Tag Archives: Aprilia Reviews

2022 Aprilia Tuono 660 Factory | First Look Review

2022 Aprilia Tuono 660 Factory review

When Aprilia introduced the Tuono 660 in 2021, the new naked bike owed much of its form to the RS 660 sportbike. However, the Noale, Italy, factory replaced the yoke-mounted clip-ons with handlebars, shaved down the front fairing and bodywork, and retuned the 659cc parallel-Twin for street duty. For the riders that enjoy riding the canyons as much as they like the track, the 2022 Aprilia Tuono 660 Factory pairs naked bike comfort with sportbike-worthy performance.

The base-model Tuono 660 features a KYB 41mm inverted fork and KYB shock with rebound damping and preload adjustment. The new Factory variant ups the ante with a full adjustability for the KYB fork and an oil reservoir-equipped Sachs shock. Both offer compression adjustments in addition to the rebound damping and preload settings, allowing users to adapt the Tuono 660 Factory to their riding style and current conditions.

2022 Aprilia Tuono 660 Factory review

Along with the new suspenders, Aprilia upgraded the liquid-cooled, 659cc parallel-Twin with a 16-tooth pinion gear. The shorter final drive results in a 5-horsepower boost. The Tuono 660 Factory now peaks at 100 horsepower (at 10,500 rpm). Despite the gearing change, Aprilia preserved the maximum torque of 49.4 lb-ft at 8,500 rpm. Of course, the 270-degree firing order and strong mid-range retain the parallel-Twin’s character, but the updates make the mill more versatile than ever.

The Factory trim’s revised engine also benefits from Aprilia’s weight-saving efforts. Touting a new lithium battery, the Tuono 660 Factory weighs in at just 399 pounds. The new battery saves 4.4 pounds on the standard model and further improves the naked bike’s impressive power-to-weight ratio.

2022 Aprilia Tuono 660 Factory review

Like the standard Tuono 660, the Factory is equipped with Aprilia Performance Ride Control (APRC) suite of electronic rider aids. The packed electronics suite boasts adjustable traction control, engine brake, and engine maps. Five customizable ride modes, a quickshifter, and cruise control optimize performance and efficiency while multi-map cornering ABS and Aprilia’s cornering lights enhance safety.

The 2022 Aprilia Tuono 660 Factory will be available in a single-seat configuration with Factory Dark graphics. Aprilia hasn’t announced the its availability or pricing, but we expect the MSRP to be a stone’s throw away from the standard variant’s $10,499 list price.

2022 Aprilia Tuono 660 Factory review

For more information or to find an Aprilia dealer near you, visit aprilia.com.

The post 2022 Aprilia Tuono 660 Factory | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 | First Ride Review

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
The 2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 is a new middleweight adventure bike with a 659cc parallel-Twin derived from the RS 660 and Tuono 660 sportbikes. (Photos by Milagro)

Having now ridden the Aprilia Tuareg 660, it’s easy to see that this machine will be a serious contender in the middleweight adventure class. Slim, stripped, lightweight, and without nonsense, it is a bike of pure function.

The narrow 659cc engine of the Tuareg 660 defines this motorcycle’s personality. Besides powering the Tuareg down routes of pavement or dirt, its narrow parallel-Twin provides svelte comfort and control while producing a respectable 80 horsepower, with as little motorcycle as possible between the rider and the engine. While it’s doubtful anyone will gaze longingly at the Tuareg 660 in admiration of its beauty, many may well gaze at it in admiration of its performance. It has a gracefully malicious personality.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
The Aprilia Tuareg 660 is available in three color schemes: Indaco Tagelmust (above, $12,599), Acid Gold, and Martian Red (both $11,999).

The Tuareg’s powerplant is a modified version of the engine in the RS 660 and Tuono 660 sportbikes, itself derived from the front cylinder bank of the 1,099cc RSV4. The Tuareg’s twin-cam profiles are the main difference, tuned to supply a flatter, wider powerband. It’s an engine that is without any midrange dips or glitches, and no stumbles or lurches throughout throttle positions. It shares the 81mm bore from the RSV4 as well as the heads and pistons from that proven World Superbike Championship engine, which should assuage concerns about reliability.

The Tuareg’s redline is lower than its sister machines, kicking in around 9,500 rpm after reaching its claimed peak of 80 horsepower at 9,250 rpm. For comparison, the RS 660 makes 100 horsepower at 10,000 rpm. Torque hits its 51.6 lb-ft peak at 6,500 rpm, and the crank pins are at 270 degrees to give the rider a feel of piloting a V-Twin.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
The Aprilia Tuareg 660’s engine has been tuned for less peak power but a wider spread of torque than the RS 660 and Tuono 660. It also has a new tubular-steel trellis frame that uses the engine as a stressed member.

The Tuareg is Euro 5 compliant and capable of meeting Euro 5+ standards with its catalytic converter optimally located as close to the headers as possible. It is shrouded by a heat shield that nicely blends into the shape of the skid plate beneath the engine, making its presence barely noticeable. Though the cat is contained within a single-walled pipe its heat is well managed, and in the 70-degree weather of our test ride in Sardinia, Italy, engine heat was undetectable.

The Tuareg 660’s chassis is quite different from the aluminum twin-spar chassis of the RS 660 and Tuono 660, with a tubular-steel frame mated to cast aluminum swingarm plates, welded up as a single unit with the rear subframe. The engine is a stressed member of the frame with six mounting points, creating a rigid chassis to meet the demands of off-road riding. Additionally, the engine is rotated back by 10 degrees, for a claimed reduction of yaw movement to lighten steering. There’s no way to verify this, but it’s fun to consider.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
With its 21-inch front/18-inch tubeless spoked wheels, 70/30 adventure tires, and generous suspension travel and ground clearance, the Aprilia Tuareg 660 is very capable off-road.

The two-sided aluminum swingarm is longer than that of the other 660s, and it is captured between the cast aluminum plates and the engine. The Tuareg’s wheelbase is 60 inches while the RS and Tuono are significantly shorter at 53.9 inches.
Fully adjustable suspension is by Kayaba, with 43mm inverted fork and a piggyback rear shock with a progressive linkage, and there’s 9.5 inches of travel at both ends. The rear spring weight is for riders between 165-175 pounds, so heavier riders or those regularly carrying a passenger or gear may need to install a beefier spring. As an adventure bike with serious off-road intentions, wheels are an expected 21 inches fore and 18 inches aft, and they’re both spoked and tubeless. Tires are Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR, adventure rubber designed for 70% on-road and 30% off-road use.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
A 5-inch color TFT display packs in a lot of info and makes navigating the APRC electronic rider aid options easy. As an accessory, it can be connected to the Aprilia MIA multimedia platform.

The Tuareg 660 was created through the combined efforts of the Piaggio Advanced Design Center, in Pasadena, California, led by Miguel Galluzzi, and Italy’s Piaggio Design Center, where project design leader Mirko Zocco is located. The combined efforts resulted in what is essentially the bobber of adventure bikes, birthed without a single unnecessary component. It doesn’t even have any bodywork on the tail section, just a subframe, a seat, and a place to hang taillights and a license plate. A rear fender? Nope.

The Tuareg’s front is dominated by a clear fairing above a three-piece headlight that’s flanked by two air intakes captured within the same aluminum-colored shroud, which is the Tuareg’s primary item of actual aesthetics. Notably, the Tuareg has no “beak” but instead sports a conventional streetbike fender, which shouldn’t be a problem outside of Georgia’s red clay on a rainy day. Combined, the windscreen and the handlebar protectors keep the rider well insulated from the elements.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
Weighing a claimed 449 pounds wet, the Tuareg 660 adheres to a minimalist design philosophy with no unnecessary parts or bodywork.

The gas cap has a retro look, standing above the fuel-tank cover just like in the old-timey days. The real intent of it though is a weight savings due to eliminating the extra hardware needed for a flush fuel tank filler. Small side fairings direct air into the radiator while providing useful streamlining for an aerodynamic profile, keeping to the Tuareg’s strict dictum of form follows function. The 4.8-gallon fuel tank sits vertically behind the engine, with over half of its volume contained below the top of the engine to keep the motorcycle’s mass as centralized as possible.

Simply put, the Tuareg is a blast to ride. Its narrowness is instantly appreciated from the rider’s seat, with the slim tank and seat profile providing easy legroom for a standing or seated rider. Even while leaning forward, one’s legs don’t come into contact with the wider forward section of the bodywork, which some may find a positive or a negative depending on one’s preference of knees pushing forward against the motorcycle or not.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
The Tuareg feels narrow between the knees, and its low, centralized weight contributes to light steering.

Once you scale your way up onto it, the Tuareg is an ultra-easy ride with everything about it brilliantly dialed in, from the throttle-by-wire to the wealth of suspension travel to the slipper clutch. We were unable to get hard data for the sag numbers, but by feel alone – and logic – the static sag appears to be about 3 inches, approximately a third of the travel. While swinging a leg over the 33.9-inch seat you can feel the bike squat an inch or so to where your feet can touch the ground.

The Tuareg is fast enough to pass other vehicles at will, while sporting light steering and stability at every speed despite not having a steering damper. On one stretch of road, a wandering tear in the pavement sent the bike into a bit of a shake, but as soon as the front tire hit smooth pavement again the nervousness immediately disappeared. There’s no trade-off here, because the Tuareg feels planted at any speed.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
Up front is a fully adjustable 43mm inverted Kayaba fork with 9.5 inches of suspension travel, a 21-inch tubeless spoked wheel with Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR rubber, and a pair of 300mm discs squeezed by Brembo 4-piston calipers.

If the Tuareg is ridden within proximity of riding the RS, the reduced horsepower and lower redline will be obvious from feel alone. Still, the power of the Tuareg is most impressive from 6,500 rpm on up, and at full throttle the throaty intake sound is a delight. The reduction in peak power from the RS is a fair trade-off for the smooth, wide powerband of the Tuareg – a real plus when riding off-road where ease of power delivery, particularly at lower speeds, assists the rider. Riding into the redline is unrewarding, as the bike hits a hard wall of nothingness rather than a soft reduction of power.

The bikes we rode were equipped with the optional quickshifter (Aprilia Quick Shift, $249.95), which makes life on the bike even easier. It provides seamless shifting up and down through the gears while forgiving attempts to modulate the throttle or use the clutch. While upshifts can be clutchless at any throttle setting, for downshifts to be smooth riders need to unload the engine. That should be obvious for any experienced rider but for some reason at times I forgot. Unlike most first-ride introductions, over-revving, stalling, missed shifts, or false neutrals were absent from our group of 13 jaded journalists. The feel and feedback of the controls are spot-on.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
Though clearly equipped for serious off-road riding, the Tuareg 660 is equally impressive on winding mountain roads.

Adding to the Tuareg’s versatility is the Aprilia Performance Ride Control (APRC) suite of electronic rider aids, which includes cruise control as well as multiple modes for throttle response, engine braking, ABS, and traction control. There are presets in the four ride modes – Urban, Explore, Off-road, and Individual – and the switchgear next to the left grip allows easy scrolling between them. Our test ride included dry and wet pavement, mud, gravel, dirt, rocks, and a healthy stream, and the ease of cycling through the Tuareg’s modes on the fly was appreciated.

