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2022 Indian Motorcycle Lineup | First Look Review

2022 Indian Motorcycle
The 2022 Indian Motorcycle lineup has been announced, covering Challenger, Chieftain, Roadmaster, Indian Springfield, and Scout models.

Indian came out of the gate early last year with an all-new Chief platform and a revised FTR lineup for the 2022 model year. The full 2022 Indian Motorcycle lineup features an updated Ride Command system and fine-tuned traction control on select models, as well as new colors and accessories.

RELATED: 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited | First Ride Review

RELATED: 2022 Indian FTR S | First Ride Review

2022 Indian Motorcycle
Indian’s Ride Command System has been updated for 2022.

Ride Command-equipped 2022 models now feature a speed limit overlay, reminding users of the current speed limit on a street-by-street basis. The system also benefits from faster loading times and expanded Bluetooth connectivity this year. The new features are included on 2022 models and available as a software update on 2020-2021 Indians.

2022 Indian Challenger

In addition to the robust Ride Command system, Indian also retuned the PowerPlus 111-powered Challenger’s traction control for smoother engagement. The platform has been refreshed with new colors as well.

Indian Challenger: Rider’s 2020 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Challenger
2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Challenger Limited
2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Challenger Dark Horse

The standard Challenger comes in Black Metallic and Titanium Smoke with an MSRP of $23,999. Starting at $27,999, the Challenger Limited is offered in Black Metallic, Maroon Metallic, Spirit Blue/Black Metallic paint options. The Challenger Dark Horse, on the other hand, retails for $28,499 in Black Smoke, Bronze Smoke, and Indy Red/Black Metallic colorways.

2022 Indian Springfield, Chieftain, and Roadmaster

Indian’s Thunder Stroke models also receive fresh liveries for the 2022 model year. Starting at $21,999, Springfield buyers can choose between Maroon Metallic/Crimson Metallic and Black Metallic/Dirt Track Tan color schemes. Additionally, the Black Smoke and Quartz Gray paint options complement the Springfield Dark Horse’s black finish and starts at $22,499.

2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Springfield
2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Springfield Dark Horse

The Chieftain goes back to basics with Black Metallic paint job and a $21,999 MSRP. However, at $27,999, the Chieftain Dark Horse amps up the options with Black Smoke, Ruby Smoke, and Quartz Gray paint jobs. The top-of-the-line Chieftain Limited commands $28,749 but sweetens the deal with premium Silver Quartz Metallic and Deepwater Metallic colorways.

2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Chieftain
2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Chieftain Dark Horse
2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Chieftain Limited

The Roadmaster returns in Black Metallic or Maroon Metallic/Crimson Metallic paint and costs $29,999. At $30,499, the Roadmaster Dark Horse boasts Black Smoke, Polished Bronze, and Silver Quartz Smoke liveries while the Roadmaster Limited comes with a $30,749 price tag and Black Azure Crystal and Crimson Metallic colorways.

2022 Indian Scouts

Indian doesn’t forget the Scout family either, bringing back the Scout (MSRP $$11,999), Scout Sixty (MSRP $9,999), Scout Bobber (MSRP $10,999), Scout Bobber Sixty (MSRP $8,999), and Scout Bobber Twenty (MSRP $11,999). The base-model Scout now features Black Metallic, White Smoke, Maroon Metallic, and Silver Quartz Metallic/Black Metallic paint while the Scout Sixty keeps it simple with Black Metallic and Storm Blue color schemes.

2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Scout
2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Scout Sixty
2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Scout Bobber Sixty

The Scout Bobber line take the paint options to the Nth degree with 2022 Scout Bobber Sixty offering Black Metallic, Black Smoke, Quartz Gray, and Ruby Smoke. The Scout Bobber now comes in Black Metallic, Alumina Jade Smoke, Maroon Metallic Smoke, Stealth Gray, Silver Quartz Smoke, and Titanium Metallic, while the Scout Bobber Twenty is available in Black Metallic, White Smoke, Maroon Metallic, and Silver Quartz Metallic/Black Metallic.

2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Scout Bobber
2022 Indian Motorcycle
2022 Indian Scout Bobber Twenty

Accessories

Along with the model updates, Indian expands its accessories catalog with Spirit Lake Luggage Collection, LED lighting add-ons, and hard fairing lowers for the Indian Challenger platform. The Scouts also benefit from the extensive collection with new piggyback rear shocks and a 5.75-inch Pathfinder Adaptive LED headlight.

2022 Indian Motorcycle
New Pathfinder Auxiliary LED Saddlebag Lights do not require any drilling, but rather feature a convenient peel-and-stick adhesive for easy and quick install.
2022 Indian Motorcycle
Indian’s new Spirit Lake Luggage Collection includes a Rack Bag, Day Bag and Touring Bag (shown).

For more information or to find a dealer near you, visit indianmotorcycle.com.

The post 2022 Indian Motorcycle Lineup | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Indian Announces 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Challenger Dark Horse

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Indian Motorcycle, America’s first motorcycle company, and Jack Daniel’s, America’s first registered distillery, along with Klock Werks Kustom Cycles, have partnered to create the 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse. Marking the sixth year of the partnership and limited-edition series, the latest model draws inspiration from Jack Daniel’s renowned Tennessee Rye whiskey.

RELATED: Indian Challenger, Rider’s 2020 Motorcycle of the Year

With only 107 available globally, the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse makes a one-of-a-kind statement. Its custom Rye Metallic paint with gold and green accents nod to the high-touch crafting process of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Rye whiskey, while the bike’s premium amenities and state-of-the-art technology deliver unmatched comfort and performance.

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

2022 Indian Challenger | Road Test Review

“We’re proud to continue this unique partnership with Jack Daniel’s and Klock Werks – two respected brands with whom we share the age-old American ethos of uncompromising quality and craftsmanship,” said Aaron Jax, Vice President for Indian Motorcycle. “The Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse takes our award-winning bagger to an even higher level, representing the highest levels of premium technology and craftsmanship – just as Jack Daniel’s has done with its Tennessee Rye whiskey.”

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

With custom-inspired style and technology at the forefront, key features for the 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse include the following:

Bold, Exclusive Design
The attention to detail and spirit of innovation that has made Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Rye whiskey a bold, unique success has been imparted throughout the design of the limited-edition motorcycle. Along with its custom paint, the motorcycle features a numbered Jack Daniel’s Montana Silversmiths badge, custom engraved rider and passenger floorboards, and a genuine leather, Jack Daniel’s custom-stitched seat.

Premium Amenities & Technology
Premium features aboard the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse, include a Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight and Pathfinder S LED Driving Lights, electronically adjustable rear suspension preload, Powerband Audio, a stylish flared windscreen, low-rise handlebar, and more.

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight and Pathfinder S LED Driving Lights
The adaptive headlight from Indian Motorcycle senses the bike’s lean angle and activates individual LED projector beams to provide unprecedented visibility. With 15 individual LED lenses that adjust in real-time to bike lean angle, patent pending technology, and the industry’s first adaptive high-beam feature, the Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight delivers unparalleled illumination of the road ahead – whether upright and traveling in a straight line or leaned over to carve a turn.

Fox Electronically Adjustable Rear Suspension Preload
The Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse has Fox electronically adjustable rear suspension preload which allows riders to adjust their rear suspension preload from the convenience of their infotainment system. To do this, riders will select if there’s a passenger and simply enter the approximate weight of what is being carried on the motorcycle. The electronically adjustable rear suspension preload handles the rest and sets the preload for optimal riding and handling. 

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Powerband Audio
Loud and clear. The Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse features the premier Indian Motorcycle sound system, Powerband Audio. With upgraded fairing speakers and added saddlebag speakers, Powerband Audio is up to 50% louder than stock audio.

Ride Command
Riders will also receive the luxuries of the Indian Motorcycle industry-leading seven-inch display powered by Ride Command with Apple CarPlay, which delivers an easier, more customized level of control for music, navigation preferences, and mobile device information. In addition, Ride Command provides riders with traffic and weather overlays, key vehicle information, and extensive customization capabilities.

PowerPlus Liquid-Cooled V-Twin
Featuring the liquid- cooled, 108-cubic-inch PowerPlus engine, the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse delivers a class-leading 122 horsepower and 128 lb-ft of torque.

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Riders looking to add custom style and improve sound can add a PowerPlus Stage 1 Air Intake with the Indian Motorcycle Stage 1 Oval Slip-On Muffler Kit. To unleash 10% more horsepower and 3% more torque, riders can upgrade to the Indian Motorcycle PowerPlus Stage 2 Performance Cams.

“Just as the Indian Challenger breaks the mold for American baggers, so does our Tennessee Rye for American whiskey with its unique distilling process and bold finish,” said Greg Luehrs, sponsorships and partnerships director for Jack Daniel’s. “This year’s bike perfectly embodies what our rye is all about – innovation and a relentless, uncompromising drive to craft American products of the highest quality.”

2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse review

Each Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse will come with a custom, co-branded bike mat with the corresponding motorcycle number (#001-#107).

Starting at $36,999, the Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse is exclusively available through Indian Motorcycle dealerships. The order window opens on October 21, 2021, at 12:00 p.m. EST, and will close once all bikes are sold. Each Indian Motorcycle dealer will have a chance to place orders during the window and will then contact the lucky buyers when the order has been confirmed. To ensure the rider is in contention for a purchase, each customer needs to fill out the form on IndianMotorcycle.com and contact their Indian Motorcycle dealership. Each bike will be built as a model year 2022 with delivery starting October 2021.

The post Indian Announces 2022 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Challenger Dark Horse first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year

2021 Motorcycle of the Year

Our first Motorcycle of the Year was awarded to the 1990 BMW K1, and for the past 31 years we’ve limited contenders to current model-year motorcycles that are new or significantly updated. In recent years, however, production timing and model-year designations have become more fluid.

And then there’s the economic shutdown last year caused by the pandemic, which disrupted the global supply chain for everything from toilet paper to semiconductors. Some manufacturers were forced to delay the release of certain models, while others skipped the 2021 model year altogether.

We’ve posted announcements of new/updated 2022 models as early as January of this year. And so far, we’ve ridden 2022 motorcycles from BMW, Honda, Indian, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha. To give all makes and models a fair shake during the calendar year when they are released and most relevant, eligible contenders for this year’s MOTY include any new/updated motorcycle released since last year’s award that are available for testing.

2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

There were plenty of motorcycles to consider, and we’ve narrowed them down to 10 contenders and one winner. Without further ado…

THE CONTENDERS

1) BMW R 18 B/Transcontinental

2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental review
2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental (Photo by Kevin Wing)

BMW entered the traditional cruiser segment in 2021 with the standard R 18 and windshield-and-saddlebags-equipped R 18 Classic, built around the 1,802cc “Big Boxer.” The 2022 R 18 B “Bagger” and R 18 Transcontinental are touring-ready with a batwing-style fairing, infotainment system, hard saddlebags, and a passenger seat, and the TC adds a top trunk with a passenger backrest.

Read our 2022 BMW R 18 B / Transcontinental review

2) Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250/Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review
2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Yes, pigs – or more accurately, hogs – can fly. The Motor Company shook up the hyper-competitive ADV segment when it introduced the 2021 Pan America 1250/Special. Powered by a 150-horsepower V-Twin and fully equipped with all the latest bells and whistles, it proved itself to be highly capable on- and off-road, and the optional Adaptive Ride Height is its killer app.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special review

3) Honda Gold Wing Tour/DCT

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review
2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Honda’s GL1800 won Rider’s MOTY when it debuted in 2001 and again when it was thoroughly overhauled in 2018. Updates for 2021 may seem minor, but they make all the difference when it comes to the two-up touring the Wing was designed for. The larger trunk holds more stuff, the improved passenger accommodations are appreciated, and the audio and styling updates add refinement.

Read our 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT review

4) Honda Rebel 1100/DCT

2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT review
2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The all-new Rebel 1100 is the sort of cruiser only Honda could make. It has styling like its smaller Rebel 300/500 siblings, a powerful engine adapted from the Africa Twin CRF1100L (including an optional 6-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission), ride modes and other electronics, well-damped suspension, good cornering clearance, modest weight, and a base price of just $9,299 (add $700 for DCT).

Read our 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT review

5) Kawasaki KLR650

2022 Kawasaki KLR650 review
2022 Kawasaki KLR650 (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The KLR is dead, long live the KLR! After a two-year absence, Kawasaki’s legendary dual-sport returns for 2022 with fuel injection (at last!), optional ABS, and other updates aimed at improving reliability, comfort, stability, load capacity, and user-friendliness. It remains one of the best deals on two wheels with a base price of $6,699.

