Tag Archives: Sport Touring Motorcycles

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello | First Look Review

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

2021 marked Moto Guzzi’s 100-year anniversary, and the Mandello Del Lario brand celebrated the momentous occasion with special-edition models and a traveling museum exhibit. By September 2021, Guzzi shifted its focus from the rearview mirror to the road ahead, giving fans a sneak peek of the all-new 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello sport-tourer.

After keeping the details under wraps for months, Moto Guzzi finally unveiled the V100 Mandello’s full details and specs at EICMA 2021. Just as the V100 moniker suggests, the new sport-touring model houses a 1,042cc transverse V-Twin. The liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve mill not only produces 115 horsepower and 77.4 lb-ft of torque but also benefits from a new compact block architecture. Compared to the V85 TT’s air-cooled, 853cc, transverse V-Twin, the liter-size V100 powerplant is shorter by 4.1 inches.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

Guzzi puts that compact design to good use with a 58.5-inch wheelbase. A long single-sided swingarm with shaft drive steadies the Mandello at high speed while the compact chassis maintains agility in the esses. The tubular-steel frame cuts weight by utilizing the 1,042cc engine as a stressed member and the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension automatically tunes the handling characteristics to rider and the road.

On the electronics front, the throttle-by-wire system offers Travel, Sport, Rain, and Road ride modes. The system adjusts the V100’s three different engine maps, 4-level traction control, three engine braking settings, and suspension calibration to suit each situation. Equipped with a Marelli 11MP ECU and 6-axis IMU, the new Goose also touts cornering ABS, adaptive LED lighting, and cruise control.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

Despite the full electronics suite, the sport-tourer’s industry-first adaptive aerodynamics steals the spotlight. Consisting of wind deflectors mounted at the sides of the 4.6-gallon fuel tank, the innovative system adapts to the current speed and ride mode. The deflectors provide 22% more wind protection in the fully-deployed position, and along with the electronically-adjustable windscreen, amplify the cockpit’s comfort beyond the generously-padded seat, high-mounted handlebars, and 5-inch TFT dash.

The 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello’s MSRP or availability have not yet been announced. It will come in two variants, a base model and a premium model with standard Öhlins semi-active suspension, heated grips, a quickshifter, and the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia system.

2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello review

For more information or to find a Moto Guzzi dealer near you, visit motoguzzi.com.

The post 2022 Moto Guzzi V100 Mandello | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 BMW K 1600 Lineup | First Look Review

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
BMW has updated its entire K 1600 lineup for 2022 (from left): K 1600 B, K 1600 GT, K 1600 Grand America, K 1600 GTL.

There are four models in BMW’s K 1600 lineup – the K 1600 GT sport-tourer, the K 1600 GTL luxury sport-tourer, the K 1600 B bagger, and the K 1600 Grand America. All are powered by a liquid-cooled, 1,649cc inline-Six that debuted on the 2012 BMW K 1600 GT and K 1600 GTL, which shared Rider’s 2012 Motorcycle of the Year award.

All four models have received updates for 2022, starting with revisions to the engine to meet Euro 5 regulations, including updated BMS engine control, two knock sensors, and two additional lambda probes. BMW says the six-cylinder engine still makes 160 peak horsepower, though it now arrives at 6,750 rpm, 1,000 rpm earlier than before. Peak torque has increased to 133 lb-ft, up from 129, at 5,250 rpm.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
The K 1600 lineup is powered by a 1,649cc inline-Six that makes 160 horsepower and 133 lb-ft of torque.

Standard equipment on all K 1600 models now includes engine drag torque control (MSR), which compares the rotational speeds of the front and rear wheels in the same way as the standard Dynamic Traction Control and thus determines the slip or traction capacity at the rear wheel, with input on lean angle from the new 6-axis IMU. The level of intervention depends on riding mode (Dynamic, Road, or Rain).

Also new on all K 1600 models is BMW Motorrad Dynamic ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment) “Next Generation,” with revised calibration and new automatic load level compensation. The semi-active suspension adjusts damping based on conditions based on input from front and rear sensors and the new IMU.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 review
New welcome, good-bye, and follow me home lighting is standard on all 2022 BMW K 1600 models.

Also new are “welcome,” “good-bye”, and “follow me home” light functions. When the ignition is switched on, a “welcome” light function is activated. The headlight and taillight remain on for a short time and then fade to the waiting state before the engine starts. After switching off the ignition, the front and rear lights are also automatically activated briefly for the “good-bye” function which illuminates the area around the motorcycle. After switching off the ignition, the “follow me home” function allows the rider to activate the lights by briefly pressing the high-beam headlight button to assist with maneuvering in parking spaces or opening the garage at home.

A new full LED headlight consists of nine LEDs for the low-beam headlight and eight LEDs for the high-beam headlight. The standard “adaptive headlight” function features a low-beam LED headlight which turns into the curve according to the lean angle. The cornering function now operates through a range of ± 35 degrees (up from ± 24 degrees) for better illumination. It also adjusts up or down by 2 degrees during acceleration and braking.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
The K 1600s get a new high-definition 10.25-inch TFT color display.

Like the R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental, the new K 1600 models features a 10.25-inch high-definition TFT color display with integrated map navigation (via the BMW Motorrad Connected app) and Bluetooth connectivity. For protection against the elements, the display is equipped with a hardened glass cover with an anti-reflective and fingerprint-resistant coating. Functions such as “My vehicle,” “Navigation,” “Radio,” “Media,” “Telephone,” and “Settings” menus can be selected via displayed tiles, and features such as cruise control, riding modes, and audio are seamlessly integrated into the display. The Multi-controller wheel is used to manage some functions.

Standard on the K 1600 GTL and K 1600 Grand America and optional on the K 1600 GT and K 1600 B is BMW’s new Audio System 2.0, with antennas now integrated into the bodywork. Whereas the previous audio system was connected to the motorcycle as a primarily independent system, Audio System 2.0 is integrated into the electrical system. Menu control and setting options as well as the unique display screens are said to make the audio experience a seamless listening experience. The system offers more customization functions as well as SiriusXM satellite radio with 1-year subscription.

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 review
Option 719 “Midnight” features a the paint finish in Meteoric Dust II Metallic with a “Galaxy” theme.