Explore and Urban are street-focused ride modes, with ABS activated at both wheels. Explore offers more aggressive throttle response and less traction control intervention than Urban. Being the sportiest mode, I used Explore for dry pavement. Given its higher margin of safety, I used Urban as the rain mode.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
The Tuareg 660 was the perfect motorcycle for exploring the southern coast of Sardinia.

Leaving the pavement, the choice of was obvious. Off Road provides the most manageable (softest) power delivery and ABS can be disabled at the rear wheel or switched off entirely. Individual gives the rider freedom to either craft the perfect recipe of preferences or muck things up incomprehensibly. Individual was a fun distraction and if I lived with this bike, I’d regularly experiment with it. The TFT dashboard where all of this is on display is nicely laid out, well angled, and wasn’t susceptible to sun glare.

The adjustable traction control decides when to intervene by evaluating the difference between front and rear wheel speeds. This results in different angles of how far the rear of the motorcycle can come out of line with the front. Using any electronic TC to its fullest is a difficult task that requires complete trust in the machine. Due to years of muscle memory, it can be hard to resist correcting for the rear stepping out. Use as your own comfort level allows.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
Of the four ride modes, Explore offers the sportiest throttle response.

Peter’s Gear:
Helmet: AGV AX-8
Jacket: IXS Evans-ST Tour
Gloves: Heroic ST-R Pro Shorty
Pants: Ugly Bros. USA Motorpool
Boots: TCX Mood Gore-Tex

Riding the Tuareg can make one wonder about the virtue of sportbikes. We rode Tuareg 660 at a hard pace on numerous snaking mountain roads, and its high clearance allowed for extreme lean angles. Its light steering and crisp feel, as well as its wide, usable powerband, make this a bike worthy of a day in any canyons or mountains alongside any road-racer replica. On top of that, bags are an option and so is a passenger who won’t start slapping your helmet after 20 miles. And after one’s streetbike pals start wondering how you stayed with the pack, you can take an off-road shortcut and beat them to the bottom of the mountain.

Riders accustomed to streetbikes might at first be surprised by how much the Tuareg 660 moves around under hard braking or acceleration. That’s the key advantage of 9.5 inches of suspension travel – there’s plenty to use. The motorcycle moves comfortably through the suspension stroke while the wheels remain on the ground – except for when the rider doesn’t want them to – and the suspension does not top or bottom. Dive is well controlled and never unsettled. On- or off-road, the Tuareg remains surprisingly properly planted. Full disclosure: no MX jumps were attempted.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
The Indaco Tagelmust color scheme is inspired by the 1988 Aprilia Tuareg Wind 600.

All in all, the Tuareg should be seriously considered by anyone desiring a middleweight adventure motorcycle that shines on both pavement and dirty stuff. It is reasonably comfortable, has seamless power, shifting, and mode selections, and provides confidence-inspiring agility. The brakes provide consistent feedback, the suspension, though fully tunable, should match most riders needs as is, and the electronics are dang smart. It’s one of the easiest and friendliest motorcycles to ride while being more than up to the task of being ridden hard.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 Specs

Base Price: $11,999 (Acid Gold, Martian Red); $12,599 (tri-color Indaco Tagelmust)
Price as Tested: $12,249 (Aprilia Quick Shift)
Website: aprilia.com
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-Twin, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 659cc
Bore x Stroke: 81.0 x 63.9mm
Horsepower: 80 horsepower @ 9,250 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 51.6 lb-ft @ 6,500 rpm (claimed)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 60.0 in.
Rake/Trail: 26.7 degrees/4.5 in.
Seat Height: 33.9 in.
Wet Weight: 449 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity: 4.8 gals.

The post 2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 | First Look Review

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 in Indaco Tagelmust (MSRP $12,599)

The 2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 is one of the most eagerly anticipated middleweight adventure bikes since the Yamaha Ténéré 700 was introduced last year. Aprilia has announced that the bike will be available in the U.S. in February 2022, and with an MSRP of $11,999.

Aprilia will begin taking pre-orders for U.S. customers on November 10, 2021, and delivery priority will be given to those who make reservations. Customers can book their ideal configuration of the Tuareg 660, including factory options and upgrades, and select their dealer of choice at storeusa.aprilia.com.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 in Acid Gold (MSRP $11,999)

Just as the Ténéré 700 is based on Yamaha’s MT-07 streetbike, the Tuareg 660’s engine is adapted from Aprilia’s RS 660 sportbike. The engine is a liquid-cooled, 659cc parallel-Twin with DOHC and 4 valves per cylinder. On the RS 660, Aprilia claims 100 horsepower and 49.4 lb-ft of torque, but for the Tuareg 660 Aprilia claims 80 horsepower and 51.6 lb-ft of torque, presumably tuned for a broad spread of torque across the rev range.

For off-road duty, Aprilia says the Tuareg 660 gets a redesigned high-clearance oil sump, an easy-access air filter, and a high-mount exhaust. The engine is carried in a lightweight tubular-steel trellis frame and wheelbase is 59 inches. Aprilia claims a 449-pound wet weight and 275 miles of range from the 4.75-gallon fuel tank.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 in Martian Red (MSRP $11,999)

As with other bikes in Aprilia’s lineup, the Tuareg 660 gets the Aprilia Performance Ride Control (APRC) electronics suite with selectable engine maps and settings for traction control and engine braking. ABS can be switched off entirely or just at the rear wheel. Standard equipment also includes cruise control and a 5-inch TFT color display with Bluetooth connectivity and navigation via the Aprilia MIA app. The bike also has full LED lighting

The Tuareg 660 has fully adjustable suspension with 9.4 inches of front/rear travel, with a 43mm inverted fork and a rear shock with progressive linkage. There’s 9.5 ground clearance for off-road riding, but the 33.8-inch saddle has reduced center arch to help riders get their feet on the ground.

2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 review
2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 in Indaco Tagelmust (MSRP $12,599)

For maximize off-road capability, the Tuareg 660 rolls on 21-inch front/18-inch rear spoked wheels with tubeless tires.

The 2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 will be priced at $11,999 for Acid Gold and Martian Red, and at $12,599 for Indaco Tagelmust (red/white/blue). For more information or to find an Aprilia dealer near you, visit aprilia.com.

We’ll get a first ride on the Tuareg 660 soon, so stay tuned for full technical specs and riding impressions.

The post 2022 Aprilia Tuareg 660 | First Look Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

This 2021 motorcycle buyers guide includes new or significantly updated street-legal models available in the U.S. It includes bikes in many categories, including adventure, cafe racer, cruiser, sport, sport-touring, retro, touring, and others.

Organized in alphabetical order by manufacturer, it includes photos and links to details or, when available, first rides and road test reviews of each motorcycle. Due to the pandemic and supply chain disruptions, some manufacturers skipped the 2021 model year. Stay tuned for our 2022 Motorcycle Buyers Guide.

RELATED: 2020 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models

2021 Aprilia RS 660

2021 Aprilia RS 660
2021 Aprilia RS 660 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Aprilia‘s RS 660 is the first of three models — the RS 660 sportbike, the Tuono 660 naked bike (below), and the not-yet-released Tuareg 660 adventure bike — built on a new engine platform, a liquid-cooled 659cc parallel-Twin with a 270-degree firing order that makes a claimed 100 horsepower at 10,500 rpm and 49.4 lb-ft of torque at 8,500 rpm. The RS 660 is equipped with the IMU-enabled APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) electronics package with five ride modes, 3-level cornering ABS, 3-level traction control, wheelie control, cruise control, and engine braking management. Pricing starts at $11,299.

Read our 2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Aprilia RS 660 Video Review

2021 Aprilia RSV4 / RSV4 Factory

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory
2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

Aprilia is an Italian brand known for performance, and the RSV4 and RSV4 Factory are at the pointy end of the company’s go-fast spear. Both are powered by a 1,099cc, 65-degree V-4 that Aprilia says cranks out an eye-watering 217 horsepower at 13,000 rpm and 92 lb-ft of torque at 10,500 rpm, even while meeting strict Euro 5 emissions regulations. And both are equipped with a 6-axis IMU and the APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) suite of rider aids. Whereas the standard RSV4 features fully adjustable Sachs suspension, the RSV4 Factory is equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension, with a 43mm NIX upside-down fork, a TTX rear shock, and an electronic steering damper. The RSV4 has cast wheels and the RSV4 Factory has lighter and stronger forged wheels. MSRP for the RSV4 is $18,999 and MSRP for the RSV4 Factory is $25,999.

Read our 2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory First Ride Review

2021 Aprilia Tuono 660

2021 Aprilia Tuono 660
2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

Based on the RS 660 (above), the Aprilia Tuono 660 is a semi-naked sportbike with a more upright seating position, and more street-oriented steering geometry. Its base price is $10,499.

Read our 2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 Video Review

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Tuono V4 Factory

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4
2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

The Tuono name has always been associated with top-of-the-line street performance, and the Aprilia Tuono V4 and Tuono V4 Factory carry the cred with a 1,077cc V-4 that produces 175 horsepower and 89 lb-ft of torque at the crank (claimed). The Tuono V4 is the more street-focused of the two, with a taller windscreen, a higher handlebar, and optional saddlebags (as shown above), and it is equipped with fully adjustable Sachs suspension. The Tuono V4 Factory is equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension. Both models feature a six-axis IMU that supports the APRC electronics suite. MSRP for the Tuono V4 is $15,999 and MSRP for the Tuono V4 Factory is $19,499.

Read our 2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory First Ride Review

2021 Benelli Leoncino / Leoncino Trail

2021 Benelli Leoncino
2021 Benelli Leoncino (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The Benelli Leoncino (“little lion”) is an Italian-designed, Chinese-manufactured roadster powered by a liquid-cooled 500cc parallel-Twin also found in the TRK502X adventure bike (below). In the U.S., the Leoncino is part of a two-bike lineup, which includes the standard street-biased roadster model (shown above) and the Leoncino Trail, a scrambler variant with more suspension travel and spoked wheels with a 19-inch front and 90/10 adventure tires. The Leoncino comes with standard ABS and is priced at $6,199, while the Leoncino Trail is $7,199.

Read our 2021 Benelli Leoncino Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Benelli Leoncino Video Review

2021 Benelli TRK502X

2021 Benelli TRK502X
2021 Benelli TRK502X (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Like the Leoncino above, the Benelli TRK502X is an Italian-designed, Chinese-manufactured adventure bike powered by a liquid-cooled 500cc parallel-Twin. It has a comfortable and upright seating position, a good windscreen, 90/10 adventure tires with a 19-inch front, spoked wheels, ABS, hand and engine guards, and enough luggage capacity to go the distance (aluminum panniers and top box are standard). MSRP is $7,398.

Read our 2021 Benelli TRK502X Road Test Review

2021 BMW R 18 / R 18 First Edition

2021 BMW R 18 First Edition
2021 BMW R 18 First Edition (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The BMW R 18 is a cruiser powered by a massive 1,802cc OHV air/oil-cooled 4-valve opposed Twin that’s the largest “boxer” engine the German company has ever produced. Part of BMW’s Heritage line, the R 18 has styling inspired by the 1930s-era R 5. Despite its classic looks, the long, low cruiser is equipped with fully modern electronics, brakes, suspension, and other features. Base price is $17,495. BMW recently announced two touring versions for the 2022 model year, the R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental, both with a fairing, hard saddlebags, and an infotainment system; the Transcontinental adds a trunk with an integrated passenger backrest.

