, most of the miles I logged for this test were done without a passenger – but the Wing’s true calling is well-appointed two-up travel. In his first ride review, Ken Lee and his wife Katie evaluated the 2021 updates to the Gold Wing Tour, which include better passenger accommodations, a bigger trunk (now 61 liters, with 121 liters of total storage capacity; the standard, non-Tour Gold Wing foregoes the trunk), and improvements to the styling and audio system. Compared to the previous-generation 2008 GL1800 in their garage, Ken and Katie both found the accommodations and ergonomics more to their liking.

Former EIC Mark Tuttle and his wife Genie did many two-up tests of Gold Wings over the years. As a wet-behind-the-ears staffer with less than a year on the job, I was tasked with testing a 2009 GL1800 for Rider’s 35th-anniversary issue (April 2009). At the time I had just started dating my wife Carrie, and she had never been on a motorcycle before. What better way to welcome her to the joys of two-wheeling than the plush back seat of a Gold Wing? She was immediately hooked. Spoiled right out of the gate, she has measured every other motorcycle she has ridden with me against the gold standard of the Gold Wing.

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
Most of the time our Gold Wing’s 7-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission enhanced the touring experience by eliminating the need for clutching and shifting. But on winding back roads, I preferred putting the DCT in manual mode and using the paddle shifters.

For that 2009 road test, photographer Rich Cox – with him riding the magazine’s former photo wagon, a black 2000 25th-anniversary GL1500SE – and I rode up California’s western edge from Ventura to Monterey on Highway 1, which hugs the rugged, dramatic coast for 100 miles from Cambria to Carmel. For this test, photographer Kevin Wing – who was a protégé of Rich’s in the early part of his career – and I followed the same northern route.

Torque and a Fork

With a perfectly balanced, liquid-cooled flat-Six displacing 1,833cc, the Gold Wing’s engine churns out a big dollop of creamy smooth torque whenever you twist the grip. When we dyno’d a 2018 GL1800, the peak rear-wheel torque was 106 lb-ft at 4,500 rpm, and more than 100 lb-ft was available between 2,000 and 5,000 rpm. With no mechanical changes since then, the results should be about the same for our 2021 GL1800.

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT
Torque is the Gold Wing’s business, and business is good.

With the Gold Wing in Tour mode, throttle response is relaxed, and its optional 7-speed Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) quickly shifts into higher gears to keep rpm low and fuel efficiency high. (Over the course of 1,300 testing miles, we’ve averaged 40 mpg and 224 miles of range. Admittedly, we’ve ridden the Wing hard and fast, so typical numbers will be higher.) It’s common to be trundling along at a modest pace on a twisty road with the DCT in 6th gear, yet on corner exits the Gold Wing’s torque-rich Six will pull all 838 pounds of bike plus hundreds more pounds of rider, passenger, and gear along without breaking a sweat.

Strangely, for a motorcycle clearly designed for touring, I found Sport mode to be way too abrupt. Rain and Econ modes serve a purpose, but I largely ignored them. When I didn’t want the DCT to upshift too early or fight to find the right gear when transitioning back and forth between corners on curvy roads like Highway 1, I put it into manual mode and used the paddle buttons to quickly shift up or down. With such a broad spread of torque, often I’d leave it in 3rd gear and control revs and speed with the throttle.

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
Big rotors are squeezed by gorilla-grip 6-piston calipers.

The ride mode also affects suspension damping, and when stopped the rider can dig into the menu to set rear preload. When riding solo on the photo-shoot ride with Kevin, I set rear preload to two-up plus luggage, which increased cornering clearance such that I rarely scraped pegs, even when riding at a brisk pace.

What most sets the current-gen GL1800 apart from its predecessors is its double-wishbone front suspension, which separates steering dynamics from suspension action and prevents fork dive under braking, a useful feature on such a heavy bike with strong, responsive brakes. The suspension offers good compliance and isolates the rider and passenger from vibration, but it also isolates the rider from front-end feedback. From the cockpit you can watch the tie-rod ends bounce rapidly up and down over bumps, seams, and ripples, yet the connection with the road often feels vague and distant. A rider can push the current Gold Wing as hard as they want and it will respond dutifully, but it lacks some of the light, intuitive steering response of the previous-generation GL1800.

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
Riding across
Bixby Bridge, an
iconic location on
California’s Highway 1
north of Big Sur. Built
in 1932, at 280 feet, it
was once the highest
single-span arch
bridge in the world.

The Stuff of Dreams

As Ken Lee wrote about in his review, the Gold Wing has been unfairly maligned over the years as an “old man’s bike.” Sure, there are thousands of Gold Wings out there ridden by older couples, sometimes with their bikes adorned with flags, cup holders, and stuffed animals lashed to trunk racks. With the sixth-generation Gold Wing, Honda made the bike lighter and gave it sportier styling and state-of-the-art tech, perhaps to attract younger buyers but also to keep evolving its flagship touring bike.

When the GL1800 replaced the GL1500 for 2001, Wing Nuts decried the loss of storage capacity, particularly the replacement of the cavernous, boxy trunk with a smaller one that looks sleek from the outside but has an oddly shaped interior. For 2021, Honda added storage capacity to the trunk, and it’s easy to load but frustratingly hard to close when full of gear. Nearly every time I closed the trunk, a warning message would appear on the dash that, nope, still not closed all the way. I got into the habit of slamming the trunk shut, which made me cringe.

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
Mission control includes a large, full-color center display
for navigation, audio, and other infotainment functions.
Analog gauges are flanked by smaller LCD displays.