The new K 1600 GT, GTL, B, and Grand America are available in three color options each: a standard color, a style variant, and Option 719. Option 719 “Midnight” is particularly noteworthy, which is only available for K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America. The highlight of this variant is the paint finish in Meteoric Dust II Metallic with the “Galaxy” theme depicted using the water transfer printing method.

MSRP pricing begins at $22,545 for the K 1600 B, $23,895 for the K 1600 GT,

$26,895 for the K 1600 GTL, and $27,745 for the K 1600 Grand America. Motorcycles will be in dealerships starting in February 2022.

Below is a summary of colors, details, standard equipment, options, and accessories for each model. For more information or to find a BMW dealer near you, visit bmwmotorcycles.com.

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Standard

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GT in Black Storm Metallic
  • Black Storm Metallic body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black
  • Front fender in Black Storm Metallic
  • Radiator cowls in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic
  • Front brake calipers in black

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Sport style

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GT in Light White/Racing Blue Metallic/Racing Red
  • Light White/Racing Blue Metallic/Racing Red body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black with gray piping and decorative stitching
  • Front part of the front fender in Light White
  • Radiator cowls in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic
  • Gold-anodized front brake calipers

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Option 719

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GT in Option 719
Mineral White Metallic
  • Mineral White Metallic body color with lines
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black (Optional Option 719 seat with diamond top-stitching in saddle brown and cloud print)
  • Front part of the front fender in Mineral White Metallic
  • Radiator cowls in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Mineral White Metallic
  • Chrome slipstream deflector trim
  • Front brake calipers in black
  • Optional Option 719 classic forged rims

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Standard

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL in Black Storm Metallic
  • Black Storm Metallic body color
  • Frame in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine in platinum
  • Seat in black
  • Front fender in Black Storm Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Exclusive style

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL in Gravity Blue Metallic
  • Gravity Blue Metallic body color
  • Frame in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine in platinum
  • Seat in black
  • Front fender in Gravity Blue Metallic, rear part in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine spoiler in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Chrome slipstream deflector trim
  • Chrome strips on cases

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Option 719

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 GTL in Option 719
Mineral White Metallic
  • Mineral White Metallic body color with lines
  • Frame in Monolith Metallic matte
  • Engine in platinum
  • Seat in black (Optional Option 719 seat with diamond top-stitching in saddle brown and cloud print)
  • Front fender in Mineral White Metallic with chrome bar, rear part in Monolith Metallic Matte
  • Engine spoiler in Monolith Metallic Matte
  • Tank center cover in Mineral White Metallic
  • Chrome slipstream deflector trim
  • Chrome strips on cases
  • Optional Option 719 classic forged rims

2022 BMW K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America: Standard

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 Grand America in Black Storm Metallic
  • Black Storm Metallic body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black
  • Front part of the front fender in Black Storm Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic

2022 BMW K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America: Exclusive style

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 K1600GT K1600GTL GT GTL review
2022 BMW K 1600 B in Manhattan Metallic Matte
  • Manhattan Metallic Matte body color
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Seat in black
  • Front part of the front fender in Manhattan White Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Black Storm Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Black Storm Metallic

2022 BMW K 1600 B and K 1600 Grand America: Option 719 “Midnight”

2022 BMW K 1600 B K1600B K 1600 Grand America K1600 review
2022 BMW K 1600 Grand America in Option 719 “Midnight” Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • Meteoric Dust II Metallic body color with water transfer printing method
  • Frame in black
  • Engine in black
  • Option 719 seat in black with diamond top-stitching and model designation
  • Front part of the front fender in Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • Engine spoiler in Night Black Matte
  • Tank center cover in Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • Slipstream deflector trim in Meteoric Dust II Metallic
  • “Midnight” badge

Standard Equipment on 2022 BMW K 1600 GT, GTL, B, and Grand America

  • Black Storm Metallic paint
  • 10.25-inch TFT screen with BMW Motorrad Connected app navigation
  • Audio System 2.0 with fairing speakers (K 1600 GTL)
  • Shaft drive
  • Slipper clutch
  • Reversing aid
  • Hill Start Control Pro
  • Dynamic Engine Brake Control
  • Adjustable windscreen
  • Cast aluminum wheels
  • Duolever front suspension
  • Paralever rear suspension
  • Integral ABS with ABS Pro
  • Dynamic Traction Control
  • Dynamic ESA “Next Generation”
  • Steering stabilizer
  • Tire pressure monitor
  • 12v power socket
  • Cooled, mobile device charging compartment
  • Electronic immobilizer
  • Heated grips and seat
  • Adaptive LED headlight, LED turn signals and rear light
  • Multi-controller
  • Programable function buttons
  • Dynamic Cruise Control
  • Ride modes
  • Luggage rack
  • Centerstand
  • Comfort footrests
  • Integrated side cases in body color
  • Top case in body color (K 1600 GTL)

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Optional equipment and accessories

  • Premium Package
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • Audio System 2.0
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar

2022 BMW K 1600 GT: Stand-alone options

  • Style: Sport Light White/Racing Blue/Racing Red metallic
  • Option 719 Mineral White Metallic
  • Option 719 bench seat
  • Floor lighting
  • Option 719 forged classic wheels
  • Low seat (30.7-inch / 31.5-inch seat height, -1.2 inches)
  • 2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Optional equipment and accessories
  • Premium Package
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar

2022 BMW K 1600 GTL: Stand-alone options

  • Style: Exclusive Gravity Blue Metallic
  • Option 719 Mineral White Metallic
  • Option 719 bench seat
  • Floor lighting
  • Option 719 forged classic wheels
  • High seat (31.5-inch seat height, +2.0 inches)

2022 BMW K 1600 B: Optional equipment and accessories

  • Bagger Package
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar
  • Center stand
  • Grand America Package
  • Grand America styling
  • Top case in body color
  • Audio System 2.0
  • Floorboards
  • High windshield
  • Keyless Ride
  • Central locking system
  • Gear Shift Assist Pro
  • Anti-theft alarm
  • LED fog lights
  • Engine protection bar
  • Centerstand

2022 BMW K 1600 B: Stand-alone options

  • Option 719 bench seat
  • Floor lighting
  • Forged handlebar
  • Option 719 forged classic wheels
  • High seat (31.5-inch seat height, +2.0 inches)

The post 2022 BMW K 1600 Lineup | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Video Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT video review
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT in Liquid Metal (Photo by Joseph Agustin)

We test the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, which won Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year award. It’s a fully featured sport-tourer powered by an 890cc inline-Triple that makes 108 horsepower at 10,000 rpm and 63 lb-ft of torque at 7,200 rpm at the rear wheel. MSRP is $14,899.

