Tag Archives: Features

2020 Yamaha YZF-R1 and YZF-R1M | First Look Review

2020 Yamaha YZF-R1M and YZF-R1
The 2020 Yamaha YZF-R1M (left) and YZF-R1 (right) benefit from engine refinements, new electronics and suspension upgrades. Photos courtesy Yamaha.

Yamaha has taken the wraps off its latest-generation flagship sportbikes, the 2020 YZF-R1 and the track-ready YZF-R1M, with both featuring refinements to their CP4 crossplane crankshaft engines, an augmented electronic rider aids package, enhanced suspension and redesigned bodywork.

Check out our Rider’s Guide to New/Updated Motorcycles for 2019 here!

The 998cc inline-four powering the R1/M was already potent, and for 2020 it gets new cylinder heads, fuel injectors, finger-follower rocker arms and camshaft profiles. Controlling the beast is an all-new Accelerator Position Sensor with Grip (APSG) ride-by-wire system with Yamaha’s Chip Controlled Throttle (YCC-T) that eliminates throttle cables and reduces weight while providing smoother throttle operation.

2020 Yamaha YZF-R1M and YZF-R1
The 2020 YZF-R1/M’s crossplane crankshaft inline-four is mostly unchanged, with a few refinements like cylinder heads, injectors and finger-follower rocker arms.

A robust electronics package centered around Yamaha’s proprietary six-axis IMU now lets riders choose between two intervention modes for enhanced Brake Control (BC): BC1 is optimized for upright, straight-line braking and BC2 increases intervention timing deeper into the lean, for enhanced braking into corners.

A new Engine Brake Management (EBM) system also allows the rider to select between three levels of engine braking force. Both the BC and EBM are adjustable through the onboard Yamaha Ride Control and Yamaha’s Y-TRAC smartphone (Android only) and tablet app (Android and iOS).

2020 Yamaha YZF-R1M and YZF-R1
Full-color TFT display includes Yamaha Ride Control, where the rider can make adjustments to various electronic systems.

Premium Öhlins Electronic Racing Suspension (ERS) has been a staple of the R1M’s chassis performance, and a new NPX pressurized front fork with a gas cylinder built into the front fork axle bracket, along with revised rear shock settings to complement the performance of the front fork, are features of the new 2020 model.

The 2020 YZF-R1 also receives suspension performance enhancements courtesy of a new KYB front fork with a new internal shim stack design and a KYB rear shock with revised internal settings. Together, the changes result in smoother suspension dampening paired with an improved feeling of contact and grip with the street or track surface.

Lastly, redesigned bodywork creates a claimed 5.3-percent increase in aerodynamic efficiency while reducing wind noise and pressure on the rider when in a tucked position, and improved comfort comes from smoother side section where the rider’s legs contact the bike. The R1M also gets a new carbon fiber tail cowl.

The 2020 YZF-R1M will initially be available in limited quantities exclusively through Yamaha’s online reservation system in a Carbon Fiber color scheme for $26,099. Dealerships will begin receiving reserved orders in September. To place a reservation, click here.

The 2020 YZF-R1 will be available in Team Yamaha Blue or Raven for $17,300, and will begin arriving in dealerships in September.

2020 Yamaha YZF-R1M and YZF-R1
2020 Yamaha YZF-R1 in Team Yamaha Blue.
2020 Yamaha YZF-R1M and YZF-R1
2020 Yamaha YZF-R1M in Carbon Fiber.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Ducati Panigale V4 25th Anniversary 916 | First Look Review

Ducati Panigale V4 25th Anniversary 916
The limited-edition Ducati Panigale V4 25th Anniversary 916 celebrates the silver anniversary of Ducati’s most iconic motorcycle. (Images courtesy Ducati)

On any list
of iconic motorcycles of the 20th century, Ducati’s 916 holds a place of
prominence. Delivering the 1-2 knockout punches of stunning good looks and
blistering performance, the 916, which debuted for 1994, is considered one of
the most beautiful motorcycles ever designed. The beauty was also a beast,
winning 120 races, eight constructors’ titles and six rider championships in
World Superbike during its 10-year production run, which includes the
larger-displacement 996 and 998 models. Closely associated with the 916 is
British racer Carl “Foggy” Fogarty, who won 43 World Superbike races and four
championships on the 916 and 996.

1994 Ducati 916 Stradale
The bike that started it all–the 1994 Ducati 916 Stradale.

To celebrate the 916’s 25th anniversary, Ducati has unveiled a limited-edition Panigale V4 25° Anniversario 916. Based on the Panigale V4 S, the 25th Anniversary edition has been upgraded with racing content from the Panigale V4 R such as the Ducati Corse Front Frame, the dry clutch and even more track-specific electronics, such as Ducati Quick Shift EVO 2 and “predictive” Ducati Traction Control EVO 2.

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 R | First Look Review

The special
Panigale’s livery is inspired by the Ducati 996 SBK (winner of the 1999 World
Superbike Championship) with forged magnesium Marchesini Racing wheels, a titanium
type-approved Akrapovič exhaust and a wish list of carbon fiber and billet
aluminum components. Limited to just 500 examples, each bike comes with an
authenticity certificate that matches the laser-engraved ID number (XXX/500) on
the top yoke with the engine and frame serial number.

