Tag Archives: Harley-Davidson Reviews

Harley Releases Details on Liquid-Cooled Revolution Max Engine Powering Pan America and Bronx Models

Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250. Photos by Harley-Davidson.

Harley-Davidson made some waves at EICMA this week, showing off two models it teased in 2018, the Pan-America adventure-tourer and the Bronx streetfighter. Both are powered by a new liquid-cooled 60-degree V-twin engine platform called the Revolution Max — 1,250cc in the Pan America and 975cc in the Bronx. Harley also confirmed that both models will launch in late 2020.

The Revolution Max is a bold new step for a company invested so heavily in (air-cooled) tradition — although perhaps not as bold as its LiveWire electric motorcycle unveiled earlier this year and now on sale at H-D dealerships nationwide. (Read our First Ride Review here.) Harley says the Revolution Max is designed to minimize weight and maximize performance, with a narrow profile that integrates into the bike as a stressed member of the frame. It also features a counter-balancer for smooth and comfortable operation.

Harley claims performance targets of more than 145 horsepower and 90 lb-ft of torque from the Revolution Max 1250, and more than 115 horsepower and 70 lb-ft of torque from the Revolution Max 975.

A few other details about the new Pan America and Bronx were released as well, including a collaboration with Brembo to create a new radial monoblock caliper that complements Harley’s unique design, and a continuing partnership with Michelin to develop co-branded tires specifically for each model.

Thanks to a smattering of new images (scroll down to see them all), we can also glean a bit more info about the new bikes.

Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Pan America looks to have a large, full-color TFT display, electronic suspension, cruise control and a one hand-adjustable windscreen.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
The Pan America also sports a chain final drive and tubeless spoked rims.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Brembo brakes have ABS.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Pan America’s luggage looks adventure-ready.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
This dark rendering of the Revolution Max 1250 gives us a few more hints, like a skid plate and side radiator guards.
Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250
Is the world ready for a Harley ADV tourer? There’s only one way to find out….
Harley-Davidson Bronx
Harley-Davidson Bronx.
Harley-Davidson Bronx
It’s hard to tell if this is a backlit LCD or a TFT. The Bronx looks to have cruise control and an adjustable fork, though.
Harley-Davidson Bronx
Smaller version of the Revolution Max powers the Bronx. Notice the footpegs, a sporty rearset design that’s positioned right underneath the rider.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

New Harley-Davidson Models for 2020

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire
New or updated Harley-Davidson models for 2020 include the LiveWire electric bike (above), Low Rider S, Road Glide Limited, a restyled Heritage Classic and three CVO models. (Photos courtesy of Harley-Davidson)

The biggest news to come out of Milwaukee for the 2020 model year is the all-new LiveWire electric motorcycle, which we’ve already ridden and reviewed. Harley-Davidson has announced the wider availability of technological features that debuted on the LiveWire, as well as several new or updated models, including the Low Rider S, Road Glide Limited, Heritage Classic and three CVO models.

H-D Connect

H-D Connect
H-D Connect sends vehicle information and security alerts to your smartphone through the Harley-Davidson app.

First seen on the LiveWire, H-D Connect is a subscription-based
cellular service that allows riders to connect with their motorcycle using
their smartphone and the Harley-Davidson app. H-D Connect provides key vehicle information
(e.g., battery voltage, fuel level, available range, riding statistics and
more) as well as remote security monitoring, including tamper alerts and stolen
vehicle assistance. H-D Connect is a standard feature on 2020 Touring (except
Road King/S and Electra Glide Standard models), Tri Glide Ultra, CVO models and
LiveWire, and it includes free service for one year.

Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS)

Also seen on the LiveWire, Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS) is a suite of electronic riding assistance features, including cornering enhanced linked braking, ABS, traction control and drag-torque slip control; hill hold control; and tire-pressure monitoring. All RDRS features are standard on CVO models (though on the CVO Tri Glide, nothing is “cornering enhanced”), and they are available as options on all Touring models except the Electra Glide Standard.

2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S
2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

Chopper-style Low Rider models have been in Harley-Davidson’s lineup almost continuously since 1977. When Dyna models were rolled into the Softail family for 2018, the Low Rider got a new chassis and a Milwaukee-Eight 107ci V-twin. The last Low Rider S model, which we reviewed in 2016, was built around a 110-cubic-inch Screamin’ Eagle Twin Cam V-twin. For 2020, the Softail-based Low Rider S flexes its muscles with a Milwaukee-Eight 114 that churns out 119 lb-ft of torque at 3,000 rpm (claimed).

2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S
2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

Radiate cast wheels (19-inch front, 16-inch rear) finished in Matte Dark Bronze, a 1-inch-diameter motocross-style handlebar on 4-inch straight risers, a color-matched mini-fairing, a high-back solo seat and black finishes on the powertrain and mufflers add plenty of attitude.

The Low Rider S also gets premium suspension components (including a 43mm USD fork) and triple-disc brakes with standard ABS. It’s available in Vivid Black and Barracuda Silver (shown above), and pricing starts at $17,999.

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited
2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited

Replacing the Road Glide Ultra model for 2020 is the new Road Glide Limited, which offers premium luxury-touring features, including painted pin striping, a gloss-finish inner fairing, heated grips, Slicer II Contrast Bright wheels and new tank, front and rear fender medallions. The Road Glide’s distinctive shark-nose fairing has triple split stream vents that improve airflow and reduce buffeting.

Read our Comparison Review: Harley-Davidson Road Glide Ultra
vs Indian Roadmaster vs Yamaha Star Venture TC

The Road Glide Limited is powered by the Twin-Cooled Milwaukee-Eight
114, and features premium suspension, Reflex linked Brembo brakes with ABS, a Boom!
Box GTS infotainment system with color touchscreen, H-D Connect and dual
Daymaker LED headlamps.

2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited
2020 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Limited

A new Black Finish Option (shown in the photos above), which is also available for the 2020 Ultra Limited, includes Slicer II cast wheels finished in Gloss Black; fuel tank, front and rear fender medallions with a Gloss Black fill surrounded by a Charcoal border; Gloss Black powdercoat powertrain, covers and exhaust; black Tour-Pak luggage carrier hinges, latches and rack, console, footboards, handlebar, gauge trim rings, hand control levers, mirrors and foot controls; black LED Daymaker headlamp, trim ring and LED fog lamps (Ultra Limited only); and black fork lowers, fork covers, engine guard and saddlebag guards.

Pricing for the 2020 Road Glide Limited starts at $28,299.

2020 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic

2020 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic
2020 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic

The Softail-chassis Heritage Classic has been re-styled for 2020, swapping the previous model’s blacked-out look for a generous helping of chrome. (The Heritage Classic 114 model powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine will retain the model’s original, blacked-out look.) The updated Heritage Classic has a bright powertrain with chrome air cleaner and covers; chrome steel laced wheels; chrome headlamp bucket and auxiliary light buckets, bright fork legs and chrome fork covers and nacelle; chrome rear fender struts and side covers; a chrome console; a polished stainless steel handlebar with a chrome riser and top clamp; and a full clear windscreen with chrome support hardware.