For 2021, the new Tracer 9 GT gets the larger crossplane Triple from the MT-09, which is lighter, more fuel efficient, and more powerful. An all-new aluminum frame is made using a controlled-fill diecast process that reduces mass and increases rigidity. A new aluminum swingarm is more rigid, and a new steel subframe increases load capacity and allows an accessory top trunk to be mounted along with the larger 30-liter saddlebags. New spinforged wheels reduce unsprung weight, and they’re shod with grippy Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires.

In addition to updated throttle response modes and all-new KYB semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT now has a 6-axis IMU that enables a suite of electronic rider aids adapted from the YZF-R1, including lean-angle-sensitive traction control, ABS, slide control, and lift control. It also has full LED lighting (including cornering lights) and a new dual-screen TFT display. The rider/passenger seats have been upgraded, and the rider’s ergonomics are adjustable.

Check out our video review:

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Specs

Base Price: $14,899
Website: yamahamotorsports.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 890cc
Horsepower: 108 @ 10,000 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Torque: 63 lb-ft @ 7,200 rpm (rear-wheel dyno)
Bore x Stroke: 78.0mm x 62.1mm
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 59.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.9/32.5 in.
Wet Weight: 503 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.
Fuel Consumption: 48.7 mpg
Estimated Range: 243 miles

The post 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | Video Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is an exciting, affordable addition to the middleweight sport-touring category.

Triumph has released an exciting new middleweight sport-tourer, the 2022 Tiger Sport 660. The new Tiger Sport will share the engine from the new Trident released earlier this year, and Triumph claims this is the first triple to make its way into the middleweight sport-touring segment.

Triumph sees the new model appealing to two groups of motorcyclists, newer riders moving up to a bigger bike, and veteran riders looking for a thrilling all-rounder. It says the new Tiger Sport has a narrow stand-over feel and the seat is on the low side at 32.8 inches, which should make it accessible to a broad range of riders in terms of height and experience.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Triumph hopes the new Tiger will attract rookie riders moving up to a first big bike and veteran riders looking for a thrilling all-rounder.

The 660cc triple-cylinder engine is designed to provide a broad torque band across a wide rev range and strong top-end horsepower.

The 660 Sport has a full-size windscreen that should be ideal for long-haul excursions, whereas the rest of the sleek design has a tall but sporty influence, including a stubby stainless-steel silencer. A slip/assist clutch should make for a slick work of the 6-speed gearbox and an up/down quickshifter is available as a factory option.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Sizable color-matched luggage and cast aluminum rack are optional.

Triumph says the 660 Sport has exceptional handling, and on paper at least, the bike appears to live up to the claim. The Sport is fitted with Showa’s lightweight 41mm separate function fork (SFF), where each fork leg performs a separate function, one side for damping and the other for spring, and at the rear, a Showa dual-rate monoshock is adjustable for preload. Claimed peak power is 80 horses at  8,750 rpm, 5% more than the V-Strom, and claimed peak torque is 47.2 lb-ft, on par with the Versys, and yet the Tiger Sport weighs 20 pounds less than either.

The Tiger Sport 660 has stats that promise sports performance, but the tall, adjustable screen, 4.7-gallon gas tank, integrated side case mounts, and pillion grab handles cater to riders looking to make longer excursions with or without a passenger. Side cases, with a combined capacity of 57 liters, and a 47-liter top box (and cast aluminum luggage rack) are available options and can be color-matched.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Integrated pillion grab-handles are fitted as standard, as are the mounts for attaching the optional side cases.

Braking is supplied by Nissin, 2-piston calipers on twin 310mm discs, with a single-piston rear caliper on a 255mm disc. Standard tires are Michelin Road 5, which promise versatility in riding conditions and styles. ABS is fitted as standard, and the brake lever is adjustable for reach.

Throttle-by-wire allows for two riding modes, Road and Rain, as well as switchable traction control. A small TFT color display is integrated into a larger LCD and shows all the key information, and allows for menu selections and connectivity. All-around LED lighting, self-canceling indicators, and key fob immobilizer are all standard.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
A small, color TFT is integrated into a larger LCD.
2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review
Integrated side-case mounts leave a clean look when not in use.

The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is available in three color schemes: Lucerne Blue & Sapphire Black, Graphite & Sapphire Black, or Korosi Red & Graphite (for an extra $125), which also comes with sporty graphics. The standard version has an MSRP of $9,295 and will be available in dealers starting in February 2022.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Specs

Base Price: $9,295
Website: triumphmotorcycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, inline triple, DOHC w/ 4 vpc.
Displacement: 660cc
Bore x Stroke: 74 x 57.7mm
Horsepower: 80 hp @ 8,750 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Torque: 47.2 lb-ft @ 6,250 rpm (claimed, at the crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain
Wheelbase: 55.8 in.
Rake/Trail: 23.7 degrees/3.8 in.
Seat Height: 32.8 in.
Wet Weight: 454 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gals.

The post 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT | First Look Review

Suzuki has released the successor to the GSX-S1000F, the new 2022 GSX-S1000GT and GT+ models.

We took a first look at Suzuki’s aggressively redesigned GSX-S1000 naked sportbike back in April, and rumors of a sport-touring variant have been amplifying ever since. Enter the new GSX-S1000GT, successor to the S1000F, with all the performance of the new S1000 on which it is based, and all the comfort and features expected from a long-haul tourer.

As with the new Hayabusa, the new GT model is fitted with Suzuki’s Intelligent Ride System (SIRS), which includes the Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (SDMS), Traction Control, Ride by Wire Electronic Throttle, Bi-Directional Quick Shift, Suzuki Easy Start, and Low RPM Assist systems.

It is powered by a street tuned version of the GSX-R sportbike’s 999cc, in-line four-cylinder engine, which has been updated with a revised intake and exhaust camshafts, cam chain tensioners, valve springs, and redesigned clutch and gearshift components. Suzuki says the enhancements deliver a broader, more consistent torque curve while meeting Euro 5 emissions compliance standards.