Details matter, and Honda has always sweated the details on the Gold Wing. When you put miles on the new Gold Wing over the course of multiple days, you can’t help but be impressed. Sure, there’s a learning curve with its buttons and menus, but once you get things dialed in, you can mostly set it and forget it. While Kevin trailed me on our KTM 890 Adventure R long-term test bike, I cruised along in the lap of luxury. Temperatures ranged from the low 50s on the coast to 102 degrees inland, and I adjusted the electric windscreen or turned on the heated grips or set the cruise control or changed riding modes as desired. If anything, at times I felt a little too comfortable, especially in the heat of the day after lunch. That’s when I cranked up the heavy metal tunes to ward off the drowsies.

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
Why, yes, the Gold
Wing will cruise
at 75 mph on a
dirt road. With
its electronic
suspension set for
comfort in Tour
mode, it floats
right along.

Thirteen years after our first ride together, with Carrie donning the same riding jacket that we had mothballed in the garage, we took a leisurely cruise on many of the same roads on the new Gold Wing that we had explored on the 2009 model. As Carrie sat comfortably in the passenger seat, hugged securely by the wrap-around backrest and perched high enough to enjoy the view (I’m much taller than she is), we enjoyed a trip down memory lane. During our lunch stop, we reminisced about our early days of dating, the many rides we’ve been on over the years, getting engaged atop Stelvio Pass in Italy, and spending our honeymoon on a Norway tour with Edelweiss Bike Travel.

Motorcycles really are dream machines. We fantasize about the bikes we want, and we use them to fulfill dreams with bucket-list adventures. They bring us together and help us create lasting memories. When Carrie and I returned home from our nostalgic ride, she said, “If we can only own one motorcycle, this has to be it.” As you wish.

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour Specs

Base Price: $28,300
Price as Tested: $29,300 (DCT model)
Warranty: 3 yrs., unltd. miles, transferable
Website: powersports.honda.com

ENGINE
Type: Liquid-cooled, longitudinal opposed flat-Six, Unicam SOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,833cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.0 x 73.0mm
Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
Valve Insp. Interval: 24,000 miles
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ 50mm throttle body
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.9 qt. cap
Transmission: 7-speed Dual Clutch Transmission automatic (as tested)
Final Drive: Shaft, 1.795:1

CHASSIS
Frame: Aluminum tubular & box-section double cradle w/ single-sided cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 66.7 in.
Rake/Trail: 30.5 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 29.3 in.
Suspension, Front: Double-wishbone w/ single shock, electronically adj. (as tested), 4.3 in. travel
Rear: Pro-Link w/ single shock, electronically adj. (as tested), 4.1 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm discs w/ 6-piston opposed calipers & C-ABS
Rear: Single 316mm disc w/ 3-piston floating caliper & C-ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.50 x 18 in.
Rear: Cast, 5.00 x 16 in.
Tires, Front: 130/70-R18
Rear: 200/55-R16
Wet Weight: 838 lbs.
Load Capacity: 421 lbs.
GVWR: 1,259 lbs.

PERFORMANCE
Horsepower: 101 @ 5,500 rpm (2018 model, rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 106 @ 4,500 rpm (2018 model, rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 5.6 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 40 mpg
Estimated Range: 224 miles

The post 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Motorcycles

This 2022 motorcycle buyers guide includes new or significantly updated street-legal models available in the U.S. It includes cruisers, sportbikes, retro-styled bikes, scooters, touring bikes, and more.

Organized in alphabetical order by manufacturer, it includes photos, pricing, key update info, and links to first looks and – when available – first rides, road tests, and video reviews of each motorcycle.

RELATED: 2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

2022 BMW C 400 GT

2022 BMW C 400 GT review
2022 BMW C 400 GT

Available in Europe since 2018, the 2022 BMW C 400 GT scooter receives updates and joins the U.S. lineup. As its Gran Turismo name implies, the GT is geared toward touring and comfort while still offering agility, twist-and-go user-friendliness, and generous underseat storage scooters are known for. The 350cc single-cylinder engine receives new Euro 5 emissions certification and delivers a claimed 34 horsepower at 7,500 rpm and 26 lb-ft of torque at 5,750 rpm. There are other updates to the engine, throttle-by-wire, traction control, and more. Base price is $8,495.

Read our 2022 BMW C 400 GT First Look Review

2022 BMW CE 04 Electric Scooter

2022 BMW CE 04 Electric Scooter review
2022 BMW CE 04

The 2022 BMW CE 04 scooter is part of BMW Motorrad’s “electromobility strategy.” It uses an innovative liquid-cooled, permanent-magnet electric motor mounted in the frame between the battery and the rear wheel. The motor is rated at 20 horsepower with a claimed maximum output of 42 horsepower, top speed is 75 mph, and 0-30 mph is achieved in 2.6 seconds. The CE 04 has a battery cell capacity of 60.6 Ah (8.9 kWh), providing a claimed range of 80 miles. Price and availability have not yet been announced. 

Read our 2022 BMW CE 04 Electric Scooter First Look Review

2022 BMW R 18 B

2022 BMW R 18 B R18B review
2022 BMW R 18 B

When BMW unveiled the R 18 last year, a cruiser powered by a massive 1,802cc OHV air/oil-cooled 4-valve opposed Twin that’s the largest “boxer” engine the German company has ever produced, it was only a matter of time before touring versions were added to the lineup. For 2022, BMW has announced the R 18 B “Bagger” (above) and R 18 Transcontinental (below). Both are equipped with a handlebar-mounted fairing with an infotainment system, a passenger seat, and locking hard saddlebags, and the Transcontinental adds a top trunk with an integrated passenger backrest. The 2022 BMW R 18 B is equipped with a low windshield, a slim seat (height is 28.3 inches), and a matte black metallic engine finish. Base price is $21,495.

Read our 2022 BMW R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental First Look Review

2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental

2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental review
2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental in Galaxy Dust metallic, an iridescent paint finish that shimmers in the spectrum from violet to turquoise blue, depending on the lighting

Like the R 18 B, the 2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental is equipped with a handlebar-mounted fairing with an infotainment system, a passenger seat, and locking hard saddlebags, and the Transcontinental adds a top trunk with an integrated passenger backrest. The 2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental has a tall windshield, wind deflectors, driving lights, heated seats, highway bars, and an engine finished in silver metallic. Base price is $24,995.

