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Rider Comparo: 2024 CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX-8S

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
With short wheelbases, sporty geometry, and low curb weights, the CFMOTO 800NK and Suzuki GSX‑­8S hustle through tight corners with ease. (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Back in the ’70s, Cycle magazine coined the term “Universal Japanese Motorcycle” to refer to the proliferation of standard bikes built by the Japanese Big Four that adhered to the same formula: air‑cooled inline‑Fours with tubular cradle frames, disc front brakes, telescopic forks, and dual rear shocks.

Much has changed in the last five decades, but manufacturers still stick to tried‑and‑true formulas when designing motorcycles. These days, regardless of where bikes hail from, there has been a convergence in the middleweight class on parallel‑Twin engines because they are cost‑effective to produce, easy to package within a frame, and flexible in terms of tuning. Also known as vertical Twins because the two side‑by‑side cylinders stand upright, modern versions typically have liquid cooling, fuel injection, and a 270‑degree crankshaft that produces a V‑Twin‑like rumble.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
We put the CFMOTO 800NK (left) side-by-side with the Suzuki GSX-8S (right) for this comparo.

Last year, Suzuki, a veteran of the UJM wars, introduced a liquid‑cooled 776cc parallel‑Twin that powered two new models: the GSX‑8S naked sportbike and V‑Strom 800DE adventure bike. The engine has DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, a 270‑degree crank, throttle‑by‑wire, and Suzuki’s patented Cross Balancer system, which minimizes vibration. The GSX‑8S is equipped with several Suzuki Intelligent Ride System electronic rider aids, including throttle response modes (Active, Basic, and Comfort), multi‑mode traction control (1, 2, 3, and Off), an up/down quickshifter, Easy Start, and Low RPM Assist.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
2024 Suzuki GSX-8S

Chinese manufacturer CFMOTO entered the U.S. motorcycle market in 2022 and has expanded its lineup to 11 models for 2024. One of its newest is the 800NK, a naked sportbike powered by a liquid‑cooled 799cc parallel‑Twin that’s a previous‑gen version of the KTM 790 engine, which CFMOTO now builds under a partnership agreement. Similar to Suzuki’s modular approach, the same engine is found in CFMOTO’s Ibex 800 adventure bikes. On the tech front, the 800NK has throttle‑by‑wire, throttle response modes (Sport, Street, and Rain), and cruise control but no traction control or quickshifter.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK
2024 CFMOTO 800NK

Those looking for an affordable, streetfighter‑styled motorcycle would likely cross‑shop these two bikes, especially since there’s just a $500 delta between their MSRPs: $8,999 for the Suzuki and $8,499 for the CFMOTO. To suss out their differences, we tested them back‑to‑back on local freeways and backroads and had our friend John Ethell at Jett Tuning run them on a Dynojet dynamometer.

CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX8S: Wonder Twin Powers, Activate!

Despite just a 23cc difference in displacement between the CFMOTO and Suzuki, there’s a significant difference in engine output. Both Twins rev out to nearly 10,000 rpm, and their dyno curves show fairly linear increases in power and flat torque curves. Past 6,000 rpm, their curves begin to diverge, with the CFMOTO climbing to 93.4 hp at 9,400 rpm while the Suzuki levels out at 75.9 hp at 8,300 rpm. Torque figures are closer, but the 800NK still has the advantage in the upper rev range, maxing out at 57.1 lb‑ft at 6,600 rpm compared to 53.3 lb‑ft at 6,700 rpm on the GSX‑8S.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S dyno

The CFMOTO also has a lower curb weight, giving it a higher power‑to‑weight ratio. It weighs 410 lb with its 4.0‑gallon tank full, whereas the Suzuki weighs 445 lb with 3.7 gallons in its tank.

Differences in power and weight aren’t readily apparent at lower rpm and around‑town speeds, but the Suzuki feels more refined. The GSX‑8S starts easily when cold, idles smoothly, and has spot‑on fueling and throttle response. The 800NK, on the other hand, is slow to warm up, idles like it’s in a bad mood, and exhibits some hesitation when making throttle adjustments between 4,000 to 6,000 rpm, which corresponds to a dip in the horsepower and torque curves.

Above 6,000 rpm, however, the CFMOTO finds its groove, responding cleanly and directly to throttle inputs and making its power and weight advantages readily apparent. It flicks back and forth through tight corners more easily than the Suzuki, and a twist of the wrist catapults the 800NK ahead more rapidly than the GSX‑8S, which falls flat in the upper rev range. Although sound doesn’t necessarily affect performance, it does tap into our emotions. The CFMOTO’s more aggressive exhaust note makes for a more engaging riding experience without being too loud.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK
New for 2024, the CFMOTO 800NK charges forward with a distinctive LED running light and angular bodywork in either Nebula Black (shown) or Nebula White.

GEAR UP

There’s also some daylight between these bikes in terms of shifting. Both are equipped with 6‑speed transmissions with cable‑actuated slip/assist clutches. Neither bike requires much effort to change gears, but the Suzuki’s gearbox is noticeably smoother, and it’s aided by the convenience of a quickshifter. The CFMOTO has an adjustable clutch lever, but the Suzuki does not.

See all of Rider‘s CFMOTO coverage here.

More Bounce to the Ounce

When manufacturers aim for aggressive price targets, one of the most common places to cut costs is with the suspension, particularly in terms of adjustability. Both CFMOTO and Suzuki sourced their components from Japanese suspension maker KYB, and both bikes have inverted forks (43mm on the CFMOTO, 41mm on the Suzuki) and rear monoshocks. The only adjustability on the GSX‑8S is rear preload, but the 800NK offers full adjustability on the fork and rebound and preload adjustability on the shock. Ride quality between the two is fairly similar, with their damping rates calibrated for general use rather than the tautness of more aggressive sportbikes, but the CFMOTO allows riders to dial in their preferences front and rear.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
Yerba Buena Road, which slithers through California’s rugged Santa Monica Mountains, was the perfect place to test these two middleweight streetfighters.

The CFMOTO has a slight edge in terms of braking. With components sourced from J.Juan, a Spanish subsidiary of Brembo, the 800NK has a pair of 4‑piston radial front calipers pinching 320mm discs, a 2‑piston rear caliper pinching a 260mm disc, a radial‑pump front master cylinder, and steel‑braided lines. The 800NK’s brakes provide strong, consistent power with good feedback from the adjustable front lever, but they could use more initial bite.

The Suzuki wears Nissin brakes, with dual 4‑piston radial front calipers squeezing 310mm discs, a 1‑piston rear caliper squeezing a 240mm disc, an axial‑pump front master cylinder, and rubber lines. Stopping power is decent, but the Suzuki’s brakes feel more numb and provide less feedback than the CFMOTO’s. ABS is standard on both bikes.

2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
The Suzuki GSX‑­8S has a minimalist look, and it’s available in Pearl Cosmic Blue (shown), Glass Matte Mechanical Gray, and Metallic Matte Black No. 2.

GEAR UP

Sit Up and Be Somebody

The 800NK and GSX‑8S are compact machines with short wheelbases, narrow waistlines, and sporty chassis geometry. Both have steel frames, steel subframes, cast‑aluminum swingarms, and tapered aluminum handlebars. From the cockpit, the Suzuki almost disappears beneath the rider thanks to its svelte tank, 1.7-inch narrower handlebar, and slender (but 0.4 inch taller) seat. The CFMOTO’s tank and bodywork flare out more, and its handlebar is wider, giving it more visual presence from the saddle. Its seat is also wider at the back and has thicker, more comfortable foam.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
The CFMOTO’s higher power, lighter weight, and wider handlebar give it an advantage over the Suzuki.

As streetfighters, these bikes lend themselves to an aggressive riding style, but they’re comfortable enough for everyday riding or commuting. Their handlebars’ bends and risers allow for an upright seating position, and their footpegs are placed high enough for good cornering clearance but low enough for adequate legroom.

When you exit the highway and find your way to a winding backroad, they are more than happy to display their athleticism. Both roll on 17‑inch cast wheels with 120/70 front and 180/55 rear tire sizes, and their radials – Maxxis Supermaxx ST on the CFMOTO, Dunlop Roadsmart 2 on the Suzuki – provide neutral handling and decent grip. With its additional steering leverage and 35‑lb weight advantage, the CFMOTO is more agile than the Suzuki but not by much.

See all of Rider‘s Suzuki coverage here.

CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX8S: Devil in the Details

In some ways, these are two evenly matched motorcycles, while in others, they diverge. One is built by a well‑established Japanese brand that has been building motorcycles since the early 1950s and selling them in America since 1963. The other is built by an upstart Chinese company that has been building motorcycles only since 2000 but has grown rapidly and not only builds its own engines and motorcycles but also builds them for KTM, Europe’s largest manufacturer.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
Both bikes have similar profiles, with pointy headlight shrouds and dagger‑­like tailsections. Despite the riders’ go‑­fast crouches above, handlebars positioned well above the triple clamp and sensibly placed footpegs allow for comfortable, upright seating positions.

Although the Suzuki GSX‑8S was introduced in 2023 as a new model with a new engine, it feels very refined. It has the build quality and fit and finish one expects from one of the Big Four Japanese manufacturers, and its engine, electronics, and chassis work together harmoniously. The GSX‑8S costs $500 more than the 800NK, but it has standard features that the CFMOTO lacks, such as traction control and an up/down quickshifter. Its bright TFT instrument panel uses a larger, thicker font and is easier to read in all conditions than the one on the 800NK.

As the new kid on the block looking to build trust in the market, CFMOTO’s value proposition is to provide more bang for the buck. For the 800NK, that starts with the tried‑and‑true KTM 790 engine that delivers an additional 17.5 hp and 3.8 lb‑ft of torque over the GSX‑8S motor. It continues with a 35‑lb lower curb weight, suspension with more adjustability, higher‑spec brakes, and features like cruise control and smartphone connectivity. Not only is the base price lower, but it comes with an additional year of warranty coverage. But it also feels rougher around the edges, particularly regarding its low‑rpm fueling.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK
The 2024 CFMOTO 800NK TFT display changes with ride mode, but the text is too small.
2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
The 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S TFT display is easy to read and adjusts to light/dark conditions.

If you’re an experienced rider who wants a light, powerful, somewhat rowdy streetfighter and can live without traction control and a quickshifter, you’ll want the CFMOTO 800NK. But if you’re someone who prioritizes smoothness and refinement over power, or if you’re a newer rider, the Suzuki GSX‑8S is for you.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S
Each bike has its strengths and weaknesses, but both provide a respectable mix of performance, technology, and style at a reasonable price.

Spec Comparo: 2024 CFMOTO 800NK vs. 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S

  • Base Price: $8,499 (CFMOTO) — $8,999 (Suzuki)
  • Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles — 1 yr., unltd. miles 
  • Website: CFMOTOusa.comSuzukiCycles.com
  • Engine Type: Liquid‑­cooled, transverse parallel‑­Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl. — Liquid­-cooled, transverse parallel-­Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
  • Displacement: 799cc — 776cc 
  • Bore x Stroke: 88 x 65.7mm — 84.0 x 70.0mm
  • Horsepower (rear-­wheel dyno): 93.4 hp @ 9,400 rpm — 75.9 hp @ 8,300 rpm
  • Torque (rear-­wheel dyno): 57.1 lb‑­ft @ 6,600 rpm — 53.3 lb‑­ft @ 6,700 rpm
  • Transmission: 6‑­speed, cable‑­actuated slip/assist wet clutch — 6‑­speed, cable‑­actuated slip/assist wet clutch 
  • Final Drive: Chain — Chain
  • Wheelbase: 57.8 in. — 57.7 in.
  • Rake/Trail: 24 degrees/3.8 in. — 25 degrees/4.1 in. 
  • Seat Height: 31.5 in. — 31.9 in. 
  • Wet Weight: 410 lb — 445 lb
  • Fuel Capacity: 4.0 gal. — 3.7 gal.
  • Fuel Consumption: 42.9 mpg — 48.7 mpg
2024 CFMOTO 800NK 2024 Suzuki GSX-8S

The post Rider Comparo: 2024 CFMOTO 800NK vs. Suzuki GSX-8S appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

21 Cool New Motorcycles at AIMExpo 2024

We’re at the 2024 American International Motorcycle Exposition (AIMExpo) in Las Vegas, where nearly 200 vendors from around the world are displaying the latest motorcycles and products to dealers, media, and other industry insiders. Here are 21 cool new motorcycles we’ve seen at the show.

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C
2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C

2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450
2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450

2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450 Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 CFMOTO Papio SS
2024 CFMOTO Papio SS

2024 CFMOTO 800NK, 450NK, and Papio CL/SS Announced


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 GasGas ES 500
2024 GasGas ES 500

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS
2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS

2024 Kawasaki Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS and Z7 Hybrid ABS Review | First Look 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 KTM 890 SMT
2024 KTM 890 SMT

2024 KTM 890 SMT Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 KTM 1390 Super Duke R Evo
2024 KTM 1390 Super Duke R Evo

2024 KTM 1390 Super Duke R Evo Review | First Look 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Moto Guzzi Stelvio
2024 Moto Guzzi Stelvio

2024 Moto Guzzi Stelvio Review | First Look


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Moto Morini Calibro
2024 Moto Morini Calibro

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 Moto Morini Corsaro Sport
2025 Moto Morini Corsaro Sport

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2025 Moto Morini X-Cape 1200
2025 Moto Morini X-Cape 1200

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 MV Agusta LXP Orioli
2024 MV Agusta LXP Orioli

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 MV Agusta Rush 1000
2024 MV Agusta Rush 1000

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 MV Agusta Superveloce 98
2024 MV Agusta Superveloce 98

New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Suzuki GSX-8R
2024 Suzuki GSX-8R

2024 Suzuki GSX-8R Review | First Ride 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+
2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+

2024 Suzuki GSX-S1000GX+ Review | First Ride 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Suzuki Hayabusa 25th Anniversary Edition
2024 Suzuki Hayabusa 25th Anniversary Edition

2024 Suzuki Hayabusa 25th Anniversary Model | First Look Review


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Triumph Scrambler 400 X
2024 Triumph Scrambler 400 X

2024 Triumph Speed 400 and Scrambler 400 X | First Look Review


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Triumph Speed 400
2024 Triumph Speed 400

2024 Triumph Speed 400 and Scrambler 400 X | First Look Review


New Motorcycles AIMExpo 2024 Triumph TF 250-X
2024 Triumph TF 250-X

2024 Triumph TF 250-X Review | First Look 


New Motorcycles AIMExpo Yamaha Tricera Concept
Yamaha Tricera Concept

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide 

The post 21 Cool New Motorcycles at AIMExpo 2024 appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450 Review | First Look

2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450
2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450 in Zephyr Blue

When the 2024 CFMOTO lineup was announced last October, notably absent was the 650 ADVentura middleweight street-adventure bike. However, added to the company’s lineup were two new naked sportbikes, one of which is based on its 450 platform, and at the annual AIMExpo in Las Vegas, the company announced two new bikes based on that same platform: the 2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450 adventure bike and the 450CL-C cruiser.     

2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450
2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450 in Tundra Grey

The Ibex 450 features a liquid-cooled 449cc parallel-Twin with DOHC, a 270-degree crank, and dual counterbalancers all working together for a claimed 44 hp at 8,500 rpm and 32.5 lb-ft of torque at 6,250 rpm. The engine is mated to a 6-speed gearbox with a slip/assist clutch. 

When we tested the 650 ADVentura in the summer of 2022, one of the things we noted was the lack of traction control. This has been added on the Ibex 450, as well as the ability to turn it off at the rear wheel. The Ibex 450 has a fully adjustable KYB inverted fork and a central-aligned, multi-link rear monoshock with adjustable damping and preload and an external gas reservoir for steady damping and enhanced heat dissipation. Suspension travel is 8 inches front and rear.  

2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450

In addition to the Standard ride mode, the Ibex 450 also features an Off-Road mode and switchable rear-wheel ABS, two features we would’ve liked on the Ibex 800 T. Otherwise, stopping power comes from J.Juan components, with a 4-piston caliper biting a single 320mm disc up front and single-piston caliper and 240mm disc in the back. 

Related: 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T | Road Test Review 

The Ibex 450 has a chromoly steel frame, tool-less windscreen adjustment, foldable mirrors, an adjustable handlebar, an aluminum alloy skid plate, and a 4.6-gallon tank. The 32.3-inch seat height/ride height can be lowered to 31.5 inches via an integrated lowering link, it has 8.7 inches of ground clearance, and it rides on tubeless, cross-spoke rims (21-inch front, 18-inch rear). The bike has a dry weight of 386 lb.   

The Ibex 450 features full LED lighting, a 5-inch curved TFT with Bluetooth and CFMOTO Ride app connectivity, and a USB type-C charging port. 

2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450

The 2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450 will come in Zephyr Blue or Tundra Grey and start at $6,499. 

For more information, visit the CFMOTO website

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide 

The post 2025 CFMOTO Ibex 450 Review | First Look appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C Review | First Look

2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C
2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C in Bordeaux Red

Following up on the addition of the new 450NK naked sportbike to the 2024 lineup, CFMOTO has announced two other new bikes based on the same platform: the 2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C cruiser and the Ibex 450 adventure bike.  

