Tag Archives: Gear

Schuberth C5 Modular Helmet and SC2 Communicator | Gear Review

Schuberth C5 Modular Helmet and SC2 Communicator

The Schuberth C5 modular helmet is a clean-sheet design that shares no parts with the company’s C4/Pro. Informed by a spatial study, the new architecture has an intermediate-oval head shape that’s less round than the C4/Pro with more interior space. The chinstrap was moved forward, and the new chinbar locking mechanism doesn’t use pins, which avoids the helmet getting tighter when the chinbar is closed.

Having worn several generations of Schuberth’s modular helmets, the changes were immediately noticeable. Sliding the helmet on and off my head is easier, and comfort while riding is greatly improved. Airflow through the helmet has been increased with larger vents and better interior channeling.

Schuberth C5 Modular Helmet and SC2 Communicator

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The C5 was designed to meet Europe’s new ECE 22.06 helmet safety standard, which sets higher benchmarks for impact protection and requires a larger eyeport for better visibility. The C5 meets the P/J homologation standard. “P” stands for “protective” and refers to full-face helmets; “J” stands for “jet” and refers to open-face helmets. P/J-homologated helmets can be used in both the open and closed positions, and the C5 has a tab to lock the chinbar in the open position.

The shell is made using Schuberth’s proprietary Direct Fiber Processing. Glass fibers are blown into a mold with a precise amount of resin and compressed in a high-pressure vacuum, creating an exceptionally strong shell. The C5 is not dual homologated to meet ECE and DOT standards. A DOT-specific version of the C5 has a shell reinforced with a basalt layer for added strength.

Inside the shell is a dual-density EPS liner and a new comfort liner with customizable pads. There are optional “sport” and “comfort” cheek pads and replaceable rear pads that can make the interior more round or more oval. The faceshield includes a Pinlock anti-fog insert, and a new patented memory function keeps the faceshield open at a desired level after opening and closing the chinbar.

Schuberth C5 Modular Helmet and SC2 Communicator

RELATED: BMW K 1600 GTL | Road Test Review

The C5 is prewired for the optional SC2 Bluetooth 5.0 communicator ($349), which is made by Sena and based on the 50S with voice activation and mesh networking. HD speakers and an antenna are built into the helmet. A remote-control unit clicks into the left side of the helmet, and the SC2 main unit with rechargeable battery plugs into the back of the helmet.

Our C5 in size medium with the SC2 installed weighs 4 lb, 2 ounces. Fit, finish, comfort, ventilation, and functionality are excellent. It’s available in sizes XS-3XL in solid colors for $749 and graphics for $849.

For more information, visit Schuberth.com.

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Legendary Best Motorcycle Seats | Gear Review

Legendary Best Motorcycle Seats

As I roll gently into my retirement years, I’ve taken to scouting used motorcycles on Craigslist to stock up my garage. I never know what will grab my attention and tickle my heart, and as I unearth hidden two-wheeled treasures, I’m usually delighted to inherit a rich assortment of accessories previous owners have lavished upon their bikes – now to become my next ride.

When acquiring used bikes, the one item that often requires my attention is the seat. Many riders work at lowering reach to the ground, but I’m 6 feet tall with a 31-inch inseam and grouchy hips. I like legroom. So when a newly acquired bike doesn’t fit me correctly, I head over to Legendary Best Motorcycle Seats in Ventura, California.

I’ve been using BMS for seat alterations for decades, beginning back in their Ojai days under Bill “Rocky” Mayer (BMS used to stand for Bill Mayer Saddles). Now, longtime stalwart Adrian Mercado handles the business, turning out the same quality work he’s crafted for all these years.

Legendary Best Motorcycle Seats

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The personal fitting service at BMS is terrific. If you can devote a half day or so on site, Mercado and his crew will craft a custom-made seat built to your liking and personal fit while you wait. BMS also appears at rallies and other riding events across the country to provide custom services, or you can also send in your seat with your necessary personal dimensions for mail-order service.

Mercado listens to your requests, then makes suggestions based on his decades of seat-building experience. He’ll give you what you want, but I’ve learned to follow his advice, typically after some give-and-take regarding comfort versus aesthetics. The decision often comes down to a simple question: Do you want the bike to “look right,” or do you want the seat to coddle your rear end over a full day’s ride? Personally, I tend to lean toward the comfort side, but you can have it your way, exactly so.