Read our 2022 BMW R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental First Look Review

2022 Honda Grom

2022 Honda Grom SP review
2022 Honda Grom SP (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The lovable, popular Grom has been Honda‘s top-selling streetbike since it was introduced in 2014. Now in its third generation, the 2022 Honda Grom gets a revised engine, a new 5-speed transmission, a larger fuel tank, a thicker, flatter seat, and fresh styling. Large bolts on the bodywork and a new two-piece design for the down pipe and muffler make the Grom easier to customize. Base price is $3,399, and another $200 gets you ABS. The Honda Grom SP ($3,499, above) comes in Pearl White and includes special graphics, gold fork tubes, and gold wheels.

Read our 2022 Honda Grom First Ride Review

2022 Indian Chief

2022 Indian Chief review
2022 Indian Chief in Ruby Smoke

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Chief, Indian Motorcycle revamped the entire lineup. In a nod to post-WW2 Indians, the lineup includes an updated Chief and two new models: the Chief Bobber and the Super Chief. Up-spec models include the Chief Dark Horse, Chief Bobber Dark Horse, and Super Chief Limited.

All Indian Chiefs are powered by the air-cooled, 49-degree Thunderstroke V-Twin, in either 111ci (1,811cc) or 116ci (1,890cc) displacement, with 6-speed transmissions and belt final drive. Every model has a low 26-inch seat height, and standard equipment includes keyless ignition, ride modes, cruise control, rear cylinder deactivation, and LED lighting.

The modern, sporty 2022 Indian Chief (above) has cast wheels with a 19-inch front, a solo saddle, midmount foot controls, and a drag-style handlebar. It’s powered by the Thunderstroke 111 V-Twin that makes 108 lb-ft of torque, and ABS is optional. The Indian Chief is available in Black Metallic, Ruby Smoke, and White Smoke, and pricing starts at $14,499.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Indian Chief Dark Horse

2022 Indian Chief Dark Horse review
2022 Indian Chief Dark Horse in Black Smoke

Dark Horse models are known for their blacked-out finishes, dark paint, and minimalist styling. The 2022 Indian Chief Dark Horse has a Thunderstroke 116 V-Twin that belts out 120 lb-ft of torque. It also features a 4-inch round instrument panel with Ride Command, offering turn-by-turn navigation, Bluetooth connectivity, and more, as well as standard ABS. The Chief Dark Horse rolls on cast wheels (19-inch front, 16-inch rear) and is available in Black Smoke, Alumina Jade Smoke, and Stealth Gray. Pricing starts at $16,999.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Indian Chief Bobber

2022 Indian Chief Bobber review
2022 Indian Chief Bobber in Black Metallic

Following the success of the Scout Bobber, it’s only natural that Indian would add a variation to the Chief lineup. The 2022 Indian Chief Bobber has mini-ape hanger handlebars paired with forward foot controls for an upright riding position. Powered by the Thunderstroke 111, it rolls on 16-inch wire wheels, has fork and shock covers, a large headlight bucket wrapped in a nacelle, and a mix of chrome and black finishes. ABS is optional. The Indian Chief Bobber is available in Black Metallic and Ruby Metallic, pricing starts at $15,999.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Indian Chief Bobber Dark Horse

2022 Indian Chief Bobber Dark Horse review
2022 Indian Chief Bobber Dark Horse in Black Smoke

The 2022 Indian Chief Bobber Dark Horse gets the larger, more powerful Thunderstroke 116 V-Twin, the 4-inch display with Ride Command, and standard ABS. Sixteen-inch wheels have chrome spokes and gloss black rims, and nearly everything gets a menacing, blacked-out look. The Chief Bobber Dark Horse comes in Black Smoke, Titanium Smoke, and Sagebrush Smoke, and pricing starts at $18,999.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Indian FTR

2022 Indian FTR review
2022 Indian FTR in Black Smoke

For 2022, Indian‘s FTR lineup includes four models: FTR, FTR S, FTR R Carbon, and FTR Rally. The entire line gets an updated liquid-cooled 1,203cc V-Twin with a revised fuel map for better cold-start performance and throttle response, and rear-cylinder deactivation and revised heat channeling to improve comfort. The street-biased FTR, FTR S, and FTR R Carbon now roll on 17-inch cast-aluminum wheels with Metzeler Sportec rubber, and have less front/rear suspension travel, a lower 32.2-inch seat height, and a narrower ProTaper handlebar. The scrambler-themed FTR Rally is still equipped with wire-spoke 19- and 18-inch wheels and longer suspension travel.

The base-model 2022 Indian FTR (above) has fully adjustable Sachs suspension, with a 43mm inverted fork and a piggyback rear shock. It’s available in Black Smoke, and pricing starts at $12,999.

Read our 2022 Indian FTR Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian FTR S First Ride Review

2022 Indian FTR S

2022 Indian FTR S review
2022 Indian FTR S in Maroon Metallic (Photo by Jordan Pay)

The up-spec 2022 Indian FTR S features a Bluetooth ready 4.3-inch Ride Command touchscreen display, giving riders access to three selectable ride modes and IMU-supported rider aides like cornering ABS, traction control, wheelie control, rear-wheel lift mitigation, and stability control. Standard equipment includes a fast-charging USB port, an Akrapovič slip-on exhaust, and fully adjustable Sachs suspension. It’s available in Maroon Metallic (above) and White Smoke, and pricing starts at $14,999.