Read our 2018 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic Road Test Review

The Heritage Classic is powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 107 V-twin and is mechanically identical to the 2019 model. This touring-ready Softail features lockable hard saddlebags, a detachable windscreen, a two-piece skirted seat and pillion with black studs, and standard cruise control and ABS. Color options include: Vivid Black, Billiard Burgundy, two-tone Silver Pine/Spruce and Billiard Red/Vivid Black. Pricing starts at $18,999.

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide
2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide

Returning for 2020 with a new look and new premium features, the CVO Street Glide is one of Harley-Davidson’s most popular limited-edition Custom Vehicle Operations models. Powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 117 V-Twin with red rocker covers, it gets premium custom paint, premium Talon wheels, custom controls and an all-new BOOM! Box GTS infotainment system with three separate amplifiers, 75 watts per channel and 900 watts of audio performance. It also includes the Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS), smartphone-linked H-D Connect and a wireless Bluetooth headset interface.

Pricing for the 2020 CVO Street Glide starts at $40,539.

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited
2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited

For the ultimate in two-up V-twin touring, the 2020 CVO Limited offers the rider and passenger plenty of comfort, luggage capacity, style and performance. Its Twin-Cooled Milwaukee-Eight 117 grunts out 125 lb-ft of torque. Premium suspension, premium paint and finishes, premium audio, RDRS, H-D Connect, wireless Bluetooth—the CVO Limited gets it all.

Read our 2019 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited First Ride Review

Pricing for the 2020 CVO Limited starts at $44,039.

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Tri Glide

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Tri Glide
2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Tri Glide

Said to be the most-requested CVO model, a new addition to
the lineup for 2020 is the CVO Tri Glide, the ultimate Milwaukee-built trike.
Like its Custom Vehicle Operations stable mates, the CVO Tri Glide gets big
power from a Milwaukee-Eight 117 V-twin, big sound from the BOOM! Box GTS
infotainment system and big style courtesy of premium paint and finishes and
the Kahuna collection of grips, levers, pegs and floorboards, and Tomahawk
contrast-cut wheels. RDRS, H-D Connect, wireless Bluetooth, Daymaker LED
headlamps and the choice of two custom paint finishes round out the wish list.

Pricing for the 2020 CVO Tri Glide starts at $48,999.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Guide to New Street Motorcycles

This handy guide includes all new or significantly updated street-legal motorcycles for the 2020 model year. Organized in alphabetical order by manufacturer, it includes photos and links to details or, when available, first rides and road test reviews about each bike. This guide is updated regularly as more new/updated models are announced, and when we’ve had a chance to ride them and report our impressions.

Want to see all of the new/updated motorcycles for 2019?
Check out Rider’s 2019 Guide to New Street Motorcycles

2020 BMW R 1250 R

2019 BMW R 1250 R. Image courtesy BMW Motorrad.
2020 BMW R 1250 R

Receiving updates similar to those that other models in the
R family received for 2019, the BMW R 1250 R roadster gets a larger 1,254cc
boxer twin with ShiftCam variable valve timing and valve stroke and updates to
its electronics package. It also gets a mild style refresh with a TFT display,
a DRL option for the halogen headlight and new color options. Although originally
announced as a 2019 model, the R 1250 R didn’t make it to the U.S. in time. BMW
says it will be available as a 2020 model with an MSRP starting at $14,995.

Read our 2020 BMW R 1250 R First Look Review

2020 BMW R 1250 RS

2019 BMW R 1250 RS. Image courtesy BMW Motorrad.
2020 BMW R 1250 RS

Receiving updates similar to those that other models in the
R family received for 2019, the BMW R 1250 R roadster gets a larger 1,254cc
boxer twin with ShiftCam variable valve timing and valve stroke and updates to
its electronics package. The RS also gets a style refresh that drops the
asymmetrical, winking look of the S 1000 RR in favor of a sporty twin-LED
headlight assembly, and an LED DRL (daytime running light) is an option.
Although announced as a 2019 model, the R 1250 RS didn’t make it to the U.S. in
time. BMW says it will be available as a 2020 model with an MSRP starting at
$15,695.

Read our 2020 BMW R 1250 RS First Look Review

2020 BMW S 1000 RR

2019 BMW S 1000 RR in Motorsport livery. Images courtesy BMW Motorrad.
2020 BMW S 1000 RR

More power (205 hp), less weight (434 lbs), updated
technology and a new up-spec Motorsport version. The 2020 BMW S 1000 RR is at
the pointy end of the sportbike spear. Pricing starts at $16,995 and bikes will
be in dealerships in summer 2019.

Read our 2020 BMW S 1000 RR First Look Review

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire action
2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire (Photo courtesy Harley-Davidson)

Harley-Davidson’s new LiveWire electric motorcycle is seriously sporty, shockingly fast and whisper-quiet–everything a typical Harley isn’t. And that’s just the way Milwaukee wants it. It’s propelled by a liquid-cooled electric motor that makes a claimed 105 horsepower and 86 lb-ft of torque, drawing power from a 15.5 kWh battery that offers, according to H-D, a range of 146 miles in the city and 95 miles of combined stop-and-go and highway riding. Single-speed transmission offers twist-and-go convenience, and styling, ergonomics and components are the sportiest offered on any Harley-Davidson. MSRP starts at $29,799.

Read our 2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire First Ride Review

2020 Suzuki Katana

2020 Suzuki Katana
2020 Suzuki Katana (Photo courtesy Suzuki)

The 2020 Suzuki Katana features styling cues that pay direct homage to the 1981 original, and it’s built around the potent GSX-S1000 999cc inline-four. It features ABS, traction control, Easy Start and Low RPM Assist, as well as a twin-spar aluminum frame, braced superbike-style swingarm, KYB suspension, dual front Brembo monoblock four-piston calipers, 310mm floating rotors and a model-specific LCD panel. We got a chance to ride the new Katana in Japan last March, but pricing and availability are TBD.

Read our 2020 Suzuki Katana First Ride Review

2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700

The Ténéré 700 will be coming to the U.S. in the second half of 2020. Images courtesy Yamaha Europe.
2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700

Announced in the fall of 2018, we’re still waiting to see the
new Ténéré 700 (T7, for short) in the flesh–Yamaha says it will be coming to
the U.S. in the second half of 2020 as a 2021 model. We know it will be
powered by the 689cc CP2 parallel twin used in the MT-07, housed in a new
tubular steel double-cradle frame. Other details include a 62.6-inch wheelbase,
9.5 inches of ground clearance, a fully adjustable USD 43mm fork with 8.3
inches of travel and a remote preload-adjustable rear shock with 7.9 inches of
travel.

