Tag Archives: Harley-Davidson Reviews

Harley-Davidson Announces Screamin’ Eagle 131 Crate Engine For Select Softail Models

Harley-Davidson Screamin' Eagle Milwaukee-Eight 131 Crate Engine
MSRP is $6,195 for the oil-cooled engine. Black and Gloss Black color option shown above.

From Press Release:

Harley-Davidson offers power-hungry street riders a new performance option with the introduction of the Screamin’ Eagle®Milwaukee-Eight® 131 Crate Engine for select Softail® model motorcycles. The new 131 cubic inch (2151cc) V-Twin engine delivers the biggest, most powerful street-compliant engine Harley-Davidson has ever created.* 

The Screamin’ Eagle 131 is a bolt-in replacement engine for select 2018-later model Harley-Davidson Softail motorcycles originally equipped with a Milwaukee-Eight engine, designed to run at high RPM and to provide a significant boost of torque from cruising speed. Riders will experience commanding performance from the moment the throttle is cracked open on the Screamin’ Eagle 131 engine, performance backed by the assurance of a 12-month factory limited warranty when installed by an authorized H-D dealer.

“Our adrenaline-seeking riders asked for thrilling power and torque with reliability,” said Harley-Davidson Product Manager James Crean. “The Screamin’ Eagle 131 Crate Engine delivers exactly that. Developed by the Screamin’ Eagle performance team and factory-assembled at Harley-Davidson Powertrain Operations to ensure the highest quality standards, this high-performance engine is genuine Harley-Davidson.”

Harley-Davidson Screamin' Eagle Milwaukee-Eight 131 Crate Engine
MSRP is $6,195 for the oil-cooled engine. Black and Chrome color option shown above.

This street-ready performance engine features H-D’s finest Screamin’ Eagle® components:

  • The Screamin’ Eagle 131 engine combines the 4.5-inch stroke of the Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine with new 4.31-inch bore cylinders with a patent-protected design. 
  • Milwaukee-Eight Extreme Ported four-valve cylinder heads are CNC-ported and fitted with valves 1mm larger in diameter than the previous generation to enhance air/fuel flow and velocity and feature fully machined combustion chambers shaped to optimize combustion efficiency.
  • The engine is completed with a high-lift SE8-517 camshaft and high-performance cam bearing, high-compression (10.7:1) forged pistons, a 64mm throttle body and intake manifold, and high-flow (5.5-grams per second) fuel injectors. 

It’s a combination that produces 135 ft-lb of torque and 124 HP at the rear wheel when paired with Screamin’ Eagle® Street Cannon mufflers. 

Each Screamin’ Eagle 131 engine is detailed with 131 Stage IV badging on the cylinder heads and timer cover. The engine is available in a choice of two finish treatments to match original motorcycle styling or a custom direction – Black and Chrome or Black and Gloss Black. 

The Screamin’ Eagle 131 engine is eligible for Custom Coverage™ Extended Limited Warranty to run concurrent with the remainder of the motorcycle’s factory 24-month manufacturer’s warranty. The engine must be purchased and installed by an authorized H-D Dealer within 60 days of vehicle purchase to qualify for the Custom Coverage and is otherwise backed by a 12-month factory limited warranty when installed by an authorized H-D Dealer.

The Screamin’ Eagle Milwaukee-Eight 131 Crate Engine ($6,195 oil cooled, $6,395 Twin-Cooled) fits 2017-later model Harley-Davidson Touring motorcycles originally equipped with either a Milwaukee-Eight Oil-Cooled or Twin-Cooled engine and select 2018-later Softail motorcycles. The Screamin’ Eagle 131 engine does not fit Trike models. ’17-’19 models require separate purchase of High-Capacity Oil Pump P/N 62400248. 17-’18 models require separate purchase of Screamin’ Eagle High-Capacity Clutch Plate Kit P/N 37000258. All models require additional purchase of ECM recalibration with Screamin’ Eagle Pro Street Tuner for proper installation. See an authorized Harley-Davidson® dealer for fitment details.

Complete fitment information can also be found on H-D.com.*The Screamin’ Eagle 131 Performance Crate Engine complies with noise and emissions standards in all U.S. states other than California on 2017-later Touring Models and select 2018-later Softail Models. Replacement engines must be re-fitted with emission control devices and systems appropriate for the vehicle model and model year in order to ensure emissions compliance.  Replacement engines are legal for use on public roads only when installed in select specified and compatible models. Street-compliant statements may not apply to markets outside the United States. Not eligible for 12-month factory limited warranty when installed in models other than those specified.  Please see the Parts and Accessories warranty statement and your H-D dealer for more information.  The prices provided are the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Prices. Prices exclude taxes and additional dealer charges, if any, and are subject to change. Actual dealer prices may vary.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Harley-Davidson Announces Learn-To-Ride Training Programs

Harley-Davidson has just announced a new initiative to encourage growth in the motorcycle community with its “Learn-To-Ride” programs, available at participating dealerships. The “Learn-To-Ride” programs offer 1-on-1, or small private group training in a low-stress environment under the supervision and instruction of a professional riding coach.

Harley-Davidson Learn-To-Ride New Rider Training

From Press Release:

MORE WAYS TO LEARN-TO-RIDE AVAILABLE NOW FROM HARLEY-DAVIDSON 

“Experience the Ride” and “Learn to Ride” Programs Offer New Ways to

Experience Two Wheels.

MILWAUKEE (June 30, 2020) – Turn “Someday I’ll ride a motorcycle,” into “Today” with new ways to learn to ride from participating Harley-Davidson® dealers.

Inspired by new rider feedback, select Harley-Davidson dealers are offering two new programs that aim to make learning to ride more convenient and personalized.

These new programs are designed to provide flexible scheduling and a learning pace that suits the rider’s needs. Personal coaching sessions can be scheduled 1-on-1, or as a private group with up to 4 participants.

Harley-Davidson Learn-To-Ride New Rider Training

Experience the Ride 

This newly developed program is designed specifically for those who have never ridden a motorcycle but are interested in trying. Under the guidance of a professional coach, participants will ride a Harley-Davidson Street® 500 motorcycle across a practice range. The entire experience takes approximately 90 minutes and is completed on a bike specially equipped for new riders.

Experience the Ride is a low commitment, no pressure way for potential riders to get behind the handlebars and experience riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle for the first time.

This program can help participants decide if learning to ride is right for them, alleviate potential anxiety before taking rider training, and help realize how motorcycles can unlock their dreams of personal freedom.