The GSX-S1000GT also utilizes the S1000’s twin-spar aluminum frame and aluminum-alloy braced swingarm from the GSX-R1000. Fully adjustable KYB suspension, ABS-equipped radial-mount Brembo monoblock calipers biting 310mm floating rotors. A new trellis-style sub-frame creates secure attachment points for the 36-liter side cases and promises an improved passenger experience.

2022 GSX-S1000GT+ is equipped with integrated side-cases.

A new cast-aluminum, rubber-mounted handlebar provides a relaxed body position, coupled with rubber footpeg inserts for long-haul comfort. Rider and passenger seats benefit from a new sporty design maximizing comfort on long rides, and both seats sport a new cover material that balances grip with freedom of movement and integrates well with the new grab-bar design. Equipped with all-around LED lights, the distinctive horizontally arranged headlights match the latest Suzuki styling.

The GSX-S1000GT is equipped with a 6.5-inch, full-color TFT LCD screen set into the inner fairing above the handlebars for enhanced visibility and protection from debris. The brightness-adjustable TFT panel features a scratch-resistant surface and an anti-reflective coating and integrates with the SUZUKI mySPIN smartphone connectivity application. A USB outlet can also be used to connect and charge a smartphone.

The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT will be available in two color schemes: Metallic Reflective Blue, and Glass Sparkle Black, each set off with distinctive GT logos. Manufacturers suggested pricing for both the GT and GT+ are yet to be announced.

For more information, please visit: suzuki.com 

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 Specs

Base Price: TBD
Website: suzukicycles.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse in-line four, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 999cc
Bore x Stroke: 73.4 x 59.0mm
Transmission: 6-speed, wet multi-plate assist clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 57.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/3.94 in.
Seat Height: 31.9 in.
Wet Weight: 498 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.

The post 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Over three generations, Yamaha’s…

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
Now in its third generation (and third name), the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT sport-tourer is better in every way. (Photo by Joe Agustin)

Over three generations, Yamaha’s middleweight sport-tourer has evolved steadily, and like a shapeshifter, it has morphed between three different model names. First came the 2015 FJ-09, then the 2019 Tracer 900 GT, and now the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT.

With each iteration, the FJ/Tracer has raised its game, with better performance, wider-ranging capabilities, and more features.

Here are our top 10 highlights of the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT:

1. That Triple!

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT gets the larger, lighter, more fuel efficient 890cc Triple from the MT-09.

In a world full of parallel-Twins, V-Twins and inline-Fours, an inline-Triple marches to a different drummer. It produces good low- to midrange torque as well as a top-end rush, and its sound is truly unique. The Tracer 9 GT gets the larger 890cc CP3 (Cross Plane 3-cylinder) Triple from the MT-09, which is lighter (by 3.7 pounds), more fuel efficient (by 9%), and more powerful (with 6% more peak torque).

Yamaha’s Y-CCT (Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle) throttle-by-wire setup now uses an APSG (Accelerator Position Sensor Grip) for a smoother connection between the loud handle and the rear wheel. Fueling issues that plagued the FJ-09 were mostly solved on the Tracer 900 GT, and the Tracer 9 GT feels even more refined. A 15% increase in crankshaft inertia further smooths out on/off throttle transitions.

Yamaha’s D-Mode, which adjusts throttle response and power, now has four preset modes: 1 (sharpest response, full power), 2 (standard response, full power), 3 (mild response, full power), and 4 (mildest response, reduced power). Mode 1 corresponds to what would be called “sport” mode on many motorcycles, which is often overly abrupt, but not so on the Tracer 9 GT. Throttle response is immediate without being harsh.

2. Curb weight is still around 500 pounds

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Tracer 9 GT’s lightness contributes to its agility.

Traditional sport-tourers like the Yamaha FJR1300, BMW R 1250 RT, and Kawasaki Concours 14 have curb weights well over 600 pounds. Yamaha’s claimed curb weight (without the saddlebags) is 485 pounds. When we tested the 2020 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT, it made 102 horsepower at the rear wheel. With the 43cc bump in displacement, the Tracer 9 GT probably makes 105-107 horsepower at the rear wheel.

While the Tracer 9 GT lacks the top-end rush of an open-class sport-tourer, its lighter weight makes it more responsive and agile. A new controlled-fill diecast aluminum frame is lighter and has 50% more lateral rigidity, further enhancing steering response.

3. It has the seating position of an ADV but the handling of a sport-tourer

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT could be classified as a “street adventure” bike or “crossover” because it blends ADV styling/seating with sport-touring street manners.

Greg’s Gear:
Helmet: Scorpion EXO-R1 Air
Jacket: Scorpion Optima
Gloves: Scorpion Havoc
Pants: Scorpion Covert Pro Jeans
Boots: Sidi Gavia Gore-Tex

The Tracer 9 GT has an upright seating position that’s more akin to an adventure tourer than the sportier ergonomics on many sport-tourers. Being able to sit up straight with no weight on the rider’s wrists, relaxed shoulders, and ample legroom makes it enjoyable to pile on the miles, and that’s what a sport-tourer is all about. The one-hand-adjustable windscreen and handguards provide good wind protection too.

Unlike ADV bikes, the Tracer 9 GT has no off-road pretensions. It rolls on 17-inch wheels shod with excellent Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires. Yamaha developed a new process called “spinforging” to make the 10-spoke aluminum wheels, which saves 1.5 pounds of unsprung weight and contributes to the Tracer 9 GT’s agile handling.

4. New semi-active suspension provides a magic-carpet ride

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
KYB semi-active suspension is a big upgrade on the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT. The fork uses a stroke sensor to detect position.

Semi-active suspension, where sensors on the fork, shock, and elsewhere on the bike provide input to a suspension control unit that adjusts damping in real time, has been around for a while. On the Tracer 9 GT, the KYB Actimatic Damping System (KADS) electronically adjusts compression and rebound damping in the fork and rebound damping in the rear shock, and there are two suspension modes: A-1 (sport) and A-2 (comfort). Spring preload must be adjusted manually using a tool for the fork (it’s in the toolkit) and a remote knob for the shock.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The rear shock uses an angular position sensor to detect position.