Read our 2021 BMW R 18 First Edition Road Test Review

2021 Ducati Monster

2021 Ducati Monster
2021 Ducati Monster (Photo by Gregor Halenda and Mike Levin)

The Ducati Monster is one of the Italian manufacturer’s most iconic and best-selling models. Gone is the trademark tubular-steel trellis frame, replaced with a front-frame design that uses the engine as a structural member of the chassis, as on the Panigale and Streetfighter V4 models. Compared to the previous Monster 821, the new model weighs 40 pounds less and is equipped with a more powerful 937cc Testastretta 11-degree L-Twin engine and top-shelf electronics. New styling and more make this an all-new Monster. Pricing starts at $11,895 for the Monster and $12,195 for the Monster+, which adds a flyscreen and passenger seat cover.

Read our 2021 Ducati Monster First Ride Review

2021 Ducati Multistrada V4

2021 Ducati Multistrada V4
2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 (Photo by Mike Levin)

Another top-selling Ducati is the Multistrada adventure bike. For 2021, it is now the Multistrada V4 and it is powered by the 1,158cc 90-degree V4 Grandturismo engine that makes 170 horsepower at 10,500 rpm and stomping 92 lb-ft torque at 8,750 rpm (claimed). Ducati Skyhook semi-active suspension and a full suite of IMU-supported electronics are standard, and S models are equipped with a radar system that enables Adaptive Cruise Control and Blind Spot Detection. New for 2021 is a 19-inch front wheel. Pricing starts at $19,995 for the Multistrada V4 and $24,095 for the Multistrada V4 S.

Read our 2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 S First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 S Video Review

2021 Ducati SuperSport 950

2021 Ducati SuperSport 950
2021 Ducati SuperSport 950

Updates to the Ducati SuperSport 950 include new styling inspired by the Panigale V4, an IMU-enabled electronics package, and improved comfort. The seat is flatter and has more padding, the handlebar is higher, and the footpegs are lower. The SuperSport 950 is powered by a 937cc Testastretta L-Twin that makes 110 horsepower at 9,000 rpm and 68.6 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm (claimed, at the crank). The SuperSport 950 is available in Ducati Red for $13,995. The SuperSport 950 S, which is equipped with fully adjustable Öhlins suspension and a passenger seat cover, is available in Ducati Red and Arctic White Silk starting at $16,195.

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival

2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival
2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival

Earlier this year Harley-Davidson announced its new Icons Collection. The first model in the collection is the stunning Electra Glide Revival, which is inspired by the 1969 Electra Glide, the first Harley-Davidson motorcycle available with an accessory “batwing” fairing. Though retro in style, the Electra Glide Revival is powered by a Milwaukee Eight 114 V-twin and is equipped with RDRS Safety Enhancements and a Boom! Box infotainment system. Global production of the Electra Glide Revival is limited to a one-time build of 1,500 serialized examples, with an MSRP of $29,199.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 114

2021 Harley-Davidson Softail Fat Boy 114
2021 Harley-Davidson Softail Fat Boy 114

With its iconic solid aluminum 18-inch Lakester wheels, for 2021 Harley-Davidson gave the Fat Boy 114 a new look with lots of chrome and bright work. Powering the Fat Boy is none other than the torquey Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-twin engine, equipped with a 6-speed gearbox and putting down a claimed 119 ft-lb of torque at just 3,000 rpm. Pricing starts at $19,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 114 First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 / Pan America 1250 Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

A competitive, state-of-the-art, 150-horsepower adventure bike built by Harley-Davidson? Yea, right, when pigs fly! Well, the Motor Company came out swinging with its Pan America 1250 and Pan America 1250 Special. Powered by the all-new Revolution Max 1250, a liquid-cooled, 1,252cc, 60-degree V-Twin with DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, and variable valve timing. The killer app is the optional Adaptive Ride Height, which lowers the higher-spec Pan America 1250 Special (which is equipped with semi-active Showa suspension) by 1 to 2 inches when the bike comes to a stop. Pricing starts at $17,319 for the Pan America 1250 and $19,999 for the Pan America 1250 Special.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 Special Video Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special
2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special

For Harley-Davidson Touring models like the Road Glide, Road King, and Street Glide, there are Special models that offer a slammed look and 119 lb-ft of torque from the Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-Twin. The 2021 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special is available with new two-tone paint options, and with a choice of a blacked-out or bright chrome styling treatments. All Special models are now equipped with the high-performance Ventilator air cleaner with a washable filter element, and a new low-profile engine guard. Pricing starts at $26,699.

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S

2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S
2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S

The (air-cooled) Sportster is dead, long live the (liquid-cooled) Sportster! Visually similar to the 1250 Custom teased several years ago, the 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S represents a new era for the legendary Sportster line. Since the introduction of the XL model family in 1957, Sportsters have always been stripped-down motorcycles powered by air-cooled V-Twins. Harley calls the new Sportster S a “sport custom motorcycle,” and at the heart of the machine is a 121-horsepower Revolution Max 1250T V-Twin, a lightweight chassis, and premium suspension. Pricing starts at $14,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114
2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114

The Street Bob, with its mini-ape handlebar, mid-mount controls, and bobber-style fenders, has become a fan favorite among those looking for a minimalist American V-twin to customize. The 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114 packs more punch, thanks to the larger, torque-rich Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine. Pricing starts at $14,999.

Read our 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Bob 114 First Look Review

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special

2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special
2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special

With a slammed look and 119 lb-ft of torque from the Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-Twin, the 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special is available with new two-tone paint options, and with a choice of a blacked-out or bright chrome styling treatments. All Special models are now equipped with the high-performance Ventilator air cleaner with a washable filter element, and a new low-profile engine guard. Pricing starts at $27,099.

Harley-Davidson Unveils Arctic Blast Limited Edition Street Glide Special

2021 Honda ADV150

2021 Honda ADV150
2021 Honda ADV150 (Photo by Joseph McKimmey)

The 2021 Honda ADV150 is an ADV-styled scooter, essentially a Honda PCX150 with longer travel Showa suspension (5.1/4.7 inches front/rear) and a larger ABS-equipped 240mm disc brake at the bow and a drum brake without ABS in the stern. Its powered by a liquid-cooled 149cc Single and has an automatic V-matic transmission. Pricing starts at $4,199.

Read our 2021 Honda ADV150 First Ride Review

2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP

2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP
2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Well-mannered motorcycles seldom make racing history, and the 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP was developed with one uncompromising goal — win superbike races at all costs. It’s powered by an inline-Four that we dyno tested at 175 horsepower at the rear wheel, and it’s equipped with Öhlins semi-active suspension, IMU-enabled electronics, and top-shelf braking hardware. And it’s street legal and available for purchase from your local Honda dealer. MSRP is $28,500.

Read our 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP Video Review

2021 Honda CRF300L

2021 Honda CRF300L
2021 Honda CRF300L (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The 2021 Honda CRF300L (above) and CRF300L Rally (below) dual-sports share the same powerplant, a liquid-cooled 286cc Single which boasts 15% more displacement, power, and torque than its 250cc predecessor. They have a new slip/assist clutch, revised steering geometry, less weight, and a new LCD meter. The CRF300L has a base price of $5,249 (add $300 for ABS), weighs 309 pounds, has a 2.1-gallon tank, and has a 34.7-inch seat height.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally First Ride Review

2021 Honda CRF300L Rally

2021 Honda CRF300L Rally
2021 Honda CRF300L Rally (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally (above) dual-sports share the same powerplant, a liquid-cooled 286cc Single which boasts 15% more displacement, power, and torque than its 250cc predecessor. They have a new slip/assist clutch, revised steering geometry, less weight, and a new LCD meter. The CRF300L Rally, which has a windscreen, handlebar weights, rubber footpeg inserts, a larger front brake rotor, more seat padding, and a larger fuel tank (3.4 gallons vs. 2.1) than the CRF300L, has a base price of $5,999 (add $300 for ABS), weighs 333 pounds, and has a 35.2-inch seat height.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF300L and CRF300L Rally First Ride Review

2021 Honda CRF450RL

2021 Honda CRF450RL
2021 Honda CRF450RL (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The Honda CRF450L debuted for 2019, bringing CRF450R motocross performance to a street-legal dual-sport. Its lightweight, compact, liquid-cooled 449cc single has a 12:1 compression ratio and a Unicam SOHC valve train with titanium valves. For 2021, Honda added an “R” to the model name (CRF450RL), lowered the price to $9,999 (from $10,399), revised the ECU and fuel-injection settings for better throttle response, and added new hand guards and fresh graphics.

Read our 2021 Honda CRF450RL Review

2021 Honda Gold Wing / Gold Wing DCT

2021 Honda Gold Wing
2021 Honda Gold Wing

The Gold Wing has been Honda‘s flagship touring model for more than 40 years. It entered its sixth generation for the 2018 model year, with a complete overhaul to the GL1800 platform that made it lighter, sportier, and more technologically advanced. The standard Gold Wing (above) and trunk-equipped Gold Wing Tour (below) won Rider‘s 2018 Motorcycle of the Year award. Gold Wing updates for 2021 include a suede-like seat cover, colored seat piping, audio improvements, and red rear turnsignals. Pricing starts at $23,800 for the Gold Wing and $25,100 for the Gold Wing DCT (with 7-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission).

Read our 2021 Honda Gold Wing First Look Review

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour / Gold Wing Tour DCT

2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT
2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Updates for the Honda Gold Wing Tour include the same ones listed above for the standard Gold Wing: a suede-like seat cover, colored seat piping, audio improvements, and red rear turnsignals. But the Tour also got a larger top trunk (61 liters, up from 50) that now easily accepts two full-face helmets; total storage capacity is now 121 liters. The passenger seat’s backrest features a more relaxed angle, thicker foam, and a taller profile. Pricing starts at $23,800 for the Gold Wing and $25,100 for the Gold Wing DCT (with 7-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission).

Read our 2021 Honda Gold Wing Tour DCT First Ride Review

2021 Honda Rebel 1100 / Rebel 1100 DCT

2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT
2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Joining the Rebel 300 and Rebel 500 in Honda‘s cruiser lineup for 2021 is the all-new Rebel 1100, which is powered by powered by a version of the liquid-cooled 1,084cc parallel-twin used in the 2020 Africa Twin, which uses a Unicam SOHC valve train and is available with either a 6-speed manual gearbox or a 6-speed automatic Dual Clutch Transmission. Standard equipment includes four ride modes (Standard, Sport, Rain and User, which is customizable), Honda Selectable Torque Control (aka traction control, which has integrated wheelie control), engine brake control, and cruise control. Pricing starts at $9,299 for the Rebel 1100 and $9,999 for the Rebel 1100 DCT.

Read our 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT First Ride Review

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS
2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

The latest addition to Honda‘s miniMOTO lineup is the Trail 125 ABS, which is powered by the same air-cooled 125cc Single found in the Grom, Monkey, and Super Cub C125. Like the Monkey and Super Cub, the Trail plays the retro card, pulling at heartstrings for a bike beloved by many decades ago. Just like its forefathers, the 2021 Honda Trail 125 proudly carries on the tradition of being a quaint and understated dual-sport, with a steel backbone frame, upright handlebar, square turnsignals, upswept exhaust, high-mount snorkel, and luggage rack. MSRP is $3,899.