Legendary Best Motorcycle Seats

Custom-built BMS seats absolutely transformed my new-to-me 2015 Ducati Multistrada 1200 S and 2017 KTM 690 Duke. Due to an extra-low seat at purchase, I found the Multi virtually unrideable, while the 690’s aftermarket rearsets shortened the seat/peg relationship and made things too cramped. Mercado fixed all of that, making both bikes more enjoyable – and “all mine” in the process. Nice. Problems solved.

Pricing begins at $595 to build a solo seat, pretty much in keeping with other custom seat options.

For more information, visit the Legendary BMS website.

The post Legendary Best Motorcycle Seats | Gear Review first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

Legendary Best Motorcycle Seats | Gear Review

Legendary Best Motorcycle Seats

As I roll gently into my retirement years, I’ve taken to scouting used motorcycles on Craigslist to stock up my garage. I never know what will grab my attention and tickle my heart, and as I unearth hidden two-wheeled treasures, I’m usually delighted to inherit a rich assortment of accessories previous owners have lavished upon their bikes – now to become my next ride.

When acquiring used bikes, the one item that often requires my attention is the seat. Many riders work at lowering reach to the ground, but I’m 6 feet tall with a 31-inch inseam and grouchy hips. I like legroom. So when a newly acquired bike doesn’t fit me correctly, I head over to Legendary Best Motorcycle Seats in Ventura, California.

I’ve been using BMS for seat alterations for decades, beginning back in their Ojai days under Bill “Rocky” Mayer (BMS used to stand for Bill Mayer Saddles). Now, longtime stalwart Adrian Mercado handles the business, turning out the same quality work he’s crafted for all these years.

Legendary Best Motorcycle Seats

Read more of Rider‘s gear reviews

The personal fitting service at BMS is terrific. If you can devote a half day or so on site, Mercado and his crew will craft a custom-made seat built to your liking and personal fit while you wait. BMS also appears at rallies and other riding events across the country to provide custom services, or you can also send in your seat with your necessary personal dimensions for mail-order service.

Mercado listens to your requests, then makes suggestions based on his decades of seat-building experience. He’ll give you what you want, but I’ve learned to follow his advice, typically after some give-and-take regarding comfort versus aesthetics. The decision often comes down to a simple question: Do you want the bike to “look right,” or do you want the seat to coddle your rear end over a full day’s ride? Personally, I tend to lean toward the comfort side, but you can have it your way, exactly so.

Legendary Best Motorcycle Seats

Custom-built BMS seats absolutely transformed my new-to-me 2015 Ducati Multistrada 1200 S and 2017 KTM 690 Duke. Due to an extra-low seat at purchase, I found the Multi virtually unrideable, while the 690’s aftermarket rearsets shortened the seat/peg relationship and made things too cramped. Mercado fixed all of that, making both bikes more enjoyable – and “all mine” in the process. Nice. Problems solved.

Pricing begins at $595 to build a solo seat, pretty much in keeping with other custom seat options.

For more information, visit the Legendary BMS website.

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Nelson-Rigg Hurricane 2.0 Waterproof Backpack/Tail Pack | Gear Review

Nelson-Rigg Hurricane 2.0 Waterproof Backpack/Tail Pack

Several years ago, I tested the first generation of Nelson-Rigg’s Hurricane Waterproof Backpack/Tail Pack, which impressed me with its practicality, functionality, and versatility. Nelson-Rigg has redesigned its entire line of Rigg Gear Hurricane waterproof luggage, which also includes saddlebags, duffel bags, and roll bags.

As with the original, version 2.0 of the Backpack/Tail Pack is made of waterproof, UV-resistant, vinyl-coated 24-oz. polyester tarpaulin fabric with electronically heat-welded seams. Rather than the previous 40-liter and 20-liter options, the new bag is available in a single, happy-medium 30-liter size. One of the key updates is the new 4-point Rigg Strap system, which uses a set of adjustable cam-lock straps to secure the bag to a motorcycle seat and/or luggage rack. Once the straps are cinched tight, the bag stays put even during aggressive off-road riding. I gave it a good thrashing while testing the KTM 1290 Super Adventure R, and it passed with flying colors.