With 5.1/5.3 inches of front/rear suspension travel, the Tracer 9 GT has plenty of available stroke to absorb bumps, seams, potholes, and other pavement irregularities. By adapting to changing conditions, the KADS suspension delivers a supple, compliant ride and it quickly firms up as needed to prevent excessive chassis pitch under braking and acceleration. That keeps the tires in contact with the ground and further contributes to the Tracer 9 GT’s sure-footed handling.

5. Its R1-derived, IMU-enabled electronics are high tech

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT has a customizable IMU-enabled electronics suite derived from the R1.

The Tracer 900 GT was equipped with throttle-by-wire, multiple modes to adjust throttle response and power, multi-mode traction control, and ABS. In addition to its new semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT has a more comprehensive suite of electronic rider aids derived from the YZF-R1 sportbike. Data from a 6-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) informs traction control, slide control, lift control, and ABS, with intervention adapted to lean angle and other inputs. All of the electronics have multiple modes, and the only system that can’t be turned off is ABS, or Brake Control System (BC) in Yamaha’s parlance.

The IMU also provides input for new LED cornering lights, which illuminate the insides of cornering when lean angle exceeds 7 degrees.

6. It has cruise control, heated grips, and a quickshifter

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
Cruise control is actuated via a button and toggle on the left switchgear. A mode button on the front of the pod and the up/down toggle control menu functions.

These features were standard on the Tracer 900 GT, and all are appreciated. Cruise control works at speeds above 31 mph in 4th, 5th, and 6th gears, and set speed can be increased in 1-mph increments (with a short button press) or continuously (long press). In addition to upshifts, the quickshifter now provides clutchless downshifts with an auto-blipper. And the heated grips now offer 10 levels of adjustment.

The Tracer 9 GT has full LED lighting, a 12-volt outlet behind the instrument panel, and a centerstand, which helps with chain and tire maintenance as well as loading and unloading the saddlebags. At Yamaha’s claimed 49 mpg, its 5-gallon tank should yield a range of nearly 250 miles.

7. Larger saddlebags hold a full-face helmet in each side

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT has larger 30-liter saddlebags that will each hold a full-face helmet.

The saddlebags on the Tracer 900 GT held 22 liters each. Larger saddlebags on the Tracer 9 GT hold 30 liters each, which is large enough for a full-face helmet. The bags can be left unlocked for convenient access, locked for security, or removed to carry them into a hotel room or to lighten the load for apex strafing. The lock barrels can be a little fiddly (which has long been an issue with Yamaha luggage), but with practice they work just fine.

Yamaha also beefed up the subframe to allow an accessory top box (39 or 50 liters) to be mounted along with the saddlebags, rather than the either/or setup on the previous model.

8. I’m seeing double

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT has dual 3.5-inch TFT color displays. Info shown on the right display can be customized. Lever above the dash adjusts windscreen height.

Yamaha has given the Tracer 9 GT a unique dual-panel TFT display, with each screen measuring 3.5 inches. The speedometer, tachometer, gear indicator, and other functions are on the left panel. The right panel has a grid of four smaller displays that can be customized to show the rider’s preferred info, even if the information is also shown on the left panel.

The mostly white-on-black text is crisp and clear, but some of the text is small. The TFT panels have a glossy surface that reflects sunlight and can make the screens appear too dim (brightness is not adjustable). Depending on the position of the sun, sometimes all I could see was the reflection of my riding jacket.

9. Rider and passenger comfort are improved

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT has an upgraded rider/passenger seat. The rider’s seat height, handlebar position, and footpeg position are also adjustable.

Yamaha upgraded the rider’s seat with higher-quality cover material and added color-matched stitching. The dual-height rider’s seat can be set at 31.9 or 32.5 inches. To suit riders of different body types or preferences, the bars and footpegs can be adjusted. Rotating the bar-riser clamps allows the handlebar to be moved up 4mm and forward 9mm, and the footpeg brackets can be moved up 14mm and back 4mm. The passenger seat is now thicker and wider, and there’s a new integrated, one-piece grab handle.

10. It costs more, but it’s worth it

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT is available in Liquid Metal (left) and Redline (right) for $14,899.

The Tracer 9 GT’s many upgrades have raised the price to $14,899, which is $1,900 more than last year’s Tracer 900 GT. For those who are cross-shopping, BMW’s F 900 XR (with Select and Premium Packages but no saddlebags) is $15,045 and Kawasaki’s Versys 1000 SE LT+ costs $18,199. More expensive, yes, but still competitively priced and no important features were left off the spec sheet. And the price is the same in either color, Liquid Metal with blue wheels or Redline with black wheels.

We’ll post our full review soon, so stay tuned! Scroll down for more photos….

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Specs

Base Price: $14,899
Website: yamahamotorsports.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse inline-Triple, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 890cc
Bore x Stroke: 78.0mm x 62.1mm
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 59.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.9/32.5 in.
Wet Weight: 485 lbs. (claimed, does not include side cases)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.

The post first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Prototype Revealed

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 prototype review
Though its bodywork is camouflaged, there’s much we can learn from these photos of the final prototype of the new Triumph Tiger Sport 660.

Last October, Triumph unveiled the Trident 660, a middleweight naked bike designed to compete with stalwarts in the class like the Honda CB650R, Suzuki SV650, Yamaha MT-07, and Kawasaki Z650. But about a month before the official unveiling, Triumph released photos of the final prototype of the Trident 660 during testing near the company’s headquarters in Hinckley, England.

Triumph has now done the same with the first spin-off of its 660 platform, “the new Tiger Sport 660 that is set to bring triple engine performance advantages to the middleweight adventure sports category.” In the photos, the bike’s bodywork is camouflaged with black-and-white Triumph stickers that hide its exact lines, but there’s still plenty to draw from.

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 prototype review
With its fairing and windscreen, the new 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 will be ready for sport-touring.

The Trident 660 is powered by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 660cc inline Triple that makes 80 horsepower at 10,250 rpm and 47 lb-ft of torque at 6,250 rpm (claimed), with 90% of peak torque on tap as low as 3,600 rpm. The engine in the Tiger Sport 660 looks exactly the same, down to the stubby exhaust exiting below the cast aluminum swingarm on the right side. Both share a tubular-steel frame.

The engine is derived from the 2013-2016 Triumph Street Triple 675, with a narrower 74mm bore and longer 51.1mm stroke yielding the lower displacement. It incorporates 67 new components, including a new crankshaft, piston design, and cam profiles.