Read our 2022 Indian FTR Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian FTR S First Ride Review

2022 Indian FTR R Carbon

2022 Indian FTR R Carbon review
2022 Indian FTR R Carbon (Photo by Jordan Pay)

The top-of-the-line 2022 Indian FTR R Carbon stands apart from the crowd with a carbon fiber tank cover, fender, and headlight nacelle. It also has fully adjustable Öhlins suspension, a red frame, silver tailsection, black Akrapovič slip-on exhaust, a premium seat cover, and numbered badging. Pricing starts at $16,999.

Read our 2022 Indian FTR Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian FTR S First Ride Review

2022 Indian Super Chief

2022 Indian Super Chief review
2022 Indian Super Chief in Black Metallic

Ready to hit the road for days on end in comfort and style, the 2022 Indian Super Chief features a quick-release windscreen, saddlebags, a touring seat with passenger pad, floorboards, and traditional pullback handlebars. Like the Chief Bobber, the Super Chief is powered by the Thunderstroke 111 and has 16-inch wire wheels, a large headlight bucket with nacelle, fork covers, and optional ABS. Its fully chromed shotgun-style dual exhaust enhances its classic style. It’s available in Black Metallic and Pearl White, and pricing starts at $18,499.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Indian Super Chief Limited

2022 Indian Super Chief Limited review
2022 Indian Super Chief Limited in BlueSlate Metallic (Photo by Jordan Pay)

For touring riders who want more power, safety, and sophistication, the 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited features a quick-release windscreen, saddlebags, a touring seat with passenger pad, floorboards, and traditional pullback handlebars like the base-model Super Chief. The Limited adds the Thunderstroke 116 V-twin, standard ABS, and a 4-inch round display with Bluetooth-connected Ride Command. Chrome finishes and rich metallic paint make the Super Chief Limited extra special. It comes in Black Metallic, BlueSlate Metallic, and Maroon Metallic, and pricing starts at $20,999.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Kawasaki KLR650

2022 Kawasaki KLR650 review
2022 Kawasaki KLR650 in Pearl Lava Orange

As far as dual-sport motorcycles go, the Kawasaki KLR650 is the stuff of legend. We’re big fans of the KLR, and when it was dropped from Kawasaki’s lineup we wrote a heartfelt requiem for our old friend. After a brief retirement, the 2022 Kawasaki KLR650 returns with some major upgrades, including a fuel-injected (finally!) liquid-cooled 652cc Single that promises increased reliability and fuel efficiency and optional ABS.

Four versions are available:

  • KLR650 (MSRP: $6,699; Pearl Sand Khaki and Pearl Lava Orange)
  • KLR650 ABS ($6,999; Pearl Sand Khaki)
  • KLR650 Traveler ($7,399; Pearl Lava Orange; equipped with factory-installed top case, 12V power outlet, and USB socket)
  • KLR650 Adventure (Non-ABS MSRP: $7,699, ABS MSRP: $7,999; Cypher Camo Gray; equipped with factory-installed side cases, LED auxiliary light set, engine guards, tank pad, 12V power outlet and USB socket)

Read our 2022 Kawasaki KLR650 First Look Review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000

The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is a naked sportbike powered by an updated version of the liquid-cooled 999cc inline Four from the K5 (2005-2008) GSX-R1000. It gets more aggressive, angular styling with stacked LED headlights and MotoGP-inspired winglets, a new 4-2-1 exhaust system, a new slipper clutch, and the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System. An updated seat design, new wheels shod with new Dunlop Roadsport 2 tires, revised instrumentation and switches, and a new larger fuel tank (5 gallons, up from 4.5) round out the changes. The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is available in Metallic Triton Blue, Metallic Matte Mechanical Gray, and Glass Sparkle Black. Price is TBD.

Read our 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 First Look Review

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Now in its third generation with its first update since 2008, the legendary 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa gets a thoroughly revised liquid-cooled 1,340cc inline that makes 187 horsepower at 9,750 rpm and a whopping 110 lb-ft of torque at 7,000 rpm. Peak figures are lower, but there’s more grunt in the midrange, and the latest Hayabusa accelerates faster than its predecessor. The Hayabusa has been updated and refined from nose to tail, with new styling and instrumentation, an IMU-enabled Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, and much more. Available in Glass Sparkle Black and Candy Burnt Gold; Metallic Matte Sword Silver and Candy Daring Red; and Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue, pricing for the 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa starts at $18,599.

Read our 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa First Ride Review

Watch our 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa Video Review

2022 Triumph Bonneville Bobber

2022 Triumph Bonneville Bobber review
2022 Triumph Bonneville Bobber

For 2022, Triumph has given performance, technological, and visual updates to its entire Modern Classic lineup, which includes the iconic Bonneville T100, Bonneville T120 and T120 Black, Street Twin and Street Twin Gold Line, Bonneville Bobber, and Speedmaster models.

Triumph has merged the Bobber and up-spec Bobber Black into one single model, the 2022 Triumph Bonneville Bobber. Like other models in the Bonneville lineup, the Bobber’s “high-torque” 1,200cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin gets a lighter crankshaft and mass-optimized clutch and counterbalancers. It also gets a larger 3-gallon fuel tank, an upgraded fork, a chunky front wheel, dual Brembo front calipers, standard cruise control and ABS, a new LED headlight, and some styling updates. The Bobber is available in Jet Black, Cordovan Red, and Matte Storm Grey and Matte Ironstone two-tone (above). Pricing starts at $13,150.

Read our 2022 Triumph Bonneville Lineup First Look Review

2022 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

2022 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster review
2022 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

The 2022 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster gets an updated “high-torque” 1,200cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin, refined riding modes (Road and Rain), a larger-diameter and higher-spec 47mm Showa cartridge fork, improved rider and passenger seating, and updated instrumentation. The Speedmaster is available in Jet Black, Red Hopper, and two-tone Fusion White and Sapphire Black with hand-painted twin coach lines (above). Pricing starts at $13,150.