To learn more and schedule a session, visit www.hdpersonalcoachfinder.com

Harley-Davidson Learn-To-Ride New Rider Training

Learn to Ride

For those that have decided to learn to ride, select Harley-Davidson dealers are now offering an additional option beyond the Harley-Davidson Riding Academy New Rider Course.  

This new program, simply known as Learn to Ride, delivers the same time-tested rider training curriculum as the Riding Academy New Rider Course. However, Learn to Ride enables students to schedule private sessions with personal coaches and learn all the techniques and riding strategies required to earn a motorcycle endorsement.

For riders that always wanted to learn but couldn’t fit a multi-day course into their schedule or prefer to learn in private session, this program is what they have been waiting for. Sessions can be scheduled 1-on-1 or as a private party with up to 4 participants. This program is a great option for spouses, friends, and individuals to finally learn and fulfill their dreams of riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle.  

Benefits of the Learn to Ride program include highly flexible scheduling, learning at the rider’s pace, more focused attention from the coach, ability to repeat training modules if needed, and completion of private sessions solo or with a small group of friends resulting in lower anxiety. 

To learn more and schedule your personalized Learn to Ride lesson visit the www.hdpersonalcoachfinder.com website.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Retrospective: 1975-1978 Harley-Davidson/Aermacchi SXT-125

1975 H-D/Aermacchi SXT-125
1975 H-D/Aermacchi SXT-125. Owner: Michael Hopkins, Rohnert Park, California. Photos by Virginia Pearlman.

Here is an attractive little trail bike, built by Harley’s former Italian subsidiary, Aermacchi. Oddly, virtually nothing has been written about this model in the American moto-press. Your scribe has looked many places, and could not find a single road test. More than a dozen Harley histories are on my shelves, some of which never even mention the Italian connection, which went from 1960 to 1978. There is reasonable reportage on the four-stroke Sprint models, less on the two-stroke Rapido 125 and Baja 100, so I am making do with what we have.

Harley should be proud of the Italian connection, because it provided the company with four international GP racing victories when Italian road-racer Walter Villa won the 250 class in 1974, ’75 and ’76, doubling up in 1976 by winning the 350 class as well — riding a parallel-twin two-stroke built by Aermacchi with Harley-Davidson writ large on the fairing.

The name Aermacchi comes from combining the two words from the previous company, Aeronautica Macchi, with which Giulio Macchi began producing airplanes in 1912. However, being on the losing side in World War II, the company had to stop making airplanes and instead moved into basic transportation — the motorcycle. Early models used a four-stroke single from 175cc to 350cc with the cylinder lying forward, almost flat.

1975 H-D/Aermacchi SXT-125

In 1960 Harley, aware of the popularity of bikes like Honda’s small OHC twins, looked at its own small bikes, a couple of rather antiquated 165cc two-strokes that had begun with the 125 Model S in 1948. Which was based on a German DKW bike, the designs for which had been given to the U.S. as part of war reparations. Now the Milwaukee suits tapped on the door of another WWII foe and cut a deal for half the company. In 1961 the first 250 models, called Wisconsins, arrived at dealers — shortly after which it was noted that this bike had nothing whatsoever to do with Wisconsin, and the name was quickly changed to Sprint.

In 1965 the first Italian-built two-stroke came into the country, a little 50cc model that the Harley dealers really objected to. Two years later that grew to 65cc, which did not help much, while the last of the DKW-based two-strokes vanished. Then the 125cc Rapido two-stroke came along in 1968, which was anything but rapid.

1969 was an interesting year for Harley, as an outfit called American Machine Foundry bought the motorcycle company. AMF was best known for selling golf carts and bowling equipment, and thought its sporting knowledge would work well with a motorcycle company. It did not. We won’t get into the Harley-Davidson snowmobile.

For 1970 the little Baja 100 two-stroke appeared, an off-road bike that appealed to quite a few riders. And it won its class in the 1971 Baja 1000 race. This was a serious effort by Harley to build a great desert racer and enduro machine, and they got a lot of help from the racers themselves. The engine was a Rapido cylinder sleeved down to 98cc. An automatic gas-oil mix was developed to simplify fueling.

1975 H-D/Aermacchi SXT-125

Obviously AMF thought that this two-stroke connection was good, and bought the entire Aermacchi Company in 1974. Aermacchi could still pursue its European market, with Walter Villa’s racing, while the profits would go to Milwaukee. The following year was the last for the lone remaining four-stroke, a 250 Sprint.

And it was the first for the SXT-125, a well-designed trail bike that was meant to appeal to the rough-and-ready folk who had liked the Baja 100. The engineers at the Aermacchi plant in Varese built a slightly oversquare engine, with a 56mm bore, 50mm stroke, using piston-port induction. The cast aluminum cylinder liner had a chrome-plated bore, which was quite useful considering the rather serious 10.8:1 compression ratio, providing some 13 rear-wheel horsepower at a little over 7,000 rpm. Kickstart only.

An oil container under the gas tank held a little more than three pints; this had no sight window and the rider had to look carefully into the opening up by the steering head to see if more needed to be added. A Mikuni pump pushed the oil into the intake to mix it with the gas flowing through a 27mm Dell’Orto carburetor. Oil metering was controlled by the throttle, with one cable running to the pump, another to the carburetor.

Electrics were simple enough, with a flywheel-alternator charging a 12-volt battery, and easily adjusted points. Turn signals were mandatory. Up on the dash were two round instrument cases, one being the speedometer. The other, which did not hold a tachometer, served to house the ignition key and lights for high beam and ignition.

1975 H-D/Aermacchi SXT-125

Gears took the power from the crankshaft to the wet clutch, then through a five-speed transmission with its own oil supply. The transmission sprocket had 14 teeth, the rear sprocket, 61. A useful primary starter allowed the bike to be kickstarted in gear after pulling in the clutch.

The frame used double downtubes, with a cradle running beneath the engine and serving as a sort of skid plate. A Ceriani fork did a good job up front, with Betor shocks at the back, adjustable for spring preload. Wheels were a 3.00 x 19 at the front, 3.50 x 18 at the back, both with five-inch, full-hub drum brakes. Wet weight was a respectable 240 pounds.