Read our 2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700 First Look Review

2020 Yamaha YZF-R1 and YZF-R1M

2020 Yamaha YZF-R1M and YZF-R1
2020 Yamaha YZF-R1M (left) and YZF-R1 (right)

Yamaha has updated its flagship sportbikes, the YZF-R1 and the track-ready YZF-R1M, for 2020, with both featuring refinements to their CP4 crossplane crankshaft engines, an augmented electronic rider aids package, enhanced suspension and redesigned bodywork. MSRP is $17,300 for the YZF-R1 and $26,099 for the YZF-R1M (the latter is available in limited quantities through Yamaha’s online reservation system).

Read our 2020 Yamaha YZF-R1 and YZF-R1M First Ride Review

2020 Zero SR/F

2020 Zero SR/F
2020 Zero SR/F

The first new model from Zero Motorcycles since 2016, the 2020 SR/F’s streetfighter look and steel trellis frame blur the styling lines between gas and electric motorcycles. Powered by a new ZF75-10 IPM (Interior Permanent Magnet) motor and ZF14.4 lithium-ion battery, it delivers a claimed 140 lb-ft of torque and 110 horsepower. It also features Bosch’s Motorcycle Stability Control System and Zero’s new Cypher III operating system. Pricing starts at $18,995.

Read our 2020 Zero SR/F First Look Review

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire | First Ride Review

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire action
Harley-Davidson’s new LiveWire electric motorcycle is seriously sporty, shockingly fast and whisper-quiet–everything a typical Harley isn’t. And that’s just the way Milwaukee wants it. (Photos courtesy Harley-Davidson)

Imagine
telling the average Harley-Davidson or American V-twin enthusiast a few years
ago that not only would the Motor Company produce and sell a naked sportbike in
2020—certainly not an outrageous concept—but that it would be an all-electric
one.

That last bit
would have not only raised an eyebrow or two among the faithful, it would have
likely burned a few clean off their respective foreheads simply from the heated
blowback of the responses. Just about any Motor Company fan will tell you: Harley-Davidsons
and electric-power EVs just weren’t meant to be talked about in the same
sentence.

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire action
With 17-inch wheels, Brembo brakes, fully adjustable Showa suspension and 45 degrees of cornering clearance, the LiveWire is by far Harley-Davidson’s sportiest motorcycle.

But as we all
know, that’s exactly what’s happened. Harley-Davidson has not only built a
naked sportbike that’s sleek, futuristic and sexy, with wide wheels, sticky
tires, sporty suspension and a lean-forward riding position, but one that’s electrically
powered, with not a molecule of internal combustion waste emanating from its
non-existent exhaust system.

It’s a simple
truth: Harley-Davidson can’t continue to exist solely by selling Big Twins to
aging baby boomers who, in a decade or so, will be mostly out of motorcycling.
Like the rest of the motorcycle industry, Harley needs new blood and new
markets, and feels very strongly that a line of electric two-wheelers led by
the high-end and high-price ($29,795) LiveWire is a prime way to reach them and
teach them.

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire
Look Ma, no pipes! No pipes means no “potato-potato-potato” rumble that has been Harley-Davidson’s signature sound for decades.

“It’s a bold
goal, helping encourage and develop the next generation of riders,”
Harley-Davidson CEO Matt Levatich told me over breakfast at the launch, “but we
think we’re on the right track with the LiveWire, our future electric
offerings, and our More Roads To Harley-Davidson efforts. Motorcyclists know
that nothing is more spectacular than two-wheeled travel, right? Spreading that
word among a more general population, and building riders in addition to
building great motorcycles…well, that seems like a pretty strong concept to us.

“That said,”
he continued, “we are not limiting in any way our emphasis on traditional
Harleys; if anything, we’re more energized than ever about Sportsters and
Softails and baggers and the like. But we do need to branch out, and see
electrification as a key avenue there. We very much intend to lead the way in
the electrification of the sport.”

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire charger
The LiveWire comes standard with a Level 1 charger that can be stored under the seat. At standard 110V, Level 1 charging takes 12.5 hours to go from 0% to 100% battery charge.

If leading
the way means introducing the world’s most advanced electrically powered
motorcycle, then Milwaukee has very clearly put its money where its mouth is. I
was only able to get a few hours on a LiveWire during the July launch, but thanks
to a thorough tech briefing, and following that a morning and afternoon ride
around town and on some of the faster roads in the hills surrounding Portland,
Oregon, I got a pretty good idea of what it is and how it works.

First off, there’s a lot of tech here. Leading the list is an all-new electric motor that’s liquid-cooled, offers 105 horsepower (78 kW) and 86 lb-ft of torque, and produces 100 percent of that torque the instant the throttle is turned. It gets its power from a 15.5 kWh battery that offers, according to H-D, a range of 146 miles in the city and 95 miles of combined stop-and-go and highway riding. Level 1 plug-in charging (e.g., at home or work) takes 12.5 hours for a full charge via an included charger cable. Since the bike has an SAE Combo CCS connector like many American and European electric cars, it can also be charged at thousands of Level 2 stations around the country (but at Level 1 speed). Approximately 150 Harley dealers nationwide (with more to come over time) will also offer fast Level 3 one-hour charging and two full years of free charges.

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire battery motor
The LiveWire’s frame wraps around a massive lithium-ion battery pack, below which is the all-new Revelation internal permanent magnet synchronous motor with water jacket cooling.

The LiveWire also has ABS and traction control, a 4.3-inch color TFT touchscreen display centered just above the handlebar, seven selectable Ride Modes (Sport, Road, Range and Rain, plus three customizable modes) and HD Connect, which links owners to their motorcycles (free initially, then for a monthly fee) and offers tons of status and service information via a smartphone using the Harley-Davidson app.

Climb aboard and you’re
immediately struck by the riding position, which is more Ducati Monster or Suzuki
GSX-S than Sportster or Softail. Its ergos invite a slight forward lean, with
semi-rearset pegs, a mildly upward-bent handlebar and scooped seat locking you
into position—the reason for which will become apparent soon enough. It all
feels reasonably normal…right until you push the starter. The color info-screen
lets you know that things are ready to roll with a green light, but in place of
a chugga-chugga/potato-potato rumble you have silence (though the battery and motor give off a little “buurp” of movement
to let you know the bike is alive and running). Give the throttle a little twist and you’re off, the bike
moving forward smoothly and predictably to your right wrist’s commands.

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire TFT display
The LiveWire’s 4.3-inch color TFT touchscreen display offers massive info. “Green” means twist-and-go!

In stop-and-go traffic I
found the LiveWire super easy to ride, which says a lot about the refinement
that’s been baked into it during eight years of development. Throttle response
at slower speeds was immediate, linear and controllable, the bike demonstrating
no lurching or driveline lash whatsoever. Steering was light and precise, and the
brakes crisp and predictable, both of which helped the LW feel considerably lighter
than its 540-plus pound wet weight might suggest.