RELATED: 2022 KTM 1290 Super Adventure R | Review

Nelson-Rigg Hurricane 2.0 Waterproof Backpack/Tail Pack

The main compartment of the bag has a large top opening that seals shut with a roll-down, dry-bag closure secured with quick-release buckles. A closable purge valve makes it easy to squeeze out excess air when closing the bag, and there’s a sleeve pocket inside that accommodates tablets and laptops up to 15 inches.

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The outside of the bag has a side pocket with a drawstring closure that holds a water or fuel bottle up to 30 oz. A large panel on the back is covered in MOLLE webbing for attaching other items, and the panel is hinged on the bottom to provide access to the waterproof document pocket on the other side. The panel also conceals a durable mesh pocket that can be used to stash items for quick access or hold an optional hydration bladder ($19.95). Both sides of the bag have rubber carry handles and loops for attaching items or threading the Rigg Straps.

Nelson-Rigg Hurricane 2.0 Waterproof Backpack/Tail Pack

Large, adjustable, contoured backpack straps have a connector strap across the chest for added security. The backpack straps have outer strips of webbing for attaching a GPS locator, a multi-tool pouch, or other quick-grab items, and there are clips on each strap for securing a hydration tube. When using the bag as a tail pack, the backpack straps can be hidden behind the padded, breathable back panel.

The Hurricane 2.0 Waterproof Backpack/Tail Pack is a well-made, durable piece of motorcycle gear that is even more practical, functional, and versatile than before. Covered by a lifetime warranty, it’s a solid value at $169.95.

For more information, visit NelsonRigg.com.

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HJC RPHA 1N Helmet | Gear Review

HJC RPHA 1N Helmet

The HJC RPHA 1N is the same full-face helmet used by top-tier racers in the MotoGP and WorldSBK series. I’m not a racer, and even trackdays are few and far between for me. But one of my top priorities for a helmet is protection in the event of a crash, and the RPHA 1N has achieved FIM homologation for safety. The helmet also meets or exceeds DOT and ECE 22.06 standards for energy attenuation, penetration resistance, and chinstrap structural integrity. That gives me peace of mind.

HJC RPHA 1N Helmet
Testing the HJC RPHA 1N on the 2022 Indian Pursuit Limited. Photo by Kevin Wing.

RELATED: 2022 Indian Pursuit Limited | Road Test Review

HJC’s PIM+ shell is made from a blend of materials that includes carbon and carbon-glass hybrid fabric, resulting in a strong, lightweight lid. My medium RPHA 1N weighs just 3 lbs, 5.3 oz. The shell shape was developed using wind-tunnel testing to make it as aerodynamic as possible, and the back of the helmet has a large spoiler that smooths airflow and pulls hot air out of a large rear exhaust vent.

HJC RPHA 1N Helmet

Inside is a Silvercool comfort liner that is anti-bacterial, moisture-wicking, removeable, and washable. It also has side channels to accommodate eyeglasses and sunglasses. For me, the fit is perfectly snug with no hot spots, and the thick neckroll does a good job of managing wind noise without making it difficult to pull the helmet on and off.

Read more of Rider‘s helmet reviews

HJC RPHA 1N Helmet

Since the RPHA 1N is designed to keep racers comfortable on hot, demanding racetracks, it has more ventilation than most full-face helmets. There are five vents along the forehead and two vents on the chinbar, all of which can be closed to keep out rain or cold air. There are two exhaust vents on the sides of the chinbar and two more on the back of the helmet. With all the vents open, the 1N moves a significant amount of air through its interior channels. The only downside is added wind noise, but that can be mitigated with earplugs.

HJC RPHA 1N Helmet

For added security, the faceshield has a double locking system, and it is attached using metal screws with hinged D-ring heads that either lay flat during riding or fold out to remove the screws without tools. The shield filters out 99% of UV radiation, has an anti-scratch coating, includes a Pinlock anti-fog insert, and has outer posts for tear-offs. In emergency situations, the cheek pads can be pulled out so the helmet can be easily removed.

If you’re a motorcyclist who doesn’t compromise on safety and comfort, the HJC RPHA 1N is an impressive, top-of-the-line helmet worth considering. It’s available in sizes 2XS-2XL in solid colors for $699.99-$709.99 or graphics starting at $799.99, and it’s covered by a 5-year warranty.

For more information, visit HJCHelmets.us.