Seat height was almost 30 inches, with a saddle long enough to move about comfortably. No passenger footpegs. Good-looking machine, with an upswept muffler and 2.7-gallon gas tank. But dealers were not pushing them, and sales did not meet expectations. So what did AMF do? Sell the whole shebang in 1978 to an Italian company called Cagiva. And the “Cagiva HD SXT 125” became a bestseller in Europe.

P.S. Should any readers have information about this bike, please contact us at [email protected] 

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Retrospective: 1999-2002 Buell X1 Lightning

1999 Buell X1 Lightning
1999 Buell X1 Lightning. Owner: Jason Len, Arroyo Grande, California.

In addition to the weather phenomenon, the word lightning means fast, as in the speed of light or 186,000 miles per second. This motorcycle is not quite that fast; its speedo only goes to 140 miles per hour. But the X1 does get up there in an earthbound way, with a top speed close to that 140 mph, and a quarter-mile time in the 11s. Not bad for a bike powered by Harley’s 1,203cc Sportster engine.

Erik Buell, a longtime chassis engineer at Harley-Davidson and a serious racer, decided to go off on his own in the mid-1980s. His last accomplishment at Harley was the frame in the FXR series, which was greeted with great enthusiasm when introduced in 1982. Eric was a dyed-in-the-leather Harley enthusiast, having talked his way into a job in Milwaukee after graduating from the University of Pittsburgh.

In 1987 he began producing the RR1000 Battle Twin, building a drastically new frame holding leftover XR1000 engines, which had been used in those sporty Sportsters that did not sell well. When that XR supply ran out he moved to the 1,200cc engine, and did quite well with the Battle Twin line. Harley was so excited by this turn of events that in 1993 it bought 49 percent of the Buell Motorcycle Company, which gave Eric financial comfort.

In 1996 he came up with the S1 Lightning, a return to his basic concept of a “fundamental” sportbike — a bit too fundamental for many riders. He built 5,000 of these and had to listen to praise and damnation concerning its performance and appearance. Late in 1998 he elected to make it a little more pleasant to ride and change the look slightly, hence the X1.

1999 Buell X1 Lightning

The chassis is the most interesting aspect of the bike. The frame, a bit stiffer than that on the S1, was made of tubular steel in the form of a trellis, with sections coming down on both sides of the cylinders. A backbone connected to one of the most notable aspects of the bike, a subframe that was perhaps the largest aluminum casting seen on a bike. And it carried a modestly improved seat that held two riders without too many complaints. Beneath the seat a large rectangular aluminum swingarm helped the belt final drive get to the rear axle.

Buells had often been criticized for their limited turning radius, and on the X1 the steering head was moved forward slightly, giving an extra four degrees in steering lock. Still tight, but better…says the photographer who had to turn this bike around. A 41mm upside-down Showa fork with a rake of 23 degrees gave 4.7 inches of travel — and trail of 3.5 inches. It was fully adjustable, with spring preload along with compression and rebound damping.

1999 Buell X1 Lightning dash

The rear end used a single Showa shock absorber, which wasn’t really at the rear but was laying flat under the engine. There wasn’t room for the shock anywhere else, as the bike had a rather short wheelbase of 55 inches, five inches less than on the stock Sportster. Most shocks rely on compression as their standard, but this one used tension, pulling apart in response to a bump rather than pushing down. It had full adjustability, including ride height, with adjustments being best left to experts.

Cast wheels were 17 inches in diameter, with Nissin calipers, 6-piston in front and 1-piston out back, squeezing single discs. Because the Showa fork was already drilled for it, this bike’s owner added a second front brake disc and caliper.

And the engine? A mildly modified Sportster, an air-cooled four-stroke 45-degree V-twin displacing 1,203cc with an 88.9 x 96.8mm bore and stroke, and, yes, hydraulically adjusted valves, two per cylinder. The trick here was Eric’s Isoplanar rubber mounting system for this shaker. A standard Sportster shook like Hades when even mildly revved, and none of this was felt on the Buell machines. The engine was actually part of the chassis, with all the vibes going into a single longitudinal plane, and apparently this increased frame rigidity. Which requires understanding beyond the limits of this scribe.

1999 Buell X1 Lightning engine

Buell had developed his Thunderstorm cylinders and pistons for the S1, with better porting and 10:1 compression. A dynamometer rated the rear-wheel output at 85 horses at 6,500 rpm, an engine speed no rider on a stock Sportster would ever want to attain. For the X1 Eric tossed the 38mm Keihin carb and bolted on a 45mm Walbro throttle body using a VDO injection-control computer, labeled Dynamic Digital Fuel Injection. There was no increase in power; the system just made the engine run more smoothly. A triple-row primary ran power back to a 5-speed transmission and belt final drive.

The look was pretty sporty, beginning with the abbreviated front fender and a very small wind deflector over the headlight. When this bike came out of the factory it had big black boxes on both sides of the 4.2-gallon gas tank, the right one feeding the airbox and fuel injection, the left intended to keep the rear cylinder cool enough to not roast the rider’s leg. Underneath the engine was a spoiler intended to protect the shock and conceal the huge muffler. However, the owner of this X1 prefers the “fundamental” look and removed the black boxes and spoiler. He is careful about jumping curbs, as there are only five inches of ground clearance.

1999 Buell X1 Lightning shifter

Dry weight is 440 pounds, 50 pounds less than the stock Sportster. People still complained about the seat, the vibration and a number of other things, but they were just pansies. The bike was intended for seriously sporty riders who didn’t mind a little discomfort as they kicked butt with an old-fashioned engine in a new-fashioned chassis. In 1999 the X1 and the Ducati 900 Supersport cost about the same; take your pick. 

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special vs. Indian Challenger Limited | Comparison Test Review

Road Glide vs Challenger
This comparo is a fixed-fairing fistfight between an icon — Harley-Davidson’s Road Glide Special — and an upstart — Indian’s all-new Challenger Limited. These are premium V-twin touring cruisers that deliver big-time torque, style and functionality. We put them to the test to find out which is the better bagger. Photos by Kevin Wing.

V-twin baggers are as American as baseball and apple pie. Big, stylish and built for our wide-open highways, they embody the self-expression and freedom that make motorcycles objects of obsession rather than just vehicles. America’s two major bagger manufacturers — Harley-Davidson and  Indian — are well-known brands from coast to coast, even among folks who’ve never ridden one, and their histories and rivalries stretch back more than a century. Being so steeped in tradition, Harley and Indian take great pains to satisfy their base, building motorcycles that conform to the expectations of loyal cruiser riders.