Read our 2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS First Ride Review

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited

2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited
2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited (Photo by Kevin Wing)

For 2021, the Indian Roadmaster Limited gets the larger 116ci Thunder Stroke V-Twin versus the original 111, and it has a modern streamlined fairing, open front fender, and slammed saddlebags. As a premium touring model, the Roadmaster Limited also gets Indian’s heated and cooled ClimaCommand seats and other upgrades. Pricing starts at $30,749.

Read our 2021 Indian Roadmaster Limited Tour Test Review

2021 Kawasaki KLX300

2021 Kawasaki KLX300
2021 Kawasaki KLX300 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Like the Honda CRF300L above, Kawasaki‘s entry-level dual-sport got a displacement boost, which warranted a name change from KLX250 to KLX300. The 2021 KLX300 makes more thanks to a larger 292cc Single, which is liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, and has DOHC with four valves. It also uses more aggressive cam profiles, making it livelier than its predecessor. All of that is paired to a 6-speed gearbox and 14/40 final drive. Pricing starts at $5,599. And joining the KLX300 is a supermoto version, the KLX300SM (below).

Read our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM Video Review

2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM

2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM
2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Joining the KLX300 dual-sport (above) in Kawasaki‘s 2021 lineup is an all-new supermoto version, the KLX300SM. It has street-oriented 17-inch wire-spoke wheels and IRC Road Winner RX-01 rubber, and the suspension is stiffer with slightly abbreviated travel. The KLX300SM also has taller final-drive gearing and a larger front brake rotor. Pricing starts at $5,599.

Read our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300SM First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Kawasaki KLX300 and KLX300SM Video Review

2021 KTM 450 SMR

2021 KTM 450 SMR
2021 KTM 450 SMR (Photo by Casey Davis)

Speaking of supermoto, KTM‘s track-only, race-ready 450 SMR is back for 2021. Using the 450 SX-F motocross racer as its foundation, the SMR shares its 63-horsepower 450cc single-cylinder SOHC engine, lightweight steel frame, and cast-aluminum swingarm. To suit its supermoto purpose, wider triple clamps with a 16mm offset accommodate tubeless Alpina wheels (16.5-inch front and 17-inch rear) fitted with ultra-sticky Bridgestone Battlax Supermoto slicks. The WP Xact suspension is updated, reducing suspension travel to an ample 11.2 inches in the front and 10.5 inches in the rear, lowering the bike’s center of gravity and improving handling. A radially mounted Brembo M50 front caliper squeezes a 310mm Galfer floating rotor to deliver all the braking power you’ll ever need on a bike that weighs just 232 pounds wet. MSRP is $11,299.

Read our 2021 KTM 450 SMR First Ride Review

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R
2021 KTM 890 Adventure R (Photo by Kevin Wing)

We selected the KTM 790 Adventure and 790 Adventure R as Rider‘s 2019 Motorcycle of the Year. Just two years later, KTM has updated the platform. Adapted from the 890 Duke R, the engine now has more displacement, a higher compression ratio, and other improvements. And like the 890 Duke R, the Adventure R has better throttle-by-wire response, a beefed-up clutch and a shortened shift lever stroke and lighter shift-detent spring for faster shifting. Chassis updates include an aluminum head tube, a lighter swingarm, revised suspension settings, and refinements to the braking system. Pricing starts at $14,199.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R (Off) Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Video Review

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally

2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally
2021 KTM 890 Adventure R Rally

The limited-edition KTM 890 Adventure R Rally received the same updates as the 890 Adventure R (above), but is loaded with race-spec inspired components. Its development utilized feedback from Red Bull KTM Factory Racing team riders, Toby Price, and Sam Sunderland. Only 700 units of the 890 Adventure R Rally will be produced worldwide, with 200 slated for the North American market. Pricing starKTM 8ts at $19,999.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Adventure R and 890 Adventure R Rally First Look Review

2021 KTM 890 Duke

2021 KTM 890 Duke
2021 KTM 890 Duke (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Powering the 2021 KTM 890 Duke is the same punchy, rip-roaring 889cc parallel-Twin producing a claimed 115 horsepower and 67.9 lb-ft of torque that’s also found in the 890 Duke R and 890 Adventure (above). Shared amongst the middleweight Duke family is a chromoly-steel frame, lightweight one-piece aluminum subframe and cast aluminum swingarm. By using the 889cc engine as a stressed member, the 890 Duke flaunts a mere 372-pound dry weight. We recently completed a comparison test of the 2021 KTM Duke lineup (200, 390, 890, and 1290), which will be posted soon.

Read our 2021 KTM 890 Duke First Look Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Photo by Larry Chen Photo)

On March 15, 2021, Moto Guzzi celebrated its 100th anniversary of continuous production at its headquarters in Mandello del Lario, Italy. One of Moto Guzzi’s most iconic models, the V7, was updated for 2021, and is available in more modern V7 Stone and classic V7 Special versions. Both have a larger 853cc V-Twin derived from engine, variations of which are found in the V9 and V85 TT. They also get reduced effort from the single-disc dry clutch, a stiffer frame, a bigger swingarm with a new bevel gear for the cardan shaft drive, revised damping and a longer stroke for the preload-adjustable rear shocks, an updated ABS module, a wider rear tire, vibration-damping footpegs, and a thicker passenger seat. MSRP for the V7 Stone is $8,990, or $9,190 for the Centenario edition (shown above).

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone Video Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special gets the same updates as the V7 Stone above. Whereas the V7 Stone has matte finishes, a single all-digital gauge, black exhausts, cast wheels, and an eagle-shaped LED set into the headlight, the V7 Special is classically styled, with spoked wheels, chrome finishes, dual analog gauges, and a traditional headlight. MSRP is $9,490.

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special and V7 Stone First Look Review

2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT

2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT
2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT

For 2021, the Moto Guzzi V85 TT gets some updates to its air-cooled 853cc 90-degree V-Twin. The revised powerplant offers more torque at low to midrange rpm thanks to optimized lift of the pushrod-and-rockers timing cams and tweaks to the engine control electronics. New spoked rims now mount tubeless tires, reducing unsprung weight by 3.3 pounds for better handling and facilitating plug-and-go flat repairs. Two new riding modes—Sport and Custom—join the existing three (Street, Rain, Off-road) to provide more flexibility in managing throttle response, traction control and ABS to suit rider preferences. Cruise control and the color TFT instrument panel also come standard. The 2021 V85 TT Adventure ($12,990) has standard saddlebags. The 2021 V85 TT Travel ($13,390) includes a Touring windscreen, side panniers from the Urban series, auxiliary LED lights, heated hand grips, and the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia platform.

Read our 2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT First Look Review

2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan

2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan
2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan

For 2021, the Royal Enfield Himalayan adventure bike, which is powered by an air-cooled 411cc Single, get several updates, including switchable ABS to help riders when riding off-road, a revised rear brake that is said to improve braking performance, a redesigned sidestand, and a new hazard light switch. MSRP is $4,999.

Read our 2021 Royal Enfield Himalayan First Look Review

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350
2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

For 2021, the Royal Enfield family gets a new addition — the Meteor 350, a light, affordable cruiser powered by an all-new air-cooled 349cc single with SOHC actuating two valves. Available in three budget-friendly trim packages, variants include the base-model Fireball ($4,399) with a black exhaust system; the Stellar ($4,499), with a chrome exhaust and a passenger backrest; and the Supernova ($4,599), which adds a windshield and a two-tone paint scheme.

Read our 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 Road Test Review

Watch our 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 Video Review

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS

2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS
2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Triumph‘s Speed Triple is one of the original hooligan bikes. It has evolved over the years since its introduction in 1994, and for 2021 the Speed Triple 1200 RS is the lightest, most powerful, highest-spec version yet. Its all-new 1,160cc Triple (up from 1,050cc) makes 165 horsepower at the rear wheel, and the RS is equipped with state-of-the-art electronics, fully adjustable Öhlins suspension, Brembo Stylema front calipers, and much more. Pricing starts at $18,300.

Read our 2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS Road Test Review

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport
2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport (Photo by Kevin Wing)

The 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport, a street-focused adventure bike powered by the same liquid-cooled 888cc in-line triple as the Tiger 900 models, but it has been detuned to 82 horsepower at 8,400 rpm and 58 lb-ft of torque at 6,700 rpm at the rear wheel, as measured on Jett Tuning‘s dyno, which is about 10 horsepower lower. To keep the price down, Triumph also reduced the number of ride modes to two (Road and Rain) and limited suspension adjustability to rear preload. But this is no bargain-bin special. It has Marzocchi suspension front and rear, and it has Brembo brakes, with Stylema front calipers and a radial front master cylinder. ABS is standard but not switchable, and traction control is also standard but is switchable.

Watch our 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport Video Review

2021 Triumph Trident 660

2021 Triumph Trident 660
2021 Triumph Trident 660

The 2021 Triumph Trident 660 is a triple-cylinder-powered roadster in the the twin-cylinder-dominated middleweight class. It’s powered by a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 660cc inline-Triple making a claimed 79.9 horsepower at 10,250 rpm and 47 lb-ft of torque at 6,250 rpm, and it is equipped with ABS, switchable traction control, and selectable ride modes. MSRP is $7,995.

Read our 2021 Triumph Trident 660 First Look Review

2021 Yamaha MT-07

2021 Yamaha MT-07
2021 Yamaha MT-07 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Updates for 2021 to the Yamaha MT-07, its best-selling middleweight naked sportbike, include revisions to the 689cc liquid-cooled CP2 (Cross Plane 2-cylinder) parallel-Twin engine to meet Euro 5 regulations and to improve low-rpm throttle response. The MT-07 has a new 2-into-1 exhaust, revisions to the 6-speed gearbox to improve shifting feel, LED lighting all around, new instrumentation, revised ergonomics, and new styling that brings it closer in appearance to the larger MT-09 (below). Base price is $7,699, and three color choices are available: Storm Fluo, Matte Raven Black, and Team Yamaha Blue.

Read our 2021 Yamaha MT-07 Road Test Review

2021 Yamaha MT-09

2021 Yamaha MT-09
2021 Yamaha MT-09 (Photo by Joe Agustin)

Now in its third generation, fully 90% of the Yamaha MT-09 naked sportbike is new for 2021. Its has an entirely new 890cc CP3 (Cross Plane 3-cylinder) inline-Triple engine, a thoroughly updated and significantly stiffer chassis, state-of-the-art electronics, and a fresh look that results in the most refined MT-09 yet. The base price increased by $400 to $9,399, but the four extra Benjamins are worth it. The MT-09 is available in Storm Fluo (shown above), Matte Raven Black, and Team Yamaha Blue. There’s also an MT-09 SP ($10,999) with exclusive special-edition coloring, premium KYB and Öhlins suspension, and cruise control.