Ducati Panigale V4 25th Anniversary 916
Four-time World Superbike champion Carl Fogarty with the limited-edition Panigale V4 and his 1999 Superbike race machine that provided inspiration.

Dedicated
equipment for the Panigale V4 25° Anniversario 916:

  • “916 25° Anniversario” color scheme
  • Numbered (xxx/500) machined-from-solid aluminum top yoke
  • Front Frame with Ducati Corse specifications
  • Two-tone rider’s seat
  • Forged magnesium Marchesini Racing wheels
  • Dry clutch
  • Titanium Akrapovič type-approved silencer
  • Ducati Traction Control EVO 2 (DTC EVO 2)
  • Ducati Quick Shift EVO 2 (DQS EVO 2)
  • Racing screen
  • Carbon fiber front mudguard
  • Carbon fiber rear mudguard
  • Carbon fiber heel guards
  • Carbon fiber/titanium swingarm cover
  • Racing grips
  • Adjustable billet aluminum rider footpegs
  • Billet aluminum folding clutch and brake levers
  • Brake lever guard (supplied)
  • Ducati Data Analyser+ (DDA+) kit with GPS module (supplied)
  • Open carbon fiber clutch cover (supplied)
  • Special “25° Anniversario 916” bike cover (supplied)
  • Billet aluminum racing-type filler cap (supplied)
  • Plate holder removal cover (supplied)
  • Billet aluminum rear view mirror plugs (supplied)
  • “Shell” and “Foggy” logo stickers (supplied)
Ducati Panigale V4 25th Anniversary 916
Ducati Panigale V4 25th Anniversary 916

The Panigale
V4 25° Anniversario 916 is powered by the 1,103cc Desmosedici Stradale. A
MotoGP-derived 90-degree V4 with Desmodromic timing, it features a
counter-rotating crankshaft and a Twin Pulse firing order, and it produces 214
horsepower at 13,000 rpm and 91 lb-ft of torque at 10,000 rpm. The engine is
enhanced with the adoption of a dry clutch and type-approved titanium Akrapovič
silencers.

Ducati Panigale V4 25th Anniversary 916
Foggy hasn’t lost his edge. He look right at home on the Panigale V4.

From a
chassis viewpoint, the Panigale V4 25° Anniversario 916 has it all. The front
frame, which exploits the Desmosedici Stradale engine as a structural chassis
element, is the same as the one on the Panigale V4 R but differs slightly on
account of the lighter, machined sides. The frame is coupled to an Öhlins
NIX-30 fork, an Öhlins TTX36 rear shock and an Öhlins steering damper, all
managed by the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 control system. This gives the rider access
to next-level dynamic bike control, augmenting on-road safety and shortening
on-track lap times. Ultralight forged magnesium Marchesini Racing wheels carry top-drawer
brakes, with two 330mm Brembo discs with Brembo Stylema monoblock front calipers
and a single 245mm disc with a 2-piston caliper at the rear.

Ducati Panigale V4 25th Anniversary 916
In addition to the special livery and limited-edition numbered plate, the racing screen includes a nod to Sir Foggy.

The Panigale
V4 25° Anniversario 916 has a latest-generation electronics package. Based on a
6-axis Bosch Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), it features controls designed to
manage every aspect of riding. The electronic package includes:

  • Bosch Cornering ABS EVO
  • Ducati Traction Control EVO 2 (DTC EVO 2)
  • Ducati Slide Control (DSC)
  • Ducati Wheelie Control EVO (DWC EVO)
  • Ducati Power Launch (DPL)
  • Ducati Quick Shift up/down EVO 2 (DQS EVO 2)
  • Engine Brake Control EVO (EBC EVO)
  • Ducati Electronic Suspension EVO (DES EVO)

Furthermore,
the Panigale V4 25° Anniversario 916 comes with the Ducati Data Analyser+
(DDA+) kit with GPS module. DDA+ is a telemetry system. Similar to those used
in competitions, it consists of a data acquisition device (via CAN line) and
analysis software that takes its inspiration from professional programs. The
device records ride parameters such as cornering lines, RPM, gear, throttle
aperture angle, front brake pressure, DTC intervention etc. and geo-locates
them on the track. Once disconnected from the bike and connected to the PC via
the USB port, the software lets the user upload the acquired data feeds and
analyse on-track performance.

For more information, visit ducati.com.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard | First Ride Review

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard
With Harley’s iconic batwing fairing, cruising was comfortable on the outskirts of the Ocala National Forest near Daytona Beach, Florida. Photos by Brian J. Nelson.

Raw and bare, stripped of all the arguably distracting bells and whistles that Bluetooth-connected, GPS-dependent riders have been coddled with, Harley’s new FLHT Electra Glide Standard is the epitome of simplicity. As a mid-year release, the bike signifies a back-to-basics, cut-the-fat approach geared to attract riders at a reasonable $18,999. Compared to the Electra Glide Ultra’s $24,589 or the Street Glide’s $21,289, the Standard is the lowest-priced offering in H-D’s touring line.