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Sargent World Sport Performance Seat | Gear Review

Sargent World Sport Performance Seat

Some things never change, such as the lack of comfort delivered by a typical OEM motorcycle seat. The stock perch on my ’09 BMW F 800 GS was a butt pincher, while my Yamaha Ténéré 700’s seat, with its cool rally look, is more plank-like. It seemed okay at first, but a couple of long rides proved me wrong. The comfort solution for my BMW was a World Sport Performance Seat from Sargent Cycle Products. Hoping lightning would strike twice, I sourced one for the Yamaha, and my derriere hasn’t stopped thanking me since.

Sargent builds its seats from the bottom up, molding Poly-Tec material to fit individual motorcycle models. The new pan for my Yamaha has the same tool storage area underneath as the stock unit, and it fits perfectly to that seat’s attachment points. I only had to transfer the Yamaha’s rubber grommets and washers to the new seat for a painless installation. The World Sport is lower than the stocker by nearly an inch and weighs 0.6 lb more, likely due to a wider pan and larger padded area.

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Atop the pan sits the comfort zone, a sculptured slab of Sargent’s proprietary Super Cell Atomic foam, designed to damp vibration while remaining firm and resilient. A memory foam layer molded inside that slab is said to relieve hot spots by conforming to your rear. One more comfort enhancement – a central channel much like those on some bicycle seats – takes the pressure off your nether region. Covering it all is black, UV-stabilized, marine-grade vinyl, hand sewn to a perfect fit. If my GS seat is any indication, this seat will last for many years with no care regimen other than an occasional scrub-down when it gets dirty.

Sargent World Sport Performance Seat

Wider at the rear than the stock perch but narrowing at the front with rounded edges for better control while standing, the slightly dished seat distributes rider weight over a larger area. I found it comfortable for sitting back on highway slogs, sliding forward for the twisties, and standing on the pegs when off the pavement. The sides are grippy enough for decent control while standing, while not interfering with tossing the bike side-to-side on curvy pavement. All of this adds up to a much-improved perch for extended riding days, something I’ve appreciated on several long rides with the World Sport under my rear.

Sargent offers a host of options and upgrades to the basic model reviewed here ($369.95), starting with color-coordinated welts. I went welt-less, preferring the smoother edge look. Those who want to match up their rear seat can order a do-it-yourself rear cover, and heated seats are available for those wanting bottom-up warmth. Sargent makes the World Sport seat for a dozen brands of motorcycles, and probably yours. When my buns were burning, they put out the fire.

For more information, visit SargentCycle.com.

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Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet | Review

Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet
The Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet has a flip-up chinbar and a 2-in-1 design with ADV (peak visor, shown) and street (no peak) modes.

Anyone who follows Rider knows that we’re big fans of the flip-up convenience of modular helmets. We’re also fans of ADV helmets, which combine the sun-blocking peak and pointy chinbar of a dirtbike helmet with the faceshield and other features of a street helmet. The Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet offers the best of both worlds, with a flip-up chinbar and a 2-in-1 design with ADV (peak visor) and street (no peak) modes.

Read Rider‘s other Fly Racing apparel reviews

Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet
Testing the Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet in ADV mode on the Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250. Photo by Kevin Wing.

The Odyssey has a polycarbonate outer shell with a slippery shape sculpted in a wind tunnel. Inside the shell and reinforcing the chinbar is dual-density EPS for impact absorption, and there are recessed speaker pockets for installing a comms system. Between the EPS and the rider’s noggin is a removable, washable, moisture-wicking Quick-Dry comfort liner that’s perforated to aid ventilation. There’s also a removable chin curtain and a dual D-ring chin strap.

Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet
The Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet in street (no peak) mode. The helmet comes with color-matched visor block-off plates.

The clear faceshield has an exterior hard coating to resist scratches and an interior coating that resists fogging. A tinted drop-down sunshield blocks 100% of harmful UVA/B radiation. Fly Racing’s True Functional Ventilation system combines intake vents in the chinbar and the top of the helmet with a negative-pressure rear spoiler that has a built-in exhaust vent.

Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet
Side view of the Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet in ADV (peak visor) mode with the drop-down sunshield deployed.

Versatility is the name of the game with this helmet. It is comfortable, reasonably quiet, and well-ventilated, and it works well on hot days, cold days, pavement, and dirt. The chinbar release, sunshield lever, vents, and faceshield are easy to operate with gloved hands, and the faceshield has large detents for three open positions.

Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet
Side view of the Fly Racing Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet in ADV (peak visor) mode with the chinbar up and the drop-down sunshield deployed.

There are two drawbacks, however. The first is weight. My medium Odyssey with the ADV peak installed weighs 4 lb, 5 oz, making it one of the heaviest modular helmets we’ve tested. The second is sensitivity to dry, dusty conditions. After riding in someone’s dust cloud for a while, the chinbar release became finicky. This is a problem that plagues moving parts like zippers and hinges on all sorts of riding gear, not just the Odyssey. A quick rinse at the end of the day cleared things right up.

The Odyssey Adventure Modular Helmet is a good value at $279.95 for solid colors (gray, white, and black) or $289.95 for the Summit graphic (black/gray/white, navy/gray/white, and tan/black/gray). It’s available in sizes XS-2XL and comes with a soft fleece helmet bag, a color-matched peak visor (for ADV mode), and color-matched visor block-off plates (for street mode). Mirror-tinted and Pinlock-ready faceshields are also available.

For more information, see your dealer or visit FlyRacing.com.

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Umberto Luce Crimson Boots | Gear Review

Umberto Luce Crimson Boots
Umberto Luce Crimson Boots (Photos by Kevin Wing)

Long before I got into motorcycles, I was into boots. As a rebellious middle-schooler, I stomped around in army-surplus combat boots. In high school, I bought a pair of Danner hiking boots that have protected my feet over hundreds of miles of trails in the Appalachians, Rockies, and Sierra Nevada. Thirty years later, I still have them, and their Vibram soles have been replaced multiple times. When it comes to boots, as with other gear we depend on, quality is worth paying for.

Umberto Luce boots first popped onto my radar last November at the IMS Outdoors show in Southern California. Peter Jones, Rider’s resident fashionista and shoe aficionado, and I both admired the stylish kicks, which look cool but are also designed to withstand the rigors of knocking about on motorcycles. We met Humberto Luce, the company founder and designer, who exudes energy and passion.

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In January, Peter and I ran into Humberto again at AIMExpo in Las Vegas, and this time he sent me home with a pair of Crimson boots. I tried them on at the show, and they were so comfortable that I kept them on. For the past few months, with rare exception, the Crimson boots have been on my feet both on and off the bike. Part of what makes them so comfortable is a flexible, durable sole made from a stack of leather, EVA (ethylene-vinyl acetate), and an anti-slip vulcanized rubber with a lugged tread. The outer sole has a unique speckled pattern that reminds me of a terrazzo floor.

The full-grain leather upper has an oil-tanned suede finish and a butter-soft, odor-resistant interior. Getting in and out of the lace-up boots is made easy with a quick-entry side zipper. Protective features include CE-certified D3O ankle protection, secure lock stitching, and a frontal-impact-protection cap toe, all of which are tastefully incorporated into the stylish design of the boots.

Umberto Luce Crimson Boots

I’ve spent full days in the saddle of a motorcycle, as well as full days tromping around city streets and airports, with these boots on, and they’re among the most comfortable I’ve ever worn. You’ll have to pry them off my cold, dead feet.

Umberto Luce Crimson boots are available in men’s sizes 7 to 13.5 and priced at $329. They’re made in small batches by craftsmen in León, Mexico. Check out the website for other styles.

For more information, visit umbertoluce.com.

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Dunlop Mutant Tires | Gear Review

Dunlop Mutant Tires
Dunlop Mutant Tires are designed performance on the street and they fit more than 250 motorcycle models.

Mutant tires. Just the name makes you want to try them. But what exactly have they mutated from or to? According to Dunlop, the Mutant combines unique components to create a premium, versatile performance street tire. The ingredients in this rubber gumbo include a high silica ratio, rayon ply casing, Jointless Belt construction, Apex sidewall technology, 4 Seasons Technology, and Dunlop’s exclusive MT Multi-Tread compounding.

Dunlop says the lightweight radials provide high mileage, nimble handling, a compliant ride, and excellent grip in both dry and wet conditions. To test those claims, I had my local shop, Ventura Harley-Davidson, spoon a fresh set onto my Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250.