Read our 2021 Yamaha MT-09 First Ride Review

Watch our 2021 Yamaha MT-09 Video Review

2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700

2021 Yamaha Tenere 700
2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

After being teased for several years, Yamaha‘s highly anticipated Ténéré 700 adventure bike made its U.S. debut in the summer of 2021, bringing some excitement during a challenging pandemic year. It’s powered by the versatile 689cc liquid-cooled CP2 (Cross Plane 2-cylinder) parallel-Twin engine from the MT-07 (above), modified for adventure duty with a new airbox with a higher snorkel, a revised cooling system, an upswept exhaust, and a final gear ratio of 46/15 vs. 43/16. The rest of the bike is all-new, including the narrow double-cradle tubular-steel frame, triangulated (welded-on) subframe, double braced steering head and aluminum swingarm, adjustable long-travel suspension, switchable ABS, and more. Base price is $9,999 and its available in Ceramic Ice, Intensity White (shown above), and Matte Black.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 First Ride Review

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 Tour Test Review

Watch our 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700 Video Review

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT
2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT

Now in its third generation, Yamaha’s middleweight sport-tourer — now called the Tracer 9 GT — is new from the ground up for 2021. It has a larger, more powerful engine, a new frame, and a state-of-the-art electronics package that includes semi-active suspension. With these updates comes a higher price, and MSRP is now $14,899. It’s available in Liquid Metal (shown above) and Redline.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Tracer 9 GT First Look Review

2021 Zero FXE

Zero FXE
2021 Zero FXE

New for 2021, Zero has taken the existing frame from the FX and added a redesigned body. The starkly modern, supermoto styling is very similar in appearance to the FXS – tall, slim and sporting a raised front mudguard. However, the FXE is capable of a claimed 100-mile range on a full battery charge and costs $11,795, which can be bought down to around $10,000 depending upon available EV rebates and credits. 

Compared to many of its heavier, more expensive competitors the FXE is a lightweight and thrilling runabout, and what it gives up in range it makes up for in accessibility and potential for fun. The FXE makes for a credible commuter bike, capable of taking to the highway but ideal to zip around town on.   

The post 2021 Motorcycle Buyers Guide: New Street Models first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory | First Ride Review

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The new Tuono V4 Factory is still an out-and-out hypernaked sport-bike, with upgraded suspension and new electronics. (Photos by Larry Chen Photo)

It was a glorious morning in Pasadena, California, and the huge windows overlooking historic Colorado Boulevard bathed Aprilia’s Advanced Design Center office in natural light. Miguel Galluzzi, whom many credit with saving Ducati when he designed the groundbreaking and immensely popular Monster, sat impassively as the room filled with journalists. Galluzzi is also the designer responsible for Aprilia’s RSV4 and Tuono V4 models, which take full advantage of the extremely compact and powerful 1,077cc V4 engine. 

Galluzzi explained that the Advanced Design Center allows his team to sit at the heart of the North American market, where proximity to a diverse group of riders and their viewpoints can be fed directly into their design process, fresh and unfiltered. The latest CAD technology and 3D printing allow design ideas inspired by feedback, coupled with cutting-edge advances trickling down from Aprilia’s factory racing team, to be prototyped and tested more efficiently than ever.  

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The two models – Tuono V4 Factory on left, Tuono V4 on right – are almost identical on paper, but offer different experiences.

The result, we are told, are the most advanced Tuono models yet, a combination of incremental updates designed to improve handling and accommodate a broad spectrum of riders’ needs. The V4 engine is now Euro 5 compliant, and with some tweaking Aprilia has managed to match the outgoing model’s performance. Claimed peak horsepower is 175 at 11,350 rpm and maximum torque is 89 lb-ft at 9,000 rpm.  

Influences from the racetrack include a redesigned fairing with integrated winglets and enhanced geometry to improve handling at the limits, as well as a new inverted swingarm designed to improve traction at the rear wheel. The updated seat is wider, longer, and surprisingly comfortable. A new sculpted fuel tank looks gorgeous and maintains the same 4.9-gallon capacity. The Tuono V4 gets an improved 5-inch TFT dash and new switchgear. The headlight array features the triple LED headlight and a DRL configuration common to the rest of the Tuono line, with the addition of cornering lights.  

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The Tuono V4 is designed to take you further, with all the thrills, added comfort, and even luggage, if required.

Despite being nearly identical on paper, the new Tuono V4 models are quite different in terms of experience. Track rats will be happy to hear that the V4 Factory model is still an out-and-out naked maniac, and is the more expensive, track-focused of the two. The street-focused Tuono V4 represents a new direction, designed to go places carrying more than just a rider and a bare minimum of gear. 

The Factory version is now fitted with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension and a new Magneti Marelli ECU, controlling fueling and a full suite of electronics. Four times faster than the previous ECU and fully integrated via ride-by-wire throttle and a six-axis IMU, the new setup promises more precise and programable handling for road and track. There are three preset and three track-oriented, user-programmable riding modes, and a host of adjustable rider aids, including traction control, wheelie control, launch control, engine mapping, engine braking, cornering ABS, cruise control, and an up/down quickshifter.   

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The Tuono V4 is billed as a naked, but a minimalist fairing now incorporates racing inspired winglets.

Siting astride the Factory, it feels much more compact than might be expected from a liter bike. The body position is definitely sporty, but the wide bars and seat feel roomy, even for my 6-foot 2-inch stature. Setting off in Tour mode, within the first few miles the V4 Factory somehow feels familiar. Even on the highway leading us to the twisty mountain roads, it is impossible to completely open the throttle for more than a moment before running out of road, and any true test of the Factory model would require a racetrack. 

Throttle response is immediate but initial ham-fistedness is miraculously smoothed out before I can get myself into trouble and I throw the Tuono into the turns with some confidence. Steering is light yet purposeful and exact, the front wheel holding its line despite less-than-perfect surface conditions. A single pop on the downshift raises a smile, and ballistic acceleration on corner exits, accompanied by one of the most fantastic, raspy exhaust notes ever to erupt from a stock can, leaves me grinning like an idiot.  

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The Tuono V4 Factory is nimble and precise, even on less than perfect roads.

The Factory is fitted with Brembo’s M50 monoblock front calipers, which offer progressive feel and no want of braking capability. With my knees firmly pocketed in the sculpted tank I can keep my weight off the bars, gripping the bike with less effort, and lean into corners with a connected conviction. The V4 Factory’s comfort and ergonomics compare quite well to rivals like the KTM 1290 Super Duke R and Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS, yet its sportbike credentials remain intact.  

The standard Tuono V4 feels similar. Slightly raised handlebars make for a less aggressive stance. Despite lower pillion pegs, the rider’s footpegs are identically placed on both models, providing plenty of clearance but also a potential source of fatigue over long distances. A slightly larger fly screen and upper fairing, a practical pillion seat, grab handles, and optional luggage all make for a hyper-naked sport-tourer, with a heavy emphasis on sport.  

Test Ride the 2021 Aprilia Tuono V4
Test Ride the 2021 Aprilia Tuono V4

Performance is identical to the Factory model, and the standard model will make a capable track-day machine if required. Its taller top gear makes for comfortable, economical highway cruising, as you make your way to the next winding backroad. The standard comes equipped with fully adjustable Sachs suspension, front and rear, but on the road, its handling is fairly close to that of the Factory. 

The new Tuono V4 and Tuono V4 Factory are intoxicating motorcycles. They offer astounding power in a compact, lightweight chassis that is exhilarating. And yet, thanks to its suite of adjustable electronics, they are both rewarding and manageable. And one can never forget – or grow tired of – the machine-gun salute connected to your right wrist. While the Factory will keep the Tuono faithful satisfied, the standard model will open up the Tuono range to a host of new riders, who, like me, actually want to go places and bring more than just our wallet and smartphone. 

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory
The new Tuono has a broader appeal. Track enthusiasts will love the factory for its suspension and formidable array of programable settings, while sports riders who like to cover miles can now add the Tuono V4 to their list of possibilities.

2021 Tuono V4 / Tuono V4 Factory Specs

Base Price: $15,999 / $19,499
Website: aprilia.com
Engine Type: Liquid cooled, transverse 65-degree V-4, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,077cc
Bore x Stroke: 81.0 x 52.3mm
Horsepower: 175 @ 11,000 rpm (claimed, at crank)
Torque: 89 lb-ft @ 9,000 rpm (claimed, at crank)
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated slip/assist wet clutch
Final Drive: X-ring chain
Wheelbase: 57.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.8 degrees/3.9 in.
Seat Height: 32.5 in.
Wet Weight: 461 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 4.9 gals. 

The post 2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 / Factory | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory | First Ride Review

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review
The 2021 Aprilia RSV4 and RSV4 Factory (above) were completely redesigned. (Photography by Larry Chen Photo)

Aprilia’s RSV4 is a bike that, like a fine wine, only gets better with age. Racing has always been a driving factor in the design of Aprilia’s sportbikes. The RSV4 was introduced for 2009 to compete in World Superbike, and Max Biaggi stood atop the podium nine times that season and won the championship in 2010. Four years later, the RSV4 was ridden to another WSBK championship by Sylvain Guintoli.

With racing in its DNA, it’s only natural that advancements made on the track influence design and engineering of models ridden by the general public, from advanced electronics to downforce-producing bodywork. The Aprilia RSV4 and RSV4 Factory underwent a ground-up redesign for 2021, giving us an opportunity to see how this racy red Italian wine tastes a decade on.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review
2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory in Aprilia Black (left) and 2021 Aprilia RSV4 in Dark Losail (right).

It’s been a few years since I through a leg over a RSV4, so I was interested to see how the folks back in Noale, Italy, improved an already great motorcycle. And what better place to stretch its legs than the legendary WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca in Monterey, California, home of the famous Corkscrew. Laguna Seca has a long history of Superbike racing, plus it’s a favorite track for many of us. If only the fog weren’t so cold and damp, conditions would have been perfect.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Before we get to how the bikes work, let’s take a look at what’s new. Last year, Aprilia’s two RSV4 models had engines with different displacements, with the FIM-homologated RSV4 1100 RR boasting 1,000cc (and a claimed 201 horsepower) and the RSV4 1100 Factory living up to its name with 1,077cc (and 217 horsepower). Aprilia simplified things for 2021, equipping the RSV4 and RSV4 Factory with the same 1,099cc, 65-degree V-4 engine — with an extra 22cc of displacement courtesy of a slightly longer 53.3mm stroke, up from 52.3 — that Aprilia says still cranks out an eye-watering 217 horsepower at 13,000 rpm and 92 lb-ft of torque at 10,500 rpm, even while meeting strict Euro 5 emissions regulations.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

The V-4 architecture allows the engine to be narrow while still offering the power-producing benefit of four cylinders. To keep the engine as light as possible, the crankshaft was made lighter and the external housings, oil sump and cylinder head covers are made of magnesium. To keep the engine as compact as possible, the cam chain drives the intake camshaft and a gear on the intake camshaft drives the exhaust camshaft. To maximize the engine’s rigidity, the crankcase is a monoblock design with integrated aluminum cylinder liners. And to minimize vibration, a countershaft cancels out engine imbalances. A new Magneti Marelli ECU 11MP allows more complex algorithms to be processed at a faster speed, and a new exhaust system not only satisfies Euro 5 but is lighter than its predecessor.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

With well over 200 horsepower on tap, electronics allow the riding experience on the RSV4s to be tailored the rider’s skill level and preferences. Guided by a Bosch 6-axis IMU, the APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) suite does crazy fast calculations to optimize the bike’s dynamic behavior while offering a wide range of adjustability. Fifth-generation APRC includes: ATC (Aprilia Traction Control, 8 levels adjustable on the fly), AWC (Aprilia Wheelie Control, 5 levels adjustable on the fly), AEM (Aprilia Engine Map, 3 to choose from), AEB (Aprilia Engine Brake, a new feature with 3 levels that take lean angle into account), ALC (Aprilia Launch Control, 3 settings for track use), AQS (Aprilia Quick Shift), APL (Aprilia Pit Limiter) and ACC (Aprilia Cruise Control). Everything comes together with the six riding modes, with three for the street (Street, Sport and customizable User) and three for the track (Race and customizable Track 1 and Track 2).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

That hardworking IMU also provides input for the Bosch 9.1 MP cornering ABS, which ensures maximum safety on the road and exceptional performance on the track. Co-developed between Aprilia and Bosch, it offers three levels of intervention and works in conjunction with Aprilia RLM (Rear Lift Mitigation) to keep the rear tire on the ground during hard braking.