Read our 2022 Kawasaki KLR650 Adventure review

6) KTM 890 Adventure R

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R review
2021 KTM 890 Adventure R (Photo by Kevin Wing)

KTM’s street-oriented 790 Adventure and off-road-ready 790 Adventure R shared Rider’s 2019 MOTY. Just two years later, the folks in Mattighofen kicked it up a notch with a larger, more powerful engine from the 890 Duke R, chassis updates, and tweaks to the suspension, brakes, and electronics, all of which contribute to the 890 Adventure R’s all-terrain capability.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R review

7) Indian Super Chief Limited

2022 Indian Super Chief Limited review
2022 Indian Super Chief Limited (Photo by Jordan Pay)

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the original Chief, Indian revamped its entire Chief lineup, with six models that strike a balance between old-school style and new-school technology. Powered by the Thunderstroke 116 V-Twin, the all-new Super Chief Limited has a quick-release windscreen, saddlebags, a two-up seat, ABS, and a Ride Command-equipped display.

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited review

8) Royal Enfield Meteor 350

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 review
2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Yes, the Meteor 350’s air-/oil-cooled Single makes just 18 horsepower and 18 lb-ft of torque. But rarely have we encountered a motorcycle that offers so much substance for so little money. In top-spec Supernova trim, the Meteor comes with ABS, turn-by-turn navigation, a two-up seat with a passenger backrest, a windshield, and a two-tone paint scheme for just $4,599.

Read our 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 review

9) Suzuki Hayabusa

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The former winner of the late-’90s top-speed wars got its first major update since 2008. Thanks to more grunt in the midrange, the Hayabusa’s updated 187-horsepower 1,340cc inline-Four helps it accelerate faster than ever before. Refined and reworked from nose to tail, the ’Busa has more aerodynamic bodywork, a full suite of IMU-enabled electronics, and much more.

Read our 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review

10) Yamaha Ténéré 700

2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 review
2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

Designed to be equally capable on- and off-road, Yamaha’s middleweight adventure bike is powered by a liquid-cooled, 689cc CP2 parallel-Twin and has a durable tubular-steel frame, adjustable long-travel suspension, switchable ABS, and spoked wheels in 21-inch front/18-inch rear sizes. Contributor Arden Kysely liked the T7 so much, he bought our test bike from Yamaha.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700 review

And the winner is…

Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT (Photos by Joseph Agustin)

For the better part of the past decade, the adventure bike segment has been the darling of the motorcycle industry, growing while other segments have been flat or declining and siphoning off R&D resources. With some adventure bikes making 150 horsepower or more, traditional sport-tourers have been all but neglected. Stalwarts such as the Honda ST1300, Kawasaki Concours 14, and Yamaha FJR1300 haven’t been updated in years.

That’s what makes the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT such a breath of fresh air. At less than 500 pounds fully fueled, it’s much easier to handle than the 600-plus-pound S-T bikes on the market. And with a claimed 115 horsepower on tap, there are few motorcycles that will leave it behind.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

We first tested the bike that would evolve into the Tracer 9 GT when Yamaha introduced the FJ-09 for 2015. At its heart was the liquid-cooled 847cc CP3 Triple from the FZ-09 – an absolute ripper of a motor. It had an ADV-ish upright seating position and wind-blocking handguards but rolled on 17-inch wheels with sport-touring rubber, while its windscreen, centerstand, and optional 22-liter saddlebags added touring capability. The FJ-09 was light and fun to ride, but it was held back by fueling issues, poorly damped suspension, and weak brakes.

Yamaha did its homework and gave its middleweight sport-tourer an overhaul for 2019, renaming it the Tracer 900 GT in the process. Updates included better throttle response, a longer swingarm for more stability, higher-quality suspension, a new TFT color display, and a larger, one-hand-adjustable windscreen. The saddlebags were made standard as were other features, such as cruise control, heated grips, and a quickshifter.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

Two years later, Yamaha went even further. For 2021, the new Tracer 9 GT gets the larger 890cc CP3 Triple from the MT-09, which is lighter, more fuel efficient, and more powerful. An all-new lightweight aluminum frame is made using a controlled-fill diecast process that reduces mass and increases rigidity. A new aluminum swingarm is longer and stronger, and a new steel subframe increases load capacity to 425 pounds and allows an accessory top trunk to be mounted along with the larger 30-liter saddlebags. New spinforged wheels reduce unsprung weight, and they’re shod with grippy Bridgestone Battlax T32 GT sport-touring tires.

In addition to updated throttle response modes and all-new KYB semi-active suspension, the Tracer 9 GT now has a 6-axis IMU that enables a suite of electronic rider aids adapted from the YZF-R1, including lean-angle-sensitive traction control, ABS, slide control, and lift control. It also has full LED lighting (including cornering lights) and a new dual-screen TFT display. The rider/passenger seats have been upgraded, and the rider’s ergonomics are adjustable.

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

We had an opportunity to test the Tracer 9 GT just before the MOTY polls closed, and it swept the field. Thanks to steady evolution and improvement over three generations, Yamaha has demonstrated just how good a modern sport-tourer can be, especially for riders who value agility over couch-like luxury. Performance, sophistication, comfort, versatility, load/luggage capacity – the Tracer checks all the right boxes and leaves nothing on the table.

Congratulations to Yamaha for the Tracer 9 GT, Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year!

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT review

The post Rider’s 2021 Motorcycle of the Year first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Motorcycles

This 2022 motorcycle buyers guide includes new or significantly updated street-legal models available in the U.S. It includes cruisers, sportbikes, retro-styled bikes, scooters, touring bikes, and more.

Organized in alphabetical order by manufacturer, it includes photos, pricing, key update info, and links to first looks and – when available – first rides, road tests, and video reviews of each motorcycle.

RELATED: 2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

2022 BMW C 400 GT

2022 BMW C 400 GT review
2022 BMW C 400 GT

Available in Europe since 2018, the 2022 BMW C 400 GT scooter receives updates and joins the U.S. lineup. As its Gran Turismo name implies, the GT is geared toward touring and comfort while still offering agility, twist-and-go user-friendliness, and generous underseat storage scooters are known for. The 350cc single-cylinder engine receives new Euro 5 emissions certification and delivers a claimed 34 horsepower at 7,500 rpm and 26 lb-ft of torque at 5,750 rpm. There are other updates to the engine, throttle-by-wire, traction control, and more. Base price is $8,495.

Read our 2022 BMW C 400 GT First Look Review

2022 BMW CE 04 Electric Scooter

2022 BMW CE 04 Electric Scooter review
2022 BMW CE 04

The 2022 BMW CE 04 scooter is part of BMW Motorrad’s “electromobility strategy.” It uses an innovative liquid-cooled, permanent-magnet electric motor mounted in the frame between the battery and the rear wheel. The motor is rated at 20 horsepower with a claimed maximum output of 42 horsepower, top speed is 75 mph, and 0-30 mph is achieved in 2.6 seconds. The CE 04 has a battery cell capacity of 60.6 Ah (8.9 kWh), providing a claimed range of 80 miles. Price and availability have not yet been announced. 

Read our 2022 BMW CE 04 Electric Scooter First Look Review

2022 BMW R 18 B

2022 BMW R 18 B R18B review
2022 BMW R 18 B

When BMW unveiled the R 18 last year, a cruiser powered by a massive 1,802cc OHV air/oil-cooled 4-valve opposed Twin that’s the largest “boxer” engine the German company has ever produced, it was only a matter of time before touring versions were added to the lineup. For 2022, BMW has announced the R 18 B “Bagger” (above) and R 18 Transcontinental (below). Both are equipped with a handlebar-mounted fairing with an infotainment system, a passenger seat, and locking hard saddlebags, and the Transcontinental adds a top trunk with an integrated passenger backrest. The 2022 BMW R 18 B is equipped with a low windshield, a slim seat (height is 28.3 inches), and a matte black metallic engine finish. Base price is $21,495.

Read our 2022 BMW R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental First Look Review

2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental

2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental review
2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental in Galaxy Dust metallic, an iridescent paint finish that shimmers in the spectrum from violet to turquoise blue, depending on the lighting

Like the R 18 B, the 2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental is equipped with a handlebar-mounted fairing with an infotainment system, a passenger seat, and locking hard saddlebags, and the Transcontinental adds a top trunk with an integrated passenger backrest. The 2022 BMW R 18 Transcontinental has a tall windshield, wind deflectors, driving lights, heated seats, highway bars, and an engine finished in silver metallic. Base price is $24,995.

Read our 2022 BMW R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental First Look Review

2022 Honda Grom

2022 Honda Grom SP review
2022 Honda Grom SP (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The lovable, popular Grom has been Honda‘s top-selling streetbike since it was introduced in 2014. Now in its third generation, the 2022 Honda Grom gets a revised engine, a new 5-speed transmission, a larger fuel tank, a thicker, flatter seat, and fresh styling. Large bolts on the bodywork and a new two-piece design for the down pipe and muffler make the Grom easier to customize. Base price is $3,399, and another $200 gets you ABS. The Honda Grom SP ($3,499, above) comes in Pearl White and includes special graphics, gold fork tubes, and gold wheels.

Read our 2022 Honda Grom First Ride Review

2022 Indian Chief

2022 Indian Chief review
2022 Indian Chief in Ruby Smoke

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Chief, Indian Motorcycle revamped the entire lineup. In a nod to post-WW2 Indians, the lineup includes an updated Chief and two new models: the Chief Bobber and the Super Chief. Up-spec models include the Chief Dark Horse, Chief Bobber Dark Horse, and Super Chief Limited.

All Indian Chiefs are powered by the air-cooled, 49-degree Thunderstroke V-Twin, in either 111ci (1,811cc) or 116ci (1,890cc) displacement, with 6-speed transmissions and belt final drive. Every model has a low 26-inch seat height, and standard equipment includes keyless ignition, ride modes, cruise control, rear cylinder deactivation, and LED lighting.

The modern, sporty 2022 Indian Chief (above) has cast wheels with a 19-inch front, a solo saddle, midmount foot controls, and a drag-style handlebar. It’s powered by the Thunderstroke 111 V-Twin that makes 108 lb-ft of torque, and ABS is optional. The Indian Chief is available in Black Metallic, Ruby Smoke, and White Smoke, and pricing starts at $14,499.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Indian Chief Dark Horse

2022 Indian Chief Dark Horse review
2022 Indian Chief Dark Horse in Black Smoke

Dark Horse models are known for their blacked-out finishes, dark paint, and minimalist styling. The 2022 Indian Chief Dark Horse has a Thunderstroke 116 V-Twin that belts out 120 lb-ft of torque. It also features a 4-inch round instrument panel with Ride Command, offering turn-by-turn navigation, Bluetooth connectivity, and more, as well as standard ABS. The Chief Dark Horse rolls on cast wheels (19-inch front, 16-inch rear) and is available in Black Smoke, Alumina Jade Smoke, and Stealth Gray. Pricing starts at $16,999.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Indian Chief Bobber

2022 Indian Chief Bobber review
2022 Indian Chief Bobber in Black Metallic

Following the success of the Scout Bobber, it’s only natural that Indian would add a variation to the Chief lineup. The 2022 Indian Chief Bobber has mini-ape hanger handlebars paired with forward foot controls for an upright riding position. Powered by the Thunderstroke 111, it rolls on 16-inch wire wheels, has fork and shock covers, a large headlight bucket wrapped in a nacelle, and a mix of chrome and black finishes. ABS is optional. The Indian Chief Bobber is available in Black Metallic and Ruby Metallic, pricing starts at $15,999.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Indian Chief Bobber Dark Horse

2022 Indian Chief Bobber Dark Horse review
2022 Indian Chief Bobber Dark Horse in Black Smoke

The 2022 Indian Chief Bobber Dark Horse gets the larger, more powerful Thunderstroke 116 V-Twin, the 4-inch display with Ride Command, and standard ABS. Sixteen-inch wheels have chrome spokes and gloss black rims, and nearly everything gets a menacing, blacked-out look. The Chief Bobber Dark Horse comes in Black Smoke, Titanium Smoke, and Sagebrush Smoke, and pricing starts at $18,999.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Indian FTR

2022 Indian FTR review
2022 Indian FTR in Black Smoke

For 2022, Indian‘s FTR lineup includes four models: FTR, FTR S, FTR R Carbon, and FTR Rally. The entire line gets an updated liquid-cooled 1,203cc V-Twin with a revised fuel map for better cold-start performance and throttle response, and rear-cylinder deactivation and revised heat channeling to improve comfort. The street-biased FTR, FTR S, and FTR R Carbon now roll on 17-inch cast-aluminum wheels with Metzeler Sportec rubber, and have less front/rear suspension travel, a lower 32.2-inch seat height, and a narrower ProTaper handlebar. The scrambler-themed FTR Rally is still equipped with wire-spoke 19- and 18-inch wheels and longer suspension travel.

The base-model 2022 Indian FTR (above) has fully adjustable Sachs suspension, with a 43mm inverted fork and a piggyback rear shock. It’s available in Black Smoke, and pricing starts at $12,999.