Described as a dressed down dresser, the Electra Glide Standard does away with the radio and instead depends on the ultra-smooth Milwaukee-Eight 107 V-twin to set the tempo. Importantly, the iconic batwing fairing with a clear, mid-height windshield and a single halogen headlight are retained, though its foam-covered speaker holes are empty as is the gaping slot for the LCD screen, which now serves as a phone or glove holder during pit stops.

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard
No speakers or LCD screen, just four essential gauges.

The dished solo seat sits at 26.1 inches, which made it extremely comfortable for my 6-foot-3 build. With a minimalist amount of chrome, the bike maintains a sleek and intimidating look that will still turn heads with the purity of its black paint job (and it only comes in Vivid Black).

The Electra Glide Standard comes with large One Touch saddlebags. spacious floorboards and a standard shift lever in place of the usual heel-toe shifter. Its naked front fender covers a 17-inch black machined Impeller wheel that is accented by chrome fork skirts.

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard
The ultra-smooth Milwaukee-Eight 107 V-twin engine is the bike’s biggest selling point.

Handling was impressive at all speeds during a daylong press ride through Florida’s swampland near Daytona Beach. The fat 130/80 front tire meant I had to put a little more effort into steering it, but the still-nimble, 820-pound bike felt firmly connected to the asphalt. With 26 degrees of rake and 6.7 inches of trail, it provides stable, comfortable cruising for days, especially with the Showa Dual Bending Valve front fork and dual emulsion shocks in the back.

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard
The 2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard’s minimalist approach focuses on utility.

This no-frills bike is not for beginners, nor is it billed as such. It is an attractive and attractively priced piece of American iron that will appeal to a wide swath of financially conscious riders. It gives a rider the basics that matter to get them out on the open road or into a dealership. And it is prepped to be incrementally customized as riding seasons pass–a deliberate Harley marketing plan.

The streamlined beauty and Milwaukee-Eight power should hopefully make the Electra Glide Standard a lasting hit in Harley’s touring line.

2019 Harley-Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard
Generous saddlebag capacity is retained, while removing the left saddlebag with one click gives easy access to make quick, toolless preload adjustments.

Kali Kotoski is the Managing Editor of Rider’s sister publication Thunder Press.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Retrospective: 1960-1964 Tohatsu CA2 Runpet Sport 50cc

1962 Tohatsu Runpet Sport 50cc
1962 Tohatsu Runpet Sport 50cc. Owner: Cliff Shoening, Bremerton, Washington.

This little charmer was in the first wave of Japanese bikes to enter the U.S. market, thanks to Hap Jones, a motorcycle racer and businessman of considerable note. Hap had been selling British bikes in the 1950s, and then decided to get out of the retail business, focusing on his more profitable distribution side. And the Japanese manufacturers were just getting interested in American buying habits, with Honda opening up for business in 1959, Yamaha in 1960.

So Hap got on the phone to Japan in 1961 and had a chat with the Tohatsu suits, who were undoubtedly very happy at the thought of getting into the burgeoning U.S. market, especially with a well-known and highly respected gent like Hap Jones. They arranged for a couple of 50cc Runpet models and several 125s to be sent over, a deal was struck and Hap introduced them to the world with a full-page ad in the January 1962 issue of “Cycle” magazine…quite unusual for a start-up to spend that kind of money. Then he had the good fortune to have a rider on a Tohatsu 125 win the lightweight Sportsman road race at Daytona, which gave him great publicity. Within a few months he claimed to have 300 motorcycle dealers and a number of sporting-goods stores carrying the Tohatsu line.

What was this little Runpet Sport? And this Tohatsu Company? The word is a combination of Tokyo and “hatsudoki” (engine factory), the origins going back to 1922 and the Takata Motor Research Corp., which made its reputation by building a small motor for a highly successful rail-track car. The name was changed to Tohatsu in 1939, and the company became focused on producing military equipment, including small motors to run little generators. War came and went, the factory survived, and it began selling these little motors to other companies building motorized bicycles. “Heck, we can do that ourselves,” some executive said, and Tohatsu began selling kits for bicycle owners to mount themselves, with gas tank, exhaust system and bracketry.

1962 Tohatsu Runpet Sport 50cc
1962 Tohatsu Runpet Sport 50cc. Owner: Cliff Shoening, Bremerton, Washington.

Better yet, it would build a sturdy bicycle, with a telescopic fork. In 1953 the Puppy appeared, powered by a 58cc two-stroke. Not a very attractive vehicle, but mildly efficient. In the mid-’50s the Japanese were all desirous of personal transportation and some 80 companies were competing in the motorized two-wheeler market. By 1956 Tohatsu was the biggest of the lot, selling 70,000 motorbikes, twice the number that Honda was. But competition was getting fierce, and the serious outfits like Honda, Yamaha and Bridgestone were busy modernizing their products, while dozens of the small operations were shutting down. Unfortunately Tohatsu’s success was followed by some major financial mismanagement, with lots of borrowing going on to keep the company afloat. In 1960 the government, through something called the Rehabilitation Act, arranged for Tohatsu to be bought by the Fuji Electric Manufacturing Corporation, the presumption being that this larger concern might be able to get Tohatsu back on its financial feet.