Read our First Look Review of the 2020 Harley-Davidson Softail Standard here.

Modern baggers must strike a delicate balance. On the outside they need to look a certain way — a big V-twin front and center, a long, low profile and muscular styling with bodywork covered in rich paint. But on the inside they need to meet increasingly stringent emissions, sound and safety standards, provide modern levels of comfort and reliability and deliver an engaging riding experience in terms of performance, technology and features.

Road Glide vs Challenger
Both of these American-made baggers carry the nameplates of legendary brands, and are similar in many ways. But there are key differences between them—the Indian (left) is powered by a liquid-cooled, SOHC V-twin and has a modular cast aluminum frame, while the Harley-Davidson has an air-cooled, OHV V-twin and a tubular-steel double-cradle frame.

These two 2020 baggers, Harley-Davidson’s Road Glide Special and Indian’s Challenger Limited, strike that balance remarkably well. Being the latest incarnation of a model family that’s been in Harley’s lineup for 40 years — starting with the 1980 FLT, then known as the Tour Glide — the Road Glide is the seasoned veteran in this comparison, and its signature feature is a frame-mounted sharknose fairing with dual headlights. Powering the Road Glide Special is the air-cooled, 114ci (1,868cc) version of Harley’s Milwaukee-Eight 45-degree V-twin with pushrod-actuated overhead valves. The Challenger is Indian’s newest model platform and the first to be powered by the PowerPlus 108 (1,768cc), a liquid-cooled, 60-degree V-twin with valves actuated by single overhead cams. Like the Road Glide, the Challenger has a frame-mounted fairing, a first for Indian.

Check out our 2020 Guide to New Street Motorcycles here.

Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special
Compared to motorcycles with handlebar-mounted fairings, those with frame-mounted fairings like the Road Glide and Challenger have lighter steering.

As head-to-head competitors, the Road Glide Special and Challenger Limited are similar in many ways. Their fixed fairings have bright LED headlights and large vents that bring fresh air into the cockpit, and both have long floorboards and protective highway bars. Their rumbling V-twins have hydraulic valve adjusters, throttle-by-wire and rear-cylinder deactivation, and both send power to their rear wheels through 6-speed transmissions with assist clutches and belt final drive. Both have cruise control, electronic rider aids (cornering ABS, cornering traction control and drag torque slip control — standard on the Indian, optional on the Harley), keyless ignition and touchscreen infotainment systems with audio, navigation, Bluetooth and USB ports. They have low seat heights, 6-gallon fuel tanks, cast wheels with tire pressure monitoring, top-loading lockable saddlebags and a pair of non-locking fairing pockets. Even their as-tested prices are separated by just $45 and their curb weights differ by a single pound—the Road Glide Special costs $28,794 and weighs 847 pounds; the Challenger Limited costs $28,749 and weighs 848 pounds.

Indian Challenger Limited
With about 31 degrees of cornering clearance on each side, both baggers can be leaned over quite a ways before their floorboards start to drag.

Despite so many similarities, these bikes are anything but clones. Specs and features are one thing, style and personality are quite another. With nearly every component bathed in black, a tinted shorty windscreen, minimal badging and foregoing traditional metal flake and gloss in favor of matte Barracuda Silver Denim paint, the Road Glide Special is dark and brooding. (The FLTRXS is available in five other colors, all with gloss finishes.) The Challenger Limited, on the other hand, grabs your attention with Ruby Metallic paint, plenty of chrome and multiple Indian logos visible from every angle. (It’s also available in two other gloss colors, while the Challenger Dark Horse comes in three matte colors.)

More differences between the Harley and Indian emerged after logging hundreds of miles in their saddles. Cruisers are tuned for low-end torque, helping heavy bikes — especially those loaded two-up with full saddlebags — pull away quickly from stops and make brisk passes. These baggers deliver ample torque, sending more than 100 lb-ft to the rear wheel, but they go about it in different ways. The Road Glide has great engine feel, with crisp throttle response, right-now thrust and a deeply satisfying V-twin pulse. The impressive refinement that went into the Milwaukee-Eight V-twin — more power and torque, less heat, less vibration at idle and smoother operation — is why we selected the entire M8-equipped Touring family as our 2017 Motorcycle of the Year. On Jett Tuning’s dyno, the Harley generated smooth power curves with nary a dip or blip, torque rising to 104.5 lb-ft at 2,900 rpm and dropping off thereafter while horsepower increases linearly to 78.5 at 4,800 rpm. Due to its low rev ceiling (5,100 rpm) and narrow torque spread, short shifting the Harley helps it stay in its meaty midrange. 

With its liquid cooling, oversquare bore/stroke and SOHC valve layout, Indian’s PowerPlus generates more output with less displacement and revs higher than the M8. Starting at 2,400 rpm, the Indian’s advantage over the Harley increases steadily, the gap widening to 28 lb-ft of torque and 27 horsepower by the time the Harley’s rev limiter kicks in. The Indian keeps going, hitting a peak of 108 horsepower at 5,600 rpm before finally signing off at 6,300 rpm. With a broader spread of torque — more than 100 lb-ft are on tap from 2,400-5,600 rpm, reaching 113.3 lb-ft at 3,300 rpm — and much higher peak power than the Harley, the Indian likes to be revved. The Challenger has three ride modes that adjust throttle response, with Standard mode being fairly soft (Rain mode is even softer) and Sport mode delivering the goods immediately without abruptness.

Road Glide vs Challenger Dyno
Road Glide vs Challenger Dyno

These heavy machines can be a handful when pushing them around the garage or negotiating parking lots, but they feel well balanced and easy to maneuver at speed. With much of their weight carried low they roll in and out of curves gracefully, and their generous torque propels them out of corners with authority. About 31 degrees of cornering clearance on either side means they can be heeled way over before anything starts to scrape, especially with some extra preload dialed into the rear suspension. Despite having “race-spec” radial-mount Brembo calipers up front, the Indian’s front brake lever feels vague and requires a firm pull to generate full stopping power. In contrast, the Harley’s front brakes have the perfect amount of initial bite and better response at the lever.

If you’re ready to lay down some serious miles, these baggers have nearly everything you need (except heated grips — a curious omission for premium models costing nearly $29,000). But they’re not created equal when it comes to touring comfort. With a lower laden seat height (25.9 inches vs. 26.5 inches on the Indian), you sit deeper in the Harley’s cockpit, with hips rolled back in the dished seat. Because the seat is U-shaped front to back and has a slick finish, it’s difficult to sit farther back; hit one bump and you slide back down.

Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special
The Harley has an upright riding position with a comfortable reach to the handlebar. The seat locks the rider into place, and those with long legs will ride with their knees above their hips.

Greg’s Gear
Helmet: HJC RPHA 90
Jacket: Aether Divide
Pants: Aether Divide
Boots: Sidi Gavia

And bumps can be a problem on the Harley. Most of the time the Road Glide Special provides a comfortable, compliant ride, but its rear shock, which is firmly damped and allows only 2.1 inches of travel, responds harshly to pavement ripples, cracks and seams. Big bumps and potholes send shock waves right up the spine and can bounce a rider out of the seat. Also, the Harley’s fairing sits much farther forward (it’s a long reach to the infotainment screen), its windscreen offers no adjustment and the two large vents flanking the headlights cannot be closed so a high volume of air always flows into the cockpit. This comparison took place in December, and testers always felt colder and more buffeted by the wind on the Harley than on the Indian.

The Challenger Limited provides a more comfortable and enjoyable riding experience. Its seat is flatter and has more grip and support, its long tank is narrower between the knees and its fairing provides more wind protection. The Indian’s fairing is closer to the rider and its windscreen is electrically adjustable over a 3-inch range — raising the screen all the way up and closing the fairing vents creates a calm, quiet space for the rider. With 5.1 inches of suspension travel in the front and 4.5 inches in the rear — 0.5 inch and 2.4 inches more than the Harley, respectively — and more compliant damping, the Indian is much better at insulating the rider and passenger from rough roads. Even at a sporting pace with riders well over 200 pounds in the saddle, the Indian never bottomed out nor reacted harshly.

Indian Challenger Limited
The Challenger’s fairing is closer to the rider and has an electric windscreen. Its seat also locks the rider in place but is flatter, more supportive and has a taller rear bolster.

Ken’s Gear
Helmet: Shoei RF-1200
Jacket: Tourmaster Transition
Pants: Aerostich Darien
Boots: TCX Evo

The Road Glide Special was clearly Indian’s benchmark for the Challenger Limited. At the press launch last October, Indian provided a side-by-side comparison of their performance and features as well as a Road Glide Special for us to ride. With Indian’s sales being about one-tenth of Harley’s, one way to improve its market share is to offer more bang for the buck on competing models. Indian has done so in terms of performance with an all-new, liquid-cooled engine that makes more power and torque and offers the flexibility of throttle-response modes. It has done so in terms of convenience with a more modern and user-friendly infotainment system with higher audio output (100W vs. 50W on the Harley) as well as extra features like central saddlebag locks and a keyless locking fuel cap. And it has done so in terms of comfort with a more supportive seat, better wind protection and superior ride quality, all in a package that costs and weighs nearly the same.

Healthy competition is good for the industry and good for riders because it provides us with better motorcycles. Since the launch of Project Rushmore for 2014, Harley-Davidson has continuously raised the bar with improvements to its engines, chassis, comfort, convenience and other features. The 2014 model year also happens to be when Indian launched its all-new Thunder Stroke V-twin and Chief lineup, reigniting an old rivalry and spurring a feverish pace of innovation from both companies. The 2020 Road Glide Special is better than ever, but the Challenger Limited surpasses it.

Road Glide vs Challenger
The Harley-Davidson vs. Indian wars are alive and well, and both make gorgeous motorcycles that are desired the world over. Brand preference is the lens through which many will view these bikes, but the Indian wins this battle.

Keep scrolling for more detailed photos after the spec charts….

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special Specs

Base Price: $27,299
Price as Tested: $28,794 (RDRS, color)
Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles
Website: harley-davidson.com

Engine

Type: Air-cooled, transverse 45-degree V-twin
Displacement: 1,868cc (114ci)
Bore x Stroke: 102.0 x 114.0mm
Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
Valve Train: OHV, 4 valves per cyl.
Valve Insp. Interval: NA (self-adjusting)
Fuel Delivery: Electronic Sequential Port Fuel Injection
Lubrication System: Dry sump, 5.2-qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated wet assist-and-slipper clutch
Final Drive: Belt

Electrical

Ignition: Electronic
Charging Output: 625 watts max.
Battery: 12V 28AH

Chassis

Frame: Tubular-steel double cradle w/ two-piece backbone & steel swingarm
Wheelbase: 64.0 in.
Rake/Trail: 26 degrees/6.8 in.
Seat Height: 25.9 in. (laden)
Suspension, Front: 49mm stanchions, no adj., 4.6-in. travel
Rear: Dual shocks, adj. preload w/ remote knob, 2.1-in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 300mm floating discs w/ opposed 4-piston calipers, fully linked & ABS
Rear: Single 300mm fixed disc w/ opposed 4-piston caliper, fully linked & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.50 x 19 in.
Rear: Cast, 5.00 x 18 in.
Tires, Front: 130/60-B19
Rear: 180/55-B18
Wet Weight: 847 lbs. (as tested)
Load Capacity: 513 lbs. (as tested)
GVWR: 1,360 lbs.

Performance

Fuel Capacity: 6.0 gals., last 1.0 gal. warning light on
MPG: 91 AKI min. (low/avg/high) 39.3/40.4/42.3
Estimated Range: 242 miles
Indicated RPM at 60 MPH: 2,200

2020 Indian Challenger Limited Specs

Base Price: $27,999
Price as Tested: $28,749 (color)
Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles
Website: indianmotorcycle.com

Engine

Type: Liquid-cooled, transverse 60-degree V-twin
Displacement: 1,768cc (108ci)
Bore x Stroke: 108.0 x 96.5mm
Compression Ratio: 11.0:1
Valve Train: SOHC, 4 valves per cyl.
Valve Insp. Interval: NA (self-adjusting)
Fuel Delivery: EFI, 52mm dual bore throttle body x 2
Lubrication System: Semi-wet sump, 5-qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, cable-actuated wet assist clutch
Final Drive: Belt

Electrical

Ignition: Electronic
Charging Output: 803 watts max.
Battery: 12V 18AH

Chassis

Frame: Modular cast aluminum w/ engine as stressed member & cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 65.7 in.
Rake/Trail: 25 degrees/5.9 in.
Seat Height: 26.5 in. (laden)
Suspension, Front: 43mm USD fork, no adj., 5.1-in. travel
Rear: Single shock, remote adj. for spring preload, 4.5-in. travel 
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm floating discs w/ opposed 4-piston radial calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 298mm floating disc w/ 2-piston pin-slide caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.50 x 19 in.
Rear: Cast, 5.00 x 16 in. 
Tires, Front: 130/60-B19
Rear: 180/60-R16
Wet Weight: 848 lbs.
Load Capacity: 537 lbs.
GVWR: 1,385 lbs.