2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C

Although the CFMOTO website says that the 700CL-X has elements of a cruiser, when we tested it in 2022, we felt it was more naked sportbike with scrambler styling. However, the new 450CL-C firmly plants its flag in cruiser territory. 

Related: 2022 CFMOTO 700CL-X | Road Test Review 

The 450CL-C features a liquid-cooled 449cc parallel-Twin with DOHC, a 270-degree crank, and dual counterbalancers all working together for a claimed 40 hp at 8,000 rpm and 30 lb-ft of torque at 6,250 rpm. The engine is mated to a 6-speed transmission, a slip/assist clutch, a Gates belt final drive, and a dual-chamber exhaust coated in a matte ceramic finish. 

2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C
2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C in Nebula Black

Braking is provided by J.Juan components, with a 4-piston caliper and single 320mm front disc and a single-piston caliper and 240mm disc in the rear. For suspension, the 450CL-C has a 37mm inverted fork and central monoshock. ABS and traction control are standard. 

2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C

The 450CL-C rides on a 58.5-inch wheelbase and has a 28-degree rake and 4.25 inches of trail. The curb weight is listed at 399 lb with its 3.2-gallon fuel tank full. The bike rolls on 16-inch rims wrapped in chunky tires (130/90-R16 front, 150/80-R16 rear) and has a 27-inch seat height.

It has full LED lighting and a 3.6-inch round TFT display with Bluetooth and CFMOTO Ride app connectivity. 

2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C

The 2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C will come in Bordeaux Red and Nebula Black and start at $5,699. 

For more information, visit the CFMOTO website

Check out more new bikes in Rider’s 2024 Motorcycle Buyers Guide 

The post 2025 CFMOTO 450CL-C Review | First Look appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2024 CFMOTO 800NK, 450NK, and Papio CL/SS Announced

2024 CFMOTO 800NK
2024 CFMOTO 800NK

CFMOTO has announced some changes to its 2024 motorcycle lineup. The CFMOTO 800NK naked sportbike joins CFMOTO’s Ibex 800 S and T adventure bikes in the middleweight class. The 450NK is another new naked sportbike that joins the 450SS, and the Papio minibike lineup now includes two models, the Papio CL and Papio SS.

Models returning for 2024 include the 300NK, 300SS, 700CL-X, and 700CL-X Sport. The 650NK naked bike and 650 ADVentura street-adventure bike have been dropped from the lineup.

Related: 2022 CFMOTO 700CL-X Review | Road Test

2024 CFMOTO 800NK

2024 CFMOTO 800NK

Similar to its adventure bike stablemates, the new CFMOTO 800NK features a liquid-cooled 799cc parallel-Twin with DOHC and 4 valves per cylinder that makes a claimed 100 hp at 9,500 rpm and 60 lb-ft of torque at 8,000 rpm. This is a previous-gen version of the KTM 790 engine that CFMOTO builds under a partnership agreement. The 800NK has a 6-speed gearbox, throttle-by-wire, and a slip/assist clutch. The 800NK adds a Street ride mode in addition to the Sport and Rain modes found on the Ibex 800 models. All three models have cruise control, but the Ibex 800 T is the only model that features a quickshifter.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK

Related: 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T Review | Road Test

The 800NK has fully adjustable KYB suspension, with an inverted fork and single shock, and for stopping power, all 800 models have J.Juan components, with radial-mount 4-piston calipers biting dual 320mm discs up front and a 2-piston floating caliper pinching a single 260mm disc in the rear. ABS is standard.

The naked sportbike rides on 17-inch aluminum alloy wheels with a 57.8-inch wheelbase. Seat height is 31.5 inches, and with a 4-gal. fuel tank, the bike comes in with a curb weight of 417 lb.

2024 CFMOTO 800NK

The 800NK has full LED lighting and a 5-inch TFT display with Bluetooth compatibility and device pairing via the CFMOTO Ride App.

The 2024 CFMOTO 800NK will come in Nebula Black or Zircon White starting at $8,499.

2024 CFMOTO 450NK

2024 CFMOTO 450NK

When we tested the 2023 CFMOTO 450SS in the Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee and North Carolina, our reviewer said the bike “proved a trustworthy steed that allowed me to work on my cornering skills with a confidence-inspiring ride.” For 2024, CFMOTO has released the naked sportbike version of the platform, which features the same liquid-cooled 449cc parallel-Twin with DOHC and 4 valves per cylinder and a 270 crank, all working together for a claimed 50 hp at 9,500 rpm and 28.8 lb-ft of torque at 7,600 rpm and mated to a 6-speed gearbox and slip/assist clutch. 

Related: 2023 CFMOTO 450SS Review | First Ride

Both the 450NK and 450SS also share the same suspension, with an inverted fork and multi-link rear suspension, but for stopping power, the 450NK uses J.Juan components while the 450SS uses Brembo M40 front calipers. However, other braking specs are the same, with a 4-piston front caliper biting a 320mm disc and a single-piston floating caliper and 270mm disc in the rear. ABS is standard on both bikes.

2024 CFMOTO 450NK

Both bikes ride on 17-inch aluminum alloy wheels. CFMOTO hasn’t specified the tires on the 2024 450SS – the 2023 model was shod with CST Adreno HS AS5 tires – but the 450NK has Maxxis Supermaxx ST tires.

The 450NK comes in with a slightly longer wheelbase than the SS (53.9 inches vs. 53.5), a slightly higher seat height (31.3 inches vs. 31.0), and at a trim 364 lb, it’s 6 pounds lighter than the SS.

Both bikes have full LED lighting and a 5-inch TFT display with Bluetooth compatibility and device pairing via the CFMOTO Ride App.

Both 2024 CFMOTO 450 models come in Nebula White, but the second option for the 450NK is Zephyr Blue, as opposed to Zircon Black for the 450SS. The 450NK starts at $5,399, and the 450SS starts at $5,699.

2024 Papio CL and SS

The CFMOTO Papio takes its name from the genus that includes baboons, and when our reviewer tested out a 2022 Papio at a CFMOTO launch in Minneapolis, he said the ride indeed was like a barrel of monkeys.

Related: 2022 CFMOTO Motorcycle Lineup Review | First Ride

For 2024, CFMOTO now offers two Papio models that will appeal to different buyers. CFMOTO says the Papio CL has “scrambler roots” and is more geared toward playing the dirt, while the Papio SS has a retro racing look.  

2024 CFMOTO Papio CL
2024 CFMOTO Papio CL

Both bikes feature an air-cooled fuel-injected 126cc Single making 9.4 hp, but the peak comes a little sooner than the 2023 model (8,250 rpm vs. 8,500), and the torque is slightly higher at 6.8 lb-ft compared to 6.5 lb-ft on the 2023 model. The engine is mated to a 6-speed gearbox, which is a unique feature in this segment.

2024 CFMOTO Papio SS
2024 CFMOTO Papio SS

Suspension is still provided by an inverted telescopic fork (with lower covers on the CL for extra protection) and a central monoshock, and braking still comes from a 2-piston caliper and 210mm disc up front with a single-piston caliper and 190mm disc in the back. ABS is standard on both models.

2024 CFMOTO Papio SS
2024 CFMOTO Papio SS

Both bikes roll on 12-inch three-spoke aluminum alloy wheels, with the CL tires sporting a more chunky tread pattern than the SS. The CL also has a higher handlebar and lower footpegs to suit its purpose, while the SS has clip-on handlebars, a quarter fairing, and a lower belly pan. The sharper beak on the previous Papio has been softened for 2024 and now features dual round LED headlights.

2024 CFMOTO Papio CL
2024 CFMOTO Papio CL

Seat height has dropped a half-inch from the previous Papio, down to 30 inches on both 2024 models, and while the fuel tank capacity is one-tenth of a gallon less at 1.8 gal, the curb weight still comes in at 251 lb. The 2024 Papio CL comes in Nebula Black or Galaxy Grey starting at $3,299, and the Papio SS comes in Magma Red, Nebula White, or Moss Green, also at $3,299.

For more information, visit the CFMOTO website.

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Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 Motorcycle of the Year Countdown

2023 Rider Magazine Motorcycle of the Year

Starting Friday, Sept. 8, and resuming Monday, Sept. 11, we’ll be announcing two MOTY finalists per day, with the big reveal of Rider‘s 2023 Motorcycle of the Year winner on Friday, Sept. 15. So bookmark this page and keep checking back. –Ed.