Read our 2022 Triumph Bonneville Lineup First Look Review

2022 Triumph Bonneville T100

2022 Triumph Bonneville T100 review
2022 Triumph Bonneville T100

The 2022 Triumph Bonneville T100’s Euro 5-compliant “high-torque” 900cc parallel-Twin boasts an additional 10 ponies, bringing its claimed figures up to 64 horsepower at 7,400 rpm and 59 lb-ft of torque at 3,750 rpm. The engine also gets a lighter crankshaft, mass-optimized clutch and counterbalancers, a magnesium cam cover, and a thin-walled clutch cover, which together reduce curb weight by 8 pounds. The T100 also gets an upgraded fork, new instrumentation, and some styling tweaks. The Bonneville T100 is available in Jet Black, two-tone Lucerne Blue and Fusion White (above), and two-tone Carnival Red and Fusion White. Pricing starts at begins at $10,500.

Read our 2022 Triumph Bonneville Lineup First Look Review

2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 / T120 Black

2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 Black review
2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 Black

The 2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 and T120 Black get engine updates, less weight (520 pounds wet, down 15.5), and other updates. The “high-torque” 1,200cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin gets a lighter crankshaft and mass-optimized clutch and counterbalancers. The big Bonnies get cruise control, new Brembo front calipers, refined riding modes (Road and Rain), and aesthetic upgrades. Pricing for the 2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 and T120 Black (above) starts at $12,050.

Read our 2022 Triumph Bonneville Lineup First Look Review

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 Black

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R Black review
2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R Black

Limited to 1,000 units worldwide, the 2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R Black gives the 2,458cc mega cruiser an even leaner-and-meaner look. It features an aggressive all-black colorway that focuses on matte finishes, darkened tank badging, a carbon fiber front fender, and blacked-out components from nose-to-tail, and it comes with a certificate of authenticity. Pricing starts at $23,700.

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R Black and Rocket 3 GT Triple Black Announced

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 GT Triple Black

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 GT Triple Black review
2022 Triumph Rocket 3 GT Triple Black

Also limited to 1,000 units worldwide, the 2022 Triumph Rocket 3 GT Triple Black applies the dark treatment to the touring version, with a high-gloss three-shade paint scheme, a carbon fiber front fender, and blacked-out components. It comes with a certificate of authenticity that lists each motorcycle’s VIN. And its enormous 2,458cc inline Triple produces 167 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and a 163 lb-ft of torque at 4,000 rpm. Pricing starts at $24,400.

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R Black and Rocket 3 GT Triple Black Announced

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC review
2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC

Also built on Triumph‘s Bonneville platform, the 2022 Scrambler 1200 XC, Scrambler 1200 XE, and Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition are powered by a “high power” version of Triumph’s liquid-cooled, 1,200cc parallel-Twin that’s been updated to meet Euro 5 emissions regulations, which includes a revised exhaust system that offers improved heat distribution. With a dedicated Scrambler tune, it makes 89 horsepower at 7,250 rpm and 81 lb-ft of torque at 4,500 rpm. All three models have a 21-inch front wheel, side-laced tubeless wheels, and nearly 10 inches of suspension travel.

The 2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC is available in Sapphire Black ($14,000), two-tone Cobalt Blue and Jet Black ($14,500, above), and two-tone Matte Khaki Green and Matte Black ($14,500).

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC, XE and Steve McQueen Edition First Look Review

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE / Steve McQueen Edition

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen review
2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition

Receiving the same updates as the XC, the higher-spec 2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE adds an Off-Road Pro mode and cornering-optimized ABS and traction control. It’s available in Sapphire Black ($15,400), two-tone Cobalt Blue and Jet Black ($15,900), and two-tone Matte Khaki Green and Matte Black ($15,900).

Limited to 1,000 in individually numbered units worldwide and based on the XE, the 2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition (above) honors the King of Cool with unique Steve McQueen branding on the tank and handlebar clamp, an exclusive Competition Green custom paint scheme, premium Scrambler accessories fitted as standard, and a certificate of authenticity with signatures from Triumph’s CEO, Nick Bloor, and Chad McQueen. Pricing starts at $16,400.

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC, XE and Steve McQueen Edition First Look Review

2022 Triumph Speed Twin

2022 Triumph Speed Twin review
2022 Triumph Speed Twin

The 2022 Triumph Speed Twin gets similar engine updates as the rest of the Bonneville family, and its “high power” liquid-cooled, 1,200cc parallel-twin makes 98.6 horsepower at 7,250 rpm and 83 lb-ft of torque at 4,250 rpm. To improve handling, the Speed Twin gets a higher-spec Marzocchi inverted cartridge fork, Brembo M50 monoblock calipers, lighter cast aluminum 12-spoke wheels, and Metzeler Racetec RR tires. Styling has also been refreshed. The Speed Twin is available in Red Hopper (above), Matte Storm Grey, and Jet Black. Pricing starts at $12,500.

Read our 2022 Triumph Speed Twin First Look Review

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm Edition

As with other Bonneville models, the 2022 Triumph Street Scrambler’s liquid-cooled 900cc parallel-twin has been updated to meet Euro 5 emissions yet it still delivers 64 horsepower at 7,250 rpm and 59 lb-ft of torque at 3,250 rpm. Styling updates include a new side panel with aluminum number board, a new heel guard, new brushed aluminum headlight brackets, new adventure-oriented seat material, new throttle body finishers, and new paint schemes. The Street Scrambler is available in Jet Black, Urban Grey, and two-tone Matte Khaki and Matte Ironstone; pricing starts at $11,000.

Limited to 775 units worldwide, the Scrambler Sandstorm Edition (above) has a unique paint scheme, premium accessories (high front fender, tail tidy, sump guard, headlight grille, and rubber knee pads on the tank), and a certificate of authenticity personalized with the bike’s VIN. Pricing starts at $11,750.