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 prototype review
If its inline Triple is unchanged from the Trident 660, then the Tiger Sport 660 will make 80 horsepower and 47 lb-ft of torque.

We can see that the Tiger Sport 660 has the same five-spoke, 17-inch cast aluminum wheels, Michelin Road 5 tires, Nissin triple-disc brakes with ABS, and Showa inverted fork as the Trident. On the Trident 660 the fork is non-adjustable, the Showa rear shock only offers preload adjustability, front/rear travel is 4.7/5.3 inches, and seat height is 31.7 inches. The Tiger Sport 660 doesn’t look appreciably taller, though it does have a different tailsection with integrated saddlebag mounts and a more deeply dished seat.

The most obvious difference between the Trident 660 and the Tiger Sport 660 is the latter’s front fairing and windscreen. The added wind protection, along with a possibly taller handlebar and optional hard luggage, will make the middleweight Tiger ready for sport-touring. Wet weight of the Trident is 417 pounds, and the Tiger’s fairing and windscreen are likely to add 20 pounds or so. Fuel capacity on the Trident 660 is 3.7 pounds; for sport-touring duty we expect to see a larger tank on the Tiger Sport, perhaps 4.5 gallons.

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 prototype review
Saddlebag mounts are integrated into the Tiger Sport 660’s tailsection. Factory accessory hard luggage will make the bike more versatile for travel.

Priced at $8,195, the Triumph Trident 660 is within a few hundred dollars of its Japanese competitors and offers additional features like selectable ride modes, switchable traction control, and a TFT color display.

To cover the cost of the extra bodywork, the 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 is likely to be priced around $8,500-$9,000. That’s on par with what would likely be its closest competitor, the Suzuki V-Strom 650, which has a base price of $8,849 and is equipped with standard ABS and traction control (neither are switchable) but not a TFT display. With its 19-inch front wheel, the V-Strom 650 offers more off-road capability than the Tiger Sport 660. Both can be outfitted with factory accessory saddlebags.

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 prototype review
Triumph-badged King Dick Tools chest not included. Nor is spotted dick.

Interestingly, 660 is same displacement used on the Aprilia RS 660, Tuono 660, and soon-to-be-released Tuareg 660., though they have parallel-Twins and the Trident and Tiger Sport have inline Triples. Aprilia took a more high-performance approach, squeezing 100 horsepower out of its engine and equipping the RS and Tuono with higher-spec components and electronics. As a result, they are priced higher – the RS 660 starts at $11,299 and the Tuono 660 starts at $10,499. With its off-road-ready spoked wheels with a 21-inch front and nearly 10 inches of suspension travel, the Tuareg 660 will compete head-to-head with the Yamaha Ténéré 700 ($9,999).

So, about a month from now we should get full technical details about the new-for-2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660. Stay tuned!

The post Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Prototype Revealed first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Favorite Ride: Lapping the Appalachians

A Father and Son Tour the Appalachians
Father and son on the the Tail of the Dragon, Tennessee. (Above photo by 129photos.com; other photos by the author)

Dad’s first sojourn through the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, and West Virginia needed to be grand. Dad is a desert dweller from southern Arizona and has never ridden east of Texas. We agreed on a short list of must-haves: Blue Ridge Parkway, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and Tail of the Dragon. Everything else – the fall foliage, the swollen creeks and runs, the rural country roads, the morning fog – would be an added bonus.

There would also be pancakes. Lots of pancakes.

We picked up Dad’s Triumph Tiger Explorer at a motorcycle dealership in northern Virginia, where he had it shipped from Arizona. We rode south and entered the Blue Ridge Parkway west  of Lynchburg. The parkway is aptly named, with smooth, graceful curves, well-manicured roadsides, and plenty of parking areas to admire the view. A word to the wise, as I learned as point man: pay attention to mile markers. I missed the country road that the kind ladies at Explore Park said would lead us to Mount Airy, North Carolina, our first stop for the night and the birthplace of actor Andy Griffith.

A Father and Son Tour the Appalachians
Lush valleys provide a stunning backdrop to the Blue Ridge Parkway, Virginia.

Dad’s Explorer has heated grips and a larger fairing than my Triumph Sprint GT, so he was better prepared for the chilly 40-degree temperatures during our ride. For most of the morning, we enjoyed relative seclusion, clear skies, autumn colors, and beautiful farm country. In one short span, the view of the valley below on my left was stolen by a patch of trees and granite outcroppings only to be returned over my right shoulder. It was a literal tennis match of competing landscapes – valleys of farm country on one side and ridgelines stretching to the horizon on the other.

Traffic increased the farther south we traveled, and overflowing pullouts often prevented us from stopping, so, we leaned back and enjoyed the ride. We left the parkway at Asheville, having decided on Maggie Valley for our overnight stay.

A Father and Son Tour the Appalachians
The author’s father posing with their motorcycles on the Blue Ridge Parkway.

A steady downpour and tornado warnings nixed riding the second day, so we covered the bikes and took a taxi to Wheels Through Time. While walking through the museum – home to more than 300 interesting and rare motorcycles – Dad shared stories of his older brother’s 1950 Harley Panhead and their shenanigans on it back on the farm in Iowa. One involved the bike, loaded with three riders, being chased by a dog that gave up the hunt after my uncle retarded the spark for a spectacular backfire. Dad hunted the base of many a cylinder barrel, searching for a stamp that would identify the same year as his brother’s, but to no avail.

Tourist traffic in the lush Great Smoky Mountains National Park slowed our progress. We found a place to park the bikes at Newfound Gap, a 5,049-foot pass on U.S. Route 441, allowing us to stretch our legs. Traffic in the park paled in comparison to the carnival of tourism we saw in Gatlinburg, where we found the Little House of Pancakes.

Dad tucked into a stack of blueberry pancakes, and I gorged on sweet-and-spicy apple pancakes. Between bites – and doing our best not to drip syrup on our map – we sketched out an alternate route back to Maggie Valley. We tested our pioneering skills on Tennessee State Route 32 in search of secluded switchbacks. Any concern about traffic was dispelled by a large red diamond-shaped sign that warned “Do Not Enter, Your GPS is Wrong” a few miles into the alternate route.