Performance

Fuel Capacity: 6.0 gals., last 1.0 gal. warning light on
MPG: 91 AKI min. (low/avg/high) 37.7/38.1/38.6
Estimated Range: 228 miles
Indicated RPM at 60 MPH: 2,500

Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special
Harley’s optional Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS) include cornering ABS, cornering traction control and drag torque control.
Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special
An American classic, finished in black.
Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special
The Harley’s Boom! Box 6.5GT touchscreen infotainment system includes audio and GPS.
Indian Challenger Limited
Smart Lean Technology (cornering ABS and TC and drag torque control) is standard on the Challenger Limited.
Indian Challenger Limited
Indian’s all-new PowerPlus 108 belts out serious horsepower and torque.
Indian Challenger Limited
Indian’s Ride Command is a comprehensive, customizable infotainment system.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Harley-Davidson Softail Standard | First Look Review

2020 Harley-Davidson Softail Standard
2020 Harley-Davidson Softail Standard

Earlier this month Harley-Davidson announced two mid-year additions to its 2020 lineup — the CVO Road Glide and Fat Boy 30th Anniversary. Now they’ll be joined by a third new model, the Softail Standard.

Like the stripped-down Electra Glide Standard introduced for 2019, the Softail Standard was designed to deliver an essential, no-frills cruiser experience. With a lean bobber profile, a Softail chassis and a Milwaukee-Eight V-twin, the Softail Standard is a back-to-basics Big Twin.

2020 Harley-Davidson Softail Standard
2020 Harley-Davidson Softail Standard

Offered only in Vivid Black, it has a solo seat that exposes
the chopped rear fender and a smooth, 3.5-gallon fuel tank that shows off the
frame and engine. The all-black Milwaukee-Eight 107 V-twin engine is
highlighted with polished rocker, primary and timer covers and a center-bolt,
round air cleaner. With chrome shields and mufflers, the 2-into-2 offset
shotgun exhaust enhances the Softail Standard’s long, low profile.

Classic laced wheels (19-inch front, 16-inch rear) with
steel rims are finished in brilliant chrome, and the front end features
clear-coated fork sliders, polished triple-clamps, polished top clamp and
riser, and chromed headlamp bezel and turn signals. A mini-ape handlebar adds a
touch of attitude.

2020 Harley-Davidson Softail Standard
2020 Harley-Davidson Softail Standard

With the look of a classic hardtail frame, the Softail swingarm is stout for dynamic handling and the rear coil-over shock is hidden under the seat. Removing the seat allows access to the shock for easy preload adjustments. The Softail Standard has a Showa dual bending valve fork, front and rear disc brakes, and standard ABS.

Check out Rider‘s 2020 Guide to New Street Motorcycles

Priced at $13,599, the 2020 Softail Standard is affordable and provides a solid foundation for customization. Harley-Davidson has created four Genuine Motor Parts & Accessories packages for the Softail Standard model, and they’re offered at a discounted price when ordered as a package (price does not include labor for installation by an authorized Harley-Davidson dealer):

Day Tripper Custom Package ($1,409.95): Combine classic bobber style with next-level versatility by adding a pillion and a 21-inch detachable sissy bar with pad so a passenger can come along for the ride. This package also includes passenger footpegs and mounts, forward foot controls, and a black leather Single-Sided Swingarm Bag designed to hold essentials.

Coastal Custom Package ($1,599.95): Capture the elements of the performance-oriented, West Coast style. Components include a Softail Quarter Fairing, black anodized aluminum Moto Bar handlebar and matching 5.5-inch tall riser, a Bevel two-up seat and passenger footpegs, and BMX-style foot pegs from the rugged 80GRIT Collection.

Touring Custom Package ($1,699.95): This package outfits the Softail Standard model for the long haul, with a comfortable Sundowner two-up seat and passenger footpegs, a 14-inch-high light smoke quick-release windshield, classic black Detachables saddlebags, and a 14.5-inch detachable sissy bar and backrest pad.

Performance Custom Package ($1,299.95): Amplify throttle response and mid-range acceleration with a Screamin’ Eagle Stage II Torque kit for the Milwaukee-Eight 107 engine and a Screamin’ Eagle Pro Street Tuner to dial it in. Complete the package with a free-flowing Screamin’ Eagle Heavy Breather Performance Air Cleaner and Screamin’ Eagle Street Cannon mufflers for a deep-bass exhaust note. It’s a 50-state street legal, factory-engineered performance upgrade that retains the original equipment factory warranty when installed by an authorized Harley-Davidson dealer.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special with Eagle Eye Custom Paint

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special Eagle Eye Paint
2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Special with the Eagle Eye Special Edition Paint Option

The new Eagle Eye Special Edition Paint Option is a custom
paint scheme only available as installed at the Harley-Davidson factory on the
Road Glide Special model.

New Harley-Davidson Models for 2020

Factory installation offers the customer an attainable
custom paint option that eliminates the need to either re-paint the original
components or install an accessory paint set that leaves take-off painted parts
on the shop floor. The Eagle Eye Special Edition Paint Option finish meets
demanding Harley-Davidson standards for quality and durability, and is backed
by the Harley-Davidson limited warranty.

Harley-Davidson CVO Road Glide and Fat Boy 30th Anniversary Join 2020 Lineup

The Eagle Eye paint option is executed on a brilliant yellow
base color with a glossy clear coat finish. A design highlight is a black eagle
graphic with spread wings that flows from the right side of the fuel tank to
the right side of the fairing. A simple Bar & Shield logo is on the left
side of the tank. Harley-Davidson script is aligned on the outside edge of each
saddlebag lid, and the saddlebag latches are color-matched. The special edition
paint is applied to the fairing, fuel tank, front and rear fenders, saddlebags and
sidecovers.

Check out Rider’s 2020 Guide to New Street Motorcycles

MSRP for the 2020 Road Glide Special with the Eagle Eye Special Edition Paint Option is $29,294, a $1,495 premium over the base price with a standard solid color.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Harley-Davidson CVO Road Glide and Fat Boy 30th Anniversary Join 2020 Lineup

Harley-Davidson has announced two mid-year additions to its
2020 lineup: the return of the CVO Road Glide and a limited-edition Fat Boy 30th
Anniversary model.