If Rider’s Motorcycle of the Year, now in its 34th year, were a person, it would have graduated from college or completed military service, launched a career, got married, bought a house, and started a family. It would have a couple motorcycles in the garage, perhaps a cruiser or sport-tourer for the open road and a dual-sport or adventure bike for exploring the backcountry.

In other words, it would be like the rest of us: a dedicated motorcycle enthusiast.

Rider has been bringing you “Motorcycling at Its Best” for almost 50 years. We’ve tested nearly every street-legal motorcycle on the market, with an emphasis on real-world bikes that are within reach for most of us. For every $100,000 Arch 1s we review, we test dozens if not hundreds of motorcycles you’ll find in dealerships and garages across America, from sea to shining sea.

Related: 2022 Motorcycle of the Year

2022 Motorcycle of the Year Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+
Rider’s 2022 Motorcycle of the Year: The 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Unlike car dealers, most motorcycle dealers don’t offer test rides. Demo rides are great, but they are few and far between and often involve parade-pace conga lines that don’t allow riders to experience a motorcycle’s true capabilities. We know you count on us to provide honest, in-depth reviews to help you make informed purchase decisions – or to just keep you up to date on the latest and greatest bikes on the market.

Every year, we ride as many new or significantly updated motorcycles as we can and evaluate them within the context of their intended use. Then we put our collective heads together and identify those that best fulfill their intended purpose and advance the state of motorcycle design, performance, and function.

For 2023, there were more than 80 eligible contenders. We narrowed them down to 10 finalists and one winner. Starting Friday, Sept 8, and resuming Monday, Sept. 11, we’ll be updating this post with two finalists per day, with the big reveal of this year’s 2023 Motorcycle of the Year winner on Friday, Sept. 15. So bookmark this page and keep checking back.

Without further ado…

2023 Motorcycle of the Year Finalists:

1. BMW R 18 Roctane

2024 BMW R 18 Roctane
BMW R 18 Roctane (Photo by Jörg Künstle, Markus Jahn)

The fifth member of the R 18 family is a unique alternative to the ubiquitous American V-Twin. It’s powered by the BMW 1,802cc “Big Boxer” Twin and features blacked-out styling, a midrise handlebar, a 21-inch front wheel, and hard saddlebags. The Roctane has admirable curb appeal, good comfort and handling, and high-tech features including Rock, Roll, and Rain ride modes.

Related: 2024 BMW R 18 Roctane | First Ride Review  

2. CFMOTO Ibex 800 T

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
CFMOTO Ibex 800 T (Photo by Aaron Crane)

CFMOTO has been on the gas lately, expanding its motorcycle lineup from seven to 10 models, including two versions of the Ibex 800 adventure-tourer powered by a 790cc parallel-Twin adapted from the KTM 790 Adventure. The top-of-the-line Ibex 800 T is comfortable, capable, and packed with useful features yet retails for an accessible $10,499.

Related: 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T | Road Test Review 

Check back Monday, Sept. 11, for the next two finalists!

The post 2023 Motorcycle of the Year Countdown appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 CFMOTO 450SS | First Ride Review 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
We test the 2023 CFMOTO 450SS sportbike in the Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee and North Carolina. (Photos by Killboy)

Earlier this year, we tested the 2023 CFMOTO 300SS, a small and capable sportbike that is the company’s bestseller worldwide. Next up the ladder is the CFMOTO 450SS, which joined the 10-model lineup this year.  

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
The CFMOTO 450SS provides upgraded components and more power over CFMOTO’s top-selling 300SS.

The CFMOTO 450SS rings in at $5,499, which is $1,000 more than the 300SS. For the extra grand, the 450 delivers 158cc more displacement and one more cylinder than the smaller bike’s 292cc Single. It also features a Brembo front brake caliper, adjustable levers, a more informative and brighter TFT display, and other upgrades. Color options for 2023 are Nebula Black with blue accents or Zircon Black with red accents. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
LED lights and the windshield add to the 450SS’s ride experience.

Level Up 

In the small sportbike segment, CFMOTO is the only manufacturer offering a 450, and the 450SS’s liquid-cooled 449cc parallel-Twin makes a claimed 50 hp at 9,500 rpm and 28.8 lb-ft of torque at 7,600 rpm. Its closest competitors are the KTM RC 390 (44 hp, 373cc Single, $5,899), Kawasaki Ninja 400 (45 hp, 399cc parallel-Twin, $5,299), and QJ Motor SRK400RR (44 hp, 400cc parallel-Twin, $5,099). The CFMOTO, KTM, and QJ Motor all come standard with ABS, but it’s a $400 upgrade on the Kawasaki. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
The 450SS’s 449cc parallel-Twin provides ample fun and immediate power.

GEAR UP

The 450SS’s engine has Bosch fuel injection, dual overhead cams with 4 valves per cylinder, and a 270-degree crankshaft, which gives it a rumbling sound and feel. The engine is mated to a 6-speed gearbox and a slip/assist clutch. The bike’s wet weight is 370 lb, only 6 lb heavier than the 300SS, and it has a 3.7-gal. fuel capacity, a 31-inch seat height, and a 53.5-inch wheelbase. 

Related: 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T | Road Test Review 

Suspension comes in the form of a 37mm inverted fork and a multi-link rear shock with preload that can be adjusted using the small toolkit under the seat. Stopping power comes from a radially mounted Brembo M40 4-piston front caliper biting a 320mm disc and a single-piston floating caliper and 270mm disc in the rear. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
Some riders might prefer higher-spec tires, but I found the stock CST Adreno HS AS5 tires sufficient for my needs.

First Date 

Upon pulling up at my local CFMOTO dealer and parking the 300SS beside the 450SS, I noticed that the 450SS has a similar overall appearance to the 300SS but with features that make it look sportier and a bit sexier. From the streamlined windshield and larger exhaust to the sliders on the bodywork and race-inspired winglets, the 450SS looks like it means business. Upon turning the key, the LED headlight performs a sort of welcome dance in which light flows from top to bottom and flashes to catch the eye of passersby. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
The sporty looks of the 450SS attracts eyes wherever it goes.

Firing up the 450SS produces a nice growl from the 449cc parallel-Twin. The seating position is comfortable for me, and I could ride the 450SS for longer periods of time than I could the 300SS before I needed to hop off and stretch out. At 5-foot-1, I had plenty of leg room and seat room. The reach to the clip-ons was a bit long but not uncomfortable. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
A view from the seat shows buttons within easy reach and a windshield that helps with buffeting.

Rolling on the throttle, the 450SS delivers immediate power. Initial throttle response is a little jumpy, but that smooths out in higher gears. Once it gets going, the bike has enough power and grunt on tap for me to do everything I want to do whenever I want to do it. To see how the 450SS stood up against longer hours in the saddle and more aggressive corners, I spent three days putting about 700 miles on the bike in the Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee and North Carolina. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
A trip to the mountains is always welcome, especially aboard a fun and capable machine like CFMOTO’s 450SS.

Wanting to make progress on my way to Robbinsville, North Carolina, from my home in Middle Tennessee, I ripped the 450SS up the interstate for about 130 miles, and the bike was happy to play along. (See sidebar below about 129 Cabins, a motorcycle-friendly inn where I stayed on this trip.) Whenever I needed to push past slower-moving traffic or change speeds, it was eager to comply. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
With a claimed 50 hp and 28.8 lb-ft, along with a Brembo front brake caliper, the 450SS makes for an enjoyable experience on twisty mountain roads.

When I got off the interstate and started winding my way through the mountains, the 450SS felt right at home. One upgrade over the 300SS that I appreciated was the front brake. Where the 300SS’s front brake felt weak and needed some encouragement to apply the right amount of pinch, the 450SS’s Brembo M40 front brake was responsive and shed speed quickly. It was a welcome upgrade when I hit the twisty roads through the mountains, including my first foray on the Tail of the Dragon. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
The seating position on the 450SS is comfortable for me, although taller riders might desire more leg room.

The suspension provided confidence as I dipped and climbed. I adjusted the front brake and clutch levers with the dial adjustments on both, and I was glad to be able to shorten my reach and put the levers in easy grabbing distance. As a rider with smaller hands, needing to stretch my wrist to reach the front brake lever affects my grip on the throttle, and having a shorter reach allowed me to experience the 450 without such hinderances. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
The Brembo M40 4-piston front caliper biting a 320mm disc provides excellent stopping power, an improvement over the CFMOTO 300SS’s weaker-feeling front brake.

On my return trip to Middle Tennessee, I rode on wet roads and dodged storms for several hours. Although I didn’t push the bike too hard in the rain, the CST Adreno HS AS5 tires never misbehaved. They held onto the pavement and provided adequate grip in the turns. When the roads were dry, the tires felt even better. Some riders who are more willing to push the 450SS to its limits might desire a higher-performing tire, but I found the stock tires were plenty for my needs. 