Littered with wet leaves and twigs from the previous day’s storms, Route 32’s pucker factor was off the scale, especially when I felt the front wheel push over some wet leaves at the apex of a turn. I rarely engaged 3rd gear after that. Pavement turned to hard gravel at Davenport Gap, where we crossed back into North Carolina on Mount Sterling Road. We found blacktop again at Waterville Road along Big Creek, and after a few miles, under cavernous trees and crags, we came upon Interstate 40 and our path back to Maggie Valley.

Compared to Route 32, the Tail of the Dragon’s 318 curves in 11 miles were not as technical, nor as precarious. The roads in this part of Tennessee, which arc around the southern side of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, plunge into valleys, rise to bluffs overlooking man-made lakes and hydroelectric dams, and hug the steep sides of tree-blanketed mountains. After a full day of Appalachian curves, we stopped for the night in Middlesboro, Kentucky, just a stone’s throw west of Cumberland Gap.

A Father and Son Tour the Appalachians
Another sweeping view along the Blue Ridge Parkway.

With our bellies full of pancakes, we rode east on U.S. Route 58 through southwestern Virginia under crisp, blue autumn skies, with ridgelines on our left marking the border with Kentucky. We continued northeast on U.S. Route 19 for our next overnight in Princeton, West Virginia, and we awoke the next morning to find frost on our bikes. Despite the cold, the scenery from Princeton to Elkins on U.S. Route 219 was a moving feast of fields, pastures, valleys, woodland, creeks, rivers, and quaint towns.

A Father and Son Tour the Appalachians
This route map is available on the REVER app in the Rider Magazine community.

Link to Appalachian tour route on REVER

A section of U.S. 219 we traveled along is known as Seneca Trail. A pleasant surprise around one bend was Indian Creek Covered Bridge, which was completed in 1903 at a cost of $400. The rest of the morning was spent passing farm after farm, including writer Pearl S. Buck’s birthplace in Hillsboro, West Virginia. For pancakes, we recommend Greenbrier Grille and Lodge, overlooking its namesake river in Marlinton.

Our last day involved riding from valley to ridge to valley. We followed curves along various creeks and branches of the Potomac River that snaked their way through the Appalachians. Eventually we had to leave the winding roads behind and hop on Interstate 66 to complete our multi-day loop. For Dad’s first ride east of the Mississippi, he was proud to see his tripmeter roll over 1,504 memorable miles.

A Father and Son Tour the Appalachians
The Indian Creek Covered Bridge on West Virginia Route 219.

The post Favorite Ride: Lapping the Appalachians first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory | First Ride Review

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The new Tuono V4 Factory is still an out-and-out hypernaked sport-bike, with upgraded suspension and new electronics. (Photos by Larry Chen Photo)

It was a glorious morning in Pasadena, California, and the huge windows overlooking historic Colorado Boulevard bathed Aprilia’s Advanced Design Center office in natural light. Miguel Galluzzi, whom many credit with saving Ducati when he designed the groundbreaking and immensely popular Monster, sat impassively as the room filled with journalists. Galluzzi is also the designer responsible for Aprilia’s RSV4 and Tuono V4 models, which take full advantage of the extremely compact and powerful 1,077cc V4 engine. 

Galluzzi explained that the Advanced Design Center allows his team to sit at the heart of the North American market, where proximity to a diverse group of riders and their viewpoints can be fed directly into their design process, fresh and unfiltered. The latest CAD technology and 3D printing allow design ideas inspired by feedback, coupled with cutting-edge advances trickling down from Aprilia’s factory racing team, to be prototyped and tested more efficiently than ever.  

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The two models – Tuono V4 Factory on left, Tuono V4 on right – are almost identical on paper, but offer different experiences.

The result, we are told, are the most advanced Tuono models yet, a combination of incremental updates designed to improve handling and accommodate a broad spectrum of riders’ needs. The V4 engine is now Euro 5 compliant, and with some tweaking Aprilia has managed to match the outgoing model’s performance. Claimed peak horsepower is 175 at 11,350 rpm and maximum torque is 89 lb-ft at 9,000 rpm.  

Influences from the racetrack include a redesigned fairing with integrated winglets and enhanced geometry to improve handling at the limits, as well as a new inverted swingarm designed to improve traction at the rear wheel. The updated seat is wider, longer, and surprisingly comfortable. A new sculpted fuel tank looks gorgeous and maintains the same 4.9-gallon capacity. The Tuono V4 gets an improved 5-inch TFT dash and new switchgear. The headlight array features the triple LED headlight and a DRL configuration common to the rest of the Tuono line, with the addition of cornering lights.  

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The Tuono V4 is designed to take you further, with all the thrills, added comfort, and even luggage, if required.

Despite being nearly identical on paper, the new Tuono V4 models are quite different in terms of experience. Track rats will be happy to hear that the V4 Factory model is still an out-and-out naked maniac, and is the more expensive, track-focused of the two. The street-focused Tuono V4 represents a new direction, designed to go places carrying more than just a rider and a bare minimum of gear. 

The Factory version is now fitted with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension and a new Magneti Marelli ECU, controlling fueling and a full suite of electronics. Four times faster than the previous ECU and fully integrated via ride-by-wire throttle and a six-axis IMU, the new setup promises more precise and programable handling for road and track. There are three preset and three track-oriented, user-programmable riding modes, and a host of adjustable rider aids, including traction control, wheelie control, launch control, engine mapping, engine braking, cornering ABS, cruise control, and an up/down quickshifter.   

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The Tuono V4 is billed as a naked, but a minimalist fairing now incorporates racing inspired winglets.

Siting astride the Factory, it feels much more compact than might be expected from a liter bike. The body position is definitely sporty, but the wide bars and seat feel roomy, even for my 6-foot 2-inch stature. Setting off in Tour mode, within the first few miles the V4 Factory somehow feels familiar. Even on the highway leading us to the twisty mountain roads, it is impossible to completely open the throttle for more than a moment before running out of road, and any true test of the Factory model would require a racetrack. 

Throttle response is immediate but initial ham-fistedness is miraculously smoothed out before I can get myself into trouble and I throw the Tuono into the turns with some confidence. Steering is light yet purposeful and exact, the front wheel holding its line despite less-than-perfect surface conditions. A single pop on the downshift raises a smile, and ballistic acceleration on corner exits, accompanied by one of the most fantastic, raspy exhaust notes ever to erupt from a stock can, leaves me grinning like an idiot.  