Other than a low whine
under acceleration the LiveWire is totally quiet, eerily smooth and almost
completely unobtrusive in an aural and vibrational sense. The Harley folks call
this “Minimal NVH,” which means minimal noise, vibration and harshness.
Accelerating away from a light or tearing down a side street you find yourself
listening to wind noise and the tires slapping against the asphalt. It’s an entirely
new experience, and one that proved compelling all day long.

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire action
The LiveWire’s chassis specs are decidedly sportbike-like: 24.5 degrees of rake and 4.3 inches of trail, with 120-70 and 180/55-spec wheels and tires, in this case sticky Michelin Scorchers. It’s a bit heavy at 549 pounds and has a longish, 58.7-inch wheelbase, but doesn’t feel it on the road thanks to crisp steering manners and firm suspension settings.

You’ll get that same feeling
when you ride the LiveWire hard and fast, too. I immediately found myself
running through turns faster, looking for pavement irregularities to hit while
leaned over to see how the chassis behaved, and then hammering the throttle at
the exit, trying—in vain, for the most part—to find what I figured would be mid-level
traction, suspension and handling limits. I didn’t find much of that at all,
which tells me that all the bluster I’d heard at the tech briefing about
chassis and engine refinement, optimized frame geometry, suspension quality and
power delivery wasn’t bluster at all. The thing is shockingly fast, amazingly
smooth, easy to get used to and ride quickly, forgiving and, most of all, big fun.

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire seat shock
Stubby, stepped two-up seat perches the pilot 30 inches off the ground. Tuning knobs for the fully adjustable Showa BFRC-lite shock are easily accessible between the seat and rear wheel.

Nitpicks are few and far
between, unless you’re talking seat-to-peg distance, which for my multi-surgery
knees is a little tight. Suspension settings, which worked well for my XXL-sized
butt, are probably too firm for average humans in terms of spring rate and
compression. The bar could use a little more pullback and maybe an inch or two extra
in height, and the seat seemed a little thin on padding.

The larger questions, of
course, involve range and price. The first isn’t going to be quite enough for a
lot of folks, and the latter is likely to be too much. That’s just the way
things stand at this point in EV development. You’re either on board and
willing to accept the trade-offs for the bennies, or you’re a skeptic.

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire action
Harley-Davidson’s LiveWire is a break from tradition in more ways than one, with a sport-standard design and ergonomics. Which makes sense given that it will go from 0 to 60 in 3 seconds flat.

But EVs are coming,
like it or not, and despite one’s perspective on price and range, the LiveWire is
a superbly designed, compellingly competent, seriously fun and
fascinating-to-ride motorcycle…a Halo bike that should represent
Harley-Davidson well as it moves into the EV space in the coming years with a
wide range of electric two-wheelers, from mid-range EVs to mountain bikes to
kids bikes and lots more.

So while that futuristic fortuneteller
might have seemed pretty crazy a few years back, this time he was absolutely
right.

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire
Styling-wise, the LiveWire is an impressive machine, with fit and finish on par with its premium price. Its available in three colors: Orange Fuse (shown), Yellow Fuse and Vivid Black.

Author Mitch Boehm is the Editor of Rider’s
sister publication
Thunder Press and
a former Editor of
Motorcyclist
magazine.

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire Specs
Website: harley-davidson.com
Base Price: $29,795
Motor Type: Revelation internal permanent magnet synchronous motor w/ water jacket cooling
Battery: 15.5 kWh lithium-ion
Transmission: Single speed w/ spiral bevel gear primary
Final Drive: Belt
Wheelbase: 58.7 in.
Rake/Trail: 24.5 degrees/4.3 in.
Suspension, Front: Showa 43mm inverted SFF-BP fork, fully adj. w/ 4.5-in. travel
Rear: Showa BFRC-lite shock, fully adj. w/ 4.5-in. travel
Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17
Rear: 180/55-ZR17
Seat Height: 30.0 in.
Claimed Wet Weight: 549 lbs.
Claimed Range: 146 mi. city, 95 mi. combined stop-and-go/highway

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard | First Ride Review

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard
With Harley’s iconic batwing fairing, cruising was comfortable on the outskirts of the Ocala National Forest near Daytona Beach, Florida. Photos by Brian J. Nelson.

Raw and bare, stripped of all the arguably distracting bells and whistles that Bluetooth-connected, GPS-dependent riders have been coddled with, Harley’s new FLHT Electra Glide Standard is the epitome of simplicity. As a mid-year release, the bike signifies a back-to-basics, cut-the-fat approach geared to attract riders at a reasonable $18,999. Compared to the Electra Glide Ultra’s $24,589 or the Street Glide’s $21,289, the Standard is the lowest-priced offering in H-D’s touring line.

Described as a dressed down dresser, the Electra Glide Standard does away with the radio and instead depends on the ultra-smooth Milwaukee-Eight 107 V-twin to set the tempo. Importantly, the iconic batwing fairing with a clear, mid-height windshield and a single halogen headlight are retained, though its foam-covered speaker holes are empty as is the gaping slot for the LCD screen, which now serves as a phone or glove holder during pit stops.

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard
No speakers or LCD screen, just four essential gauges.

The dished solo seat sits at 26.1 inches, which made it extremely comfortable for my 6-foot-3 build. With a minimalist amount of chrome, the bike maintains a sleek and intimidating look that will still turn heads with the purity of its black paint job (and it only comes in Vivid Black).

The Electra Glide Standard comes with large One Touch saddlebags. spacious floorboards and a standard shift lever in place of the usual heel-toe shifter. Its naked front fender covers a 17-inch black machined Impeller wheel that is accented by chrome fork skirts.

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard
The ultra-smooth Milwaukee-Eight 107 V-twin engine is the bike’s biggest selling point.

Handling was impressive at all speeds during a daylong press ride through Florida’s swampland near Daytona Beach. The fat 130/80 front tire meant I had to put a little more effort into steering it, but the still-nimble, 820-pound bike felt firmly connected to the asphalt. With 26 degrees of rake and 6.7 inches of trail, it provides stable, comfortable cruising for days, especially with the Showa Dual Bending Valve front fork and dual emulsion shocks in the back.

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard
The 2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard’s minimalist approach focuses on utility.

This no-frills bike is not for beginners, nor is it billed as such. It is an attractive and attractively priced piece of American iron that will appeal to a wide swath of financially conscious riders. It gives a rider the basics that matter to get them out on the open road or into a dealership. And it is prepped to be incrementally customized as riding seasons pass–a deliberate Harley marketing plan.

The streamlined beauty and Milwaukee-Eight power should hopefully make the Electra Glide Standard a lasting hit in Harley’s touring line.

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard
Generous saddlebag capacity is retained, while removing the left saddlebag with one click gives easy access to make quick, toolless preload adjustments.