Motorcycles were just a part of the Tohatsu Company, with marine hardware, from bilge pumps to outboard motors, being more important. However, the two-wheeler R&D boys had been hard at work with new models now at hand, including the 50cc Runpets, the Japanese advertising saying in translation, “…with the accent on having fun!”

1962 Tohatsu Runpet Sport 50cc
1962 Tohatsu Runpet Sport 50cc. Owner: Cliff Shoening, Bremerton, Washington.

The Runpet Sport was indeed a sporty creature, with a highly tuned 49cc piston-port engine, fed through a TK carburetor that, like the Amals of the day, had both a tickler and a choke. A single-disc clutch connected to a three-speed gearbox. The factory claimed it put out 6.8 horsepower at 10,800 rpm and was capable of speeds in excess of 60 mph. Quite astounding for a street-worthy little single! It should be noted that 50cc racing was quite popular back then, especially in Japan.

Unfortunately Tohatsu did not get into developing automatic oiling, and owners had to do things the un-fun way, mixing the oil with the gas. As well as kickstarting the tiny terror. Tohatsu had put an electric starter on its basic Runpet with a lower state of tune, intended for the commuter and housewife, but the Sport was to live up to its name.

Chassis was simple, with a large tubular steel backbone frame from which the engine hung, two bolts securing the head; two more were down at the back close to the swingarm pivot. A telescopic fork up front. Two pairs of arms went back from the main frame to hold the saddle and places for bolting the tops of the two shock absorbers.

1962 Tohatsu Runpet Sport 50cc
1962 Tohatsu Runpet Sport 50cc. Owner: Cliff Shoening, Bremerton, Washington.

The 17-inch wheels had drum brakes, and the distance between axles was 44.5 inches. A 100 mph speedometer (rather optimistic) sat in the headlight nacelle, and a very small windshield served to enhance the sport look. A short saddle and no passenger pegs indicated that this was a one-up ride. But you could get the groceries, as there was a small luggage rack and two tiny pannier bags, made from the hide of a Nauga. Total weight was 135 pounds.

There were several options as to presentation, and this one has the scramblerish high pipe and small skid plate. Shiny chrome fenders and nice paint on the tank and side panels enhanced the image. The company was also putting out new two-stroke models, designed with American riders in mind, like a 125 parallel twin with four gears and 15 horsepower.

All to no avail. Bankruptcy was declared in 1964 and the motorcycle side was shut down. We don’t know how many Runpet Sports were sold by the 300 dealers Hap Jones claimed were carrying the brand, but there don’t seem to be many in the used-bike lists.

1962 Tohatsu Runpet Sport 50cc
1962 Tohatsu Runpet Sport 50cc. Owner: Cliff Shoening, Bremerton, Washington.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Moto Guzzi 250 TS two-stroke twin


The 250 TS (along with its badge engineered twin, the Benelli 250 2C) was the first all new design to emerge from Moto Guzzi after the de Tomaso take over in 1972. It was released in 1974 and remained in production until 1982.

Moto Guzzi TS PA GuzziTS
This 1978 Moto Guzzi 250 TS only has 3km on the clocks, but poor storage took their toll

Powered by a 231cc 2-stroke parallel twin, the TS differed only from the 2C in using alloy cylinders with chromed liners, whereas the Benelli used cast iron.

Moto Guzzi TS PA GuzziTS
The 231cc 2-stroke parallel twin generates 24.5hp

Power output was 24.5 hp at 7570 rpm, which combined with a 137 kg weight to allow for a top speed of 161 km/h.

Moto Guzzi TS PA GuzziTS
A top speed of 161km/h was possible

Points were replaced by electronic ignition in ’75 and the original double-sided single leading shoe front brake was changed to a single disc the following year. Otherwise very little development took place during the production run.

Moto Guzzi TS PA GuzziTS
The 250 TS pictured here features the later disc brake on the front

The bike seen here is a 1978 model and is completely original, having only 3km on the clock! However due to poor storage conditions by the previous owner its finish has deteriorated.

Moto Guzzi TS PA GuzziTS
The 250 TS stood apart from the 2C due to using alloy cylinders with chromed liners
Moto Guzzi TS PA GuzziTS
Points were replaced by electronic ignition in ’75
Moto Guzzi TS PA GuzziTS
1978 Moto Guzzi 250 TS
Moto Guzzi TS PA GuzziTS
1978 Moto Guzzi 250 TS
Moto Guzzi TS PA GuzziTS
1978 Moto Guzzi 250 TS

Source: MCNews.com.au

Lino Tonti | The Linto 500 GP

Linto 500 GP

With Phil Aynsley

The Italians seem to have provided more than their fair share of talented designers to the motorcycle community. One of these was Lino Tonti.