Read our 2022 Indian FTR Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian FTR S First Ride Review

2022 Indian FTR S

2022 Indian FTR S review
2022 Indian FTR S in Maroon Metallic (Photo by Jordan Pay)

The up-spec 2022 Indian FTR S features a Bluetooth ready 4.3-inch Ride Command touchscreen display, giving riders access to three selectable ride modes and IMU-supported rider aides like cornering ABS, traction control, wheelie control, rear-wheel lift mitigation, and stability control. Standard equipment includes a fast-charging USB port, an Akrapovič slip-on exhaust, and fully adjustable Sachs suspension. It’s available in Maroon Metallic (above) and White Smoke, and pricing starts at $14,999.

Read our 2022 Indian FTR Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian FTR S First Ride Review

2022 Indian FTR R Carbon

2022 Indian FTR R Carbon review
2022 Indian FTR R Carbon (Photo by Jordan Pay)

The top-of-the-line 2022 Indian FTR R Carbon stands apart from the crowd with a carbon fiber tank cover, fender, and headlight nacelle. It also has fully adjustable Öhlins suspension, a red frame, silver tailsection, black Akrapovič slip-on exhaust, a premium seat cover, and numbered badging. Pricing starts at $16,999.

Read our 2022 Indian FTR Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian FTR S First Ride Review

2022 Indian Super Chief

2022 Indian Super Chief review
2022 Indian Super Chief in Black Metallic

Ready to hit the road for days on end in comfort and style, the 2022 Indian Super Chief features a quick-release windscreen, saddlebags, a touring seat with passenger pad, floorboards, and traditional pullback handlebars. Like the Chief Bobber, the Super Chief is powered by the Thunderstroke 111 and has 16-inch wire wheels, a large headlight bucket with nacelle, fork covers, and optional ABS. Its fully chromed shotgun-style dual exhaust enhances its classic style. It’s available in Black Metallic and Pearl White, and pricing starts at $18,499.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Indian Super Chief Limited

2022 Indian Super Chief Limited review
2022 Indian Super Chief Limited in BlueSlate Metallic (Photo by Jordan Pay)

For touring riders who want more power, safety, and sophistication, the 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited features a quick-release windscreen, saddlebags, a touring seat with passenger pad, floorboards, and traditional pullback handlebars like the base-model Super Chief. The Limited adds the Thunderstroke 116 V-twin, standard ABS, and a 4-inch round display with Bluetooth-connected Ride Command. Chrome finishes and rich metallic paint make the Super Chief Limited extra special. It comes in Black Metallic, BlueSlate Metallic, and Maroon Metallic, and pricing starts at $20,999.

Read our 2022 Indian Chief Lineup First Look Review

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited First Ride Review

2022 Kawasaki KLR650

2022 Kawasaki KLR650 review
2022 Kawasaki KLR650 in Pearl Lava Orange

As far as dual-sport motorcycles go, the Kawasaki KLR650 is the stuff of legend. We’re big fans of the KLR, and when it was dropped from Kawasaki’s lineup we wrote a heartfelt requiem for our old friend. After a brief retirement, the 2022 Kawasaki KLR650 returns with some major upgrades, including a fuel-injected (finally!) liquid-cooled 652cc Single that promises increased reliability and fuel efficiency and optional ABS.

Four versions are available:

  • KLR650 (MSRP: $6,699; Pearl Sand Khaki and Pearl Lava Orange)
  • KLR650 ABS ($6,999; Pearl Sand Khaki)
  • KLR650 Traveler ($7,399; Pearl Lava Orange; equipped with factory-installed top case, 12V power outlet, and USB socket)
  • KLR650 Adventure (Non-ABS MSRP: $7,699, ABS MSRP: $7,999; Cypher Camo Gray; equipped with factory-installed side cases, LED auxiliary light set, engine guards, tank pad, 12V power outlet and USB socket)

Read our 2022 Kawasaki KLR650 First Look Review

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 review
2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000

The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is a naked sportbike powered by an updated version of the liquid-cooled 999cc inline Four from the K5 (2005-2008) GSX-R1000. It gets more aggressive, angular styling with stacked LED headlights and MotoGP-inspired winglets, a new 4-2-1 exhaust system, a new slipper clutch, and the Suzuki Intelligent Ride System. An updated seat design, new wheels shod with new Dunlop Roadsport 2 tires, revised instrumentation and switches, and a new larger fuel tank (5 gallons, up from 4.5) round out the changes. The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is available in Metallic Triton Blue, Metallic Matte Mechanical Gray, and Glass Sparkle Black. Price is TBD.

Read our 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 First Look Review

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa review
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Now in its third generation with its first update since 2008, the legendary 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa gets a thoroughly revised liquid-cooled 1,340cc inline that makes 187 horsepower at 9,750 rpm and a whopping 110 lb-ft of torque at 7,000 rpm. Peak figures are lower, but there’s more grunt in the midrange, and the latest Hayabusa accelerates faster than its predecessor. The Hayabusa has been updated and refined from nose to tail, with new styling and instrumentation, an IMU-enabled Suzuki Intelligent Ride System, and much more. Available in Glass Sparkle Black and Candy Burnt Gold; Metallic Matte Sword Silver and Candy Daring Red; and Pearl Brilliant White and Metallic Matte Stellar Blue, pricing for the 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa starts at $18,599.

Read our 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa First Ride Review

Watch our 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa Video Review

2022 Triumph Bonneville Bobber

2022 Triumph Bonneville Bobber review
2022 Triumph Bonneville Bobber

For 2022, Triumph has given performance, technological, and visual updates to its entire Modern Classic lineup, which includes the iconic Bonneville T100, Bonneville T120 and T120 Black, Street Twin and Street Twin Gold Line, Bonneville Bobber, and Speedmaster models.

Triumph has merged the Bobber and up-spec Bobber Black into one single model, the 2022 Triumph Bonneville Bobber. Like other models in the Bonneville lineup, the Bobber’s “high-torque” 1,200cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin gets a lighter crankshaft and mass-optimized clutch and counterbalancers. It also gets a larger 3-gallon fuel tank, an upgraded fork, a chunky front wheel, dual Brembo front calipers, standard cruise control and ABS, a new LED headlight, and some styling updates. The Bobber is available in Jet Black, Cordovan Red, and Matte Storm Grey and Matte Ironstone two-tone (above). Pricing starts at $13,150.

Read our 2022 Triumph Bonneville Lineup First Look Review

2022 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

2022 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster review
2022 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

The 2022 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster gets an updated “high-torque” 1,200cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin, refined riding modes (Road and Rain), a larger-diameter and higher-spec 47mm Showa cartridge fork, improved rider and passenger seating, and updated instrumentation. The Speedmaster is available in Jet Black, Red Hopper, and two-tone Fusion White and Sapphire Black with hand-painted twin coach lines (above). Pricing starts at $13,150.

Read our 2022 Triumph Bonneville Lineup First Look Review

2022 Triumph Bonneville T100

2022 Triumph Bonneville T100 review
2022 Triumph Bonneville T100

The 2022 Triumph Bonneville T100’s Euro 5-compliant “high-torque” 900cc parallel-Twin boasts an additional 10 ponies, bringing its claimed figures up to 64 horsepower at 7,400 rpm and 59 lb-ft of torque at 3,750 rpm. The engine also gets a lighter crankshaft, mass-optimized clutch and counterbalancers, a magnesium cam cover, and a thin-walled clutch cover, which together reduce curb weight by 8 pounds. The T100 also gets an upgraded fork, new instrumentation, and some styling tweaks. The Bonneville T100 is available in Jet Black, two-tone Lucerne Blue and Fusion White (above), and two-tone Carnival Red and Fusion White. Pricing starts at begins at $10,500.

Read our 2022 Triumph Bonneville Lineup First Look Review

2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 / T120 Black

2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 Black review
2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 Black

The 2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 and T120 Black get engine updates, less weight (520 pounds wet, down 15.5), and other updates. The “high-torque” 1,200cc liquid-cooled parallel-Twin gets a lighter crankshaft and mass-optimized clutch and counterbalancers. The big Bonnies get cruise control, new Brembo front calipers, refined riding modes (Road and Rain), and aesthetic upgrades. Pricing for the 2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 and T120 Black (above) starts at $12,050.

Read our 2022 Triumph Bonneville Lineup First Look Review

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 Black

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R Black review
2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R Black

Limited to 1,000 units worldwide, the 2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R Black gives the 2,458cc mega cruiser an even leaner-and-meaner look. It features an aggressive all-black colorway that focuses on matte finishes, darkened tank badging, a carbon fiber front fender, and blacked-out components from nose-to-tail, and it comes with a certificate of authenticity. Pricing starts at $23,700.

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R Black and Rocket 3 GT Triple Black Announced

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 GT Triple Black

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 GT Triple Black review
2022 Triumph Rocket 3 GT Triple Black

Also limited to 1,000 units worldwide, the 2022 Triumph Rocket 3 GT Triple Black applies the dark treatment to the touring version, with a high-gloss three-shade paint scheme, a carbon fiber front fender, and blacked-out components. It comes with a certificate of authenticity that lists each motorcycle’s VIN. And its enormous 2,458cc inline Triple produces 167 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and a 163 lb-ft of torque at 4,000 rpm. Pricing starts at $24,400.

2022 Triumph Rocket 3 R Black and Rocket 3 GT Triple Black Announced

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC review
2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC

Also built on Triumph‘s Bonneville platform, the 2022 Scrambler 1200 XC, Scrambler 1200 XE, and Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition are powered by a “high power” version of Triumph’s liquid-cooled, 1,200cc parallel-Twin that’s been updated to meet Euro 5 emissions regulations, which includes a revised exhaust system that offers improved heat distribution. With a dedicated Scrambler tune, it makes 89 horsepower at 7,250 rpm and 81 lb-ft of torque at 4,500 rpm. All three models have a 21-inch front wheel, side-laced tubeless wheels, and nearly 10 inches of suspension travel.

The 2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC is available in Sapphire Black ($14,000), two-tone Cobalt Blue and Jet Black ($14,500, above), and two-tone Matte Khaki Green and Matte Black ($14,500).

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC, XE and Steve McQueen Edition First Look Review

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE / Steve McQueen Edition

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen review
2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition

Receiving the same updates as the XC, the higher-spec 2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE adds an Off-Road Pro mode and cornering-optimized ABS and traction control. It’s available in Sapphire Black ($15,400), two-tone Cobalt Blue and Jet Black ($15,900), and two-tone Matte Khaki Green and Matte Black ($15,900).

Limited to 1,000 in individually numbered units worldwide and based on the XE, the 2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition (above) honors the King of Cool with unique Steve McQueen branding on the tank and handlebar clamp, an exclusive Competition Green custom paint scheme, premium Scrambler accessories fitted as standard, and a certificate of authenticity with signatures from Triumph’s CEO, Nick Bloor, and Chad McQueen. Pricing starts at $16,400.

2022 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC, XE and Steve McQueen Edition First Look Review

2022 Triumph Speed Twin

2022 Triumph Speed Twin review
2022 Triumph Speed Twin

The 2022 Triumph Speed Twin gets similar engine updates as the rest of the Bonneville family, and its “high power” liquid-cooled, 1,200cc parallel-twin makes 98.6 horsepower at 7,250 rpm and 83 lb-ft of torque at 4,250 rpm. To improve handling, the Speed Twin gets a higher-spec Marzocchi inverted cartridge fork, Brembo M50 monoblock calipers, lighter cast aluminum 12-spoke wheels, and Metzeler Racetec RR tires. Styling has also been refreshed. The Speed Twin is available in Red Hopper (above), Matte Storm Grey, and Jet Black. Pricing starts at $12,500.

Read our 2022 Triumph Speed Twin First Look Review

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler

2022 Triumph Street Scrambler review
2022 Triumph Street Scrambler Sandstorm Edition

As with other Bonneville models, the 2022 Triumph Street Scrambler’s liquid-cooled 900cc parallel-twin has been updated to meet Euro 5 emissions yet it still delivers 64 horsepower at 7,250 rpm and 59 lb-ft of torque at 3,250 rpm. Styling updates include a new side panel with aluminum number board, a new heel guard, new brushed aluminum headlight brackets, new adventure-oriented seat material, new throttle body finishers, and new paint schemes. The Street Scrambler is available in Jet Black, Urban Grey, and two-tone Matte Khaki and Matte Ironstone; pricing starts at $11,000.

Limited to 775 units worldwide, the Scrambler Sandstorm Edition (above) has a unique paint scheme, premium accessories (high front fender, tail tidy, sump guard, headlight grille, and rubber knee pads on the tank), and a certificate of authenticity personalized with the bike’s VIN. Pricing starts at $11,750.

Read our 2022 Triumph Street Scrambler First Look Review

2022 Triumph Street Twin / Street Twin Gold Line

2022 Triumph Street Twin review
2022 Triumph Street Twin

Heralded as Triumph’s best-selling Modern Classic, the 2022 Triumph Street Twin gets an updated engine, new cast wheels, and updated styling. Featuring the same updated “high-torque” 900cc liquid-cooled parallel-twin as the T100, the Street Twin now boasts 64 horsepower at 7,500 rpm and 59 lb-ft of torque at 3,800 rpm. New 18- and 17-inch 10-spoke cast-aluminum wheels are fitted with Pirelli Phantom Sportcomp tires. The Street Twin is available in Cobalt Blue (above), Matte Ironstone, and Jet Black. Pricing starts at $9,400.