Read our 2022 Triumph Street Scrambler First Look Review

2022 Triumph Street Twin / Street Twin Gold Line

2022 Triumph Street Twin review
2022 Triumph Street Twin

Heralded as Triumph’s best-selling Modern Classic, the 2022 Triumph Street Twin gets an updated engine, new cast wheels, and updated styling. Featuring the same updated “high-torque” 900cc liquid-cooled parallel-twin as the T100, the Street Twin now boasts 64 horsepower at 7,500 rpm and 59 lb-ft of torque at 3,800 rpm. New 18- and 17-inch 10-spoke cast-aluminum wheels are fitted with Pirelli Phantom Sportcomp tires. The Street Twin is available in Cobalt Blue (above), Matte Ironstone, and Jet Black. Pricing starts at $9,400.

Limited to 1,000 units worldwide, the 2022 Triumph Street Twin Gold Line features a Matte Sapphire Black colorway with a Triumph heritage logo and hand-painted gold lining. Pricing starts at $10,150.

Read our 2022 Triumph Bonneville Lineup First Look Review

2022 Yamaha YZF-R7

2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 review
2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The all-new 2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 is a 689cc sportbike based on the MT-07 platform, slotting between the YZF-R3 and YZF-R1. It features an slip/assist clutch, an optional quickshifter, chassis upgrades, and all-new bodywork. The R7 delivers track-ready performance within reach, with an MSRP of $8,999. Available in Team Yamaha Blue (above) and Performance Black.

Read our 2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 First Ride Review

Watch our 2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 Video Review

The post 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Motorcycles first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport | Road Test Review

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review
Triumph’s new Tiger 850 Sport is a capable, affordable adventure bike. It looks like it was dipped beak-first into a vat of red paint, like a Maker’s Mark bottle dipped in wax. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Manufacturers sometimes make peculiar choices when naming motorcycles. Despite its name, the new-for-2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport has the same engine size (888cc) as the Tiger 900 GT and Tiger 900 Rally. And even though it has “Sport” in the name, the 850 actually makes less horsepower. On Jett Tuning’s dyno, the Tiger 850 made 82.1 horsepower and 58 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheel, which is 7.6 horsepower and 1.4 lb-ft of torque less than the Tiger 900 Rally Pro we tested last year.

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review
Twin radiators channel heat through ducts in the bodywork.

Designed to be the most accessible Tiger in terms of power, torque, specification, and price, simply calling it the Tiger 900 probably makes more sense. With a base price of $11,995, the Tiger 850 Sport costs $2,705 less than the Tiger 900 GT and $3,405 less than the Tiger 900 Rally. Its main competitors are street-oriented adventure bikes like the BMW F 750 GS (which is actually an 850; base price, $10,995), the BMW F 900 XR ($11,695), and the KTM 890 Adventure ($13,099).

Triumph detuned the Tiger 850’s engine to comply with A2 licensing requirements in Europe. It was able to hit a lower price point by foregoing an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and multi-mode cornering-optimized ABS and traction control in favor of a more conventional non-switchable ABS and switchable traction control setup. The Tiger 850 Sport has fewer riding modes (only Road and Rain) and the  Marzocchi suspension adjustability is limited to rear preload. Other nips and tucks include a 5-inch TFT display instead of the 7-inch TFT the Tiger 900s, and there’s no cruise control, quickshifter, self-canceling turnsignals, or centerstand.

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review
Windscreen is one-hand adjustable to five positions over a 2-inch range.

The Tiger 850 Sport is hardly a bargain-bin special. It’s equipped with premium Brembo Stylema monoblock front calipers, a radial front brake master cylinder, a slip/assist clutch, a dual-height seat (31.9/32.7 inches), a hand-adjustable windscreen, full LED lighting, a 12-volt power outlet, and a luggage rack. Its curb weight is a manageable 474 pounds, and we averaged 219 miles of range from the 5.3-gallon tank.

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review
A roomy cockpit with an upright riding position allows riders to relax or shift into attack mode.

Greg’s Gear
Helmet: Fly Racing Sentinel Mesh
Jacket: Fly Racing Butane
Gloves: Fly Racing FL-2
Pants: Scorpion Covert Pro Jeans
Boots: Sidi Gavia Gore-Tex

Inline Triples are a signature feature on Triumphs as diverse as Tiger adventure bikes, the Speed Triple naked sportbike, and the Rocket 3 muscle cruiser. The Tiger 850 has what Triumph calls a T-Plane crankshaft with a 1-3-2 firing order. After cylinder 1 fires, the crank turns 180 degrees, cylinder 3 fires, the crank turns 270 degrees, cylinder 2 fires, the crank turns 270 degrees, and so on. The irregular firing sequence gives the engine the feel of a Twin down low and the character of a Triple from the midrange on up.

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review
A T-Plane crankshaft enhances the character and torque spread of the Tiger’s Triple.

Power increases linearly to 7,000 rpm then plateaus at around 80 horsepower until the 10,000-rpm redline. There’s a broad spread of torque, with 80% or more of peak torque available between 2,400 and 9,100 rpm. A balancer shaft quells most of the engine’s vibrations, but overall it feels more coarse than some of Triumph’s other Triples. Rain mode dulls throttle response, but in Road mode the right grip delivers precise throttle inputs with no stutters or hiccups. Other than a fair amount of heat felt on the left side, there’s little to complain about with the Tiger’s engine.

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review

As I’ve written in previous reviews, Triumph’s design and engineering philosophy imbues its motorcycles with a user-friendliness that makes its bikes – even those I’ve never ridden before – feel familiar and intuitive. The Tiger 850 Sport is no exception. Its ergonomics are comfortable, its fit and finish are at a high level, and its handling strikes a good balance between agility and stability. Response and feel at the front brake lever are excellent, the slip/assist clutch is light and smooth, and the transmission shifts with minimal effort. The fork dives under hard braking, but generous suspension travel and comfort-oriented damping settings provide good ride quality in a range of riding conditions.