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Once on the road and scrubbed in, the Mutants provided good feedback on various road surfaces, with predictable, stable turn-in. Once pointed in the right direction, they held a steady line without any tendency to fall in or stand up.

Dunlop Mutant Tires
We tested the Dunlop Mutant tires on a 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250.

The Mutant’s unique tread pattern looks almost like a dirt-track tire, but the tire is billed as a sport-touring tire that’s suitable for everything from big GT tourers to sportbikes to adventure bikes. I felt comfortable attacking paved roads at speed, even over those nasty tar snakes that are common on California’s backroads and get greasy on sunny days.

Though not intended for off-road use, I couldn’t help myself. The Mutants performed admirably on a few dirty, rocky roads I ventured down, but where they really shine is on backroads, where pavement can range from smooth to rough, wet to dry, clean to dirty.
I took my Mutant-shod Pan Am on a 2,000-mile trip to Oregon in April, where I encountered one of the worst snowstorms on record. While I wouldn’t recommend riding on sub-freezing roads with blowing snow, I felt reassured because the Mutants provided confident grip until conditions deteriorated beyond what I deemed as safe.

As far as longevity goes, I usually get about 5,322.8 miles (but who’s counting) out of a set of tires, changing them in pairs when either the front or rear wear bar begins to show. When new, the Mutants had 5/32 inch of tread depth up front and 9/32 inch of tread depth on the rear. After 3,000 miles, the tread depth was 3/32 inch for both front and rear. The Mutants are on track to hit the average mileage for my admittedly aggressive riding style.

Dunlop Mutant tires are available in multiple sizes to fit more than 250 motorcycle models, and MSRP ranges from $187.95-$290.95. For riders who enjoy riding on a wide variety of roads, they’re a solid choice.

For more information, see your dealer or visit dunlopmotorcycletires.com.

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Scorpion EXO-GT930 Transformer Helmet | Gear Review

Scorpion EXO-GT930 Transformer Helmet

I don’t know anybody who loves wearing a helmet, but most of us who do wear them appreciate their – shall we say – utility. And a motorcycle helmet is a lot more comfortable than the helmets the U.S. Army issues, though the purpose is the same – to save your life.

There are five basic types of motorcycle helmets: full-face, off-road, modular, three-quarter open-face, and half helmets, also called shorties. In 1956, I bought my first bike, and my mother bought me a shorty helmet – that was all there was. Then around 1959 Bell introduced the 500TX, which may have been the first three-quarter open-face. I immediately sprung for one and wore open-faces for the next 20 years or so. Until I got a job in the industry and was told photos would be done with a full-face. I am mildly claustrophobic, but I adjusted to the enclosed feeling, more or less. Then modulars came along, and I’ve been a fan of those for many years, being able to lift up the chinbar when idling through town or going slow on a wooded lane.

Scorpion EXO-GT930 Transformer Helmet

Scorpion’s EXO-GT930 is called the Transformer because it serves both as a modular, with the chinbar and visor opening up, and as an open-face. You can easily detach the chinbar and faceshield and put on the peak visor. I like using the open-face configuration while riding along paved roads on a warm day through the little-trafficked countryside with vineyards and cattle.

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Modular crash-hats tend to be heavier than full-face ones because of the hinges and locking systems. Scorpion uses three different shells for the seven sizes, from XS to 3XL, and I figure my XL uses the largest. The modular configuration weighs 4.1 pounds; the open-face with peak visor weighs 3.4 pounds. The outer shell is polycarbonate, and the life-saving crushable middle portion is multi-density expanded polystyrene (or EPS), which absorbs impacts should you have the misfortune to use the helmet for its intended purpose. Inside is a removeable, washable KwikWick comfort liner, and the helmet stays put with a traditional double D-ring chinstrap.

The mechanism for flipping up the chinbar works just fine, and when opened it can be locked in place. Removing the chinbar and attached anti-fog faceshield is merely a matter of holding down the spring-loaded levers just below the pivot point, one at a time, and then pulling the chinbar forward. Easily done after a little practice, as is installing the peak visor. A drop-down tinted sun shield can be used in either configuration.

Ventilation, comfort, and build quality are good. Solid colors retail for $249.95-$254.95, and the Modulus graphic (shown) in three colorways retails for $269.95. A matte black version with an EXO-Com Bluetooth communication system retails for $424.95.

For more information, visit scorpionusa.com.

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