From the Cockpit 

The 5-inch TFT display is also an upgrade over the TFT on the 300SS. I found the display on the 300SS a little hard to see in direct sunlight, but the display on the 450SS is always bright and visible. It also provides more information than the display on the 300SS. You’ll find speed, a tachometer, a clock, gear position, and fuel level, as expected. With up and down arrows on the left switch, you can also toggle between a variety of information, including an odometer, two tripmeters, range, average speed, fuel consumption, and average mph per trip. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
The 5-inch TFT display’s Concision mode allows for easy navigation through options and settings. (Photo by the author)

The 450SS will also connect to a phone via Bluetooth, and from the CFMOTO app, the rider can pull up navigation and music on the display. The navigation worked the same as on the 300SS, which means there are still some kinks that need to be worked out. For example, when choosing a route on the app, I’m given two options. If I choose the longer option that avoids interstates and highways, the navigation will hold that route for a mile or two before trying to direct me to the faster route. I also still don’t like that the distance to the next turn is given in inches after coming within 0.1 mile of the turn, which was an annoyance with the 300SS as well. However, these are minor nuisances for which I expect CFMOTO will find a solution before long. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
The Classics display mode makes revs and speed easy to see with less extra information to distract from the ride. (Photo by the author)

The 300SS comes with two ride modes. In contrast, the 450SS has no ride modes, but it does have two display modes. Concision mode provides more information and easier access to all the options, and Classics mode is simplified and puts revs and speed front and center. 

One More Round 

For a moto trip to and through the Appalachian Mountains, the CFMOTO 450SS proved a trustworthy steed that allowed me to work on my cornering skills with a confidence-inspiring ride. I enjoyed the 300SS as well, but if I were deciding between the two, I’d opt for the higher-powered and more refined 450SS for $1,000 extra. The parallel-Twin is impressively responsive, the Brembo front brake provides much better braking, and the dimensions are more comfortable for longer stints in the saddle. I’d be happy to keep this one in the garage and on the road for a while longer. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review

2023 CFMOTO 450SS Specifications 

  • Base Price: $5,499  
  • Website: CFMOTOUSA.com  
  • Warranty: 2 yr., unltd. miles  
  • Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl. 
  • Displacement: 449cc  
  • Bore x Stroke: 77.0 x 55.2mm  
  • Horsepower: 50 hp @ 9,500 rpm (factory claim)  
  • Torque: 28.8 lb-ft @ 7,600 rpm (factory claim)  
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch   
  • Final Drive: Chain  
  • Wheelbase: 53.5 in. 
  • Seat Height: 31 in. 
  • Wet Weight: 370 lb  
  • Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gal.  
  • Fuel Consumption: 63 mpg 
  • Estimated Range: 233 miles  

SIDEBAR: 129 Cabins 

My trip to Robbinsville, North Carolina, for this test ride not only provided me with excellent roads in the Appalachian Mountains but also a chance to get away and enjoy the beauty of the area. Not wanting to stay at an uninspiring chain hotel, I found a room at 129 Cabins that had exactly what I was looking for: proximity to great riding roads, solitude, and scenery. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
129 Cabins features three buildings with two private rooms each, as well as the Lodge to host larger groups. The fire pits, covered porch with rocking chairs, and individual motorcycle garages add to the homey feel of a stay at 129 Cabins.

Located off of U.S. Route 129 about 25 miles southeast of the Tail of the Dragon, 129 Cabins offers six private rooms on a wooded hillside, each with a private motorcycle garage. I stayed in a room with a king bed, but other layouts have two full-size beds or a king and bunk beds. Each room includes a large TV, wi-fi, air conditioning, a bathroom and shower, a microwave, a minifridge, and a breakfast area with a table and coffee pot. Outside each room is a covered porch with rocking chairs and a supply of firewood for the firepits located around the cabins. There is also a lodge available for rent for larger groups. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
A single motorcycle garage attached to the cabin was convenient for keeping my ride safe and dry during the night.

My room was clean and comfortable, as well as more spacious than I expected. The firepit provided a welcoming spot to relax in the evenings, and the porch was perfect for listening to the rain while I sipped my morning cup of coffee. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
Rocking chairs with a table on the covered porch gave me a spot to sip a morning cup of coffee before gearing up for my ride.

I’d recommend 129 Cabins to anyone looking for an Appalachian motorcycle getaway. Pricing starts at $89, and more information can be found at the 129 Cabins website or by calling 865-771-0957. 

2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Ride Review
The CFMOTO 450SS and I enjoyed our relaxing and remote stay at 129 Cabins in Robbinsville, North Carolina.

The post 2023 CFMOTO 450SS | First Ride Review  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T | Road Test Review 

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
The 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T is more geared toward on-road touring, but it comes with standard features that make intermediate backroads a whole lotta fun as well. (Photos by Aaron Crane)

CFMOTO is no stranger to off-road vehicles. In fact, many of you may be more familiar with CFMOTO ATVs and side-by-sides, which the company has been selling in the U.S. for more than 20 years. Its first foray into the ADV market was the street-focused 650 ADVentura, announced in June of last year as part of the 2022 lineup. More recently, the company released the 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T and Ibex 800 S, with the 800 T designed for “when the blacktop turns to dirt” – fitting since the bike is named after a wild mountain goat.  

Related: 2022 CFMOTO Motorcycle Lineup | First Ride Review 

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
MSRP for the 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T is $10,499. Our test bike was equipped with the optional centerstand ($279.99) and pannier set ($1,699.99), for an as-tested price of $12,479.

Both the Ibex 800 T and S are powered by a liquid-cooled 799cc parallel-Twin with DOHC and 4 valves per cylinder borrowed from the previous-generation KTM 790 Adventure that makes a claimed 94 hp and 57 lb-ft of torque and is mated to a 6-speed gearbox with a slip/assist clutch (the T also adds a quickshifter to the mix). Both bikes are equipped with throttle-by-wire and have two ride modes (Sport and Rain) and cruise control.

The Ibex 800 S ($9,499) rolls on cast wheels (19-inch front, 17-inch rear) and is aimed at street-focused riders. The Ibex 800 T ($10,499) has spoked wheels and is equipped with several upgrades, including a skid plate, heated grips, a heated seat, a quickshifter, and both USB and 12V outlets. Our Ibex 800 T test bike was equipped with the optional centerstand ($279.99) and pannier set ($1,699.99), for an as-tested price of $12,479.

Related: 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 S | First Look Review

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
The Ibex 800 T has a KYB inverted fork and rear monoshock, both fully adjustable.

When I fired up the Ibex 800 T for the first time, I found the aural quality of the engine to be kind of chirpy, but once you get moving, the billy goat gets gruff, producing a satisfying growl and a surge forward with some nice grunt in the midrange. However, the throttle-by-wire needs some fine tuning. In Sport mode, response was a bit too snatchy. This can be mitigated in Rain mode, but when the roads are dry, this seems more like a workaround than a feature. The throttle-by-wire also led to issues in the dirt, but more on that shortly. 

As this is an adventure-touring bike, it seemed fitting that my first experience on the bike was about 50 miles of interstate – and 3,000 feet of elevation gain – to my house. The 800 T has an adjustable windscreen, and it was quite effective at preventing buffeting for my 6-foot frame. I kept the windscreen at the highest position, but for those wanting it somewhere else, height adjustment is tool-less and quick, offering about 2 inches of range. 

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
The skid plate and heated grips and seat are nice up-spec features the Ibex 800 T has over its 800 S stablemate.

The Ibex 800 T rides on Maxxis MaxxVenture MA1 tires, which CFMOTO says are manufactured specifically for the bike. Their tread pattern is that of a 90/10 (road/off-road) tire, and as such, I felt the tires performed admirably on the pavement. They offered a smooth ride and weren’t noisy at high speeds, and when combined with the fully adjustable KYB suspension (6.3/5.9 inches of travel front/rear), they inspired more confidence than I was expecting when cornering. Even with the 37 lb of the accessory aluminum top and side cases added, I definitely enjoyed the ride when I was able to get it off the interstate and onto some state highways with more sweepers. 

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
The accessory aluminum top case has a 36-liter capacity – big enough for a full-size helmet – and like the other cases, it has a lockable lid and quick-release mounting system.

CFMOTO Ibex 800 T: In It For the Distance…Mostly   

There were a couple issues I noticed during those first miles on the Ibex. First, there was something about the aerodynamics of the bike that caused a high pitched, near-constant whistle between 65 and 80 mph. Thinking it might’ve been the cases (it sounded like it was coming from behind me), I pulled them off and tested again after I got home, but I still got the same result. I’m not sure what could be done to remedy this, but I would want to get it solved if this was my bike.  