Limited to 1,000 units worldwide, the 2022 Triumph Street Twin Gold Line features a Matte Sapphire Black colorway with a Triumph heritage logo and hand-painted gold lining. Pricing starts at $10,150.

Read our 2022 Triumph Bonneville Lineup First Look Review

2022 Yamaha YZF-R7

2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 review
2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The all-new 2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 is a 689cc sportbike based on the MT-07 platform, slotting between the YZF-R3 and YZF-R1. It features an slip/assist clutch, an optional quickshifter, chassis upgrades, and all-new bodywork. The R7 delivers track-ready performance within reach, with an MSRP of $8,999. Available in Team Yamaha Blue (above) and Performance Black.

Read our 2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 First Ride Review

Watch our 2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 Video Review

The post 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Motorcycles first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

This 2021 motorcycle buyers guide includes new or significantly updated street-legal models available in the U.S. It includes bikes in many categories, including adventure, cafe racer, cruiser, sport, sport-touring, retro, touring, and others.

Organized in alphabetical order by manufacturer, it includes photos and links to details or, when available, first rides and road test reviews of each motorcycle. Due to the pandemic and supply chain disruptions, some manufacturers skipped the 2021 model year. Stay tuned for our 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide.

RELATED: 2020 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

2021 Aprilia RS 660

2021 Aprilia RS 660
2021 Aprilia RS 660 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Aprilia‘s RS 660 is the first of three models — the RS 660 sportbike, the Tuono 660 naked bike (below), and the not-yet-released Tuareg 660 adventure bike — built on a new engine platform, a liquid-cooled 659cc parallel-Twin with a 270-degree firing order that makes a claimed 100 horsepower at 10,500 rpm and 49.4 lb-ft of torque at 8,500 rpm. The RS 660 is equipped with the IMU-enabled APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) electronics package with five ride modes, 3-level cornering ABS, 3-level traction control, wheelie control, cruise control, and engine braking management. Pricing starts at $11,299.

Read our 2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Aprilia RS 660 Video Review

2021 Aprilia RSV4 / RSV4 Factory

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory
2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

Aprilia is an Italian brand known for performance, and the RSV4 and RSV4 Factory are at the pointy end of the company’s go-fast spear. Both are powered by a 1,099cc, 65-degree V-4 that Aprilia says cranks out an eye-watering 217 horsepower at 13,000 rpm and 92 lb-ft of torque at 10,500 rpm, even while meeting strict Euro 5 emissions regulations. And both are equipped with a 6-axis IMU and the APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) suite of rider aids. Whereas the standard RSV4 features fully adjustable Sachs suspension, the RSV4 Factory is equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension, with a 43mm NIX upside-down fork, a TTX rear shock, and an electronic steering damper. The RSV4 has cast wheels and the RSV4 Factory has lighter and stronger forged wheels. MSRP for the RSV4 is $18,999 and MSRP for the RSV4 Factory is $25,999.

Read our 2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory First Ride Review

2021 Aprilia Tuono 660

2021 Aprilia Tuono 660
2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

Based on the RS 660 (above), the Aprilia Tuono 660 is a semi-naked sportbike with a more upright seating position, and more street-oriented steering geometry. Its base price is $10,499.

Read our 2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 Video Review

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Tuono V4 Factory

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4
2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

The Tuono name has always been associated with top-of-the-line street performance, and the Aprilia Tuono V4 and Tuono V4 Factory carry the cred with a 1,077cc V-4 that produces 175 horsepower and 89 lb-ft of torque at the crank (claimed). The Tuono V4 is the more street-focused of the two, with a taller windscreen, a higher handlebar, and optional saddlebags (as shown above), and it is equipped with fully adjustable Sachs suspension. The Tuono V4 Factory is equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension. Both models feature a six-axis IMU that supports the APRC electronics suite. MSRP for the Tuono V4 is $15,999 and MSRP for the Tuono V4 Factory is $19,499.

Read our 2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory First Ride Review

2021 Benelli Leoncino / Leoncino Trail

2021 Benelli Leoncino
2021 Benelli Leoncino (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The Benelli Leoncino (“little lion”) is an Italian-designed, Chinese-manufactured roadster powered by a liquid-cooled 500cc parallel-Twin also found in the TRK502X adventure bike (below). In the U.S., the Leoncino is part of a two-bike lineup, which includes the standard street-biased roadster model (shown above) and the Leoncino Trail, a scrambler variant with more suspension travel and spoked wheels with a 19-inch front and 90/10 adventure tires. The Leoncino comes with standard ABS and is priced at $6,199, while the Leoncino Trail is $7,199.

Read our 2021 Benelli Leoncino Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Benelli Leoncino Video Review

2021 Benelli TRK502X

2021 Benelli TRK502X
2021 Benelli TRK502X (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Like the Leoncino above, the Benelli TRK502X is an Italian-designed, Chinese-manufactured adventure bike powered by a liquid-cooled 500cc parallel-Twin. It has a comfortable and upright seating position, a good windscreen, 90/10 adventure tires with a 19-inch front, spoked wheels, ABS, hand and engine guards, and enough luggage capacity to go the distance (aluminum panniers and top box are standard). MSRP is $7,398.

Read our 2021 Benelli TRK502X Road Test Review

2021 BMW R 18 / R 18 First Edition

2021 BMW R 18 First Edition
2021 BMW R 18 First Edition (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The BMW R 18 is a cruiser powered by a massive 1,802cc OHV air/oil-cooled 4-valve opposed Twin that’s the largest “boxer” engine the German company has ever produced. Part of BMW’s Heritage line, the R 18 has styling inspired by the 1930s-era R 5. Despite its classic looks, the long, low cruiser is equipped with fully modern electronics, brakes, suspension, and other features. Base price is $17,495. BMW recently announced two touring versions for the 2022 model year, the R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental, both with a fairing, hard saddlebags, and an infotainment system; the Transcontinental adds a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

Read our 2021 BMW R 18 First Edition Road Test Review

2021 Ducati Monster

2021 Ducati Monster
2021 Ducati Monster (Photo by Gregor Halenda and Mike Levin)

The Ducati Monster is one of the Italian manufacturer’s most iconic and best-selling models. Gone is the trademark tubular-steel trellis frame, replaced with a front-frame design that uses the engine as a structural member of the chassis, as on the Panigale and Streetfighter V4 models. Compared to the previous Monster 821, the new model weighs 40 pounds less and is equipped with a more powerful 937cc Testastretta 11-degree L-Twin engine and top-shelf electronics. New styling and more make this an all-new Monster. Pricing starts at $11,895 for the Monster and $12,195 for the Monster+, which adds a flyscreen and passenger seat cover.

Read our 2021 Ducati Monster First Ride Review

2021 Ducati Multistrada V4

2021 Ducati Multistrada V4
2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 (Photo by Mike Levin)

Another top-selling Ducati is the Multistrada adventure bike. For 2021, it is now the Multistrada V4 and it is powered by the 1,158cc 90-degree V4 Grandturismo engine that makes 170 horsepower at 10,500 rpm and stomping 92 lb-ft torque at 8,750 rpm (claimed). Ducati Skyhook semi-active suspension and a full suite of IMU-supported electronics are standard, and S models are equipped with a radar system that enables Adaptive Cruise Control and Blind Spot Detection. New for 2021 is a 19-inch front wheel. Pricing starts at $19,995 for the Multistrada V4 and $24,095 for the Multistrada V4 S.

Read our 2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 S First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 S Video Review

2021 Ducati SuperSport 950

2021 Ducati SuperSport 950
2021 Ducati SuperSport 950

Updates to the Ducati SuperSport 950 include new styling inspired by the Panigale V4, an IMU-enabled electronics package, and improved comfort. The seat is flatter and has more padding, the handlebar is higher, and the footpegs are lower. The SuperSport 950 is powered by a 937cc Testastretta L-Twin that makes 110 horsepower at 9,000 rpm and 68.6 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm (claimed, at the crank). The SuperSport 950 is available in Ducati Red for $13,995. The SuperSport 950 S, which is equipped with fully adjustable Öhlins suspension and a passenger seat cover, is available in Ducati Red and Arctic White Silk starting at $16,195.

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival
2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival

Earlier this year Harley-Davidson announced its new Icons Collection. The first model in the collection is the stunning Electra Glide Revival, which is inspired by the 1969 Electra Glide, the first Harley-Davidson motorcycle available with an accessory “batwing” fairing. Though retro in style, the Electra Glide Revival is powered by a Milwaukee Eight 114 V-twin and is equipped with RDRS Safety Enhancements and a Boom! Box infotainment system. Global production of the Electra Glide Revival is limited to a one-time build of 1,500 serialized examples, with an MSRP of $29,199.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 114

2021 Harley-Davidson Softail Fat Boy 114
2021 Harley-Davidson Softail Fat Boy 114

With its iconic solid aluminum 18-inch Lakester wheels, for 2021 Harley-Davidson gave the Fat Boy 114 a new look with lots of chrome and bright work. Powering the Fat Boy is none other than the torquey Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-twin engine, equipped with a 6-speed gearbox and putting down a claimed 119 ft-lb of torque at just 3,000 rpm. Pricing starts at $19,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 114 First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 / Pan America 1250 Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

A competitive, state-of-the-art, 150-horsepower adventure bike built by Harley-Davidson? Yea, right, when pigs fly! Well, the Motor Company came out swinging with its Pan America 1250 and Pan America 1250 Special. Powered by the all-new Revolution Max 1250, a liquid-cooled, 1,252cc, 60-degree V-Twin with DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, and variable valve timing. The killer app is the optional Adaptive Ride Height, which lowers the higher-spec Pan America 1250 Special (which is equipped with semi-active Showa suspension) by 1 to 2 inches when the bike comes to a stop. Pricing starts at $17,319 for the Pan America 1250 and $19,999 for the Pan America 1250 Special.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special Video Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special
2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special

For Harley-Davidson Touring models like the Road Glide, Road King, and Street Glide, there are Special models that offer a slammed look and 119 lb-ft of torque from the Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-Twin. The 2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special is available with new two-tone paint options, and with a choice of a blacked-out or bright chrome styling treatments. All Special models are now equipped with the high-performance Ventilator air cleaner with a washable filter element, and a new low-profile engine guard. Pricing starts at $26,699.

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S
2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S

The (air-cooled) Sportster is dead, long live the (liquid-cooled) Sportster! Visually similar to the 1250 Custom teased several years ago, the 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S represents a new era for the legendary Sportster line. Since the introduction of the XL model family in 1957, Sportsters have always been stripped-down motorcycles powered by air-cooled V-Twins. Harley calls the new Sportster S a “sport custom motorcycle,” and at the heart of the machine is a 121-horsepower Revolution Max 1250T V-Twin, a lightweight chassis, and premium suspension. Pricing starts at $14,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114
2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114

The Street Bob, with its mini-ape handlebar, mid-mount controls, and bobber-style fenders, has become a fan favorite among those looking for a minimalist American V-twin to customize. The 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114 packs more punch, thanks to the larger, torque-rich Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine. Pricing starts at $14,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114 First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special
2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special

With a slammed look and 119 lb-ft of torque from the Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-Twin, the 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special is available with new two-tone paint options, and with a choice of a blacked-out or bright chrome styling treatments. All Special models are now equipped with the high-performance Ventilator air cleaner with a washable filter element, and a new low-profile engine guard. Pricing starts at $27,099.

Harley-Davidson Unveils Arctic Blast Limited Edition Street Glide Special

2021 Honda ADV150

2021 Honda ADV150
2021 Honda ADV150 (Photo by Joseph McKimmey)

The 2021 Honda ADV150 is an ADV-styled scooter, essentially a Honda PCX150 with longer travel Showa suspension (5.1/4.7 inches front/rear) and a larger ABS-equipped 240mm disc brake at the bow and a drum brake without ABS in the stern. Its powered by a liquid-cooled 149cc Single and has an automatic V-matic transmission. Pricing starts at $4,199.

Read our 2021 Honda ADV150 First Ride Review

2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP

2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP
2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Well-mannered motorcycles seldom make racing history, and the 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP was developed with one uncompromising goal — win superbike races at all costs. It’s powered by an inline-Four that we dyno tested at 175 horsepower at the rear wheel, and it’s equipped with Öhlins semi-active suspension, IMU-enabled electronics, and top-shelf braking hardware. And it’s street legal and available for purchase from your local Honda dealer. MSRP is $28,500.