We’re not done yet.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Whereas the standard RSV4 features fully adjustable Sachs suspension, the RSV4 Factory is equipped with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension, with a 43mm NIX upside-down fork, a TTX rear shock and an electronic steering damper. An array of sensors and servo motors adjust compression and rebound damping automatically as you ride, adapting to changing conditions. There are two modes — semi-active and manual — and three suspension maps for each mode, and Öhlins’ OBTi (Objective Based Tuning Interface) simplifies pushbutton adjustments. Both RSV4 models are perfectly capable of delivering effective feel and control in any situation, but the standard RSV4 requires manual changes while the Factory’s setup can be changed on the fly with the touch of a button (preload must be manually adjusted on both models).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Perhaps it goes without saying that the RSV4 is smarter than I am. I’ve done a lot of racing over the years, including the Isle of Man TT, back when control was all in the wrist and I had to rely on my own brain rather than the motorcycle’s to keep me out of trouble. But things can and do go wrong from time to time, and I have come to appreciate not only the helping hand but also the convenience and customization that modern electronics provide.

Because most changes can be made on the fly, I was able to try out various setups without having to return to the paddock. Pressing a button on the right cluster below the kill switch changes the riding mode, while a four-button setup on the left makes adjustments within each mode. A lever on the bottom of the left cluster adjusts traction control, and a switch on the top of the left cluster adjusts both cruise control and wheelie control. There wasn’t much cruising going on at Laguna Seca, but there were plenty of wheelies that needed to be tamed! And a new 5-inch full-color TFT display, which offers Road and Track screens, provides an easy-to-read mission control.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Aprilia revised the RSV4’s chassis and bodywork as well. To optimize strength, rigidity and feedback, the twin-beam aluminum frame uses both cast and pressed-and-welded elements. The cast aluminum swingarm has a new lower reinforcing brace for added stiffness and uses three welded sections instead of seven, reducing unsprung weight by 1.3 pounds. Unique among production sportbikes is the degree of adjustment possible with the RSV4’s chassis, including engine position, headstock angle, swingarm pivot and rear ride height. Chassis geometry has been tweaked slightly to improve handling, and to keep mass centralized mass, most of the RSV4’s fuel is carried under the rider’s seat.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Inspired by the Aprilia RS 660, the new RSV4 is more aerodynamic, with revised bodywork, a larger windscreen and new winglets built into the double-wall fairing that provide more wind protection for the rider, more downforce and a 7% increase in airbox pressure. Revisions to the lower cowling help improve cornering agility and reduce cross wind buffeting. A new fuel tank provides more support during braking and cornering and has a deeper chin perch for getting behind the windscreen when fully tucked in. Seat height was reduced by 9mm and the footpegs were lowered by 10mm, yet cornering clearance increased by 1.5 degrees on both sides thanks to narrower pegs. All this adds up to a more comfortable cockpit, especially for someone my size (5 feet, 10 inches).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

The RSV4 has always been a looker, and the new bodywork only enhances its go-fast, form-follows-function stance. The front lighting application is what really stuck out to me. New DRL light rails that run under and up the sides of the LED cat-eye headlights really make it pop, and cornering lights add visibility during nighttime riding. And the exhaust muffler looks the business. The Factory is available in either Lava Red or Aprilia Black (shown), while the standard RSV4 comes in Dark Losail. The Factory also rolls on light, strong, five-spoke forged and machined aluminum wheels rather the three-spoke cast aluminum wheels on the standard model.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

After a few laps on the RSV4 Factory I realized this bike is seriously fast. The smooth nature and low growling sound of the V-4 were deceptive, making me think I was going slower than I actually was. With 80% of peak torque available in the midrange, you don’t have to rev the engine into the stratosphere to get a strong pull out of corners. And it continues to pull even harder as the revs pick up heading down the straight to the next corner. The new Brembo Stylema monoblock radial front calipers paired with 330mm rotors were perfectly capable of slowing things down. Front brake action was superb, allowing me to modulate the needed pressure to control corner entry with plenty of feel and braking power.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

I started the day in Race mode, which had a rather abrupt throttle response, but switching to Street mode smoothed things right out. As the day progressed, I ended up back in the Race and Track modes because, once I found my groove, it’s never fast enough, right? Unlike the Track modes, the three road-going modes tame power delivery for everyday riding, like commuting (don’t forget the cruise control!) or riding through town on your way to the good stuff, with the APRC electronics on standby in the background.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

In terms of handling, the RSV4 and RSV4 Factory are perfectly suited to a challenging track like Laguna Seca. The RSV4 has always offered positive feedback to the rider, and the latest iteration is even better, allowing me to attack corners with complete confidence. Leaned over in the middle of a corner, the bike felt planted and told me exactly what was going on. Under hard braking the RSV4 never got out of shape, and with three levels of engine braking I could explore how much to let the rear step out.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

I managed to get the RSV4 out of shape a few times on hard exits, especially coming out of Turn 2. The bike started to lift the front and I could feel the rear starting to let go, but before things went pear-shaped the wheelie control and traction control kicked in and kept me from ending the day early. The quickshifter with auto-blip downshifting is almost like cheating; just move your foot and the shift is made up or down with no clutch and no hesitation (it’s adjustable too).

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

Although the RSV4 Factory performed exceptionally, I struggled with the bike squatting on hard corner exits. Since the day got off to a late start due to a foggy and damp morning, we lost some valuable track time. The bike I was on seemed a little out of balance front to rear, but more preload at the rear remedied the problem. Fine-tuning is part of the process when you’re trying to squeeze every bit of performance out of a race-ready sportbike.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory review

For conoisseurs, Aprilia’s latest RSV4 and RSV4 Factory offer robust, full-bodied vintages suitable for different budgets and tastes. The standard RSV4 has an MSRP of $18,999, whereas the RSV4 Factory has an MSRP of $25,999, with the extra lira paying for the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 semi-active suspension and primo forged wheels. Enjoy responsibly.

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory Specs

Base Price: $25,999
Website: aprilia.com

ENGINE
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 65-degree V-4, DOHC w/ 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,099cc
Bore x Stroke: 81.0 x 53.3mm
Compression Ratio: 13.6:1
Horsepower: 217 @ 13,000 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 92 lb-ft @ 10,500 rpm (claimed)
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated wet slipper clutch
Final Drive: Chain

CHASSIS
Frame: Aluminum dual-beam with pressed & cast sheet elements, cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 56.5 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.6 degrees/4.1 in.
Seat Height: 33.3 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm USD fork, electronically adj., 4.9 in. travel
Rear: Single shock, electronically adj., 4.5 in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 330mm floating discs w/ 4-piston opposed radial monoblock calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 220mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Forged aluminum, 3.5 x 17 in.
Rear: Forged aluminum, 6 x 17 in.
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 200/55-ZR17
Wet Weight: 445 lbs. (claimed, 90% fuel)
Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gals.

The post 2021 Aprilia RSV4 Factory | First Ride Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory Review | Motorcycle Test

2020 Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory

By Adam Child ‘Chad’ – Photography by Snapshot


You’d think 214 bhp in the wet would be frightening, like stepping into a bull ring for the first time and running around in a red cape. That much power and force should be overwhelming in the wet – but the new 2020 Aprilia RSV4 Factory has ensured it isn’t.

This is the most advanced RSV to ever leave the Aprilia factory, and it now comes fitted with the latest electronic Smart EC 2.0 Öhlins suspension and steering damper, and alongside some clever rider aids, it makes this supersonic superbike quite usable in the wet.

Wet conditions proved the ideal testing ground for the RSV4 1100 Factory

And it’s far easier to set up, too. Its semi-active suspension now has three ‘active’ modes and three ‘static’ modes, which are electronically adjustable from the buttons on the left ’bar.

You could argue Aprilia is a little late to the game given the major manufacturers already have electronic semi-active suspension. But, to quote Aprilia directly, “We would never use semi-active suspension until the stopwatch demonstrated an improvement in terms of lap times. That time has come. After two years of development in close contact with Öhlins technicians, and thanks also to experience gained with the Tuono V4 1100 Factory, semi-active suspension now features on the top-of-the-range RSV4 1100 Factory.”

The Factory features Smart EC 2.0 Öhlins suspension

Aprilia has extensively tested the new Öhlins electronic suspension at tracks like Imola and Mugello, and is claiming the new RSV4 1100 Factory is now half-a-second faster as a result. So 214 bhp, 177 kg dry – all sitting alongside some huge electronic advancement. I was like a kid on Christmas Eve.

We headed to a very wet Vallelunga race-track just outside Rome to put it through its paces. If it worked in the wet, I reasoned, then it’s sure to work in the dry.


Taking Your Money

It costs $38,690 Ride-Away, so Aprilia is slotting the new RSV4 factory right into the middle of the pricing war. It’s cheaper than Honda’s Fireblade CBR1000RR-R SP at $49,999 +ORC, and cheaper than its closest rival, which is arguably Ducati’s Panigale V4 S at $40,390 Ride-Away.

The 2020 Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory edition

Interestingly the previous V4 1100 Factory, with conventional Öhlins suspension was listed at $33,990 + ORC, so you’re only paying $3000-odd for the clever electronic suspension once you factor in on-road costs. Both Kawasaki’s ZX-10SE and Yamaha’s R1M come with semi-active suspension and are cheaper again; the Yamaha at $34,999 Ride-Away and the Kawasaki at only $25,999 Ride-Away.


Power and Torque

So when did 200-plus bhp become normal? Quite recently, actually. In today’s superbike battles, if you haven’t got over 200 bhp to warm your tyres, you’re effectively bringing a knife to a gun fight.

The V4 engine remains unchanged for 2020, which means 214 bhp at 13,200 rpm and 122 Nm at 11,000 rpm. At the start of 2019, the RSV4 was upped in capacity from 1000cc to 1077cc by keeping the stroke the same but increasing the bore from 78mm to 81mm, and although power remains identical on the ‘new’ model, it’s still hugely impressive.

The 2020 RSV4 1100 Factory retains the 1077 cc V4 delivering 214 bhp

It’s not a one-trick pony either; torque from the V4 is stunning and, on paper, its 122 Nm blows away the Japanese competition. It is only edged out by the slightly larger-capacity Ducati (Aprilia: 1077 cc, Panigale: 1103 cc), with a quoted 123.3 Nm of torque.