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
The Ibex 800 T comes with LED headlights, taillights, turnsignals, and fog lights.

Another minor issue is the cruise control. The buttons are large and easy to reach, but it tops out at 80 mph. In my home state of Utah, that’s the interstate speed limit, a speed that it seems like only the semis do…sometimes. The Ibex is a bike that feels steady at higher speeds, and I took it easily above 80 on a few occasions when I needed to overtake someone, but I was limited if I wanted to peg the cruise.       

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
The Ibex 800s have the same liquid-cooled 799cc parallel-Twin as the 2019 KTM 790 Adventure.

Otherwise, this is a bike that is comfortable for the distance, especially on the highway. Its handling was a pleasure – even more enjoyable when I tested it without the added weight of the cases – and the handlebar is set at a good height and sweep and combines with an approachable 32.5-inch seat height (and a relatively wide and cushy saddle) for an upright position that matched my frame and 32-inch inseam. On a longer trip I took, I stopped every couple hours for gas, but there wasn’t any inordinate stiffness in my body as I stepped off the bike, and I was ready to hop back on as soon as it was filled up. 

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
This Ibex 800 T has a 5-gallon tank, and we averaged 44.2 mpg and 224 miles of range. (Photo by the author)

The 7-inch TFT is clear and easy to read. The home screen includes everything you might want to see without feeling too cluttered, and the submenus offer a plethora of options, including three levels of heated grips and heated seats, handy features when I was climbing to higher elevations. Getting to the various submenus, however, requires a combination of long and quick pushes of several buttons that is reminiscent of the starting sequence of Furiosa’s rig in Mad Max: Fury Road, which can get a little cumbersome if you’re wanting to turn on those heated grips on the fly…or during the apocalypse. Once you get the sequence down, it’s pretty intuitive, but sometimes I got sent back to the main menu by accident, and there were times the menu froze up entirely for a moment. 

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
The 90/10 Maxxis MaxxVenture MA1 tires were great on the pavement, but serious ADV riders will want to fit something more off-road ready.

The bike’s navigation feature is also a little clunky. On my longer trip, I paired the bike to my phone with the CFMOTO Ride app and set a destination. The app offered a couple alternate choices to the main route, but when I selected one and set off, the navigation kept trying to take me on the original route, attempting to reroute me every time I ignored it. Also, even though the automated voice in my helmet was giving distances in miles, the display was giving me kilometers. My colleague Allison Parker had similar issues with the navigation feature on a different CFMOTO (see her 2023 CFMOTO 300SS First Ride Review here). At least I wasn’t being given distances in inches like she was, but there are certainly a few kinks to be worked out with the app’s navigation settings. 

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
The 7-inch TFT means there is plenty of room for everything you want to see without feeling cluttered. (Photo by the author)

However, I appreciated that all the home screen information was still displayed across the top of the navigation screen. And when it comes to connectivity and charging, the Ibex has two USB ports and a 12-volt port just below and on either side of the TFT display.    

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
The windscreen offers 2 inches of height adjustment and provides good wind protection.

And ‘When the Blacktop Turns to Dirt’? 

This is my first time on an ADV bike, and while I enjoyed the new experience, I think the Ibex 800 T in stock form won’t provide the adventure that more experienced ADV riders seek, although there are accessories that would take it up a notch. At a minimum, mounting more off-road-ready tires would be smart if you want to get dirty. 

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
The design of the Ibex 800 T provided a comfortable standing position for my 6-foot frame with having to lean over.

While enjoying a highway tour on the bike, I spotted a dirt road in the distance that left the pavement, heading off into the hills between the sagebrush and pinyon junipers. It was a two-track intermediate dirt road, not too sandy, rutted, or rocky. I was comfortable in the standing position that suited my height without feeling strain in my back, and I rode relatively conservatively. However, I felt hindered from pushing myself a little more by that snatchy throttle. I may have been physically comfortable standing at steady speed, but slight rolling on or off of the throttle threw me off balance.  

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
Being able to take the Ibex 800 T on this trek off the beaten path made my appreciate my first foray into the ADV bike segment. (Photo by the author)

After I came to a turn-around point on the dirt road, since I was enjoying this newfound freedom – I kept thinking about how there was no way my Harley Softail would’ve taken me on this adventure – I decided to see if putting it in Rain mode would allow me to take the pace up a little.  

Some of you may see where this is going. 

For stopping power, both Ibex 800 models have J.Juan components, with radial-mount 4-piston calipers biting dual 320mm discs up front and a 2-piston floating caliper pinching a single 260mm disc in the rear. The brakes did a great job on the pavement, shedding speed when necessary without feeling too grabby. Both bikes also have cornering ABS, which is where I ran into a problem in the dirt. 

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
J.Juan radial-mount 4-piston calipers and dual 320mm discs provide confident stopping power on the pavement.

Unlike some other ADV bikes on the market, ABS cannot be turned off and there’s not an off-road ABS mode (which typically has less intervention on the front wheel and disables ABS at the rear). As I rode down the dirt road in Rain mode, even at slow speed, applying the front brake lever made the front end shudder as ABS kicked in. Down I went.  

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
The accessory aluminum top and side cases add 37 pounds to the overall weight, but the 99 liters of total capacity are great for touring.

After I hefted the 546-lb bike back up on its rubber, I switched back to Sport mode, as I hadn’t noticed the ABS issue when riding with that setting. So for the rest of my novice dirt adventure, I was caught between wanting to push myself a little more but not feeling confident with the snatchy throttle responses. 

Right on the Cusp 

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T
Even with the accessory cases, the Ibex 800 T confidently carved out the sweepers in Sport mode and made for an exhilarating ride.

Besides not having switchable ABS, most of my nits to pick with the Ibex 800 T are pretty minor and will hopefully work themselves out in future models – or at least with a Utah version that ups the cruise control limit. When all is said and done, this is a fun bike that feels like it’s right on the cusp of staking its claim as a solid adventure-touring bike for a reasonable price.  

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T

2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T Specs 

  • Base Price: $10,499 
  • Price as Tested: $12,479 (centerstand [$279.99] and pannier set [$1,699.99]) 
  • Website: CFMOTOUSA.com 
  • Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles 
  • Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl. 
  • Displacement: 799cc 
  • Bore x Stroke: 88 x 65.7mm 
  • Horsepower: 94 hp @ 9,000 rpm (factory claim) 
  • Torque: 56.8 lb-ft @ 7,500 rpm (factory claim) 
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch 
  • Final Drive: Chain 
  • Wheelbase: 60.3 in. 
  • Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.06 in. 
  • Seat Height: 32.5 in. 
  • Wet Weight: 509 lb (without panniers) 
  • Fuel Capacity: 5 gal.
  • Fuel Consumption: 44 mpg
  • Estimated Range: 220 miles

The post 2023 CFMOTO Ibex 800 T | Road Test Review  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2023 CFMOTO 300SS | First Ride Review 

CFMOTO 300SS
The 2023 CFMOTO 300SS exceeds expectations with thoughtful features and a good fit and finish. (Photos by Yve Assad)

Last year, CFMOTO returned to the U.S. market with a seven-model lineup. The company’s list of models has since grown to 10, ranging from the 126cc Papio minibike to the Ibex 800 T adventure bike. CFMOTO’s best seller worldwide is the 300SS, a lightweight sportbike with full bodywork. 

Related: 2022 CFMOTO Motorcycle Lineup | First Ride Review 

One of CFMOTO’s value propositions is affordability. The 300SS has an MSRP of $4,499, which is $400 less than the Honda CBR300R and $1,000 less than the more powerful Yamaha YZF-R3. But CFMOTO is going to have to do more than offer a better price to compete with brands that have already earned the trust of many American riders. 

CFMOTO 300SS
The semi-circle of color around the wheels adds personality to CFMOTO’s top-seller.

However, curious to see what makes the 300SS so popular, I spent a month riding it on a variety of city streets, highways, and winding country roads. 

Swing a Leg Over 

The 300SS is powered by a 292cc Single that makes a claimed 29 hp at 8,750 rpm and 18.7 ft-lb of torque at 7,250 rpm, numbers nearly on par with Honda’s CB300 range of bikes. It’s fairly lightweight at 364 lb, and it sports a narrow seat with a 30.7-inch height and has a 3.2-gallon fuel tank. Riding on a steel trellis frame, the 300SS has an inverted fork and a single rear shock with five-position preload adjustability. For 2023, color options are Nebula Black with red accents (as tested) and Ghost Gray with blue accents. 

CFMOTO 300SS
The 292cc engine is eager to please and easy to handle.