Kali Kotoski is the Managing Editor of Rider’s sister publication Thunder Press.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Re-Cycling: 2008-2013 Harley-Davidson FXDF Fat Bob

2012 Harley-Davidson FXDF Fat Bob.
2012 Harley-Davidson FXDF Fat Bob.

The time comes to us all when age and experience send us looking for a change, something less hard-edged and more focused on comfort and a laid-back riding style. For a lot of riders that means boning up on Harleys to see why so many of their peers eventually end up aboard Milwaukee iron. The lucky ones find the FXDF Fat Bob. With a torquey engine, decent if not outstanding suspension and brakes, and a more basic look than some of the brand’s gaudier models, it’s one of the smoothest transitions into the Harley world from outside.

Introduced in 2008, the Fat Bob came with a Twin Cam 96 engine, and in 2012 got an upgrade to the TC103. Both iterations of the archetypal Harley V-twin put out enough low-end power to launch the big Bob from stoplights with ease, and although neither is a match for high-revving Japanese and European bikes in the upper reaches of the rev range, the Harley is no slouch for a bike its size. The engine’s 45-degree cylinder spread, a holdover from the company’s early days, is practically a prescription for vision-blurring vibration, but the worst of it is held in check by rubber engine mounts that isolate you from all but the most pleasant mechanical sensations. Harley’s maintenance-free belt final drive gives you more time to enjoy the ride, too.

Rider magazine June 2012 cover
We featured the Fat Bob on the cover of our June 2012 issue.

If the Fat Bob has a signature styling lick, it’s the slotted disc wheels and fat, wide tires. They take some getting used to if you’re accustomed to the sizes used on most other bikes, but they don’t take away much from the bike’s handling, as long as you accept that you’re not on a sportbike or an adventure tourer. With that in mind you’ll find braking and cornering clearance sufficient to enjoy a brisk ride down a twisty road. Rougher surfaces, though, highlight the twin rear shocks’ dismally short travel, and make you wish as much attention had been lavished on the inside of the front fork as the outside. Still, riders who’ve sampled both the Fat Bob and other Harley baggers and touring models say the FXDF is probably the best all-day ride in Harley’s cruiser fleet, and that with some soft luggage and a quick-detach windscreen it makes a versatile touring mount. 

Harley Fat Bob
Rubber engine mounts, decent suspension, belt final drive and strong midrange power delivery made the TC96 and TC103 Fat Bob a versatile choice among Harley’s 2008-2013 cruiser lineup.

Shopping for a used Fat Bob takes patience, especially if you’re looking for a stock(ish) one. The biggest obstacles are “performance” mods that add little to the otherwise bulletproof Twin Cam engine apart from more noise, worse gas mileage and decreased reliability. The FXDF’s big draw is its tractability, and you’re not likely to improve much on that. Two areas of the chassis–the drive belt and the rubber engine mounts–warrant close inspection. You can inspect the belt visually for holes, tears or other damage, and see if the sides of the belt or the rear pulley are worn, indicating an alignment problem with the rear wheel. But the only way to check the engine mounts is to ride the bike. The rowdy vibes should smooth out just above idle and stay that way until redline.

The market for used Harleys seems to be cooling lately, but you should still expect to see Fat Bobs ranging from $10,000 for an early model with the TC96 engine to $12,500 for the later TC103. Beware the seller who thinks every accessory added to the bike is still worth its retail value on top of the asking price. Service records are nice to have, but a valid title is a must–accept no excuses on this point.

2012 Harley-Davidson FXDF Fat Bob.
2012 Harley-Davidson FXDF Fat Bob.

PROS

Strong engine, decent chassis and good reliability, plus a huge dealer network for parts and service.

CONS

Big and heavy with short-travel suspension. Endless “fat” jokes, especially if your name is Bob.

Engine: Air-cooled 45-degree V-twin, 1,570cc (TC96), 1,690cc (TC103)
Final drive: Belt
Weight: 706 lbs.
Fuel capacity: 5.0 gals.
Seat height: 27 in.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2019 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Standard | First Look Review

2019 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Standard.
2019 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Standard.

Harley-Davidson has announced a stripped-down, fundamental version of its Electra Glide touring bagger dubbed the Electra Glide Standard. Powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 107, the new Electra Glide Standard is aimed at the rider looking for a simpler experience: no screens, no infotainment, just a motorcycle.

Read about more Harley-Davidson updates for 2019 here.

The Electra Glide Standard features chrome trim pieces and polished rocker, cam and derby covers, along with selected blacked-out components for a blend of timeless and traditional. It’s also equipped with many of the ride and handling technology of the rest of Harley’s Touring line, such as electronic cruise control, hand-adjustable emulsion-technology rear shock absorbers, a 49mm front fork with Showa dual bending valve suspension, and Brembo brakes with optional Reflex Linked and ABS features.

Behind the classic batwing fairing, a glovebox takes the place of an audio system, and a single scooped touring seat is standard (a pillion seat is available as an accessory).

The Electra Glide Standard is available in dealerships now, in Vivid Black, starting at $18,999.

For more information, visit harley-davidson.com. Scroll down for more photos.

2019 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Standard.
2019 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Standard.
2019 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Standard.
2019 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Standard.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

The Best Bikes for Smaller Riders (and Budgets): 2019 Edition!

Bigger doesn’t always mean better, and fortunately for those of us looking for a fun, affordable motorcycle there are more choices than ever. Nearly every manufacturer now offers at least one model that will fit just about any rider’s size and/or budget.

Scroll down for Rider’s 2019 list of Best Bikes for Smaller Riders and Budgets. When possible we’ve included a link to our review, making it easy for you to get a real ride evaluation. We’ve also included the 2019 model year’s U.S. base MSRP (as of publication), seat height and claimed wet weight (when a wet weight was not available from the manufacturer, the claimed dry weight is listed). For more details, you can read our review, which includes comprehensive specs, or click on the bike’s name to be taken directly to the manufacturer’s page.

BMW F 750 GS

2019 BMW F 750 GS
2019 BMW F 750 GS (Photo by Kevin Wing)

BMW F 750 GS
$10,395
32.1-inch seat w/ optional 31.1-inch seat or 30.3-inch seat
493 lbs.

Read our Road Test Review of the 2019 BMW F 750/850 GS

BMW G 310 GS 

2018 BMW G 310 GS. Photo by Kevin Wing.
2018 BMW G 310 GS (Photo by Kevin Wing)

BMW G 310 GS
$5,795
32.9-inch seat w/ optional 32.3-inch seat
374 lbs.

Read our First Ride Review of the 2018 BMW G 310 GS

How did the G 310 GS stack up against the Kawasaki Versys-X 300 and Royal Enfield Himalayan? Find out in our comparison test.

BMW G 310 R

The G 310 R is anything but boring. You can't see it, but I'm grinning inside my helmet.
2018 BMW G 310 R (Photo by Kevin Wing)

BMW G 310 R
$4,750
30.9-inch seat w/ optional 30.3-inch seat
349 lbs.