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Road Glide

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Road Glide
2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Road Glide

Joining the CVO Limited, CVO Street Glide and CVO Tri Glide
in Harley-Davidson’s ultra-premium Custom Vehicle Operations lineup is the CVO
Road Glide, with its distinctive frame-mounted sharknose fairing. Like other
CVO models, it’s powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 117 V-twin, which makes a
claimed 125 lb-ft of torque.

Standard features on the 2020 CVO Road Glide include H-D
Connect, the Reflex Defensive Rider Systems electronics package, Kahuna
Collection components, Boom! Box GTS with Premium Boom! Audio, a Boom! Audio
30K Bluetooth Helmet Headset, a low-profile two-piece fuel tank console with
lighted CVO logo, a Fang Front Spoiler, a Screamin’ Eagle Heavy Breather
intake, Knockout 21-inch front and 18-inch rear wheels and more.

For 2020 there is a single color choice: Premium Sand Dune
with pearl topcoat and subtle graphics highlighted by Smoked Satin Chrome,
Gloss Black and Black Onyx finishes. Front and rear wheels are finished in
Gloss Black/Smoked Satin, and the Heavy Breather air cleaner is finished in
Gloss Black.

Pricing for the 2020 CVO Road Glide starts at $40,999.

Check out Rider’s Guide to New 2020 Street Motorcycles

2020 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 30th Anniversary

2020 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 30th Anniversary
2020 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 30th Anniversary

Harley-Davidson is celebrating three decades of the iconic
Fat Boy with a limited-edition 30th Anniversary model—only 2,500 will be built,
each serialized with a number plate on the fuel tank console.

Introduced for the 1990 model year, the “Fat Boy took the
look, proportions and silhouette of a 1949 Hydra-Glide motorcycle and
completely modernized it for a new generation of riders,” explains Brad
Richards, Harley-Davidson Vice President of Styling and Design. “Those riders
appreciated our post-war design DNA but also found themselves drawn to the
clean simplicity of contemporary industrial design. Each of these elements was captured
in the new 2018 version of the Fat Boy model. For this 30th Anniversary model
we wanted to create something very special, so we leaned into the popularity of
darker finishes and a limited run/serialized strategy to make the bike truly
unique and exclusive.”

The Fat Boy 30th Anniversary offers a bold reinterpretation of the original with dark finishes and a single color option, Vivid Black. The cast-aluminum Lakester disc wheels are finished in Satin Black with machined highlights. The blacked-out Milwaukee-Eight 114 powertrain is finished with engine covers in gloss black and subtle bronze-tone lower rocker covers and timer cover script. The exhaust finished in a Black Onyx, a durable physical vapor deposition paint finish that reveals the underlying chrome in bright light. A Vivid Black headlamp nacelle, handlebar and controls as well as a new bronze-tone waterslide Fat Boy tank logo complete the dark look that is distinctive from the regular production model.

Based on the Harley-Davidson Softail platform launched in 2018, the Fat Boy redefines an icon with power and presence. The entire Fat Boy front end is massive and topped with an LED headlamp in a newly shaped nacelle. The Lakester disc aluminum wheels update one of the Fat Boy’s defining styling features, with a 160mm front and a 240mm rear tire that deliver a factory custom look.

Pricing for the 2020 Fat Boy 30th Anniversary starts at $21,949.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Harley Releases Details on Liquid-Cooled Revolution Max Engine Powering Pan America and Bronx Models

Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250. Photos by Harley-Davidson.

Harley-Davidson made some waves at EICMA this week, showing off two models it teased in 2018, the Pan-America adventure-tourer and the Bronx streetfighter. Both are powered by a new liquid-cooled 60-degree V-twin engine platform called the Revolution Max — 1,250cc in the Pan America and 975cc in the Bronx. Harley also confirmed that both models will launch in late 2020.

The Revolution Max is a bold new step for a company invested so heavily in (air-cooled) tradition — although perhaps not as bold as its LiveWire electric motorcycle unveiled earlier this year and now on sale at H-D dealerships nationwide. (Read our First Ride Review here.) Harley says the Revolution Max is designed to minimize weight and maximize performance, with a narrow profile that integrates into the bike as a stressed member of the frame. It also features a counter-balancer for smooth and comfortable operation.

Harley claims performance targets of more than 145 horsepower and 90 lb-ft of torque from the Revolution Max 1250, and more than 115 horsepower and 70 lb-ft of torque from the Revolution Max 975.

A few other details about the new Pan America and Bronx were released as well, including a collaboration with Brembo to create a new radial monoblock caliper that complements Harley’s unique design, and a continuing partnership with Michelin to develop co-branded tires specifically for each model.

Thanks to a smattering of new images (scroll down to see them all), we can also glean a bit more info about the new bikes.

Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Pan America looks to have a large, full-color TFT display, electronic suspension, cruise control and a one hand-adjustable windscreen.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
The Pan America also sports a chain final drive and tubeless spoked rims.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Brembo brakes have ABS.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Pan America’s luggage looks adventure-ready.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
This dark rendering of the Revolution Max 1250 gives us a few more hints, like a skid plate and side radiator guards.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Is the world ready for a Harley ADV tourer? There’s only one way to find out….
Harley-Davidson Bronx
Harley-Davidson Bronx.
Harley-Davidson Bronx
It’s hard to tell if this is a backlit LCD or a TFT. The Bronx looks to have cruise control and an adjustable fork, though.
Harley-Davidson Bronx
Smaller version of the Revolution Max powers the Bronx. Notice the footpegs, a sporty rearset design that’s positioned right underneath the rider.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

New Harley-Davidson Models for 2020

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire
New or updated Harley-Davidson models for 2020 include the LiveWire electric bike (above), Low Rider S, Road Glide Limited, a restyled Heritage Classic and three CVO models. (Photos courtesy of Harley-Davidson)

The biggest news to come out of Milwaukee for the 2020 model year is the all-new LiveWire electric motorcycle, which we’ve already ridden and reviewed. Harley-Davidson has announced the wider availability of technological features that debuted on the LiveWire, as well as several new or updated models, including the Low Rider S, Road Glide Limited, Heritage Classic and three CVO models.

H-D Connect

H-D Connect
H-D Connect sends vehicle information and security alerts to your smartphone through the Harley-Davidson app.