Read our 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP Video Review

2021 Honda CRF300L

2021 Honda CRF300L
2021 Honda CRF300L (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The 2021 Honda CRF300L (above) and CRF300L Rally (below) dual-sports share the same powerplant, a liquid-cooled 286cc Single which boasts 15% more displacement, power, and torque than its 250cc predecessor. They have a new slip/assist clutch, revised steering geometry, less weight, and a new LCD meter. The CRF300L has a base price of $5,249 (add $300 for ABS), weighs 309 pounds, has a 2.1-gallon tank, and has a 34.7-inch seat height.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally First Ride Review

2021 Honda CRF300L Rally

2021 Honda CRF300L Rally
2021 Honda CRF300L Rally (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally (above) dual-sports share the same powerplant, a liquid-cooled 286cc Single which boasts 15% more displacement, power, and torque than its 250cc predecessor. They have a new slip/assist clutch, revised steering geometry, less weight, and a new LCD meter. The CRF300L Rally, which has a windscreen, handlebar weights, rubber footpeg inserts, a larger front brake rotor, more seat padding, and a larger fuel tank (3.4 gallons vs. 2.1) than the CRF300L, has a base price of $5,999 (add $300 for ABS), weighs 333 pounds, and has a 35.2-inch seat height.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally First Ride Review

2021 Honda CRF450RL

2021 Honda CRF450RL
2021 Honda CRF450RL (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The Honda CRF450L debuted for 2019, bringing CRF450R motocross performance to a street-legal dual-sport. Its lightweight, compact, liquid-cooled 449cc single has a 12:1 compression ratio and a Unicam SOHC valve train with titanium valves. For 2021, Honda added an “R” to the model name (CRF450RL), lowered the price to $9,999 (from $10,399), revised the ECU and fuel-injection settings for better throttle response, and added new hand guards and fresh graphics.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF450RL Review

2021 Honda Gold Wing / Gold Wing DCT

2021 Honda Gold Wing
2021 Honda Gold Wing

The Gold Wing has been Honda‘s flagship touring model for more than 40 years. It entered its sixth generation for the 2018 model year, with a complete overhaul to the GL1800 platform that made it lighter, sportier, and more technologically advanced. The standard Gold Wing (above) and trunk-equipped Gold Wing Tour (below) won Rider‘s 2018 Motorcycle of the Year award. Gold Wing updates for 2021 include a suede-like seat cover, colored seat piping, audio improvements, and red rear turnsignals. Pricing starts at $23,800 for the Gold Wing and $25,100 for the Gold Wing DCT (with 7-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission).

Read our 2021 Honda Gold Wing First Look Review

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour / Gold Wing Tour DCT

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT
2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Updates for the Honda Gold Wing Tour include the same ones listed above for the standard Gold Wing: a suede-like seat cover, colored seat piping, audio improvements, and red rear turnsignals. But the Tour also got a larger top trunk (61 liters, up from 50) that now easily accepts two full-face helmets; total storage capacity is now 121 liters. The passenger seat’s backrest features a more relaxed angle, thicker foam, and a taller profile. Pricing starts at $23,800 for the Gold Wing and $25,100 for the Gold Wing DCT (with 7-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission).

Read our 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT First Ride Review

2021 Honda Rebel 1100 / Rebel 1100 DCT

2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT
2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Joining the Rebel 300 and Rebel 500 in Honda‘s cruiser lineup for 2021 is the all-new Rebel 1100, which is powered by powered by a version of the liquid-cooled 1,084cc parallel-twin used in the 2020 Africa Twin, which uses a Unicam SOHC valve train and is available with either a 6-speed manual gearbox or a 6-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission. Standard equipment includes four ride modes (Standard, Sport, Rain and User, which is customizable), Honda Selectable Torque Control (aka traction control, which has integrated wheelie control), engine brake control, and cruise control. Pricing starts at $9,299 for the Rebel 1100 and $9,999 for the Rebel 1100 DCT.

Read our 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT First Ride Review

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS
2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The latest addition to Honda‘s miniMOTO lineup is the Trail 125 ABS, which is powered by the same air-cooled 125cc Single found in the Grom, Monkey, and Super Cub C125. Like the Monkey and Super Cub, the Trail plays the retro card, pulling at heartstrings for a bike beloved by many decades ago. Just like its forefathers, the 2021 Honda Trail 125 proudly carries on the tradition of being a quaint and understated dual-sport, with a steel backbone frame, upright handlebar, square turnsignals, upswept exhaust, high-mount snorkel, and luggage rack. MSRP is $3,899.

Read our 2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS First Ride Review

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited
2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited (Photo by Kevin Wing)

For 2021, the Indian Roadmaster Limited gets the larger 116ci Thunder Stroke V-Twin versus the original 111, and it has a modern streamlined fairing, open front fender, and slammed saddlebags. As a premium touring model, the Roadmaster Limited also gets Indian’s heated and cooled ClimaCommand seats and other upgrades. Pricing starts at $30,749.

Read our 2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited Tour Test Review

2021 Kawasaki KLX300

2021 Kawasaki KLX300
2021 Kawasaki KLX300 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Like the Honda CRF300L above, Kawasaki‘s entry-level dual-sport got a displacement boost, which warranted a name change from KLX250 to KLX300. The 2021 KLX300 makes more thanks to a larger 292cc Single, which is liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, and has DOHC with four valves. It also uses more aggressive cam profiles, making it livelier than its predecessor. All of that is paired to a 6-speed gearbox and 14/40 final drive. Pricing starts at $5,599. And joining the KLX300 is a supermoto version, the KLX300SM (below).

Read our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM Video Review

2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM

2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM
2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Joining the KLX300 dual-sport (above) in Kawasaki‘s 2021 lineup is an all-new supermoto version, the KLX300SM. It has street-oriented 17-inch wire-spoke wheels and IRC Road Winner RX-01 rubber, and the suspension is stiffer with slightly abbreviated travel. The KLX300SM also has taller final-drive gearing and a larger front brake rotor. Pricing starts at $5,599.

Read our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM Video Review

2021 KTM 450 SMR

2021 KTM 450 SMR
2021 KTM 450 SMR (Photo by Casey Davis)

Speaking of supermoto, KTM‘s track-only, race-ready 450 SMR is back for 2021. Using the 450 SX-F motocross racer as its foundation, the SMR shares its 63-horsepower 450cc single-cylinder SOHC engine, lightweight steel frame, and cast-aluminum swingarm. To suit its supermoto purpose, wider triple clamps with a 16mm offset accommodate tubeless Alpina wheels (16.5-inch front and 17-inch rear) fitted with ultra-sticky Bridgestone Battlax Supermoto slicks. The WP Xact suspension is updated, reducing suspension travel to an ample 11.2 inches in the front and 10.5 inches in the rear, lowering the bike’s center of gravity and improving handling. A radially mounted Brembo M50 front caliper squeezes a 310mm Galfer floating rotor to deliver all the braking power you’ll ever need on a bike that weighs just 232 pounds wet. MSRP is $11,299.

Read our 2021 KTM 450 SMR First Ride Review

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R
2021 KTM 890 Adventure R (Photo by Kevin Wing)

We selected the KTM 790 Adventure and 790 Adventure R as Rider‘s 2019 Motorcycle of the Year. Just two years later, KTM has updated the platform. Adapted from the 890 Duke R, the engine now has more displacement, a higher compression ratio, and other improvements. And like the 890 Duke R, the Adventure R has better throttle-by-wire response, a beefed-up clutch and a shortened shift lever stroke and lighter shift-detent spring for faster shifting. Chassis updates include an aluminum head tube, a lighter swingarm, revised suspension settings, and refinements to the braking system. Pricing starts at $14,199.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R (Off) Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Video Review

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally
2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally

The limited-edition KTM 890 Adventure R Rally received the same updates as the 890 Adventure R (above), but is loaded with race-spec inspired components. Its development utilized feedback from Red Bull KTM Factory Racing team riders, Toby Price, and Sam Sunderland. Only 700 units of the 890 Adventure R Rally will be produced worldwide, with 200 slated for the North American market. Pricing starKTM 8ts at $19,999.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R and 890 Adventure R Rally First Look Review

2021 KTM 890 Duke

2021 KTM 890 Duke
2021 KTM 890 Duke (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Powering the 2021 KTM 890 Duke is the same punchy, rip-roaring 889cc parallel-Twin producing a claimed 115 horsepower and 67.9 lb-ft of torque that’s also found in the 890 Duke R and 890 Adventure (above). Shared amongst the middleweight Duke family is a chromoly-steel frame, lightweight one-piece aluminum subframe and cast aluminum swingarm. By using the 889cc engine as a stressed member, the 890 Duke flaunts a mere 372-pound dry weight. We recently completed a comparison test of the 2021 KTM Duke lineup (200, 390, 890, and 1290), which will be posted soon.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Duke First Look Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

On March 15, 2021, Moto Guzzi celebrated its 100th anniversary of continuous production at its headquarters in Mandello del Lario, Italy. One of Moto Guzzi’s most iconic models, the V7, was updated for 2021, and is available in more modern V7 Stone and classic V7 Special versions. Both have a larger 853cc V-Twin derived from engine, variations of which are found in the V9 and V85 TT. They also get reduced effort from the single-disc dry clutch, a stiffer frame, a bigger swingarm with a new bevel gear for the cardan shaft drive, revised damping and a longer stroke for the preload-adjustable rear shocks, an updated ABS module, a wider rear tire, vibration-damping footpegs, and a thicker passenger seat. MSRP for the V7 Stone is $8,990, or $9,190 for the Centenario edition (shown above).

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Video Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special gets the same updates as the V7 Stone above. Whereas the V7 Stone has matte finishes, a single all-digital gauge, black exhausts, cast wheels, and an eagle-shaped LED set into the headlight, the V7 Special is classically styled, with spoked wheels, chrome finishes, dual analog gauges, and a traditional headlight. MSRP is $9,490.

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special and V7 Stone First Look Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT

2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT

For 2021, the Moto Guzzi V85 TT gets some updates to its air-cooled 853cc 90-degree V-Twin. The revised powerplant offers more torque at low to midrange rpm thanks to optimized lift of the pushrod-and-rockers timing cams and tweaks to the engine control electronics. New spoked rims now mount tubeless tires, reducing unsprung weight by 3.3 pounds for better handling and facilitating plug-and-go flat repairs. Two new riding modes—Sport and Custom—join the existing three (Street, Rain, Off-road) to provide more flexibility in managing throttle response, traction control and ABS to suit rider preferences. Cruise control and the color TFT instrument panel also come standard. The 2021 V85 TT Adventure ($12,990) has standard saddlebags. The 2021 V85 TT Travel ($13,390) includes a Touring windscreen, side panniers from the Urban series, auxiliary LED lights, heated hand grips, and the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia platform.

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT First Look Review

2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan

2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan
2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan

For 2021, the Royal Enfield Himalayan adventure bike, which is powered by an air-cooled 411cc Single, get several updates, including switchable ABS to help riders when riding off-road, a revised rear brake that is said to improve braking performance, a redesigned sidestand, and a new hazard light switch. MSRP is $4,999.

Read our 2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan First Look Review

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350
2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

For 2021, the Royal Enfield family gets a new addition — the Meteor 350, a light, affordable cruiser powered by an all-new air-cooled 349cc single with SOHC actuating two valves. Available in three budget-friendly trim packages, variants include the base-model Fireball ($4,399) with a black exhaust system; the Stellar ($4,499), with a chrome exhaust and a passenger backrest; and the Supernova ($4,599), which adds a windshield and a two-tone paint scheme.

Read our 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 Video Review

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS
2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Triumph‘s Speed Triple is one of the original hooligan bikes. It has evolved over the years since its introduction in 1994, and for 2021 the Speed Triple 1200 RS is the lightest, most powerful, highest-spec version yet. Its all-new 1,160cc Triple (up from 1,050cc) makes 165 horsepower at the rear wheel, and the RS is equipped with state-of-the-art electronics, fully adjustable Öhlins suspension, Brembo Stylema front calipers, and much more. Pricing starts at $18,300.

Read our 2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS Road Test Review

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport
2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport, a street-focused adventure bike powered by the same liquid-cooled 888cc in-line triple as the Tiger 900 models, but it has been detuned to 82 horsepower at 8,400 rpm and 58 lb-ft of torque at 6,700 rpm at the rear wheel, as measured on Jett Tuning‘s dyno, which is about 10 horsepower lower. To keep the price down, Triumph also reduced the number of ride modes to two (Road and Rain) and limited suspension adjustability to rear preload. But this is no bargain-bin special. It has Marzocchi suspension front and rear, and it has Brembo brakes, with Stylema front calipers and a radial front master cylinder. ABS is standard but not switchable, and traction control is also standard but is switchable.

Watch our 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport Video Review

2021 Triumph Trident 660

2021 Triumph Trident 660
2021 Triumph Trident 660

The 2021 Triumph Trident 660 is a triple-cylinder-powered roadster in the the twin-cylinder-dominated middleweight class. It’s powered by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 660cc inline-Triple making a claimed 79.9 horsepower at 10,250 rpm and 47 lb-ft of torque at 6,250 rpm, and it is equipped with ABS, switchable traction control, and selectable ride modes. MSRP is $7,995.