Read our First Ride Review of the 2018 BMW G 310 R

Can-Am Ryker

Can-Am Ryker
2019 Can-Am Ryker Rally (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Can-Am Ryker
starting at $8,499 (600cc model)
23.5-inch seat
594 lbs. (dry, 600cc)

Read our First Ride Review of the 2019 Can-Am Ryker

CSC RX3

The 2016 CSC RX3 is a surprisingly capable small-displacement adventurer tourer, at a price point that is undeniably attractive. (Photos: the author and James Norris)
CSC RX3 (Photo by James Norris)

CSC RX3
$5,395
31.9-inch seat
450 lbs. (dry)

Read our Road Test Review of the 2016 CSC RX3

Ducati Monster 797+

2018 Ducati Monster 797+
2018 Ducati Monster 797+

Ducati Monster 797+
$9,295
31.7-inch seat
386 lbs. (dry)

Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

2019 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2.
2019 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

Ducati Scrambler Sixty2
$7,995
31.1-inch seat w/ optional 30.3-inch seat
403 lbs.

Read about Ducati’s updates to the 2019 Scrambler lineup

Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

2019 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
2019 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
$10,995
31.4-inch seat w/ optional 30.6-inch seat
417 lbs.

Read about Ducati’s updates to the 2019 Scrambler lineup

Harley-Davidson Street Rod

The 2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod is based on the Street 750, with sharpened handling and styling. It has a steeper rake, longer suspension travel and a higher seat height that enables deeper lean angles. (Photos by Brian J. Nelson)
2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod (Photo by Brian J. Nelson)

Harley-Davidson Street 500/750/Street Rod
starting at $6,899
25.7-inch seat
492 lbs. (dry)

Read our first ride review of the 2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

Harley-Davidson SuperLow

Harley-Davidson Superlow
Harley-Davidson SuperLow

Harley-Davidson SuperLow
$8,699
25.5-inch seat
545 lbs. (dry)

Harley-Davidson Iron 883

Harley-Davidson Iron 883
Harley-Davidson Iron 883

Harley-Davidson Iron 883/1200
starting at $8,999
25.7-inch seat
545 lbs. (dry)

Check out our First Look Review of the 2018 Harley-Davidson Iron 1200

Harley-Davidson 1200 Custom

2019 Harley-Davidson 1200 Custom.
2019 Harley-Davidson 1200 Custom

Harley-Davidson 1200 Custom
$10,999
26.6-inch seat
562 lbs. (dry)

Honda CB300R

2019 Honda CB300R
2019 Honda CB300R (Photo by Drew Ruiz)

Honda CB300R
$4,649
31.5-inch seat
318 lbs.

Read our First Ride Review on the 2019 Honda CB300R

Honda CBR300R

2019 Honda CBR300R.
2019 Honda CBR300R

Honda CBR300R
$4,699
30.7-inch seat
357 lbs.

Honda CB500F

2019 Honda CB500F.
2019 Honda CB500F

Honda CB500F
$6,199
30.9-inch seat
415 lbs.

Honda CBR500R

2019 Honda CBR500R.
2019 Honda CBR500R

Honda CBR500R
$6,699
30.9-inch seat
419 lbs.

Honda CB500X

2019 Honda CB500X. Image courtesy Honda.
2019 Honda CB500X

Honda CB500X
$6,599 (2018 model)
31.8-inch seat
428 lbs.

Read about the updates for the 2019 Honda CB500X

Honda CB650R

2019 Honda CB650R. Images courtesy Honda.
2019 Honda CB650R

Honda CB650R
$8,899
31.9-inch seat
445 lbs.

Read our First Look Review of the 2019 Honda CB650R

Honda CBR650R

2019 Honda CBR650R. Images courtesy Honda.
2019 Honda CBR650R

Honda CBR650R
$TBD
31.9-inch seat
456 lbs.

Read our First Look Review of the 2019 Honda CBR650R

Honda CRF250L

2017 Honda CRF250L
Honda CRF250L

Honda CRF250L
$5,199
34.4-inch seat
318 lbs.

Read our review of the 2017 Honda CRF250L Rally

Honda Grom

2019 Honda Grom.
2019 Honda Grom

Honda Grom
$3,399
30-inch seat
229 lbs.

Honda Monkey

Honda Monkey
2019 Honda Monkey (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Honda Monkey
$3,999
30.6-inch seat
232 lbs.

Watch our video review of the 2019 Honda Monkey

Honda NC750X

2017 Honda NC750X
2019 Honda NC750X

Honda NC750X
$7,999 (2018 model)
32.7-inch seat
478 lbs.

Honda Shadow Phantom

2019 Honda Shadow Phantom
2019 Honda Shadow Phantom

Honda Shadow Phantom
$7,899
25.8-inch seat
549 lbs.

Honda Super Cub C125

2019 Honda Super Cub C125
2019 Honda Super Cub C125

Honda Super Cub
$3,599
30.7-inch seat
240 lbs.

Honda Rebel 300/500

2017 Honda Rebel 500
Honda Rebel 500 (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Honda Rebel 300/500
starting at $4,499
27.2-inch seat
364 lbs.

Read our First Ride Review of the Honda Rebel 500

Indian Scout Sixty

Indian Scout Sixty
Indian Scout Sixty

Indian Scout Sixty
$9,499
25.8-inch seat
542 lbs.

Read about Indian’s 2019 Scout lineup

Indian Scout

2019 Indian Scout.
2019 Indian Scout

Indian Scout
$11,999
25.8-inch seat
550 lbs.

Read about Indian’s 2019 Scout lineup

Kawasaki KLX250

2019 Kawasaki KLX250
2019 Kawasaki KLX250

Kawasaki KLX250
$5,349
35.0-inch seat (squishes way down under rider’s weight)
304 lbs.

Kawasaki Ninja 400

2018 Kawasaki Ninja 400 ABS
2018 Kawasaki Ninja 400 ABS (Photo by Kevin Wing)

Kawasaki Ninja 400
$4,999
30.9-inch seat
366 lbs.

Read our First Ride Review of the 2018 Kawasaki Ninja 400 ABS

Kawasaki Ninja 650

2019 Kawasaki Ninja 650.
2019 Kawasaki Ninja 650

Kawasaki Ninja 650
$7,399
31.1-inch seat
426 lbs.

Kawasaki Versys-X 300

2019 Kawasaki Versys-X 300.
2019 Kawasaki Versys-X 300

Kawasaki Versys-X 300
$5,499
32.1-inch seat
386 lbs.

How did the Versys-X 300 stack up against the BMW G 310 GS and Royal Enfield Himalayan? Find out in our comparison test.

Kawasaki Vulcan S

2019 Kawasaki Vulcan S.
2019 Kawasaki Vulcan S

Kawasaki Vulcan S
starting at $7,099
27.8-inch seat
498 lbs.