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review
On rough twisty roads, the Tiger digs its claws in. Its Brembo Stylema front calipers are fantastic.

The Tiger’s 19-inch front wheel, Michelin Anakee Adventure 90/10 tires, and decent ground clearance allow for some light-duty off-roading, but the ABS doesn’t have an off-road mode nor can it be turned off at the rear wheel. What makes the Tiger 850 Sport most appealing is its versatility as a streetbike, serving as an able commuter or errand-runner during the week, a canyon carver on the weekend, and a comfortable tourer for as many days as you can take off from the grind. Given its budget-friendly MSRP, buyers should have some money left over to tailor the bike to their needs. Triumph offers various luggage options and other accessories such as heated grips, handguards, a centerstand, crash protection, comfort seats, a low seat (31.1/31.9 inches), and more.

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review
The Tiger 850 Sport is a well-sorted adventure bike. Its engaging engine, quality components, and sensible feature set make for an appealing overall package. And if red isn’t your thing, it also comes in blue.

Its name may be a bit misleading, but the Tiger 850 Sport is a great value for an impressively versatile European motorcycle.

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport Specs

Base Price: $11,995
Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com

ENGINE

Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline Triple, DOHC, 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 888cc
Bore x Stroke: 78.0 x 61.9mm
Compression Ratio: 11.3:1
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ throttle-by-wire, 44mm throttle bodies x 3
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.3 qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet slip/assist clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain

CHASSIS

Frame: Tubular-steel trellis w/ engine as a stressed member, cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 61.3 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.6 degrees/5.2 in.
Seat Height: 31.9/32.7 in.
Suspension, Front: 45mm USD fork, no adj., 7.1 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, adj. spring preload, 6.7 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm floating discs w/ 4-piston radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 255mm disc w/ 1-piston floating caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast aluminum, 2.50 x 19 in.
Rear: Cast aluminum, 4.25 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 100/90-19
Rear: 150/70-17
Wet Weight: 474 lbs.
Load Capacity: 491 lbs.
GVWR: 965 lbs.

PERFORMANCE

Horsepower: 82 @ 8,400 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 58 lb-ft @ 6,700 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Fuel Capacity: 5.3 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 41 mpg
Estimated Range: 219 miles

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review dyno horsepower torque

The post 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport | Road Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Honda Monkey Gets 5 Speeds

2022 Honda Monkey ABS
2022 Honda Monkey ABS in Banana Yellow

Like the updated 2022 Honda Grom, the retro-styled Honda Monkey will also get a 5-speed transmission for the new model year. Both are powered by a revised air-cooled 125cc Single, and two of the most popular model’s in Honda’s miniMOTO lineup, which also includes the Super Cub C125 and Trail 125.

Base price for the 2022 Honda Monkey is $4,199, and ABS is standard.

RELATED: Honda Monkey: Super-Spreader of Happiness

“While the Monkey has been a hit in the U.S. since we reintroduced it for the 2019 model year, customers have expressed a desire for more comfortable cruising and better acceleration,” said Brandon Wilson, Sports & Experiential Manager at American Honda. “Now we’re happy to offer that capability by equipping the Monkey with the same 5-speed engine that has earned rave reviews in the all-new 2022 Grom. It’s yet another example of Honda producing not only the most diverse lineup of miniMOTO models, but also the most capable.”

At the same time, Honda confirmed that the CB300R, Shadow Aero, and Shadow Phantom are returning for the 2022 model year.

2022 Honda Monkey ABS

2022 Honda Monkey ABS
2022 Honda Monkey ABS in Pearl Black

A hit with both the new generation of enthusiasts and nostalgic riders seeking a trip down memory lane (its heritage extends back to 1961, when the original version was used in a Honda-owned Japanese amusement park called Tama Tech), the Monkey oozes fun and charm in a pint-sized package. Updates for 2022 include a 5-speed transmission (up from 4) , a wider spread of gear ratios, and a 37-tooth final-drive sprocket (previously 34). The changes provide peppy acceleration from low speeds as well as increased top speed. The air-cooled 125cc Single, which has 2 valves and an overhead cam, has a more undersquare design, with a narrower bore and longer stroke.

2022 Honda CB300R ABS

2022 Honda CB300R ABS
2022 Honda CB300R ABS

Boasting Honda’s signature Neo-Sports Café styling in its most lightweight representation, the CB300R ABS is the ultimate entry-level sport-naked machine. It delivers exemplary sporting performance – including responsive, precise handling and excellent braking – thanks to its good power, standard two-channel ABS (with IMU) and feathery, centralized unsprung weight. The optimum chassis feel and balance are complemented by premium features found on its larger-capacity siblings, but what really turns heads is the minimalist design, expressing attitude through exposed hardware and a dramatic cutaway tail.

2022 Honda Shadow Aero

2022 Honda Shadow Aero
2022 Honda Shadow Aero

Even more timeless than a leather jacket, Honda’s retro Shadow Aero is highlighted by classic cruiser touchstones like a large front fender, chrome headlights, low-slung seat, spoke wheels and of course a V-Twin engine with swept-back twin exhausts. At the same time, it benefits from sensible elements including programmed fuel injection, available ABS, a shaft final drive, an affordable price and Honda’s legendary reliability. The combination honors tradition and style while still prioritizing performance and ease of ownership.

2022 Honda Shadow Phantom

2022 Honda Shadow Phantom
2022 Honda Shadow Phantom

When it comes to cruisers, sometimes simpler is better – take Honda’s classic Shadow Phantom, a minimalist, bobber-inspired V-Twin whose uncluttered looks are highlighted by a blacked-out engine, short fenders, and black wheels with spokes. At the same time, practical considerations are always welcome, and the Shadow Phantom has them in spades, with programmed fuel injection, a comfortable seating position, low center of gravity and Honda reliability topping the list. No wonder it’s such a popular staple in Honda’s lineup.