Engine, Gearbox and Exhaust

The team that designed the fly-by-wire fuelling deserve a huge pay rise, because it’s perfect. I recently rode the new 1100 Tuono on track and couldn’t compliment the fuelling enough. It’s the same story with the new RSV4 Factory. It’s so precise, yet without any snatch. There isn’t a trace of lag, and you always feel you’re in direct management of the bike and have a perfect connection. The gearbox, combined with the up-and-down quick-shifter is also flawless.

It’s a surprise the Akrapovic exhaust passed muster with modern EURO4 restrictions

In wet and tricky conditions this is exactly what you require; immaculate fuelling and throttle response that allow you to seek out grip, with quick gear changes to moderate and optimise the force to the rear tyre. Add to that the road-legal titanium Akrapovic exhaust, and you have a sweet soundtrack to help you along. I’m unsure how Aprilia have managed to get it past the Euro regulators, but it does sound nice, even at low revs.

The engine is a peach. The 65-degree V4 provides a lovely synchronisation between usable torque in the low and mid-range, and a screaming over-run of power that ultimately hits the rev limiter at 13,600rpm. On test, in heavy rain, I simply short-shifted to give the rear full racing wet tyre a calmer time. But in dryer conditions, I let it shriek, only changing gear when the rev limiter lights flashed, logging 265km/h down the relatively short back straight.

Three riding modes offer very different characteristics

There are three engine modes to choose from: Rain, Sport, and Track. Despite the rain, everyone still opted for Sport mode; Rain mode is for wet riding on standard tyres, and we were using full race wets. Each of the three maps gives you full power, but changes the engine character and power delivery. The modes also change the percentage of engine braking, which is specific to each map.


Handling, Suspension, Chassis and Weight

For 2020 with the electronic Smart EC 2.0 Öhlins suspension and steering damper, you now have three ‘Active’ options – A1, A2 and A3 – and three ‘Manual’ options – M1, M2 and M3. Active signifies the suspension is acting according to the road and riding, and Manual is more like conventional suspension.

A1 is used for slick tyres, obviously on a racetrack, which should, surface-wise, be relatively smooth. A2 is for race or track-day tyres, again on track, but now the track is a little bumpy. And, finally, A3 allows more movement for the road on road tyres.

The Ohlins suspension offers active ‘A’ modes, as well as a more traditionally adjustable set of ‘M’ modes

The manual modes are similar but not semi-active. The modes within Active and Manual are not fixed and can be fine-tuned to the rider’s weight and skill, weather conditions, track, etc. The Öhlins steering damper is also now managed electronically.

Aprilia has simplified fine-tuning the suspension, so you don’t need to be an Öhlin’s technician to get the perfect set-up. Everything is presented via a 4.3-inch full-colour dash using the buttons the left ’bar. But Aprilia doesn’t use words like “compression” Instead, you have the option to increase or decrease “brake support”, or reduce or increase “rear support” on acceleration. You can even add or reduce “cornering support”.

Adjustability does differ from the usual compression, and rebound riders have come to expect

For most of the test ride I opted for A2; track use with race tyres. Yes, it was wet, but grip was acceptable, and Vallelunga is a flat and relatively smooth race track. On the RSV4 I immediately felt at home. Some taller and larger riders remarked on the smallish ergonomics of the RSV, but I’ve always found it roomy enough on the road. As soon as you leave pit lane, your confidence is boosted by that perfect fuelling, which means on pre-heated wet race tyres you can attack from the get-go.

Every now and then electronic suspension can take away a chassis’ natural feedback. You tend to rely on the suspension and tyres rather than feel the level of grip, but not so on the Aprilia. I’d never ridden Valleunga previously, and I soon discovered different sectors of the track have fluctuating levels of grip, which changed several times during the four-kilometre lap. But after only a handful of laps I’d worked this out, and this was all down to the superb response via the Smart EC-2 Öhlins suspension.

The Ohlins suspension still delivers a direct and intimate feel of the track surface

It was the same result in braking and acceleration. Once again, the Öhlins suspension allowed me to feel for the grip available. I could brake later and later as the conditions improved, get on the power slightly earlier, feel the rear wet tyre take the load and smoothly, and with the precise fuelling, start accelerating.

The chassis is outstanding, you can make mistakes and bring it back to a tighter line without it objecting. I couldn’t push as hard in the wet as I could in the dry, but the data showed towards to end of the day when the rain stopped, I’d achieved a lean angle of 45-degrees on those wets, and I always felt relatively safe, thanks to the feedback the chassis was giving me.


Brakes

In 2019 Aprilia upgraded the Brembo brakes from the old M50 radial calipers to the new Stylema items to put the RSV on-par with the opposition. The braking set-up remains untouched. There are three levels of ABS: Level 1, with conventional ABS on the front and no ABS on the rear; Level 2 with corning ABS front and back with rear-wheel-lift intervention; and Level 3 with corning ABS front and back and rear-wheel-lift intervention, which is more road specific.

High spec Brembo Stylema calipers are fitted, seen here with the option carbon-fibre air vents

I was immediately impressed by the feedback and lack of intrusiveness of Level 1. On par with the other very clever rider aids, you can’t ‘feel’ the system working; there is no juddering. Only in severe situations in greasy conditions did I feel the system take over, saving me from locking up the front tyre.


More toys than Santa

You have the previously rider modes, Race, Track and Sport, which give full power in each mode and simply change the engine character, responsiveness and engine brake assist. You also have the braking modes mentioned above.

Traction control offers eight levels of adjustability on the fly

But there’s more. There’s the eight-stage traction control, which is simple to change via the thumb and finger toggle on the left ’bar. It is easily altered on the fly and can also be deactivated.

More? Sure. AWC is three-level Aprilia Wheelie Control; ALC is Aprilia Launch Control; AQS is Aprilia Quick Shift; a pit lane limiter, APL, and even cruise control, ACC.

To make a 214 bhp Superbike functional and rideable in the wet takes very clever electronics and rider aids. I’ve ridden the previous model and the naked Tuono, which have very similar electronics, and both are exceptional. The only downside, and this is me being very picky, is the engine brake assist, which prevents the rear from locking up, but unlike other manufacturers’ similar systems, can’t be changed independently. In fact, it can only be changed via the three engine modes.

The Factory features a host of carbon-fibre features sweetening the deal, including the winglets

We had the optional front brake carbon air vents fitted, which are designed to cool down the calipers and maintain a consistent braking performance.

Other accessories include a full racing exhaust from Akrapovic, which requires a dedicated map supplied by Aprilia Racing. There is also a racing ECU designed for track use and to work with the dedicated racing exhaust. Cosmetically, there are a host of carbon extras to lighten the bike further and give even greater visual impact.


The Verdict

I’m struggling to find a negative, aside from the atrocious track conditions at its launch, and maybe the rather small dash – but even that is still clear and easy to read. All I have are superlatives and applause for the revamped 2020 model.

The fuelling is flawless; the gearchange, the quick-shifter, engine performance, and sound, are hard to fault. On test, the new Öhlins electronic suspension was fantastically responsive which increased rider confidence. And it’s easy to adjust and personalise, too. The electronic rider aids are some of the very best, and to top of it all off, the RSV4 looks just stunning. Aprilia doesn’t make ugly bikes.

Adam Child with the 2020 Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory at Vallelunga
Adam Child with the 2020 Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory at Vallelunga

Hopefully, my track impressions transmit to the road. I can’t wait to find out.

2020 Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory Specifications
Engine Liquid-cooled 65° V4 DOHC 16-valve, 1077cc
Bore x Stroke 81 x 52.3 mm
Compression Ratio 13.6:1
Claimed Power 159.6 kW (217 hp) @ 13,200 rpm
Claimed Torque 122 Nm (89.98 lb-ft) @ 10,500 rpm
Induction Four Marelli 48 mm throttle-bodies with eight injectors, RbW
Gears Six-speed chain
Clutch Multi-disc oil bath with mechanical slipper system
Frame Aluminium dual beam frame with pressed and cast sheet elements
Forks 43mm fully adjustable Smart EC 2.0 electronic Öhlins suspension, fully adjustable
Shock Smart EC 2.0 electronic Öhlins TTX monoshock, fully adjustable
Tyres 120/70 ZR17, 200/55 ZR17
Front Brakes 2 x 330 mm discs, Brembo Stylema monobloc four-piston calipers with cornering ABS
Rear Brake 220mm single disc, Brembo 2-piston caliper with ABS
Electronics Three rider modes, APRC System (Aprilia Performance Ride Control), which includes Traction Control (ATC), Wheelie, Control (AWC), Launch Control (ALC), cruise control (ACC) and speed limiter (APT)
Instrumentation 4.3 inch TFT
Dry Weight 177kg
Seat Height 851mm
Wheelbase 1439mm
Rake / Trail 24.5°/103.8 mm
Fuel Capacity 18.5 litres
Service Intervals 10,000 km
Warranty 24 months
Website https://www.aprilia.com/au_EN/
Price $38,690 Ride-Away

Source: MCNews.com.au

2021 Aprilia RS 660 | First Ride Review

2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review
Photos by Kevin Wing.

Those with a finger on the sportbike category’s pulse have had their gaze fixated on the Aprilia RS 660 ever since a concept of it was displayed at EICMA 2018. Rightfully so, as the RS 660 fills a vital role for the Italian manufacturer. It is its first fully faired middleweight offering, providing a street friendly but racetrack-capable alternative to the legendary RSV4 superbike. In a broader sense, the RS 660 also brings a level of sophistication and technology utterly unheard of in the class.

For decades, adding a 600cc inline-four cylinder or equivalently powered supersport model to its sportbike lineup has been the modus operandi of many a bike maker. The average 600 with their stratospheric redlines, peaky powerbands, taut chassis and racy riding positions are an absolute blast on the circuit — where they can be wrung out as intended.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 MSRP
2021 Aprilia RS 660 in Lava Red

On the street, few of those characteristics translate positively, unless you happen to reside at the base of an unpopulated mountain road. In traffic, the committed riding position weights the wrists something fierce, compounded only by the pain of stiff suspension and anemic engine feel, unless it’s spooled up to the heavens.

Instead, Aprilia carved out a niche within the still flourishing middleweight class, rubbing elbows with the likes of the iconic Suzuki SV650, Kawasaki Ninja 650, Yamaha MT-07 and Honda CBR650R, albeit with a raised pinky due to the $11,299 price tag. While all admirable motorcycles in their own right, their performance, power to weight ratios, equipment and electronics can’t match what the Aprilia RS 660 offers. This thing is entirely different, as I discovered on our first ride, beginning in Santa Barbara, California.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review
The Acid Gold colorway costs an additional $200.

The RS 660’s story begins with its all-new 659cc parallel-twin engine, producing a claimed 100 horsepower at 10,500 rpm and a peak 49.4 lb-ft of torque at 8,500 rpm. Equipped with a 270-degree firing order that’s become fashionable in European parallel-twin engine design, the 660’s engine is a spunky little firecracker and belts out a downright mean exhaust note, reminiscent of the RSV4.

With smooth bottom end and roughly 80 percent of its max torque coming online at a low 4,000 rpm, the 660 has plenty of gumption right out of the gate, delivering loads of mid-range power. Oh, what a peach this engine is, pulling with authority up to roughly 9,500 rpm, where things start to trail off.

There’s a lot of punch in that small package. Look close at the head tube and you’ll be able to see the seam right down the center.