Read our 2021 Triumph Trident 660 First Look Review

2021 Yamaha MT-07

2021 Yamaha MT-07
2021 Yamaha MT-07 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Updates for 2021 to the Yamaha MT-07, its best-selling middleweight naked sportbike, include revisions to the 689cc liquid-cooled CP2 (Cross Plane 2-cylinder) parallel-Twin engine to meet Euro 5 regulations and to improve low-rpm throttle response. The MT-07 has a new 2-into-1 exhaust, revisions to the 6-speed gearbox to improve shifting feel, LED lighting all around, new instrumentation, revised ergonomics, and new styling that brings it closer in appearance to the larger MT-09 (below). Base price is $7,699, and three color choices are available: Storm Fluo, Matte Raven Black, and Team Yamaha Blue.

Read our 2021 Yamaha MT-07 Road Test Review

2021 Yamaha MT-09

2021 Yamaha MT-09
2021 Yamaha MT-09 (Photo by Joe Agustin)

Now in its third generation, fully 90% of the Yamaha MT-09 naked sportbike is new for 2021. Its has an entirely new 890cc CP3 (Cross Plane 3-cylinder) inline-Triple engine, a thoroughly updated and significantly stiffer chassis, state-of-the-art electronics, and a fresh look that results in the most refined MT-09 yet. The base price increased by $400 to $9,399, but the four extra Benjamins are worth it. The MT-09 is available in Storm Fluo (shown above), Matte Raven Black, and Team Yamaha Blue. There’s also an MT-09 SP ($10,999) with exclusive special-edition coloring, premium KYB and Öhlins suspension, and cruise control.

Read our 2021 Yamaha MT-09 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Yamaha MT-09 Video Review

2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700

2021 Yamaha Tenere 700
2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

After being teased for several years, Yamaha‘s highly anticipated Ténéré 700 adventure bike made its U.S. debut in the summer of 2021, bringing some excitement during a challenging pandemic year. It’s powered by the versatile 689cc liquid-cooled CP2 (Cross Plane 2-cylinder) parallel-Twin engine from the MT-07 (above), modified for adventure duty with a new airbox with a higher snorkel, a revised cooling system, an upswept exhaust, and a final gear ratio of 46/15 vs. 43/16. The rest of the bike is all-new, including the narrow double-cradle tubular-steel frame, triangulated (welded-on) subframe, double braced steering head and aluminum swingarm, adjustable long-travel suspension, switchable ABS, and more. Base price is $9,999 and its available in Ceramic Ice, Intensity White (shown above), and Matte Black.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 First Ride Review

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 Tour Test Review

Watch our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 Video Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

Now in its third generation, Yamaha’s middleweight sport-tourer — now called the Tracer 9 GT — is new from the ground up for 2021. It has a larger, more powerful engine, a new frame, and a state-of-the-art electronics package that includes semi-active suspension. With these updates comes a higher price, and MSRP is now $14,899. It’s available in Liquid Metal (shown above) and Redline.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT First Look Review

2021 Zero FXE

Zero FXE
2021 Zero FXE

New for 2021, Zero has taken the existing frame from the FX and added a redesigned body. The starkly modern, supermoto styling is very similar in appearance to the FXS – tall, slim and sporting a raised front mudguard. However, the FXE is capable of a claimed 100-mile range on a full battery charge and costs $11,795, which can be bought down to around $10,000 depending upon available EV rebates and credits. 

Compared to many of its heavier, more expensive competitors the FXE is a lightweight and thrilling runabout, and what it gives up in range it makes up for in accessibility and potential for fun. The FXE makes for a credible commuter bike, capable of taking to the highway but ideal to zip around town on.   

The post 2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Indian Chief Custom Program Announced

2022 Indian Chief Bobber Chief Custom Program
2022 Indian Chief Bobber

Indian Motorcycle has announced plans for three customization projects based on its recently unveiled 2022 Indian Chief platform, which includes the Chief, Chief Bobber and Super Chief. To showcase the range of possibilities inherent to the new Chief platform, three well-known V-twin customizers will create unique interpretations: the former Indian Larry team of Paul Cox and Keino Sasaki, freestyle motocross legend Carey Hart and the creator of Bratstyle, Go Takamine.

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited first ride review

Paul Cox Indian Larry Indian Chief Custom Program
Paul Cox

Cox and Sasaki are teaming up for the first time in nearly 15 years, having parted ways in the early 2000s after the untimely passing of legendary customizer and friend, Indian Larry.

“Keino and I have stayed in touch over the years, continuing to work in our own individual styles, but when Indian Motorcycle approached us about this collaboration, the timing seemed right. We both bring unique skills to this project, and it will be interesting to collaborate again,” said Cox. “Initially, I found the new Chief platform to be beautifully designed and thoughtfully engineered in its stock form. It’s tough and clean but possesses a modern elegance at the same time. These are all qualities that I try to combine in my own work, for a well-balanced custom.”

Keino Sasaki Indian Larry Indian Chief Custom Program
Keino Sasaki

Completely overhauled for 2022, the new Chief platform has a tubular-steel frame wrapped tightly around Indian’s air-cooled Thunderstroke V-twin motor and exposed dual rear shocks. It’s more stripped down and elemental, the perfect canvas for customization.

“This bike is as much about history and heritage, as it is about modern design sophistication, and that’s why we were intentional in choosing builders that represented both old and new styles,” said Ola Stenegard, Director of Design for Indian Motorcycle. “With Go, we have a builder who honors and takes inspiration from the post-war bobber scene. On the other hand, Carey will push forward with modern, performance-oriented design elements, while Paul and Keino bridge the gap between past and future.”

Over the past five years, Hart has customized various Indian models, and he unveiled the first-ever custom 2022 Indian Chief — a modern club-style take on the new bike — soon after the model’s debut in early February.

Carey Hart Indian Chief Custom Program
Carey Hart

“With the new Chief, Indian Motorcycle has done an incredible job of capturing the strength and timeless lines of what we all have come to expect from a true American V-twin, and in doing so, they’ve served up the ultimate platform for customization,” said Hart. “I’m proud to be amongst this incredible group of builders, and I couldn’t be more excited to see what each of us comes up with.”

Well-known for his Bratstyle brand, a design aesthetic and lifestyle that has inspired followers and copycats across the globe, Takamine has focused much of his work on restoring and customizing vintage Chiefs and Scouts. This project will be the first time that Takamine will bring Bratstyle to a modern Indian.

Go Takamine Bratstyle Indian Chief Custom Program
Go Takamine

“Indian Motorcycle has been at the heart of my work for many years, and I have great admiration for the company. It’s an honor to be included in this elite group of builders,” said Takamine. “The new Indian Chief is ideal for customization with its classic steel tube frame and air-cooled motor, and I’m excited by the possibilities of what I can do with it.”

To inspire personalization, Indian Motorcycle has curated three Authentic Accessory collections that dramatically change style, enhance comfort and increase power and performance. Each piece within the collections are sold individually and can pair with any Chief model — allowing riders to mix and match parts to fit their style and riding preference. Riders can design and build their own Chief on Indian Motorcycle’s accessory configurator.

Rogue Collection: Providing a stripped-down riding experience where power and minimalism lead the way, Indian Motorcycle curated the Rogue Collection to enhance performance and deliver aggressive attitude for the Indian Chief and Indian Chief Dark Horse. With the all-new Thunderstroke Forward Stage 1 Intake, Stage 1 Slip-On Exhaust and Thunderstroke Stage 2 Performance Kit, the Rogue Collection delivers 17% more horsepower than a stock Thunderstroke 116 engine. Indian Motorcycle’s Slash Cut Exhaust Tips personalize style, while a passenger seat, backrest and pegs provide two-up riding capabilities.

Authentic Collection: With bulky tires wrapped around spoke wheels, a muscled-up front end and a solo bobber seat, the Chief Bobber and Chief Bobber Dark Horse pay stylistic homage to the classic post-war era V-twins. Riders looking to personalize their ride can outfit it with premium accessories from Indian Motorcycle’s Authentic Collection. Featuring a floating solo seat, luggage rack, Mini Ape Handlebars, and various performance accessories, this collection pays tribute to the original 1922 Indian Chief.

Tour Collection: Featuring soft saddlebags and a windshield, the Super Chief and Super Chief Limited begs riders for longer miles and an even bolder escape. For those looking to take the capable day tripper to the next level, Indian Motorcycle assembled its Tour Collection. Heated grips, a passenger backrest, highway bar lower closeouts and highway pegs take the Super Chief’s comfort to an entirely new level for both the rider and passenger going the extra mile.

Riders can learn more about the Chief Customs program on the Indian Motorcycle Custom Garage webpage.

The post Indian Chief Custom Program Announced first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Indian Chief Custom Program Announced

2022 Indian Chief Bobber Chief Custom Program
2022 Indian Chief Bobber

Indian Motorcycle has announced plans for three customization projects based on its recently unveiled 2022 Indian Chief platform, which includes the Chief, Chief Bobber and Super Chief. To showcase the range of possibilities inherent to the new Chief platform, three well-known V-twin customizers will create unique interpretations: the former Indian Larry team of Paul Cox and Keino Sasaki, freestyle motocross legend Carey Hart and the creator of Bratstyle, Go Takamine.

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited first ride review

Paul Cox Indian Larry Indian Chief Custom Program
Paul Cox

Cox and Sasaki are teaming up for the first time in nearly 15 years, having parted ways in the early 2000s after the untimely passing of legendary customizer and friend, Indian Larry.

“Keino and I have stayed in touch over the years, continuing to work in our own individual styles, but when Indian Motorcycle approached us about this collaboration, the timing seemed right. We both bring unique skills to this project, and it will be interesting to collaborate again,” said Cox. “Initially, I found the new Chief platform to be beautifully designed and thoughtfully engineered in its stock form. It’s tough and clean but possesses a modern elegance at the same time. These are all qualities that I try to combine in my own work, for a well-balanced custom.”

Keino Sasaki Indian Larry Indian Chief Custom Program
Keino Sasaki

Completely overhauled for 2022, the new Chief platform has a tubular-steel frame wrapped tightly around Indian’s air-cooled Thunderstroke V-twin motor and exposed dual rear shocks. It’s more stripped down and elemental, the perfect canvas for customization.

“This bike is as much about history and heritage, as it is about modern design sophistication, and that’s why we were intentional in choosing builders that represented both old and new styles,” said Ola Stenegard, Director of Design for Indian Motorcycle. “With Go, we have a builder who honors and takes inspiration from the post-war bobber scene. On the other hand, Carey will push forward with modern, performance-oriented design elements, while Paul and Keino bridge the gap between past and future.”

Over the past five years, Hart has customized various Indian models, and he unveiled the first-ever custom 2022 Indian Chief — a modern club-style take on the new bike — soon after the model’s debut in early February.

Carey Hart Indian Chief Custom Program
Carey Hart

“With the new Chief, Indian Motorcycle has done an incredible job of capturing the strength and timeless lines of what we all have come to expect from a true American V-twin, and in doing so, they’ve served up the ultimate platform for customization,” said Hart. “I’m proud to be amongst this incredible group of builders, and I couldn’t be more excited to see what each of us comes up with.”

Well-known for his Bratstyle brand, a design aesthetic and lifestyle that has inspired followers and copycats across the globe, Takamine has focused much of his work on restoring and customizing vintage Chiefs and Scouts. This project will be the first time that Takamine will bring Bratstyle to a modern Indian.

Go Takamine Bratstyle Indian Chief Custom Program
Go Takamine

“Indian Motorcycle has been at the heart of my work for many years, and I have great admiration for the company. It’s an honor to be included in this elite group of builders,” said Takamine. “The new Indian Chief is ideal for customization with its classic steel tube frame and air-cooled motor, and I’m excited by the possibilities of what I can do with it.”

To inspire personalization, Indian Motorcycle has curated three Authentic Accessory collections that dramatically change style, enhance comfort and increase power and performance. Each piece within the collections are sold individually and can pair with any Chief model — allowing riders to mix and match parts to fit their style and riding preference. Riders can design and build their own Chief on Indian Motorcycle’s accessory configurator.

Rogue Collection: Providing a stripped-down riding experience where power and minimalism lead the way, Indian Motorcycle curated the Rogue Collection to enhance performance and deliver aggressive attitude for the Indian Chief and Indian Chief Dark Horse. With the all-new Thunderstroke Forward Stage 1 Intake, Stage 1 Slip-On Exhaust and Thunderstroke Stage 2 Performance Kit, the Rogue Collection delivers 17% more horsepower than a stock Thunderstroke 116 engine. Indian Motorcycle’s Slash Cut Exhaust Tips personalize style, while a passenger seat, backrest and pegs provide two-up riding capabilities.