When I picked up our test bike and first swung a leg over it, I was immediately impressed by its appearance alone. The lines on the bodywork are well-done, the colored stripe on the wheels adds personality, and the air vents under the passenger seat make the 300SS look like it means business. Aside from looking cool, it also has good fit and finish. 

CFMOTO 300SS
The clip-on handlebars provide a sporty seating position for zipping around corners, and the carbon-fiber-styled accent on the fuel tank adds character.

The only thing about it that seemed odd was the reach to the mirrors. It’s not something I think about with a new bike often, but when I reached up to adjust the mirrors, they were so far away that I could barely touch them. However, I was able to set the mirrors where I wanted them without having to adjust them throughout the ride, so it wasn’t much of an issue. 

Related: 2023 CFMOTO 450SS | First Look Review

Twist Off 

Since I picked the bike up in a suburb of Nashville, I had to putter along for a few miles before I could really open it up and see what it could do. Right away, the bike felt easy to ride, and that held true when I was able to get up to speed. Its small size and easy-to-control clutch make it nimble and responsive. The gearing felt dialed in just right. The 292cc engine had plenty of power to zip off from a red light and get me down the interstate, but it never felt like it was trying to run away without me. The 300SS’s smaller size, flickability, and affordability make this bike a smart choice for new riders. 

CFMOTO 300SS
The 300SS comes equipped with full LED lighting, two ride modes, Bluetooth connectivity, ABS, and other thoughtful features.

For a bike with a price below its competition, the 300SS has a few features that were pleasantly surprising additions. For example, it comes equipped with two ride modes: Eco and Sport. I started out using Eco mode but switched to using Sport primarily. There’s not a big difference between the two modes, but Sport is a bit peppier and more fun. And this is a bike to have fun on. It gave me confidence in curves and had me grinning from ear to ear. Shifting gears is smooth, and the sporty seating position made me feel like I was riding faster than I was – in a good way. 

CFMOTO 300SS
Air vents under the passenger seat add to the 300SS’s sporty look.

However, that sportier seating position is not ideal for longer trips. Maybe if I were more used to the sporty ergonomics, I wouldn’t feel fatigued so quickly. As it was, I could ride the 300SS for about 45 minutes to an hour before I started looking for a spot to pull over and shake out the aches. For bopping around town or going on quick sprints close to the house, the narrow profile and firm seat were perfect and put me in a controlling position. 

CFMOTO 300SS
Rear suspension is provided by an Internal Floating Piston monoshock with five-position preload adjustability.

In the sweeping curves through the hills of rural Tennessee, the suspension was just right. The only time I regretted having firm suspension was on the potholed and bumpy Interstate 40 through Memphis, but that section of road is notoriously rough on all vehicles. Everywhere else, the suspension provided a nice balance of control and comfort. 

Gear Up

While riding around town, several people approached me to ask about the bike and told me they thought it looked really cool. They say you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but there’s something to be said for a bike that’s both fun to ride and fun to look at, and the 300SS is both. 

CFMOTO 300SS
The 300SS is CFMOTO’s top-selling motorcycle, and I can understand why. Its quality build, sporty looks, and low price make it an attractive option.

Exceeding Expectations 

Another nice touch for a low-price bike is the 5-inch TFT display. The display shows everything you’d expect: odometer, tachometer, speed, fuel level, voltage, temp, time, and gear. When switching ride modes, the layout changes, making it easy to tell the mode has changed but maybe a little harder to find what you’re looking for if you’ve already gotten used to the other layout. 

CFMOTO 300SS
The TFT display changes layout when switched to a different ride mode. I enjoyed both the performance and the display layout of Sport mode.

The display is easy to read as long as it’s not in direct sunlight. When the sun was behind me, I found myself having to move my head to shade the display to read it, which was a little annoying. The display also connects with the CFMOTO RIDE app for navigation and playing music. One feature I appreciated was the security alert. Once connected, the app will alert your phone if the bike is rolled without keys in it, a handy feature if someone tries to take it off your hands while you’re not around. 

CFMOTO 300SS
The mirrors provide a nice view of what’s coming up on your rear. Just make sure you adjust them before you take off, as they’re a little hard to reach while riding.

My only other beef with the display is that, while using the navigation, once the distance to your next turn or destination is less than 0.1 mile, that distance is given in inches rather than feet or yards. Maybe you’re better at judging distances than I am, but if you asked me to walk 5,864 inches in one direction, I’d have to pull out a calculator to figure out approximately how far I needed to go. It wasn’t a problem on the sparsely populated country roads, but while riding in downtown Memphis, it was hard to know if I should turn at the next block or the one after that. Even though I’d prefer measurements in feet instead of inches, having navigation on a low-price model was welcome, and I appreciated all the other information and features available through the CFMOTO RIDE app. 

CFMOTO 300SS
The seating position puts me in a controlling stance, but after about 45 minutes, I’m in need of a stretch break.

Stopping power comes from a 4-piston caliper and a 292mm disc up front and a 220mm disc and single-piston caliper in the rear, and ABS is standard. The rear brake performed its job well, but the front brake felt a little weak. Luckily, such a small bike is not hard to slow down, but if it were much heavier, I’d want more stopping power up front. 

CFMOTO 300SS
More stopping power from the front break would be a welcome upgrade, but the current setup is adequate for this lightweight bike.

Along with the Bluetooth connectivity, ride modes, and the TFT display already mentioned, the 300SS comes equipped with LED headlights, taillights, and turnsignals. This isn’t a bare-bones and cheaply made bike; it’s a well-built machine with thoughtful additions that make the riding experience even better. All-in-all, the 300SS provides a lot for your money. 

CFMOTO 300SS
The 300SS is an enjoyable and affordable ride that CFMOTO should be proud of.

CFMOTO’s 300SS gave me confidence that the brand is on track to earning its keep on American streets. It’s a fun ride with cool looks and an affordable price: the perfect recipe for attracting new riders, whether they’re new to riding in general or just new to CFMOTO. If you haven’t ridden a CFMOTO before, I’d encourage you to give it a try. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised, and with more than 200 CFMOTO motorcycle dealers in the U.S., there’s probably one near you. 

CFMOTO 300SS
For 2023, color options are Nebula Black with red accents (shown a above) and Ghost Gray with blue accents.

2023 CFMOTO 300SS Specifications 

  • Base Price: $4,499 
  • Website: CFMOTOUSA.com 
  • Warranty: 2 yr., unltd. miles 
  • Engine Type: Liquid-cooled Single, DOHC w/ 4 valves 
  • Displacement: 292cc 
  • Bore x Stroke: 78.0 x 61.2mm 
  • Horsepower: 29 hp @ 8,750 rpm (factory claim) 
  • Torque: 18.7 lb-ft @ 7,250 rpm (factory claim) 
  • Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch  
  • Final Drive: Chain 
  • Wheelbase: 53.5 in. 
  • Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/4.1 in. 
  • Seat Height: 30.7 in. 
  • Wet Weight: 364 lb 
  • Fuel Capacity: 3.2 gal. 

The post 2023 CFMOTO 300SS | First Ride Review  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders: Seat Height 31-31.9 Inches 

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review
The Kawasaki Z650RS has a 31.5-inch seat height. (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Choices for smaller, affordable motorcycles are growing, and that’s good news for riders looking for a fun bike that won’t break the bank. Whether you’re new to riding and want something easy to handle or an experienced rider looking for a lighter or shorter bike, you have more options now than ever when it comes to finding the best motorcycles for smaller riders!  

Below is Rider’s 2023 list of best motorcycles for smaller riders, an update of the popular post from 2019. This list includes motorcycles with seat heights between 31.0 and 31.9 inches with an MSRP of $17,000 or less.  

We’ve also curated lists of the best motorcycles with seat heights between 30.0 and 30.9 inches, as well as a list of the best motorcycles with seat heights below 30 inches

When possible, we’ve included a link to our test ride reviews so you can get a sense of how each bike performs in action. We’ve also included the 2022-2023 model year’s U.S. base MSRP (as of publication), seat height, and claimed wet or dry weight. On models with options to lower the seat height or suspension, we’ve listed the standard and lowered seat heights. You can also click on a model’s name to go to the manufacturer’s webpage for a full list of specifications and details.   

The models in this list are arranged by seat height, with the first model having the shortest seat height and the last model having the tallest seat height in the list. 