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Lino Tonti’s Linto 500 GP

Lino Tonti's Linto 500 GP

Tonti graduated as an aeronautical engineer in 1937 and started at Benelli,  working on the amazing supercharged 250/4 (link). After the war he designed several motorcycles and scooters before being employed by Aermacchi to start their motorcycle production.

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

In 1956 he moved to FB Mondial, then after they quit racing at the end of 1957, he and Joseph Pattoni continued the race department under the Paton name. He then designed for White (a Bianchi offshoot) and Gilera during the ‘60s before being made the technical director at Moto Guzzi in 1967, where he headed the V7 Sport project. At Guzzi he went on to create the ‘small block’ V35 & V50 motors as well as many different prototypes.

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

His work at Guzzi didn’t curtail him to that firm’s products only however. In 1967, together with long time associate Alcide Biotti, he saw an opening for a privateers’ bike for the 500cc GP class where the Manx and G50 were running a distant second to Agostini on the MV. He took two Aermacchi 250 singles (which despite only being a pushrod design were competitive and reliable) and combined them into a parallel twin!

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

Using the barrels, heads, pistons and rods from the Aermacchi, mated to a bottom end and crankcase of his own design provided a motor that proved to be more than a match for the British singles (61hp at 9,800rpm with the bike weighing the same as a G50), if not quite up to the MVs.

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

The high revs resulted in a switch from the original 180º crankshaft to a 360º design but vibration continued to be a problem with primary gear and chassis weld failures occurring.

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

In 1968 two prototypes hit the track with Alberto Pagani finishing 2nd in the East German GP. For the 1969 season production of a batch of 15 bikes (possibly only 8 were completed) was begun, with two of them being for ‘works’ riders Pagani and Aussie Jack Findlay.

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

These works bikes featured magnesium crankcases and 40mm carburettors (in place of the standard 36mm items). Ceriani suspension and Fontana brakes were used. Power was now up to 64hp. Pagani won the Italian GP on the bike seen here and Gyula Marsovszky finished the season in 2nd place to Agostini.

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

Aermacchi Lino Tonti PA Linto
Linto 500 GP

Source: MCNews.com.au

2019 BMW R nineT /5 | First Look Review

2019 BMW R nineT /5
BMW has announced a new R nineT /5 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of its iconic /5 (“slash five”) series. Images courtesy BMW Motorrad.

Fifty years ago, in 1969, the first BMW motorcycle rolled off the assembly line at BMW’s factory in Berlin Spandau. The new /5 series (pronounced “slash five”) included the R 50/5, R 60/5 and R 75/5, and sported a new chassis and engine and a fresh, modern design with a wide range of bold color options.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the classic /5 series, BMW has announced a special R nineT /5 that evokes the look and spirit of the originals.

The 2019 R nineT /5 features black kneepads on a gorgeous Lupine Blue metallic tank, with a smoke effect, double-line pin stripe, a special 50th anniversary badge and a double seat with white piping. Other /5 details include chrome mirrors, exhaust manifold and silencer, fork gaiters and brushed aluminum engine covers, gearbox, fork tubes and wheels.

Otherwise the R nineT /5 is familiar, with its air- and oil-cooled 1,170cc opposed-twin boxer engine, spoked tube-type rims, standard ABS, ASC (automatic stability control) and heated grips and 6-speed gearbox.

Read: BMW R nineT Pure | Road Test Review

U.S. pricing and availability are TBD. Keep scrolling for more images.

2019 BMW R nineT /5
2019 BMW R nineT /5.
2019 BMW R nineT /5
2019 BMW R nineT /5.
2019 BMW R nineT /5
2019 BMW R nineT /5.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Stayin’ Safe: Fueling Risk

gas station
With multiple entrances and vehicles constantly flowing in and out, a busy gas station is one of the most foreboding intersections a rider will encounter.

Intersections are the most common sites of motorcycle crashes involving other vehicles. You probably knew that. Oncoming vehicles turning left across the path of the unsuspecting motorcyclist and drivers pulling into the rider’s lane from a side street are serious risks to the street rider. The astute motorcyclist approaches intersections with anticipation and minimizes risk by adjusting position and speed to create precious space and time.

But what does an intersection look like? Not all traffic junctions are traditional four-way crossroads. In developed areas, the local gas station may be the busiest and most frenetic intersection in town–especially those biggie-sized gas/convenience stores popping up everywhere.

Unlike the traditional intersection where vehicle drivers have limited turning options, the gas station has multiple entrances and exits as well as undefined paths of travel within the fueling compound. This creates a free-for-all and challenges the rider to determine where any given threat may come from.

Avoidance begins before you get there. Look for gas stations in the distance. Actively scan for vehicles on the highway that may turn across your lane, while also scanning for vehicles moving within the fuel stop that could present a moving threat.

Be aware there are multiple things demanding a driver’s attention near gas stations. Other vehicles entering and exiting, the flow of highway traffic and even intangibles like concerns of being late for work. All of these make a rider even less noticeable to motorists.