Read our Road Test Review of the Kawasaki Vulcan S Cafe

Kawasaki Vulcan 900

2019 Kawasaki Vulcan 900.
2019 Kawasaki Vulcan 900

Kawasaki Vulcan 900
starting at $7,999
26.8-inch seat
617 lbs.

Kawasaki W800 Cafe

2019 Kawasaki W800 Cafe
2019 Kawasaki W800 Cafe

Kawasaki W800 Cafe
$9,799
31.1-inch seat
489.5 lbs.

Kawasaki Z125 Pro

2019 Kawasaki Z125 Pro.
2019 Kawasaki Z125 Pro

Kawasaki Z125 Pro
$3,199
31.7-inch seat
225 lbs.

Kawasaki Z400

2019 Kawasaki Z400 ABS
2019 Kawasaki Z400 ABS

Kawasaki Z400
$4,799
30.9-inch seat
364 lbs.

Kawasaki Z650

2019 Kawasaki Z650.
2019 Kawasaki Z650

Kawasaki Z650
$6,999
30.9-inch seat
410 lbs.

Read our First Ride Review on the Z650 ABS here

KTM 390 Duke

2018 KTM 390 Duke
2018 KTM 390 Duke (Photo by Kevin Wing)

KTM 390 Duke
$5,449
32.7-inch seat
359 lbs.

Read our Road Test Review of the KTM 390 Duke here

Moto Guzzi V7III Stone

Moto Guzzi V7III Stone.
Moto Guzzi V7III Stone

Moto Guzzi V7III Stone
$8,490
30.3-inch seat
470 lbs.

Royal Enfield Continental GT

2019 Royal Enfield Continental GT
2019 Royal Enfield Continental GT

Royal Enfield Continental GT
$5,999
31.1-inch seat
461 lbs.

Read our road test review of the 2019 Royal Enfield Continental GT

Royal Enfield Himalayan

2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan
2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan

Royal Enfield Himalayan
$4,499
31.5-inch seat
421 lbs.

Read our first ride review of the 2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan

How did the Himalayan stack up against the Kawasaki Versys-X 300 and BMW G 310 GS? Find out in our comparison test here.

Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

2019 Royal Enfield Interceptor 650
2019 Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

Royal Enfield Interceptor 650
$5,799
31.6-inch seat
473 lbs.

Read our road test review of the 2019 Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

Suzuki Boulevard S40

2019 Suzuki Boulevard S40.
2019 Suzuki Boulevard S40

Suzuki Boulevard S40
$5,799
27.6-inch seat
381 lbs.

Suzuki Boulevard C50

2019 Suzuki Boulevard C50.
2019 Suzuki Boulevard C50

Suzuki Boulevard C50
starting at $8,299
27.6-inch seat
611 lbs.

Suzuki Boulevard M50

2019 Suzuki Boulevard M50.
2019 Suzuki Boulevard M50

Suzuki Boulevard M50
$8,699
27.6-inch seat
593 lbs.

Suzuki GSXR250R

2018 Suzuki GSX250R
2018 Suzuki GSX250R (Photo by Enrico Pavia)

Suzuki GSX250R
$4,599
31.1-inch seat
392 lbs.

Read our review of the Suzuki GSX250R

Suzuki GSX-S750

2019 Suzuki GSX-S750 ABS. Image courtesy Suzuki.
2019 Suzuki GSX-S750 ABS

Suzuki GSX-S750Z
$8,499
32.2-inch seat
469 lbs.

Suzuki SV650

2019 Suzuki SV650.
2019 Suzuki SV650

Suzuki SV650
$7,099
30.9-inch seat
432 lbs.

Read our first ride review of the 2017 Suzuki SV650

Suzuki TU250X

2019 Suzuki TU250X.
2019 Suzuki TU250X

Suzuki TU250X
$4,649
30.3-inch seat
326 lbs.

Suzuki VanVan 200

2019 Suzuki VanVan 200.
2019 Suzuki VanVan 200

Suzuki VanVan 200
$4,649
30.3-inch seat
282 lbs.

A Man on a VanVan Without a Plan…read the story here!

Triumph Street Scrambler

2019 Triumph Street Scrambler
2019 Triumph Street Scrambler (Photo by Kingdom Creative)

Triumph Street Scrambler
$11,000
31.1-inch seat
447.5 lbs. (dry)

Read our first ride review of the 2019 Triumph Street Scrambler

Triumph Street Twin

2019 Triumph Street Twin
2019 Triumph Street Twin (Photo by Kingdom Creative)

Triumph Street Twin
$9,300
29.9-inch seat
437 lbs. (dry)

Read our first ride review of the 2019 Triumph Street Twin

Triumph Street Triple

2019 Triumph Street Triple R.
2019 Triumph Street Triple R

Triumph Street Triple
$9,950
31.2-inch seat
370 lbs.

2019 Yamaha Bolt.
2019 Yamaha Bolt

Yamaha Bolt
starting at $7,999
27.2-inch seat
542 lbs.

2019 Yamaha MT-07.
2019 Yamaha MT-07.

Yamaha MT-07
$7,599
31.7-inch seat
403 lbs.

Read our road test review on the 2018 Yamaha MT-07

2019 Yamaha MT-09.
2019 Yamaha MT-09.

Yamaha MT-09
$8,999
32.3-inch seat
425 lbs.

2019 Yamaha TW200.
2019 Yamaha TW200

Yamaha TW200
$4,599
31.1-inch seat
278 lbs.

Read our review of the Yamaha TW200

2019 Yamaha V-Star 250.
2019 Yamaha V-Star 250.

Yamaha V Star 250
$4,349
27-inch seat
326 lbs.

2019 Yamaha XSR700.
2019 Yamaha XSR700.

Yamaha XSR700
$8,499
32.9-inch seat
410 lbs.

Read our first ride review of the 2018 Yamaha XSR700

We held onto our XSR700 for a long-term review; read it here

2019 Yamaha XT250.
2019 Yamaha XT250

Yamaha XT250
$5,199
31.9-inch seat
291 lbs.

2019 Yamaha YZF-R3
2019 Yamaha YZF-R3 (Photos by Brian J. Nelson)

Yamaha YZF-R3
$4,999
30.7-inch seat
368 lbs.

Read our first ride review on the 2019 Yamaha YZF-R3

Check out Rider’s Guide to New/Updated Street Motorcycles for 2019

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Harley-Davidson Announces LiveWire Electric Motorcycle Pricing

2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycle. Image courtesy Harley-Davidson.
2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycle.

Harley-Davidson today announced pricing for the 2020 LiveWire, its first electric motorcycle, which is now available for U.S. dealer preorder. MSRP on the LiveWire is $29,799.

Learn more about Harley-Davidson’s plans for 2019 and beyond

The LiveWire, which Harley says represents the next chapter in the 116-year-old company’s history, offers the benefits and performance of an electric motorcycle, with signature Harley attitude and style. Its H-D Revelation electric powertrain promises 0-to-60 acceleration in less than 3.5 seconds, with no clutch and no gear shifting, and an urban range of about 110 miles.