CFMOTO 450SS 

CFMOTO 450SS Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

CFMOTO 450SS 

$5,499 

31-inch seat 

370 lb 

Read our 2023 CFMOTO 450SS First Look Review 


Honda CBR500R 

Honda CBR500R Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Honda CBR500R 

$7,299 

31.1-inch seat 

423 lb 

Read our 2013 Honda CBR500R First Ride Review 


Honda CB500F 

Honda CB500F Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Honda CB500F 

$6,799 

31.1-inch seat 

416 lb 

Read our 2017 Honda CB500F First Ride Review 


Kawasaki Ninja 650 

Kawasaki Ninja 650 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Kawasaki Ninja 650 

$7,999 

31.1-inch seat 

419 lb 

Read our 2020 Kawasaki Ninja 650 Road Test Review 


Kawasaki Z650 

Kawasaki Z650 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Kawasaki Z650 

$7,749 

31.1-inch seat 

410 lb 

Read our 2017 Kawasaki Z650 First Ride Review 


Kawasaki W800 

Kawasaki W800 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Kawasaki W800 

$9,199 

31.1-inch seat 

496 lb 

Read our 2020 Kawasaki W800 First Look Review 


Royal Enfield Hunter 350 

Royal Enfield Hunter 350 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Royal Enfield Hunter 350 

$3,999 

31.1-inch seat 

400 lb 

Read our 2023 Royal Enfield Hunter 350 First Ride Review 


Suzuki GSX250R 

2023 Suzuki GSX250R ABS in Metallic Diamond Red and Pearl Nebular Black

Suzuki GSX250R 

$4,999 

31.1-inch seat 

399 lb 

Read our 2023 Suzuki GSX250R First Look Review 


Triumph Bonneville T100 

Triumph Bonneville T100 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Triumph Bonneville T100 

$10,995 

31.1-inch seat 

503 lb 

Read our 2017 Triumph Bonneville T100 First Look Review 


Triumph Bonneville T120 

Triumph Bonneville T120 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Triumph Bonneville T120 

$12,695 

31.1-inch seat 

520 lb 

Read our 2022 Triumph Bonneville T120 First Look Review 


Triumph Scrambler 900 

Triumph Scrambler 900 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Triumph Scrambler 900 

$11,495 

31.1-inch seat 

492 lb 

Read our 2022 Triumph Scrambler 900 First Look Review 


Yamaha TW200 

Yamaha TW200 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Yamaha TW200 

$4,899 

31.1-inch seat 

278 lb 

Read our 2017 Yamaha TW200 First Ride Review 


CFMOTO 300NK 

CFMOTO 300NK Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

CFMOTO 300NK 

$4,199 

31.2-inch seat 

333 lb 

Read our 2022 CFMOTO 300NK First Ride Review 


Royal Enfield Scram 411 

Royal Enfield Scram Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Royal Enfield Scram 411 

$5,099 

31.3-inch seat 

408 lb 

Read our 2023 Royal Enfield Scram 411 First Ride Review 


CFMOTO 700CL-X 

CFMOTO 700CL-X Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

CFMOTO 700CL-X 

$6,799 

31.5-inch seat 

432 lb 

Read our 2022 CFMOTO 700CL-X Road Test Review 


CFMOTO 700CL-X Sport 

CFMOTO 700CL-X Sport

CFMOTO 700CL-X Sport 

$7,199 

31.5-inch seat 

432 lb 

Read our 2022 CFMOTO 700CL-X Sport First Ride Review 


Kawasaki Ninja ZX-4RR KRT Edition 

Kawasaki Ninja ZX-4RR KRT Edition Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Kawasaki Ninja ZX-4RR KRT Edition 

$9,699 

31.5-inch seat 

415 lb 

Read our 2023 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-4RR KRT Edition First Look Review 


Kawasaki Z900 

Kawasaki Z900RS Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Kawasaki Z900 

$9,399 

31.5-inch seat 

468 lb 

Read our 2017 Kawasaki Ninja Z900 ABS First Ride Review 


Kawasaki Z650RS 

Kawasaki Z650RS Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Kawasaki Z650RS 

$9,099 

31.5-inch seat 

412 lb 

Read our 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS First Ride Review 


Royal Enfield Himalayan 

Royal Enfield Himalayan Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Royal Enfield Himalayan 

$5,449 

31.5-inch seat 

439 lb 

Read our 2022 Royal Enfield Himalayan First Ride Review 


Honda CB300R 

Honda CB300R Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Honda CB300R 

$5,049 

31.6-inch seat 

316 lb 

Read our 2019 Honda CB300R First Ride Review 


Honda NC750X DCT 

Honda NC750X Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Honda NC750X DCT 

$9,399 

31.6-inch seat 

493 lb 

Read our 2018 Honda NC750X Road Test Review 


BMW R nineT 

BMW R nineT Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

BMW R nineT 

$15,945 

31.7-inch seat 

487 lb 

Read our 2021 BMW R nineT First Look Review 


BMW R nineT Pure 

BMW R nineT Pure Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

BMW R nineT Pure 

$10,995 

31.7-inch seat 

483 lb 

Read our 2017 BMW R nineT Pure Road Test Review 


Kawasaki Z125 PRO 

Kawasaki Z125 PRO Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Kawasaki Z125 PRO 

$3,399 

31.7-inch seat 

225 lb 

Read our 2017 Kawasaki Z125 PRO First Ride Review 


Royal Enfield Classic 350 

Royal Enfield Classic 350 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Royal Enfield Classic 350 

$4,699 

31.7-inch seat 

430 lb 

Read our 2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350 First Ride Review 


Royal Enfield INT650 

Royal Enfield INT 650 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Royal Enfield INT650 

$6,149 

31.7-inch seat 

445 lb 

Read our 2019 Royal Enfield INT650 Road Test Review 


Royal Enfield Continental GT 

Royal Enfield Continental GT 650 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Royal Enfield Continental GT 

$6,349 

31.7-inch seat 

445 lb 

Read our 2019 Royal Enfield Continental GT Road Test Review 


Triumph Trident 660 

Triumph Trident 660 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Triumph Trident 660 

$8,595 

31.7-inch seat 

417 lb 

Read our 2021 Triumph Trident 660 First Look Review 


Yamaha MT-07 

Yamaha MT-07 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Yamaha MT-07 

$8,199 

31.7-inch seat 

406 lb 

Read our 2021 Yamaha MT-07 Road Test Review 


Zero S 

Zero S Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Zero S 

$12,995 

31.8-inch seat 

313 lb 

Read our 2022 Zero S First Look Review 


Ducati SuperSport 950 

Ducati SuperSport 950 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Ducati SuperSport 950 

$14,595 

31.9-inch seat 

405 lb (dry) 


Honda CBR650R 

Honda CBR650R Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Honda CBR650R 

$9,899 

31.9-inch seat 

445 lb 

Read our 2023 Honda CBR650R First Look Review 


Honda CB650R 

Honda CB650R Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Honda CB650R 

$9,399 

31.9-inch seat 

445 lb 

Read our 2023 Honda CB650R First Look Review 


Suzuki GSX-R750 

Suzuki GSX-R750 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Suzuki GSX-R750 

$12,849 

31.9-inch seat 

419 lb 

Read our 2023 Suzuki GSX-R750 First Look Review 


Suzuki GSX-R600 

Suzuki GSX-R600 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Suzuki GSX-R600 

$11,699 

31.9-inch seat 

412 lb 

Read our 2023 Suzuki GSX-R600 First Look Review 


Suzuki GSX-S1000 

Suzuki GSX-S1000 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Suzuki GSX-S1000 

$11,499 

31.9-inch seat 

472 lb 

Read our 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 Road Test Review 


Suzuki GSX-S1000GT 

Suzuki GSX-S1000GT Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Suzuki GSX-S1000GT 

$13,349 

31.9-inch seat 

498 lb 

Read our 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT Road Test Review 


Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ 

Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ 

$14,099 

31.9-inch seat 

498 lb 

Read our 2023 Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ First Look Review 


Suzuki GSX-8S 

Suzuki GSX-8S Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Suzuki GSX-8S 

$8,849 

31.9-inch seat 

445 lb 

Read our 2023 Suzuki GSX-8S First Ride Review 


Triumph Speed Twin 1200 

Triumph Speed Twin 12000 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Triumph Speed Twin 1200 

$12,895 

31.9-inch seat 

476 lb 

Read our 2023 Triumph Speed Twin 1200 First Look Review 


Yamaha XSR900 

Yamaha XSR900 Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Yamaha XSR900 

$10,199 

31.9-inch seat 

425 lb 

Read our 2022 Yamaha XSR900 First Ride Review 


Yamaha Tracer 9 GT 

Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders

Yamaha Tracer 9 GT 

$14,999 

32.5-inch seat (optional low seat of 31.9 inches) 

485 lb 

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT Long-Term Review 

The post Best Motorcycles for Smaller Riders: Seat Height 31-31.9 Inches  appeared first on Rider Magazine.

Source: RiderMagazine.com