Consider the busiest times of day for gas station traffic. Early morning can be particularly hectic as folks fill up on fuel and coffee on their way to work. As vehicles move in and out of traffic, be aware that the sun can be blinding when it’s low in the sky, potentially hiding your bike in the glare.

Just passing by? Anticipate ingress and egress movement and have an escape plan. Slow your approach and, when safe, accelerate out of the danger zone. When turning into a station, assess the scene and plan your clearest path in and around the pumps, parked cars, fuel puddles and plodding vehicles before you get into the middle of it all.

By pumping a few gallons of high-octane strategy into your ride and topping up your awareness level, you’ll be able to safely manage one of the busiest intersections found on any ride. Isn’t that a gas?

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Motorcycle Sales Figures | 2019 Half-Year Results

2019 YTD Australia Motorcycle Sales Data

Overall the Australian motorcycle market, across all sectors, road, off-road, ATV and scooters is down 11.4 per cent. Every single major brand is down in comparison to the first six months of 2018, which itself was not a great year for the motorcycle market.

From January to June, motorcycle industry sales totalled 47,942 in 2018 compared with 50,939 for the same period in 2017. Over the first six months of 2019 that half-year figure has fallen further to 42,457.

Honda is still #1 overall with 10,275 sales chalked up in the first half of 2019. Big Red’s result helped a great deal by Honda’s very positive growth in scooter sales combined with a relatively good showing in the off-road market. These positives helped somewhat offset a 28.9 per cent drop in road sales for Honda and a 22 per cent drop in ATV sales.

Honda CBE Red
Affordable learner machines like Honda’s CB125E is what is keeping road bike sales ticking over

None of the brands are in positive territory overall. KTM and Kawasaki are the only two companies to only go backwards in single digit percentages, while the rest of the brands suffered double-digit declines.

Despite a 19.4 per cent decline in sales Harley-Davidson are still Australia’s biggest selling road bike brand while Yamaha narrowly edged past Honda on road bike sales.

Yamaha MT LA RHF
Yamaha MT-07 LA

Off-road it was a reversal of the blue-red fortunes with Honda sneaking ahead of Yamaha for the #1 spot in dirt-bikes.

Scooters are the only segment of the market that is in positive territory overall and Honda’s growth in this area has been phenomenal. Only a few years ago Honda was a bit-part player in the scooter market, but are now by far the market leader in this area.

Polaris remain the biggest selling ATV brand in Australia across a four-wheeler market that is 13.4 per cent down overall.


Motorcycle brands by overall volume

January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Total
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Honda 10274 11655 -11.8%
Yamaha 8959 10085 -11.2%
Kawasaki 4533 4718 -3.9%
Suzuki 3322 3724 -10.8%
KTM 3310 3476 -4.8%
Harley Davidson 2925 3629 -19.4%
Polaris 2685 3098 -13.3%
BRP Australia 1333 1308 1.9%
BMW 1238 1395 -11.3%
Husqvarna 1064 1232 -13.6%
Triumph 906 1195 -24.2%
Ducati 662 738 -10.3%
Vespa 379 434 -12.7%
Piaggio 375 498 -24.7%
Indian Motorcycle 323 453 -28.7%
Aprilia 104 197 -47.2%
Moto Guzzi 65 74 -12.2%
TOTAL 42457 47909 -11.4%

2019 Road Motorcycle Sales

January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Road
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Harley Davidson 2925 3629 -19.4%
Yamaha 2749 3014 -8.8%
Honda 2738 3853 -28.9%
Kawasaki 2012 2344 -14.2%
BMW 1156 1367 -15.4%
Suzuki 1097 1327 -17.3%
Triumph 906 1195 -24.2%
KTM 866 794 9.1%
Ducati 662 738 -10.3%
Indian Motorcycle 323 453 -28.7%
Husqvarna 109 143 -23.8%
Moto Guzzi 65 74 -12.2%
Aprilia 60 111 -45.9%
TOTAL 15668 19042 -17.7%

2019 Off-Road Motorcycle Sales

January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Off Road
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Honda 4182 4180 0.0%
Yamaha 4135 4740 -12.8%
KTM 2444 2682 -8.9%
Kawasaki 1793 1663 7.8%
Suzuki 1157 1226 -5.6%
Husqvarna 955 1089 -12.3%
TOTAL 14666 15580 -5.9%

2019 Scooter Sales

January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Scooter
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Honda 969 557 74.0%
Vespa 379 434 -12.7%
Piaggio 375 498 -24.7%
Suzuki 375 252 48.8%
Yamaha 261 236 10.6%
BMW 82 28 192.9%
Aprilia 44 86 -48.8%
TOTAL 2485 2091 18.8%

2019 ATV Sales

January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer ATV
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Polaris 2685 3098 -13.3%
Honda 2385 3065 -22.2%
Yamaha 1814 2095 -13.4%
BRP Australia 1333 1308 1.9%
Kawasaki 728 711 2.4%
Suzuki 693 919 -24.6%
TOTAL 9638 11196 -13.9%

Top Ten Selling Motorcycles in Australia
YTD 2019

Top 10 Overall – Excludes ATVs
January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Model Total
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Kawasaki KLX110 870 539 61.4%
Honda CRF50F 763 614 24.3%
Yamaha WR450F 671 620 8.2%
Yamaha PW50 628 625 0.5%
Honda CRF110F 570 504 13.1%
Honda CB125E 569 637 -10.7%
Yamaha MT07L 525 504 4.2%
Honda NSC110 496 238 108.4%
Honda CRF230F 494 668 -26.0%
Kawasaki NINJA 400 488 443 10.2%

What about the other brands….?