The post 2022 Honda Monkey Gets 5 Speeds first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Honda Grom | First Ride Review

2022 Honda Grom review
We got a first ride on the third-generation Grom, which has a revised engine, a 5-speed transmission, a new seat, fresh styling, and other changes. With a base price of $3,399, you’ll never have so much fun for so little money. (Photos by Drew Ruiz)

When the Honda Grom debuted for 2014, it was a curiosity. The first question was, “What the heck is a grom?” Since 1959, American Honda has been based in Southern California, a place known for its tasty waves. When the time came to name a 125cc minibike, it chose the slang term for a talented young surfer.

The next question was, “Who’s gonna buy it?” Everyone, as it turned out. Priced at $2,999, the low buy-in and appeal of a modern, playful minibike proved irresistible. Dealers ordered them by the dozen, and when they couldn’t get as many as they needed, they took deposits and put people on waiting lists. Some early buyers flipped Groms for a profit.

Almost overnight, Grom subcultures popped up like mushrooms after a rainstorm. Shops like Steady Garage in California and MNNTHBX (man in the box, get it?) in Tennessee started customizing Groms, and aftermarket companies began offering special parts like shocks, exhaust pipes, and big-bore kits. Grom enthusiasts started racing them, and friends and clubs got together for group rides.

There’s a house in my neighborhood that was occupied by four bikers who rode tricked-out Dynas and dressed like Sons of Anarchy cast members. At random times I’d see their garage door open, and out they’d come in black vests and half helmets on four identical Groms, their normally serious “cruiser face” replaced with boyish smiles.

2022 Honda Grom review
The 2022 Honda Grom SP ($3,499) comes in Pearl White and includes special graphics, gold fork tubes, and gold wheels. Large bolts make it easier to remove the Grom’s bodywork.

The Grom has been Honda’s top-selling streetbike in the U.S. since it was introduced. Worldwide, more than 750,000 have been sold. And over the past few years Honda’s miniMOTO lineup has expanded to include the Monkey, Super Cub C125, and Trail 125, all powered by the same 125cc air-cooled Single.

After getting an edgy styling refresh in 2017, the Grom was updated for 2022 with a new look, a revised engine, a new transmission, a larger fuel tank, and a thicker, flatter seat. The goal was to make the Grom easier to customize, more comfortable, and – dare we say it – more practical.

2022 Honda Grom review
The light and agile Grom is right at home on city streets.

Greg’s Gear
Helmet: HJC RPHA 90S
Jacket: Fly Racing Strata
Pants: Sa1nt Unbreakable Jeans
Boots: Highway 21 Axle Shoes

Though still a fuel-injected, 2-valve 125cc Single with an overhead cam, the Grom’s powerplant now has a more undersquare bore/stroke (now 50 x 63.1mm vs. 52.4 x 57.9mm before), a higher compression ratio (10:1, up from 9.3:1), and a larger airbox, all aimed at making the little engine that could more torquey and fuel efficient. A replaceable oil filter simplifies maintenance, and the down pipe and muffler are now a two-piece design for easier replacement.

2022 Honda Grom review
We dare you find a way to have more fun for less money on a motorcycle.

The Grom’s gearbox now has five speeds (up from four) and wider gear ratios, which, along with a larger 38-tooth rear sprocket (up from 34), help the bike cruise more easily at speed. Nonetheless, due to its top speed of about 60 mph, the Grom is too small to take on the freeway, not that I’d be inclined to do so even if I could. A larger 1.6-gallon tank (up from 1.45) will help the fuel sipper go even farther between fill-ups – last year’s model got an EPA-tested 134 mpg.

I showed up to the Grom press ride after a particularly stressful week. The day before we had shipped our August issue off to the printer, and I felt wrung out like an old dishrag. After getting a tour of the Steady Garage shop in Irwindale, California, and checking out some of their amazing Grom builds, our get-along gang of eight riders buzzed through the city streets and up into the San Gabriel Mountains.

2022 Honda Grom review
LCD meter has a speedo, tach, fuel gauge, clock, gear position, and trip/fuel economy functions.

I’m 6 feet tall and weigh more than 200 pounds. Honda hasn’t provided a curb weight figure for the 2022 model, but the previous model weighed 229 pounds. Even with my big sack of taters in the saddle, the Grom is zippy and pulls away from stops eagerly. Its clutch pull is ultra light, and rowing through the gears is effortless, which is good since keeping the Grom in the go zone requires the right gear and all the throttle you can twist out of the right grip.

Going up into the mountains was a tad slow, but going down was a total riot. With 12-inch wheels and barely 10 horsepower, the Grom is all about corner speed and drafting the person in front of you. Its brakes and suspension are as basic as you’d expect for a $3,399 motorcycle, but they are steady and predictable. (An extra $200 gets you ABS.) The Grom is tough and takes a lot of abuse without complaint.

By the time we got back to the valley, I had all but forgotten what I was so stressed out about. I had been so focused on keeping up and being smooth and laughing inside my helmet at the silliness of it all that the fun had displaced all of my concerns

2022 Honda Grom review
Grom, Monkey, (Super) Cub, or Trail, there’s a 125cc Honda miniMOTO for you.

It has been said that you never see a motorcycle parked in front of a psychiatrist’s office. That’s especially true if the motorcycle is a Grom. Go ahead, have some fun!

2022 Honda Grom Specs

Base Price: $3,399
Price as Tested: $3,499 (Grom SP)
Website: powersports.honda.com
Engine Type: Air-cooled Single, SOHC w/ 2 valves
Displacement: 125cc
Bore x Stroke: 50 x 63.1mm
Transmission: 5-speed, cable-actuated wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 47.2 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.3 in.
Seat Height: 30 in.
Wet Weight: 229 lbs. (2020 model)
Fuel Capacity: 1.6 gals.

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Source: RiderMagazine.com