First seen on the LiveWire, H-D Connect is a subscription-based
cellular service that allows riders to connect with their motorcycle using
their smartphone and the Harley-Davidson app. H-D Connect provides key vehicle information
(e.g., battery voltage, fuel level, available range, riding statistics and
more) as well as remote security monitoring, including tamper alerts and stolen
vehicle assistance. H-D Connect is a standard feature on 2020 Touring (except
Road King/S and Electra Glide Standard models), Tri Glide Ultra, CVO models and
LiveWire, and it includes free service for one year.

Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS)

Also seen on the LiveWire, Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS) is a suite of electronic riding assistance features, including cornering enhanced linked braking, ABS, traction control and drag-torque slip control; hill hold control; and tire-pressure monitoring. All RDRS features are standard on CVO models (though on the CVO Tri Glide, nothing is “cornering enhanced”), and they are available as options on all Touring models except the Electra Glide Standard.

2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S
2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

Chopper-style Low Rider models have been in Harley-Davidson’s lineup almost continuously since 1977. When Dyna models were rolled into the Softail family for 2018, the Low Rider got a new chassis and a Milwaukee-Eight 107ci V-twin. The last Low Rider S model, which we reviewed in 2016, was built around a 110-cubic-inch Screamin’ Eagle Twin Cam V-twin. For 2020, the Softail-based Low Rider S flexes its muscles with a Milwaukee-Eight 114 that churns out 119 lb-ft of torque at 3,000 rpm (claimed).

2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S
2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

Radiate cast wheels (19-inch front, 16-inch rear) finished in Matte Dark Bronze, a 1-inch-diameter motocross-style handlebar on 4-inch straight risers, a color-matched mini-fairing, a high-back solo seat and black finishes on the powertrain and mufflers add plenty of attitude.

The Low Rider S also gets premium suspension components (including a 43mm USD fork) and triple-disc brakes with standard ABS. It’s available in Vivid Black and Barracuda Silver (shown above), and pricing starts at $17,999.

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited
2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited

Replacing the Road Glide Ultra model for 2020 is the new Road Glide Limited, which offers premium luxury-touring features, including painted pin striping, a gloss-finish inner fairing, heated grips, Slicer II Contrast Bright wheels and new tank, front and rear fender medallions. The Road Glide’s distinctive shark-nose fairing has triple split stream vents that improve airflow and reduce buffeting.

Read our Comparison Review: Harley-Davidson Road Glide Ultra
vs Indian Roadmaster vs Yamaha Star Venture TC

The Road Glide Limited is powered by the Twin-Cooled Milwaukee-Eight
114, and features premium suspension, Reflex linked Brembo brakes with ABS, a Boom!
Box GTS infotainment system with color touchscreen, H-D Connect and dual
Daymaker LED headlamps.

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited
2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited

A new Black Finish Option (shown in the photos above), which is also available for the 2020 Ultra Limited, includes Slicer II cast wheels finished in Gloss Black; fuel tank, front and rear fender medallions with a Gloss Black fill surrounded by a Charcoal border; Gloss Black powdercoat powertrain, covers and exhaust; black Tour-Pak luggage carrier hinges, latches and rack, console, footboards, handlebar, gauge trim rings, hand control levers, mirrors and foot controls; black LED Daymaker headlamp, trim ring and LED fog lamps (Ultra Limited only); and black fork lowers, fork covers, engine guard and saddlebag guards.

Pricing for the 2020 Road Glide Limited starts at $28,299.

2020 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic

2020 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic
2020 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic

The Softail-chassis Heritage Classic has been re-styled for 2020, swapping the previous model’s blacked-out look for a generous helping of chrome. (The Heritage Classic 114 model powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine will retain the model’s original, blacked-out look.) The updated Heritage Classic has a bright powertrain with chrome air cleaner and covers; chrome steel laced wheels; chrome headlamp bucket and auxiliary light buckets, bright fork legs and chrome fork covers and nacelle; chrome rear fender struts and side covers; a chrome console; a polished stainless steel handlebar with a chrome riser and top clamp; and a full clear windscreen with chrome support hardware.

Read our 2018 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic Road Test Review

The Heritage Classic is powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 107 V-twin and is mechanically identical to the 2019 model. This touring-ready Softail features lockable hard saddlebags, a detachable windscreen, a two-piece skirted seat and pillion with black studs, and standard cruise control and ABS. Color options include: Vivid Black, Billiard Burgundy, two-tone Silver Pine/Spruce and Billiard Red/Vivid Black. Pricing starts at $18,999.

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide
2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide

Returning for 2020 with a new look and new premium features, the CVO Street Glide is one of Harley-Davidson’s most popular limited-edition Custom Vehicle Operations models. Powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 117 V-Twin with red rocker covers, it gets premium custom paint, premium Talon wheels, custom controls and an all-new BOOM! Box GTS infotainment system with three separate amplifiers, 75 watts per channel and 900 watts of audio performance. It also includes the Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS), smartphone-linked H-D Connect and a wireless Bluetooth headset interface.

Pricing for the 2020 CVO Street Glide starts at $40,539.

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited
2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited

For the ultimate in two-up V-twin touring, the 2020 CVO Limited offers the rider and passenger plenty of comfort, luggage capacity, style and performance. Its Twin-Cooled Milwaukee-Eight 117 grunts out 125 lb-ft of torque. Premium suspension, premium paint and finishes, premium audio, RDRS, H-D Connect, wireless Bluetooth—the CVO Limited gets it all.

Read our 2019 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited First Ride Review

Pricing for the 2020 CVO Limited starts at $44,039.

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Tri Glide

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Tri Glide
2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Tri Glide

Said to be the most-requested CVO model, a new addition to
the lineup for 2020 is the CVO Tri Glide, the ultimate Milwaukee-built trike.
Like its Custom Vehicle Operations stable mates, the CVO Tri Glide gets big
power from a Milwaukee-Eight 117 V-twin, big sound from the BOOM! Box GTS
infotainment system and big style courtesy of premium paint and finishes and
the Kahuna collection of grips, levers, pegs and floorboards, and Tomahawk
contrast-cut wheels. RDRS, H-D Connect, wireless Bluetooth, Daymaker LED
headlamps and the choice of two custom paint finishes round out the wish list.

Pricing for the 2020 CVO Tri Glide starts at $48,999.

Source: RiderMagazine.com