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The Tuono V4 Factory is nimble and precise, even on less than perfect roads.

The Factory is fitted with Brembo’s M50 monoblock front calipers, which offer progressive feel and no want of braking capability. With my knees firmly pocketed in the sculpted tank I can keep my weight off the bars, gripping the bike with less effort, and lean into corners with a connected conviction. The V4 Factory’s comfort and ergonomics compare quite well to rivals like the KTM 1290 Super Duke R and Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS, yet its sportbike credentials remain intact.  

The standard Tuono V4 feels similar. Slightly raised handlebars make for a less aggressive stance. Despite lower pillion pegs, the rider’s footpegs are identically placed on both models, providing plenty of clearance but also a potential source of fatigue over long distances. A slightly larger fly screen and upper fairing, a practical pillion seat, grab handles, and optional luggage all make for a hyper-naked sport-tourer, with a heavy emphasis on sport.  

Test Ride the 2021 Aprilia Tuono V4
Test Ride the 2021 Aprilia Tuono V4

Performance is identical to the Factory model, and the standard model will make a capable track-day machine if required. Its taller top gear makes for comfortable, economical highway cruising, as you make your way to the next winding backroad. The standard comes equipped with fully adjustable Sachs suspension, front and rear, but on the road, its handling is fairly close to that of the Factory. 

The new Tuono V4 and Tuono V4 Factory are intoxicating motorcycles. They offer astounding power in a compact, lightweight chassis that is exhilarating. And yet, thanks to its suite of adjustable electronics, they are both rewarding and manageable. And one can never forget – or grow tired of – the machine-gun salute connected to your right wrist. While the Factory will keep the Tuono faithful satisfied, the standard model will open up the Tuono range to a host of new riders, who, like me, actually want to go places and bring more than just our wallet and smartphone. 

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The new Tuono has a broader appeal. Track enthusiasts will love the factory for its suspension and formidable array of programable settings, while sports riders who like to cover miles can now add the Tuono V4 to their list of possibilities.

2021 Tuono V4 / Tuono V4 Factory Specs

Base Price: $15,999 / $19,499
Website: aprilia.com
Engine Type: Liquid cooled, transverse 65-degree V-4, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,077cc
Bore x Stroke: 81.0 x 52.3mm
Horsepower: 175 @ 11,000 rpm (claimed, at crank)
Torque: 89 lb-ft @ 9,000 rpm (claimed, at crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain
Wheelbase: 57.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.8 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 32.5 in.
Wet Weight: 461 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 4.9 gals. 

The post 2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | First Look

The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT – Finished in Liquid Metal

Now in its third generation, Yamaha’s middleweight sport-tourer — now called the Tracer 9 GT — is new from the ground up. It has a larger, more powerful engine, a new frame, and a state-of-the-art electronics package that includes semi-active suspension. With these updates comes a higher price, with MSRP now $14,899.

The 2021 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT – Finished in Redline

As the platform has evolved so has its name, starting with the original FJ-09 in 2015 and continuing with the Tracer 900 GT in 2019. For the latest update, the Tracer 9 GT gets a lightweight aluminum frame made using the latest casting technology to strategically reduce bulk. Like its predecessors, the new Tracer uses the inline triple from the MT-09, which is lighter, more fuel-efficient, and complies with Euro 5 emissions standards. An increase in displacement (890cc, up from 847cc) should yield more power and torque, though Yamaha does not quote figures. D-Mode now offers four presets for varying throttle response and power. The 6-speed transmission has an assist-and-slipper clutch and a new quickshifter.

Yamaha Tracer 900 GT – Side cases come standard

The focus on weight reduction continues to the longer, lighter, and stiffer swingarm, resulting in a slightly increased wheelbase, which should improve stability and traction, and new forged aluminum wheels also reduce unsprung mass for improved handling. Curb weight has been reduced by 18 pounds to a very reasonable 485 pounds.

The Tracer 9 GT gets a new lightweight aluminum frame and a newly designed engine.

The use of new technology wasn’t limited to design and development. The new Tracer 9 GT is fitted with an integrated electronic control package, enabling Yamaha to incorporate a number of new features. This includes a 6-axis IMU that continually feeds data to the new KYB semi-active suspension, which electronically adjusts rebound and compression damping in the fork and rebound in the rear shock in real-time to suit the terrain and conditions. It also stabilizes the chassis under braking and acceleration and offers two modes (Sport and Comfort).

The new Tracer GT gets KYB semi-active suspension

The IMU also feeds data to the new rider aids which can be adjusted to preference or completely turned off, these include lean angle-sensitive traction control, slide control, wheelie control, and cornering lights. The ABS is newly equipped with a brake control system, and riders can choose between two levels of intervention. Yamaha’s YCC-T throttle-by-wire system now includes Accelerator Position Sensor Grip (ASPG), which uses a sensor and a magnet to detect throttle opening and send corresponding signals to the throttle valves. ASPG uses a spring, slider, and gear to produce variable resistance to the grip creating a natural throttle feel. An additional D-Mode has been added providing four preset running modes that adjust throttle response and power. Cruise control and heated grips are standard.

The tracer 900 GT is equipped with two 3.5-inch TFT displays

As with the previous model, dual 298 mm discs provide the bulk of the stopping power, now with the addition of a new radial Nissin master cylinder, which promises a more linear supply of hydraulic pressure for excellent controllability.

The 2021 Tracer 900 GT is fitted with full LED and cornering light system.

Riders of various sizes will appreciate the Tracer 9 GT’s new adjustable footpegs, which along with the dual-height seat and adjustable handlebar on the previous model allow ergonomics to be customized.

With cruise control, a large windscreen, and standard hard saddlebags, the 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT is ready to hit the road. It’s available in Liquid Metal or Redline for $14,899, and it’s in dealerships now.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Specs

Base Price: $14,899
Website: yamahamotorsports.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, DOHC, inline 3-cylinder w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 890cc
Bore x Stroke: 78.0mm x 62.1mm
Transmission: 6-speed; multiplate assist and slipper clutch
Final Drive: Chain
Wheelbase: 59.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 25.0 degrees/4.3 in.
Seat Height: 31.9/32.5 in.
Wet Weight: 485 lbs. (claimed, does not include side cases)
Fuel Capacity: 5.0 gals.

The post 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT | First Look first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com