Sergio Garcia to miss Emilia-Romagna Grand Prix

Sergio Garcia: “I feel physically well, but I have undergone a check-up this morning at the IMED Hospital in Valencia, where I have had a CT scan to see how the kidney injury is, and we have seen that it is still not at one hundred per cent. The hematoma on the kidney has not disappeared and the doctors have recommended that I not travel to Misano, they have told me that I could be fit for Portugal, which is something that motivates me, but I am sad to miss this Grand Prix, since I am in P3 and missing one more race is going to hurt my options. I am motivated and more eager than ever to get on the GASGAS.”

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

Energica to end era as single MotoE™ manufacturer after 2022

Nicolas Goubert, Executive Director of the FIM Enel MotoE™ World Cup: “The first three seasons of the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup have delivered an incredible show despite all the unforeseen external challenges that have been thrown at us. It wasn’t an easy task to undertake and one very new in many aspects, but we did it and this was thanks to a joint effort between all parties involved. From the very beginning, Energica has brought its know-how to the track in a way we couldn’t be happier with,  delivering a package that has proved to be extremely competitive, showing impressive maximum speed (exceeding 260km/h in Barcelona in 2021), and lap-times that on some occasion were in line with other classes – despite the much shorter history of electric motorcycles.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

The third Rising Stars Series Regional Final is here!

Back for a second season, the Rising Stars Series is gearing up for the Regional Finals that will determine who gets a shot at the 2022 MotoGP™ eSport Championship Global Series.
 
First started in 2020, this talent-spotting programme required young hopefuls around the world to tackle four Online Challenges in which Gamers are divided into three categories, depending on their location. These three are the Americas, Europe and Africa, and finally Asia and Oceania.
 
The stakes in the Regional Finals couldn’t be higher, with the winner in each category (the Americas, Asia and Oceania, Europe and Africa) receiving a guaranteed place in the MotoGP™ eSport Pro Draft Selection in 2022.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

Quartararo: 2021 World Champion at Misano if…

This weekend at the Gran Premio Nolan del Made in Italy e dell’Emilia-Romagna, Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP’s Fabio Quartararo could become the 2021 MotoGP™ World Champion. The Frenchman holds a 52-point advantage over Francesco Bagnaia (Ducati Lenovo Team), so what does Quartararo need to win the title?

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

Criville started that Spanish record-breaking dream

We don’t know if it’s Fabio Quartararo or Pecco Bagnaia who will be crowned MotoGP™ World Champion in the next few weeks, but one thing for certain a record-breaking run will be coming to an end. Joan Mir set the record last season when he became the ninth successive Spanish winner in the premier class. It’s a record in the 73 years history of World Championship racing that has never been matched by another country. Even the greats including Giacomo Agostini, Mike Hailwood, Kenny Roberts and Mick Doohan couldn’t produce a similar consecutive winning run for their countries, although they have come close.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

CFMOTO offer free extras on 800MT

CFMOTO Australia has announced a pre-order campaign for their 800MT adventure tourer range with $899 of free accessories.

The 800MT Sport in Starlight Black will cost just $12,990 ride away and the up-spec Ocean Blue 800MT Touring is only $1000 more.

They will start arriving in January 2022 with a three-year, unlimited kilometres warranty under CFMOTO current ‘2 plus 1’ deal.

For those who have already ordered the bikes or do so before the end of the year, CFMoto Australia will throw in $899 worth of free accessories fitted during pre-delivery.

They include:
•    Silver side crash bars;
•    Black radiator protector; and
•    Black headlight guard.

It sounds like a good idea and a real incentive to get customers to be patient while they wait for the Chinese-made motorcycle.

CFMoto 800MT

The company supplied this question-and-answer info for those interested:

How will the campaign work?

Customers can make a pre-order through a dealership, over the phone or online via a new dedicated 800MT microsite with a simple step-by-step build process.

The microsite’s address is www.cfmoto800mt.com.au, and has extensive information on both models including images, words, specs and video.

Once the customer has digested the full gamut of 800MT information, they can start the build process to place a pre-order and nominate their preferred dealer.

The build process also allows customers to include any accessories they’d like to include on their 800MT over and above the free items already included in the campaign.

Once the pre-order details are received by a CFMOTO dealer, it will then contact the customer to verify details and process a $500 deposit.

Does the customer have to place a pre-order through the new 800MT microsite?

No. A customer can still place a pre-order directly with a dealership, over the phone etc, as long as a deposit is taken by the dealer within the promotional period.

Is the deposit refundable?

On the basis that customers won’t see either 800MT before they arrive, the $500 deposit is 100 per cent refundable if the customer changes their mind.

What about customers who already have placed deposits?

Yes, these customers are eligible for the pre-order promotion.

When will deliveries start to take place?

First shipments are scheduled to arrive in January 2021 to begin honouring the summer delivery guarantee.CFMoto 800mt

800MT FAMILY FEATURES
•    Seven-inch TFT screen
•    Ride by-wire throttle
•    Multiple riding modes
•    Slipper clutch
•    Cruise control
•    Continental ABS braking system
•    KYB fully adjustable suspension
•    Adjustable screen
•    Fog lights
•    Crash bars
•    USB charging
•    LED lights and turn signals
•    Three-year warranty

CFMoto 800mt

ADDITIONAL 800MT TOURING FEATURES
•    Tyre pressure monitoring
•    Wire-spoked wheels
•    Centrestand
•    Up/down quickshifter
•    Handguards
•    Alloy bashplate
•    Steering damper

At the heart of both bikes is KTM’s  799cc parallel twin, which produces 70kW (95hp) at 8000rpm and 88Nm at 6600rpm.