Authentic Collection: With bulky tires wrapped around spoke wheels, a muscled-up front end and a solo bobber seat, the Chief Bobber and Chief Bobber Dark Horse pay stylistic homage to the classic post-war era V-twins. Riders looking to personalize their ride can outfit it with premium accessories from Indian Motorcycle’s Authentic Collection. Featuring a floating solo seat, luggage rack, Mini Ape Handlebars, and various performance accessories, this collection pays tribute to the original 1922 Indian Chief.

Tour Collection: Featuring soft saddlebags and a windshield, the Super Chief and Super Chief Limited begs riders for longer miles and an even bolder escape. For those looking to take the capable day tripper to the next level, Indian Motorcycle assembled its Tour Collection. Heated grips, a passenger backrest, highway bar lower closeouts and highway pegs take the Super Chief’s comfort to an entirely new level for both the rider and passenger going the extra mile.

Riders can learn more about the Chief Customs program on the Indian Motorcycle Custom Garage webpage.

The post Indian Chief Custom Program Announced first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Indian Chief Custom Program Announced

2022 Indian Chief Bobber Chief Custom Program
2022 Indian Chief Bobber

Indian Motorcycle has announced plans for three customization projects based on its recently unveiled 2022 Indian Chief platform, which includes the Chief, Chief Bobber and Super Chief. To showcase the range of possibilities inherent to the new Chief platform, three well-known V-twin customizers will create unique interpretations: the former Indian Larry team of Paul Cox and Keino Sasaki, freestyle motocross legend Carey Hart and the creator of Bratstyle, Go Takamine.

Read our 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited first ride review

Paul Cox Indian Larry Indian Chief Custom Program
Paul Cox

Cox and Sasaki are teaming up for the first time in nearly 15 years, having parted ways in the early 2000s after the untimely passing of legendary customizer and friend, Indian Larry.

“Keino and I have stayed in touch over the years, continuing to work in our own individual styles, but when Indian Motorcycle approached us about this collaboration, the timing seemed right. We both bring unique skills to this project, and it will be interesting to collaborate again,” said Cox. “Initially, I found the new Chief platform to be beautifully designed and thoughtfully engineered in its stock form. It’s tough and clean but possesses a modern elegance at the same time. These are all qualities that I try to combine in my own work, for a well-balanced custom.”

Keino Sasaki Indian Larry Indian Chief Custom Program
Keino Sasaki

Completely overhauled for 2022, the new Chief platform has a tubular-steel frame wrapped tightly around Indian’s air-cooled Thunderstroke V-twin motor and exposed dual rear shocks. It’s more stripped down and elemental, the perfect canvas for customization.

“This bike is as much about history and heritage, as it is about modern design sophistication, and that’s why we were intentional in choosing builders that represented both old and new styles,” said Ola Stenegard, Director of Design for Indian Motorcycle. “With Go, we have a builder who honors and takes inspiration from the post-war bobber scene. On the other hand, Carey will push forward with modern, performance-oriented design elements, while Paul and Keino bridge the gap between past and future.”

Over the past five years, Hart has customized various Indian models, and he unveiled the first-ever custom 2022 Indian Chief — a modern club-style take on the new bike — soon after the model’s debut in early February.

Carey Hart Indian Chief Custom Program
Carey Hart

“With the new Chief, Indian Motorcycle has done an incredible job of capturing the strength and timeless lines of what we all have come to expect from a true American V-twin, and in doing so, they’ve served up the ultimate platform for customization,” said Hart. “I’m proud to be amongst this incredible group of builders, and I couldn’t be more excited to see what each of us comes up with.”

Well-known for his Bratstyle brand, a design aesthetic and lifestyle that has inspired followers and copycats across the globe, Takamine has focused much of his work on restoring and customizing vintage Chiefs and Scouts. This project will be the first time that Takamine will bring Bratstyle to a modern Indian.

Go Takamine Bratstyle Indian Chief Custom Program
Go Takamine

“Indian Motorcycle has been at the heart of my work for many years, and I have great admiration for the company. It’s an honor to be included in this elite group of builders,” said Takamine. “The new Indian Chief is ideal for customization with its classic steel tube frame and air-cooled motor, and I’m excited by the possibilities of what I can do with it.”

To inspire personalization, Indian Motorcycle has curated three Authentic Accessory collections that dramatically change style, enhance comfort and increase power and performance. Each piece within the collections are sold individually and can pair with any Chief model — allowing riders to mix and match parts to fit their style and riding preference. Riders can design and build their own Chief on Indian Motorcycle’s accessory configurator.

Rogue Collection: Providing a stripped-down riding experience where power and minimalism lead the way, Indian Motorcycle curated the Rogue Collection to enhance performance and deliver aggressive attitude for the Indian Chief and Indian Chief Dark Horse. With the all-new Thunderstroke Forward Stage 1 Intake, Stage 1 Slip-On Exhaust and Thunderstroke Stage 2 Performance Kit, the Rogue Collection delivers 17% more horsepower than a stock Thunderstroke 116 engine. Indian Motorcycle’s Slash Cut Exhaust Tips personalize style, while a passenger seat, backrest and pegs provide two-up riding capabilities.

Authentic Collection: With bulky tires wrapped around spoke wheels, a muscled-up front end and a solo bobber seat, the Chief Bobber and Chief Bobber Dark Horse pay stylistic homage to the classic post-war era V-twins. Riders looking to personalize their ride can outfit it with premium accessories from Indian Motorcycle’s Authentic Collection. Featuring a floating solo seat, luggage rack, Mini Ape Handlebars, and various performance accessories, this collection pays tribute to the original 1922 Indian Chief.

Tour Collection: Featuring soft saddlebags and a windshield, the Super Chief and Super Chief Limited begs riders for longer miles and an even bolder escape. For those looking to take the capable day tripper to the next level, Indian Motorcycle assembled its Tour Collection. Heated grips, a passenger backrest, highway bar lower closeouts and highway pegs take the Super Chief’s comfort to an entirely new level for both the rider and passenger going the extra mile.

Riders can learn more about the Chief Customs program on the Indian Motorcycle Custom Garage webpage.

The post Indian Chief Custom Program Announced first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited | Tour Test Review

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited Tour Test Review
Despite its enormous length and girth, the Roadmaster Limited can be hustled along a winding backroad pretty briskly as long as you keep your inputs smooth and easy.

Since the last time we put a Roadmaster through it paces (Rider, April 2018), Indian’s Touring family has grown to five models. At the top of the heap are the Roadmaster Elite and limited-edition Jack Daniel’s Roadmaster Dark Horse, flashy Harley CVO competitors adorned with premium finishes, accessories and hardware to go with their nearly $40,000 price tags. Riders with simpler tastes have a choice of three Roadmaster models all priced within $750 of one another, the Roadmaster and Roadmaster Dark Horse at $29,999, and the Roadmaster Limited at $30,749. For 2021 all offer the plush, stable Roadmaster highway experience, now with a little more rumble and snort thanks to getting a larger 116ci Thunder Stroke engine versus the original 111ci air-cooled V-twin. Like the Roadmaster Elite, the base Roadmaster still wears the bike’s original swoopy fork-mounted fairing and skirted front fender like Indians of old, while the Limited and Dark Horse models have a more modern streamlined fairing, open front fender and slammed saddlebags.

The “new” Indian Motorcycle company did it right when it launched its first lineup for 2014, delivering three cruiser and bagger models with signature Indian styling like those fully valanced fenders and finned flathead-like cylinder heads with downward-firing exhaust headers on the new Thunder Stroke 111 engine. The Roadmaster full dresser followed shortly after with a complete complement of touring equipment, including an electric windscreen, removable fairing lowers, plush air adjustable single-shock rear suspension and a large top trunk. We were mightily impressed by its comfort, convenience and performance, but had concerns about the bike’s massive weight and engine heat output. As time marched on and the supply of nostalgia buffs interested in their historic styling began to wane, Indian added lighter versions of the Chieftain bagger and Roadmaster with crisper, more modern lines, as well as the all-new Challenger bagger with its liquid-cooled Power Plus 108 V-twin and frame-mounted fairing (a bike we deemed worthy of Rider’s 2020 Motorcycle of the Year award).

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited Tour Test Review
Standard ClimaCommand seat works great on its heat settings but cooling function is still a work in progress.

As a great touring motorcycle in its own right, with less weight and no engine heat to complain about, the Challenger’s introduction created a dilemma. Since you can add the Roadmaster top trunk to it as an accessory and end up with a cooler, lighter, fully dressed touring machine that handles better and makes more power, is there still a place in the lineup for the hot and heavy Roadmaster? Let’s find out.

Fascinated as we are by shiny things, for this refresher we focused on the Roadmaster Limited, which gets beautiful deep gloss Crimson Metallic or Thunder Black Azure Crystal paint and a V-twin engine swathed in chrome rather than the Dark Horse’s matte paint and black engine. For 2021 both the Limited and Dark Horse come with Indian’s recently released heated and cooled ClimaCommand seats, with controls conveniently integrated into the Ride Command infotainment system’s touchscreen. The seats also have separate temperature button controls for rider and passenger. Their 19-inch Contrast Cut front wheels vs. the 17-incher on the base model further distinguish these two bikes.

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited Tour Test Review
Like the Dark Horse, the Limited gets a 19-inch Contrast Cut front wheel, which does look good but slows steering a bit.

Some other nice changes for 2021 include the replacement of the fairing-mounted starter button with a 12-volt, 5-amp accessory socket under a flip cover (the starter button lives on the right handlebar now). That wouldn’t be notable except that the socket is an SAE type, the first we’ve seen integrated from the factory in such a way. It can be used to charge the bike’s battery, and to plug in other accessories with SAE connectors and power draws of five amps or less. The bike also has two 12-volt, 5-amp cigarette outlets, one in the trunk and one in the right saddlebag, so you can charge or power devices from all three sockets while riding. Apple CarPlay is integrated into the Ride Command System now, and there’s a USB port in the small pocket in the top of the fairing for plugging in a thumb drive or your iPhone (required to enable CarPlay, as is a Bluetooth headset).

Of course the major change since we last tested a Roadmaster is the bump in the Thunder Stroke’s displacement from 111ci (1,811cc) to 116ci (1,890cc), a move meant to keep power levels up in the face of more restrictive emissions requirements and counter Harley’s jump to 114ci on some of its models. Cylinder bore in the air-cooled, 49-degree OHV V-twin with two valves per cylinder was increased 2.2mm to 103.2mm to get the extra cubes. On the Jett Tuning dyno this roughly 5-percent increase in volume has resulted in slightly more power at the rear wheel, to the tune of 75.9 horsepower at 4,200 rpm and 105.8 lb-ft of torque at an astoundingly low 2,000 rpm — talk about a stump puller. From its peak, torque output stays above 90 lb-ft up to about 4,000 rpm, but most of us will have shifted long before that. Ridden solo the Thunder Stroke 116 gives the Roadmaster plenty of power with great pulse feel and an enormously satisfying rumble, and even fully loaded for touring and two-up the bike can still be coaxed into making a brisk pass with a single downshift. Shifting the 6-speed transmission is clean and positive, with a decisive “thunk” going into gear that big V-twin riders seem to like, and power gets to the rear via clean and quiet belt final drive.

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited Tour Test Review
Increasing the Thunder Stroke engine’s displacement to 116ci gives it slightly more power and torque without hurting fuel economy.

ABS brakes and suspension are unchanged since our last Roadmaster review, fitting since the bike’s ride remains plush and well controlled, it stops as quickly and easily as desired and has good feel at the front adjustable lever and rear pedal (though the reach to the latter is a bit far for my 29-inch inseam). Handling on such a big, heavy motorcycle with a long wheelbase is a bit like dancing with an elephant — perfectly doable as long as you watch your feet and don’t try any sudden moves, which will just annoy the elephant and run you out of ground clearance right quick. Let’s just say that the Roadmaster’s handling rewards smoothness, more now with the stylish increase in front wheel size to 19 inches that seems to make the bike handle even more slowly. You need to keep your wits about you on a winding road, though steering effort is low and it does hold a line well unless a strong crosswind jostles the fork-mounted fairing.

Wind protection and comfort on the Roadmaster are excellent, with a very functional pushbutton electric windscreen, adjustable vents in the fairing lowers (that with practice you can open with your feet), a low seat and longish floorboards that allow you to move your boots forth and back. Excess engine heat can still be a problem in ambient temperatures of more than 70-75 degrees or so — at the end of long, hot ride in the sun on backroads or the Interstate you will definitely feel pretty baked. Bring the Mitchum. The cooling function of the unique ClimaCommand seat (explained in detail on our website here) helps a little, but on our test bike it mostly made the seat feel less hot, not cold or even especially cool, and only on a strip in the center. Personally I’d rather have more padding instead, since the seat’s thermoelectric module can be felt just below the surface, and it adds several pounds to an already heavy bike. On the other hand, with its substantial wind protection, adjustable heating in the seat and grips and all of that engine warmth, it takes a Blue Norther to get cold on the Roadmaster!