It should be noted that some brands are not represented in the official audit figures in relation to motorcycle sales. Brands under the UMI group such as MV Agusta, Royal Enfield and Gas Gas, along with the likes of Sherco, CF Moto, Kymco and SWM which come under the stewardship of Mojo Motorcycles, are not included in the sales figures as these companies choose not to be members of the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries.

An educated guesstimate suggests that these brands represent around 10 per cent of the whole market, thus the data is formulated from audited figures that cover around 90 per cent of the motorcycles sold in Australia.

Along with compiling motorcycles sales data, the FCAI is the primary organisation funded by the motorcycle industry to deal with government agencies. FCAI helped lobby for the Learner Approved Motorcycles Scheme and the Recreational Registration Scheme. They also lobby for exemptions on tightening emissions schemes in relation to motorcycles, and helping to prevent governments trying to restrict or ban the use of ATVs.

Source: MCNews.com.au

Road Motorcycle Sales Figures | 2019 Half-Year Results

Motorcycles Sales Figures

2019 YTD Road Motorcycle Sales Data

If any cold comfort can be taken in today’s release of the latest motorcycle sales figures for the Australian market it is that, despite the efforts of regulators to make obtaining a motorcycle licence as painful and expensive as possible, it is again the learner legal machines that are propping up the road motorcycle sales volume.

Honda CBE Blue
Honda CB125E leads the way

Honda’s affordable CB125E again led the way ahead of Yamaha’s MT-07L. Kawasaki’s Ninja 400 took third place ahead of Yamaha’s YZF-R3 and MT-09.

The chrome is still shining for Harley-Davidson with the big-bore breakout defying the overall negative trend to rank as Australia’s sixth biggest selling road motorcycle and earn the mantle once again as the country’s favourite cruiser style motorcycle.

Next best is the baby cruiser from Honda. The CMX 500 continues to do very well and Honda will be very pleased to have bested Harley’s Street 500 in the sales figures. 330 new CMX 500 machines hit the streets in the first six months of 2019 while in equal eighth with the Honda Grom was the H-D Street 500, that unlikely pairing registering 298 sales apiece while Yamaha’s MT-03LA rounded out the overall road-bike top ten.

Amongst the big-bore boy racer Superbikes Honda topped the charts with the CBR 1000 RR Fireblade by a handy margin. In fact, Fireblade sales almost doubled that of any of the other Japanese litre-bikes.  Ducati is making progress with V4 sales while the S 1000 RR also did reasonably well considering that BMW have been waiting a long time for stock of their latest model.

2019 Road Motorcycle Sales

January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Road
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Harley Davidson 2925 3629 -19.4%
Yamaha 2749 3014 -8.8%
Honda 2738 3853 -28.9%
Kawasaki 2012 2344 -14.2%
BMW 1156 1367 -15.4%
Suzuki 1097 1327 -17.3%
Triumph 906 1195 -24.2%
KTM 866 794 9.1%
Ducati 662 738 -10.3%
Indian Motorcycle 323 453 -28.7%
Husqvarna 109 143 -23.8%
Moto Guzzi 65 74 -12.2%
Aprilia 60 111 -45.9%
TOTAL 15668 19042 -17.7%

Road Bikes Top Ten Overall

Top 10 by Category – Road Bikes
January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Model Total
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Honda CB125E 569 637 -10.7%
Yamaha MT07L 525 504 4.2%
Kawasaki NINJA 400 488 443 10.2%
Yamaha YZF-R3A 471 445 5.8%
Yamaha MT-09 395 384 2.9%
Harley Davidson FXBRS 383 384 -0.3%
Honda CMX500 330 350 -5.7%
Harley Davidson XG500 298 466 -36.1%
Honda GROM 298 355 -16.1%
Yamaha MT03LA 292 376 -22.3%

Learner Approved Motorcycle Sales

Top 10 by Category – LAMS Approved
January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Model Total
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Yamaha WR450F 671 620 8.2%
Honda CB125E 569 637 -10.7%
Yamaha MT07L 525 504 4.2%
Honda NSC110 496 238 108.4%
Kawasaki NINJA 400 488 443 10.2%
Yamaha YZF-R3A 471 445 5.8%
Suzuki DR-Z400E 350 435 -19.5%
KTM 300EXC 344 519 -33.7%
Suzuki ADDRESS 342 203 68.5%
Honda CMX500 330 350 -5.7%