The 800MTs also have a slipper clutch, Bosch electronic fuel injection and a ride-by-wire throttle with three riding modes: rain, off-road and road.

The 800MT Sport and 800MT Touring share the same 19-litre fuel capacity, expansive rider and pillion seats, tubular steel frame, fully adjustable KYB suspension, crash bars, 825mm seat height, adjustable screen and Spanish J.Juan brakes with ABS.

The major point of differentiation between the two is in the rolling stock: cast wheels on the Sport as opposed to spoked tubeless wheels on the Touring. Wheel sizes are 19-inch front and 17-inch rear – an ideal compromise for road and off-road riding.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Ryan McFarland: Ep. 23 Rider Magazine Insider Podcast

Ep 23 Ryan McFarland Rider Magazine Insider Podcast
Ryan McFarland, CEO of Strider Bikes, on an adventure tour in Baja, Mexico.

Our guest for Episode 23 of the Rider Magazine Insider Podcast is Ryan McFarland, the founder and CEO of Strider Bikes, a company whose mission is to build lightweight, efficient, all-terrain bikes that develop two-wheeled balance, coordination, and confidence in children. McFarland built the first Strider Bike in his garage for his son, Bode. The company was founded in Rapid City, South Dakota, in 2007, and since then has sold more than 3 million bikes to families around the world. In 2014, the company established the Strider Rider Fund, which commits 1% of gross revenue to benevolence. In 2018, the Strider Education Foundation launched All Kids Bike, a nonprofit whose mission is to teach every child in America how to ride a bike in kindergarten PE class. As we all know, when you learn to ride a bike when you’re young, you’re more likely to graduate to a motorcycle when you get older!

You can listen to Episode 23 on iTunesSpotify, and SoundCloud, or via the Rider Magazine Insider webpage. Please subscribe, leave us a 5-star rating, and tell your friends!

Visit the Rider Magazine Insider podcast webpage to check out previous episodes:

The post Ryan McFarland: Ep. 23 Rider Magazine Insider Podcast first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Kawasaki W800 to Enter the European Market

Team Green is fixing to release a beastie into the European market – and many are rating the bike as a less-than-spectacular version of the more ‘genuine’ Triumph Bonneville

a rider enjoying the 2022 Kawasaki W800 on a red bridge

The W800’s predecessor, the W650, was released in Japan in the year 1999. It showcased a nicely overbuilt 650cc air-cooled twin-engine and featured a dependable, modest performance reputation that also happened to do decently in European markets. 

A side view of the Kawasaki W650, from the early Y2K days

With the competition (the Bonneville) outing the Kawi bike from American markets in a scant two years and giving the UK version a run for its money until it dropped from dealership floors with the introduction of Euro-compliancy, we all knew Kawasaki was bound to come back swinging. 

A side view of the 2022 Kawasaki W800

So, meet the 2022 Kawasaki W800 – a machine that’s gunning to go head-to-head against the Bonneville, with 100 more cc’s and the addition of fuel injection (and some pretty colors). 

A side view of the 2022 Kawasaki W800

RideApart states that Team Green has given their 2022 W800 a new set of graphics schemes to complement the minimalistic handsomeness and lack of unnecessary features on the bike. “It’s a motorcycle, and it simply exists,” states the report – and considering the amount of Kawi fans in the UK raring to hop a leg over this machine, we’d say that’s pretty spot on.  

A frontal three-quarter view of a rider enjoying the 2022 Kawasaki W800

On top of the LED headlight and Euro5-optimized exhaust system, the Kawasaki W800 sports a 773cc parallel-twin complete with cooling fins and polished cases. That’s 48 pretty (slightly chubby) ponies pulling at the bit, with the feel of the bike best explained from the following review:

“The W800 is designed to be simple, straightforward, and mostly to play nice. In fact, it’s so well-mannered that I could easily recommend it as a starter bike. Think about it: it’s easy to maneuver and easy to control, which also makes it easy to learn on without being overwhelmed.”

a rider enjoying the 2022 Kawasaki W800 leaning into the twisties

Due to the power displacement, A2 license holders will be able to take advantage of the W800, though we’ve yet to be given a heads up on the exact release date for the UK market. If you’re thinking of saving your pennies, expect to fork over something along the lines of €10,040 (the W800’s price in Italy, which translates to around $11,646 USD).

A side view of the 2022 Kawasaki W800

We’ll keep you posted as updates come our way; in the meantime, make sure to check out other fantastic bikes from Kawasaki’s current lineup.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Misano: #MatchPoint Quartararo & the Doctor’s last dance

And then, of course, there’s Rossi. There may be three races left for the number 46 to shine the sun and moon in the premier class of Grand Prix racing, but the third to last event of the Doctor’s tenure will be extra special in its own way. Home turf, at a venue likely no one on Earth knows better or has raced more, and in front of his final home crowd in gloriously uproarious yellow, it’s its own occasion. The end of an era for an area that has become defined first by what was the new kid on the block searing through the ranks with such charisma and style, and then the icon who has created one of the most successful academies in motorcycle racing, based just up the road. His ranch adds some significant acreage to his home village of Tavullia, just as his presence and legacy have added so much to the region and the sport. Emotional doesn’t quite explain it; it’s a point of no return for all those who’ve raced, watched and loved one of global sport’s biggest icons. 

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here