The powertrain sits low in the LiveWire’s chassis to lower the center of gravity and helps the motorcycle handle well at all speeds and make it easier to balance when stopped. The motorcycle also sports standard cornering ABS and traction control.

Read our 2014 Project LiveWire first ride review

It also features H-D Connect, which pairs motorcycle riders with their bikes through an LTE-enabled Telematics Control Unit coupled with connectivity and cloud services using the latest version of the Harley-Davidson app. With H-D Connect, data is collected and transferred to the app to provide information to the rider’s smartphone about:

Motorcycle Status: Information available through H-D Connect includes battery charge status and available range from any location where a sufficient cellular signal is available. This allows the rider to remotely check the charge status including charge level and time to completion. Riders will be able to locate a charging station with ease thanks to an integrated location finder built into the H-D app.

Tamper Alerts and Vehicle Location: H-D Connect indicates the location of the parked LiveWire motorcycle and alerts can be sent to the rider’s smartphone if the bike is tampered with or moved. GPS-enabled stolen-vehicle tracking provides peace of mind that the motorcycle’s location can be tracked (requires law enforcement assistance; available in select markets).

Service Reminders and Notifications: Reminders about upcoming vehicle service requirements, automated service reminders and other vehicle care notifications.

Looking for a more traditional Harley experience? Check out our 2019 FXDR 114 review!

Interestingly, while the electric LiveWire will of course produce minimal vibration, Harley says it’s designed a new “signature Harley-Davidson sound” that “represents the smooth, electric power” of the motorcycle. Whether or not that will be enough to satisfy riders looking for the classic “potato-potato” rumble remains to be seen.

To find a LiveWire dealer or place a preorder, visit h-d.com/LiveWire.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2019 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited | First Ride Review

2019 Harley CVO Limited
We crossed the Land of 10,000 Lakes then stormed across Wisconsin aboard Harley’s apex touring machine, the 2019 CVO Limited. Photos by Brian J. Nelson and Kevin Wing.

There’s a reason Harley’s top-shelf touring machine has been a staple of its CVO line since 2006. There are thousands of them. Go to Sturgis and try and count how many you see. Your head will spin. It’s a huge revenue generator for The Motor Company. But it’s also proven itself as a legitimate cross-country tourer. So offering one as a dream machine straight from the factory makes perfect sense. 

Read about Harley’s plans for 2019 and beyond here.

Powering the 2019 CVO Limited is the Twin-Cooled Milwaukee-Eight 117, The Motor Company’s largest production engine, a CVO-exclusive powerplant that made its debut across the line last year. That’s 1,923cc at the disposal of your right hand along with a high-performance camshaft, intake and bumped-up compression ratio.

2019 Harley CVO Limited
Rejoice, all CVOs run the Milwaukee-Eight 117, the 1,923cc powerplant the biggest to date on a Harley coming straight out of the factory.

The motorcycle’s electronic throttle control is dialed and the hit off idle is immediate. But stump-pulling bottom-end torque is standard fare on Harley tourers. What benefits most is top end in the middle gears as the 117 continues to give where its predecessors sign off.

The 2019 CVO Limited hits its claimed peak of 125 lb-ft at 3,500 rpm but the standard Ultra Limited with the 114 maxes out at 3,000 rpm. It gets you up to highway speed quicker and has plenty of passing power on tap. While it didn’t skip a beat rowing through gears, engagement continues to be harsh and abrupt. 

Between its Batwing fairing and Tour-Pak top trunk, the CVO Limited’s presence can be intimidating. It looks like a whole lot of bike to handle. But as I climb aboard, the rider’s triangle feels compact for a six-foot-tall rider.

With a seat height of 30.1 inches, it’s easy to place both feet firmly on the ground, a good thing when you’re balancing a bike that tips the scales at more than 900 pounds. The bars fall naturally at hand, my legs have plenty of room to stretch and my back is straight. The relaxed riding position made my 260-mile test ride a cinch. I could have easily done 260 more without feeling beat down. You’d be hard pressed to find a bike with a cushier seat and friendlier all-day ergonomics.

2019 Harley CVO Limited
Who knew such a big bike would be so much fun at lean? Turn-in is surprisingly light on the CVO Limited, and it transitions more fluidly than expected.

Hustling through the hinterlands between Lacrosse and Madison, Wisconsin, we chanced upon a rural road of sweepers, one flowing into the next. The CVO Limited shines on this stretch as turn-in is light, even with its big fork-mounted fairing. It’s solid at lean and has no problem staying on the designated line.

Even with the Tour-Pak, its center of gravity feels low and it transitions with surprising agility. You’d think for a bike with such a Herculean physique it’d be a handful to toss around but, like a heavyweight boxer, it’s deceptively light on its feet. 

Reining in all that weight and power requires a solid set of binders, and Harley’s triple-disc Brembos and ABS-equipped Reflex Linked Brakes handle the job. When squeezing the front lever, initial bite into the two 300mm discs is strong but not grabby and doesn’t fade as the system administers a bit of squeeze to the rear as well.

2019 Harley CVO Limited
Harley CVO wheels are always custom quality, and for 2019 the 19-inch Tomahawk on the CVO Limited is the torchbearer of tradition.

Using solely the rear it takes a pretty good stomp on the pedal to get the ABS to engage, and overall the ABS is well modulated. Using the front and rear brakes simultaneously, the setup does a bang-up job of bringing the bike to a stop.

Bells and whistles. Check all the boxes. Gorgeous paint set off by the proper blend of shiny chrome, custom-quality wheels, a fresh assortment of bits and pieces from Harley’s new Kahuna collection and the upgraded Boom! Box GTS infotainment system, which boots up faster, is easier to see in direct sunlight and functions more like a smartphone.

The bike has a bounty of storage space, everything locks tight at the push of a button and a factory security system to protect your almost $44,000 investment comes standard. Harley offers three combinations of powertrain finishes and paint options to tailor your CVO Limited like a fine suit. Granted, its price tag puts it out of range for many of us, but those few who pony up will undoubtedly be pleased because despite its movie star good looks, the 2019 CVO Limited is ready to go coast-to-coast at a moment’s notice.

2019 Harley CVO Limited
2019 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited.

Check out Rider’s guide to new/updated street motorcycles for 2019 here!

2019 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited Specs

Base Price: $43,889
Website: harley-davidson.com
Engine Type: Air/liquid-cooled, transverse 45-degree V-twin, OHV, 4 valves per cyl.
Displacement: 1,923cc (117ci)
Bore x Stroke: 103.5 x 114.3mm
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated wet assist-and-slipper clutch
Final Drive: Belt
Wheelbase: 64.0 in.
Rake/Trail: 26 degrees/6.7 in.
Seat Height: 29.9 in.
Claimed Wet Weight: 901 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 6.0 gals., last 1.0 gal. warning light on
MPG: 91 PON min. / NA

Source: RiderMagazine.com