Adventure-Touring Motorcycle Sales

Top 10 by Category – Adventure Touring
January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Model Total
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Suzuki DR650SE 229 274 -16.4%
BMW R 1250 GS Adventure 194 0 100%
Honda Africa Twin 176 318 -44.7%
KTM 790 Adventure R 169 0 100%
BMW R 1250 GS 155 0 100%
Honda CB500XA 141 111 27.0%
Suzuki DL650 116 109 6.4%
Kawasaki KLR650 112 137 -18.2%
BMW G 310 GS 108 112 -3.6%
KTM 690 Enduro 92 88 4.5%

Cruiser Motorcycle Sales

Top 10 by Category – Cruiser
January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Model Total
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Harley Davidson FXBRS 383 384 -0.3%
Honda CMX500 330 350 -5.7%
Harley Davidson XG500 298 466 -36.1%
Kawasaki Vulcan S 268 378 -29.1%
Harley Davidson FLFBS 235 222 5.9%
Yamaha XVS650/A 231 226 2.2%
Harley Davidson FLSB 195 168 16.1%
Indian Motorcycle Scout 178 258 -31.0%
Harley Davidson FXBB 132 240 -45.0%
Harley Davidson FXFBS 95 137 -30.7%

Nakedbike Motorcycle Sales

Top 10 by Category – Naked
January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Model Total
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Honda CB125E 569 637 -10.7%
Yamaha MT07L 525 504 4.2%
Yamaha MT-09 395 384 2.9%
Honda GROM 298 355 -16.1%
Yamaha MT03LA 292 376 -22.3%
Kawasaki Z900RS 167 246 -32.1%
Yamaha XSR700LA 152 152 0.0%
KTM 390DUKE 139 156 -10.9%
Honda CB300R 114 22 418.2%
Yamaha MT10 108 131 -17.6%

Sport-Touring  Motorcycle Sales

Top 10 by Category – Sport Touring
January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Model Total
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Yamaha YZF-R3A 471 445 5.8%
Kawasaki Ninja 650L 141 161 -12.4%
Yamaha MT09TRA 99 65 52.3%
Suzuki GSX-S125 87 76 14.5%
Kawasaki VERSYS-X 300 69 73 -5.5%
Honda CBR650FL 63 181 -65.2%
Yamaha MT07TRL 57 37 54.1%
Kawasaki Ninja 1000 54 75 -28.0%
BMW S 1000 XR 53 69 -23.2%
Suzuki GSX-R125 52 41 26.8%

Touring Motorcycle Sales

Top 10 by Category – Touring
January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Model Total
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Harley Davidson FLHXS 177 122 45.1%
Harley Davidson FLHTK 101 69 46.4%
Harley Davidson FLTRXS 86 46 87.0%
Harley Davidson FLHRXS 69 70 -1.4%
Harley Davidson FLHTCUTG 65 65 0.0%
Indian Motorcycle Chieftain 53 36 47.2%
Yamaha FJR1300 50 50 0.0%
Harley Davidson FLHXSE 45 40 12.5%
BMW R 1250 RT 43 0 100%
Harley Davidson FLHX 41 60 -31.7%

Supersport Motorcycle Sales

Top 10 by Category – Super Sport
January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Model Total
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Kawasaki NINJA 400 488 443 10.2%
Honda CBR500R 222 310 -28.4%
Honda CBR650R 138 0 100%
Honda CBR1000RR 112 65 72.3%
Ducati Superbike 102 0 100%
KTM RC390 81 125 -35.2%
BMW S 1000 RR 75 108 -30.6%
Suzuki GSX-R750 69 80 -13.8%
Yamaha YZF-R1 68 73 -6.8%
Suzuki GSX-R1000 62 62 0.0%

Scooter Sales Figures

Honda’s NSC110 is smashing it in the scooter market and along with Suzuki’s Address this pairing along are taking a hefty slice of the overall scooter sales in Australia.

Vespa continues to do pretty well while Yamaha’s new XMAX 300 is starting to grow in popularity.

It is so pleasing to see that Australian consumers have now almost completely shunned the cheap and nasty no-name shite that once sold in good numbers in this space, but now thankfully have died a natural death.

Honda has now established themselves as the clear market leader in scooter sales.

2019 Scooter Sales

January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Scooter
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Honda 969 557 74.0%
Vespa 379 434 -12.7%
Piaggio 375 498 -24.7%
Suzuki 375 252 48.8%
Yamaha 261 236 10.6%
BMW 82 28 192.9%
Aprilia 44 86 -48.8%
TOTAL 2485 2091 18.8%

Scooter Sales

Top 10 by Category – Scooters
January – June 2019 compared to January – June 2018
Manufacturer Model Total
YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % CHAN
Honda NSC110 496 238 108.4%
Suzuki ADDRESS 342 203 68.5%
Vespa GTS 300 188 196 -4.1%
Honda MW110 167 89 87.6%
Piaggio Fly 150 156 184 -15.2%
Honda WW150 154 135 14.1%
Yamaha XMAX300 110 68 61.8%
Vespa PRIMAVERA 150 110 103 6.8%
Yamaha GPD150A 69 60 15.0%
Piaggio Medley 150 67 54 24.1%

Source: MCNews.com.au