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited Tour Test Review
Braking and suspension duties are handled by top-flight components that make it clear Indian cares about performance and comfort.

With 142 liters total of storage in the central locking saddlebags, trunk and fairing lower pockets plus its luggage rack you should never run out of room for stuff, and the trunk will hold two full-face helmets. Keyless ignition, throttle-by-wire, cruise control and three ride modes (Tour, Standard, Sport) are all included, though I never felt the need to ride in anything except Standard mode, which provides great throttle response. We’ve written reams about Indian’s highly functional Ride Command infotainment system with its 7-inch glove-friendly touchscreen, navigation, Bluetooth and gigawatt audio with four speakers, and it only seems to get better with each passing year. For 2020 Indian added a new quad-core processor to speed up the experience, more intuitive destination search capabilities, improved customizable ride screens and Connected Services, which include traffic and weather overlays so riders can avoid traffic and poor weather conditions. Combine it all with hands-free Apple CarPlay functionality and you just won’t find a more comprehensive system.

Which brings us back to that dilemma. Now that Indian has the Challenger, is there still a place for the Roadmaster? For me it comes down to a matter of style and tradition—though it adds a lot of electronic and performance advantages to the features found on the Roadmaster, the liquid-cooled Challenger’s looks aren’t everyone’s cup of tea. Both versions of the traditional air-cooled Roadmaster, on the other hand, are and will remain classic beauties for the foreseeable future. And to many riders that’s the most important aspect of a full dresser.

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited Tour Test Review
Handling on such a big, heavy motorcycle with a long wheelbase is a bit like dancing with an elephant — perfectly doable as long as you watch your feet and don’t try any sudden moves, which will just annoy the elephant and run you out of ground clearance right quick.

Mark’s Gear:
Helmet: Shoei Neotec II
Jacket: Highway 21 Motordrome
Pants: Olympia X Moto II
Boots: Dianese Long Range

2021 Indian Loadmaster Limited Specs:

Base Price: $30,749
Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles
Website: indianmotorcycle.com

Engine
Type: Air-cooled, transverse 49-degree V-twin
Displacement: 1,890cc (116ci)
Bore x Stroke: 103.2 x 113.0mm
Compression Ratio: 11.0:1
Valve Train: OHV, 2 valves per cyl.
Valve Insp. Interval: NA (self-adjusting)
Fuel Delivery: Closed loop EFI w/ 54mm throttle body
Lubrication System: Semi-wet sump, 6.0-qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet assist clutch
Final Drive: Belt

Electrical
Ignition: Electronic
Charging Output: 710 watts @ 3,500 rpm
Battery: 12V 18AH

Chassis
Frame: Modular, aluminum backbone w/ cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 65.7 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/5.9 in.
Seat Height: 26.5 in.
Suspension, Front: 46mm stanchions, no adj.,
4.7-in. travel
Rear: Single shock, air-adj. preload, 4.5-in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 300mm discs w/ 4-piston opposed calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 300mm disc w/ 2-piston pin-slide caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.50 x 19 in.
Rear: Cast, 5.00 x 16 in.
Tires, Front: 130/60-BH19
Rear: 180/60-RH16
Wet Weight: 895 lbs.
Load Capacity: 490 lbs.
GVWR: 1,385 lbs.

Performance
Horsepower: 75.9 horsepower at 4,200 rpm
Torque: 105.8 lb-ft at 2,000 rpm
Fuel Capacity: 5.5 gals., last 1.0 gal. warning light on
MPG: 91 PON min. (high/avg/low) 41.3/39.9/38.8
Estimated Range: 219 miles
Indicated RPM at 60 MPH: 2,250

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited Photo Gallery:

The post 2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited | Tour Test Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Rider Magazine’s 2020 Motorcycle of the Year

Rider Magazine's 2020 Motorcycle of the Year

No doubt the year 2020 is primarily going to be remembered for a nasty pandemic, civil unrest and a tumultuous election (and to think it’s only August!). With all of that on our minds, finding a silver lining to fall back on can be tough, but there are actually several in motorcycle land this year. No one expected, for example, that the need for social distancing would inspire people to buy dirt bikes — as I write this, 50% more new off-highway bikes were sold in the first half of 2020 than in the same time period last year. New on-highway motorcycle sales are still in the doldrums, but many dealers can’t keep entry-level dual-sports and used road bikes in stock. Turns out motorcycles can satisfy the need to distance ourselves in a fun and thrilling way, yet another silver lining in a year a lot of us would like to see in the rearview mirror.

Before 2020 enters the history books, there’s the important and exciting matter of selecting Rider’s Motorcycle of the Year. Despite temporary factory shutdowns and press introductions going virtual, the manufacturers still found a way to bring more than 75 all-new or significantly changed motorcycles to their lineups, and the preponderance of great bikes made our decision pretty difficult. Turns out our winner was actually introduced in 2019 as a 2020 model and was among the first 2020s we tested last year. Other notable contenders for the title are on the facing page, and that list could go on and on, what with machines like Harley’s new electric LiveWire, the Suzuki Katana and Moto Guzzi V85TT Travel also in dealerships as 2020 models. Manufacturer production timing varying as it often does, we didn’t get the opportunity to ride every 2020 model before we had to settle in and pick one as the MOTY in time for this issue. And though we may have actually ridden several early release 2021 models that might be available at your dealer before it was time to select the MOTY—the Yamaha Ténéré 700, for example—since they’re not 2020 models they’re not eligible for this year’s award, though we will include them in next year’s considerations.

So it’s never easy, but one machine did stand out above the rest as our pick for the 2020 Motorcycle of the Year, because it’s capable of so much and represents a solid improvement in a very popular category. Our choice, as always, goes to a machine that succeeds best at its intent and could be considered a game-changer. We celebrate all new motorcycles, as they each represent the opportunity to get more people on two wheels, experiencing this great adventure we know and love…even while staying 6 feet apart. Congratulations to all of the manufacturers, and thank you for keeping our passion alive in a year in which it might be tempting to run away and hide….

The contenders

BMW F 900 R

2020 BMW F 900 R
2020 BMW F 900 R (Photo by Kevin Wing)

BMW F 900 R/XR | Road Test Review

The successor to BMW’s popular F 800 R naked bike gets a smoother, larger and more powerful parallel twin with great character thanks to a new imbalanced firing interval. An all-new chassis and suspension and relaxed seating help it carve corners in comfort, and you can pay just $8,995 or boost the price with a slew of the latest electronic enhancements as accessories.

Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited
2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited (Photo by Kevin Wing)

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited | First Ride Review

Powered by the Twin-Cooled Milwaukee-Eight 114, the Road Glide Limited has premium suspension, linked Brembo brakes with ABS and a Boom! Box GTS infotainment system with color touchscreen. Premium features such as painted pinstriping, a gloss-finish inner fairing and Slicer II Contrast Bright wheels are icing on the cake.

Honda Africa Twin CRF1100L Adventure Sports ES

2020 Honda Africa Twin CRF1100L Adventure Sports ES
2020 Honda Africa Twin CRF1100L Adventure Sports ES (Photo by Kevin Wing)

2020 Honda Africa Twin CRF1100L Adventure Sports ES | Road Test Review

For 2020 both Africa Twins offer more power and better handling, with a larger parallel twin-cylinder engine carried in a lighter, stiffer chassis. The Adventure Sports ES adds a barrel-full of adventure-touring features such as electronic semi-dynamic suspension, spoked tubeless wheels and tires, cruise control, a larger 6.5-gallon tank and more.

KTM 390 Adventure

2020 KTM 390 Adventure
2020 KTM 390 Adventure (Photo by Mark Tuttle)

2020 KTM 390 Adventure | Road Test Review

With a base price of just $6,199, the new single-cylinder 390 Adventure is a lot of KTM for the money, with adjustable front and rear WP suspension, a full-color TFT display, lean-angle sensitive traction control and Bosch 2-channel cornering ABS, with a quickshifter offered as an option. A smaller bike for big adventures on or off the road.

Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT

2020 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT
2020 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT (Photo by Kevin Wing)

2020 Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT | Tour Test Review

When it launched the DL1000 V-Strom, Suzuki became the first Japanese manufacturer to offer a big adventure bike in the U.S. For 2020 engine displacement is unchanged but its 1,037cc V-twin makes more power, and the bike gets throttle-by-wire, an updated traction control system, new instrumentation and LED lighting, all wrapped in attractive new retro styling.

Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro Tour Test Review
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro (Photo by Kevin Wing)

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT and Rally Pro | First Ride Review

Triumph has updated its middleweight ADV platform with a larger engine, a new chassis, technology, styling and more. The engine gets a unique firing interval for great sound, and a lighter new tubular-steel chassis give both the street-oriented GT and more dirt-worthy Rally great handling. Pro versions of each add creature comforts and high-end electronics.

Yamaha MT-03

2020 Yamaha MT-03
2020 Yamaha MT-03 (Photo by Joseph Augustin)

2020 Yamaha MT-03 | First Ride Review

Essentially a naked version of the YZF-R3 sportbike, the MT-03 shares the aggressive, mass-forward styling of the larger MTs in Yamaha’s Hyper Naked family, but powered by the same smooth, 321cc parallel twin with 180-degree firing order as the YZF-R3. Priced at just $4,599 and weighing less than 375 pounds, the MT-03 is a scrappy little bike with a big heart.

And the winner is…

Indian Challenger

Rider Magazine's 2020 Motorcycle of the Year Award
2020 Indian Challenger (Photo by Barry Hathaway)

2020 Indian Challenger | Road Test Review

In just a few short years Indian has forged a complete lineup of American V-twin cruisers, baggers, touring bikes and street trackers that have both taken on the competition and established Indian as a well-rounded manufacturer of both contemporary and traditional motorcycles. The name of one of its new motorcycles for 2020 makes its intentions very clear: Challenger. Aimed squarely at Harley-Davidson’s popular Road Glide line, at the heart of the daringly styled Challenger with its frame-mounted fairing is Indian’s new liquid-cooled Powerplus 108 V-twin. Though its 1,768cc displacement is 122cc smaller than that of the 1,890cc Thunder Stroke 116 found in most of Indian’s heavyweight lineup, the PowerPlus revs higher and makes more torque. On the Jett Tuning dyno it also out-pulled all of the competition by cranking out an impressive 113.3 lb-ft of torque and 107.6 horsepower when we ran it for the December 2019 issue. So the bike not only delivers right-now power for rapid acceleration, its liquid-cooled design also means much less heat radiates into the cockpit, eliminating our biggest complaint about the air-cooled Thunder Stroke.

2020 Indian Challenger
2020 Indian Challenger (Photo by Barry Hathaway)

Rather than implement partial liquid-cooling, Indian gave the Challenger full conventional liquid cooling, wrapping the front frame downtubes around the blacked-out radiator to help downplay its presence. Throttle-by-wire enables three riding modes and cruise control, and hydraulic valves and cam chain tensioners reduce maintenance for a thoroughly modern engine with classic style.

2020 Indian Challenger
2020 Indian Challenger (Photo by Barry Hathaway)

Outside of the engine bay, the Challenger is designed not only for style and performance but also touring, with a fairing and electric windscreen that provide good wind protection, a seat and riding position that are all-day comfortable and generous luggage capacity of 68 liters. The Ride Command infotainment system with its large 7-inch touchscreen and 100-watt audio keeps the riders informed and entertained, and even the base Challenger model has conveniences such as keyless ignition. The Challenger Dark Horse adds navigation, a customizable route builder, connected weather and traffic services and contrast-cut wheels with tire-pressure monitoring. The Challenger Limited comes in several metallic colors and adds color-matched fender closeouts and highway bars.

2020 Indian Challenger
2020 Indian Challenger (Photo by Barry Hathaway)

Even at 848 pounds wet for the Limited version, the Challenger’s frame-mounted fairing, strong aluminum chassis, compliant suspension and decent cornering clearance help it hustle through corners with ease. On the Dark Horse, Indian’s Smart Lean Technology uses a Bosch IMU to enable cornering ABS, traction control and Drag Torque Control.

2020 Indian Challenger
2020 Indian Challenger (Photo by Barry Hathaway)

The PowerPlus 108 is most likely the engine that will take Indian’s heavyweight models into the future, so its debut in the Challenger is only the beginning. It offers the performance, comfort and lower emissions that only liquid cooling can provide, and delivers impressive grunt and smoothness with the rumbling character that makes V-twins so popular. That plus muscular, modern style, an excellent chassis, a full range of available technology, generous wind protection and luggage capacity and plenty of long-haul comfort make the Challenger a really great bagger.

Congratulations to Indian for the Challenger, Rider’s 2020 Motorcycle of the Year! 

2020 Indian Challenger
2020 Indian Challenger (Photo by Barry Hathaway)

Rider Magazine’s 2020 Motorcycle of the Year Photo Gallery:

Source: RiderMagazine.com