Best yet, all of that power is delivered in a tractable, exciting and approachable way — intermediate riders will appreciate the inviting, rousing performance, while experienced riders are going to relish every ounce of power. Whether you’re in the city or hitting your favorite twisty road, you will always have punchy acceleration at your beck and call, unlike typical inline-four supersports.

The RS 660 is tame at lower rpm, and the engine decidedly difficult to lug when trawling traffic. On the opposite end of the rpm spectrum, the single counterbalancer does well to hide vibrations below 6k, but above that, buzz is felt through the footpegs. I wouldn’t consider it a deal-breaker, though.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review

The sporty 6-speed gearbox offers precision shifts and is equipped with a slip-assist clutch that results in an impressively light clutch pull. Separating itself from the pack further, the RS 660 is the only middleweight bike fitted with an up/down quickshifter and it is a treat to use in the canyons, allowing you to blast through the gearbox with glee. The quickshifter works well most of the time, but occasionally, you will be met with longer kill times on the upshift and slight hesitation on the downshift.

From the beginning, the tagline for Aprilia’s new P-twin was that it’s the RSV4’s powerplant with the rear cylinder bank lopped off. While Aprilia engineers took inspiration from the 999cc and 1,077cc V4 engines, the 660 is its own entity. Evidence of its RSV4 lineage is best expressed in the intake design and varied length intake funnels, 48mm electronically operated throttle bodies, high 13.5:1 compression ratio and cylinder head design, all taking more than a few pages from the RSV4 playbook. It even shares the superbike’s 81mm stroke.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 Quickshifter and Autoblipper
The RS 660 comes with a quickshifter and autoblipper standard and work well, save for a few occasional hiccups.

Helping you control everything is a Continental 6-axis IMU supported, class-leading APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) rider aid package, lifted directly from the RSV4 and Tuono motorcycles. It includes 3-level cornering ABS, 3-level traction control, wheelie control, 3 throttle maps, cruise control and even engine braking management, which isn’t featured on the big bikes. In ABS level 3, the cornering function is enabled, while level 2 removes the cornering function for more aggressive riding, and in level 1, ABS is disabled in the rear only.

A total of five ride modes are standard: Commute (high intervention), Dynamic (sport riding) and Individual (customizable). Diving into the dash and switching from Road to Race will reveal the preset Challenge and custom Time Attack ride modes, that replaces your speedometer with a lap timer on the instrument panel.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 Specs

All of those parameters can be quickly adjusted from the full-color TFT display found on several Piaggio models, but its easily navigable interface is updated for this application.

The street isn’t a place to test traction control or ABS limits, but I sure am glad to have those aids watching over my shoulder, especially when rolling through dusty apexes in the canyons. I stuck with Dynamic mode and enjoyed the crisp throttle connection, as well as the long leash for spirited riding.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review

What was crucial for the RS 660 platform is that the engine be as compact as possible to aid in a narrow and physically smaller chassis. A uniquely designed, lightweight aluminum twin-spar frame uses the 659cc engine as a stressed member to help save weight. Interestingly, each spar has one half of the head-tube cast into it and it’s completed when the two frame halves bolt together. Also, the cast aluminum swingarm connects directly to the engine, again saving weight.

With a leg thrown over the RS 660, it becomes apparent just how much emphasis was put on making the bike as sleek and svelte as can be. The footpeg distance is 0.72-inches narrower than the RSV4, and the subframe is 0.63-inches slimmer. Together, those dimensions make the relatively tall yet plush 32.3-inch seat height completely accessible for shorter riders. Additionally, the narrow subframe allows me to drive my weight through the footpegs, increasing control and feedback. For my 5-foot, 10-inch frame, the cockpit is spacious enough, although taller riders may disagree.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review

Faux riser clip-on handlebars integrated into the upper triple-clamp create a sporty yet sustainable riding position. Things can get wristy if you’re complacent on a longer ride, but it’s nowhere near as taxing as a supersport or superbike. Meanwhile, the 3.96-gallon fuel tank makes for a great anchoring point when braking or cornering. Aprilia representatives stated that they aimed for a riding position between the upright Kawasaki Ninja 650 and the racetrack-ready Yamaha YZF-R6.

Stylistically, the RS 660 references the RSV4 heavily and is equipped with LED lighting all around. Designers did add a bit of flair to the three-headlight RSV4 design by giving the RS 660 a daytime running light that extends upward on the front fairing in a “furrowed eyebrow” manner. The bike also features a functional passenger seat in standard trim, and when removed, luggage can be strapped to the bracket beneath.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review
The RSV4 superbike’s design has stood the test of the time and the RS 660’s lineage is more than clear.

A sportbike wouldn’t be a sportbike in 2020 without MotoGP-inspired aerodynamic winglets, and while the dual-layered plastics aren’t necessarily about creating down force, they are about encouraging rider comfort. The winglets are said to draw hot air away from the engine. In practice, it seems to work, as the engine’s radiant heat was rarely noticeable.

The supersport windscreen also provides a decent amount of wind protection when riding at freeway speeds, directing air toward the top of my helmet, and I can get into full-tuck comfortably.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review

A glance at the spec sheet reveals appropriately sporty numbers. Its short 53.9-inch wheelbase, steep 24.1-degree rake and 4.1-inches of trail pull no punches. However, this is where the Aprilia engineers have flexed their chassis knowledge against the competition — this bike is absolutely planted, translating tons of feel to the rider.

With a claimed wet weight of 403 pounds, the RS 660 tips into corners confidently and has a front end that encourages zealot-like faith. It’s light, nimble, and begs to be whipped into corners, remaining incredibly steady in every phase of the turn. Of course, Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corso II 120/70 and 180/55 rubber certainly contribute to the positive feelings. Thankfully, due to its reasonable power, the RS 660 won’t shred tires to the same degree its larger siblings will.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review

Handling suspension duties is a 41mm KYB fork featuring spring preload and rebound damping adjustment, accompanied by a non-linkage type KYB shock with the same adjustment abilities. The suspenders are tuned for street riding, soaking up bumps and bruises of the road nicely while still maintaining a composed and pleasurable ride. When the pace heats up, I would prefer a bit more compression damping, as sizable g-outs can unsettle things a bit. However, the all but officially confirmed up-spec Factory model will take care of that and appeal to those with a calendar full of track days.

In the front, radially mounted Brembo 4-piston calipers clamp onto 320mm floating rotors with good feel and stopping power — a noticeable improvement above the Japanese competition. In the rear, a dual-piston Brembo caliper grabs onto a 220mm disc and works well for line correction.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 Seat Height
In stock trim, the RS 660 features a relatively comfortable pillion seat. Once removed, the bracket beneath can be used to secure luggage.

To call the 2021 Aprilia RS 660 anything but a game changer is an understatement, even with a couple minor teething issues. In a traditionally budget-minded class, reflected in paired-down components, technology and performance compromises, the RS 660 is trailblazing its own path. In essence, it’s the sportbike we always needed — real-world ergonomics, an energetic parallel-twin producing useable power, a stellar chassis and a swath of top-shelf electronics. Enough faffing around, let’s get it to the track.

2021 Aprilia RS 660 First Ride Review

Nic’s Gear:
Helmet: Arai Corsair-X
Gloves: Alpinestars GPX
Jacket: Alpinestars T-GP PLUS R V3
Pants: Alpinestars Crank
Boots: Alpinestars Faster-3

2021 Aprilia RS 660 Specs:

Website: Aprilia.com
Base Price: $11,299
Price as Tested: $11,499 (Acid Gold Color)
Horsepower: 100 horsepower @ 10,500 rpm (claimed)
Torque: 49.4 lb-ft @ 8,500 rpm (claimed)
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse parallel-twin, DOHC, 4 valves per cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 81.0 x 63.9 mm
Displacement: 659cc
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet clutch
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Wheelbase: 53.9 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.1 degrees/4.1 in
Seat Height: 32.3 in.
Claimed Wet Weight: 403 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 3.96 gals., last TK gal. warning light on

2021 Aprilia RS 660 Photo Gallery:

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Aprilia USA presents 2020 Limited Edition RSV4 and Tuono Misano collection on Facebook Live, Sunday, June 28

Aprilia USA will be presenting the 2020 Aprilia RSV4 and Tuono Limited Edition Misano collection on Facebook Live. Those looking to soak up a few hours on a Sunday afternoon are encouraged to check out this broadcast featuring Aprilia’s limited edition RSV4 Superbike and Tuono Supernaked models.

From Press Release:

2020 Limited Edition RSV4 and Tuono Misano collection

I would like to invite you to join me this Sunday, June 28 at 5:30pm (PST), when Aprilia USA will host a Facebook live presentation from Buttonwillow Raceway of the new Limited Edition RSV4 and Tuono Misano collection.

Join in to learn more about availability of the new model at dealerships, the model characteristics and how Aprilia’s racing heritage has influenced the creation of this iconic model: https://www.facebook.com/events/2924768980985652/

We will be hosting our first Aprilia Racers Days track experience the following morning, and I cannot wait to get on the track for my first time since February, especially on these new machines.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Aprilia Racers Days On-Track Demo Experience

Aprilia Racers Days

Aprilia USA announces the return of its Aprilia Racers Days track-day demo tour, where enthusiasts can ride the latest offerings from Aprilia in an environment that inspired the models. Five track-day events will provide a unique opportunity to test Aprilia sportbikes in a controlled setting with no stop signs, traffic signals or automobiles.

Check out Rider‘s 2020 Guide to New Street Motorcycles

Starting at the recently repaved Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas, following the MotoGP weekend in April, two other Aprilia Racers Days will follow MotoAmerica race weekends, allowing enthusiasts to ride the same tracks where professionals raced the previous weekend.

Aprilia Racers Days
The Aprilia Racers Days track-day demo tour will be at Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas, on Tuesday, April 7, 2020, following the MotoGP weekend.

EVENT DETAILS:

Circuit of the Americas
Tuesday, April 7, 2020 (following MotoGP weekend)
9201 Circuit of the Americas Blvd
Austin, TX 78617

Road Atlanta
Monday, April 20, 2020 (following MotoAmerica weekend)
5300 Winder Hwy
Braselton, GA 30517

New Jersey Motorsports Park
Friday, May 15, 2020
8000 Dividing Creek Rd
Millville, NJ 08332

Buttonwillow Raceway Park
Monday, June 1, 2020
24551 Lerdo Hwy
Buttonwillow, CA 93206

The Ridge Motorsports Park
Monday, June 29, 2020 (following MotoAmerica weekend)
1060 W Eells Hill Rd
Shelton, WA 98584

Aprilia Racers Days events will be supported directly by Aprilia-trained technicians and product specialists, as well as partners Pirelli, Dainese and AGV to offer the best on-track experience with expert advice, performance and protection. The entry fee provides participants with an incredible track-day experience with their existing motorcycle and includes a VIP Aprilia Racers Days package, with ability to demo a new Aprilia for one of the track-day sessions, equipped with Pirelli performance tires. Attendees will also have an opportunity to be measured for a custom suit from Dainese and try out the latest track suits as well as helmets from AGV. All registrants will receive a $250 accessory voucher toward qualifying Aprilia purchases before June 30, 2020.

For tickets, visit: Aprilia Racers Days 2020

For more information about Aprilia, visit: aprilia.com

Source: RiderMagazine.com