Tag Archives: Bluetooth

RoadOne controls bike accessories

The RoadOne controller replaces messy multiple switches to operate electrical accessories such as chargers, heated grips and seat, dash cams and auxiliary lights.

It allows riders to switch these devices on and off with the wave of a hand and a voice command.

Funding campaign

RoadOne accessories Support_chargeur_telephonePHone charger

French company Plug&Ride has launched an Indiegogo crowd-funding campaign to bring their RoadOne central controller to market.

Prices start at $A225 for the controller and phone charger or $A127 for funding supporters.

You can also buy packs that include their dashcam, lights and various warmers, or buy them separately.

However, it appears the RoadOne will only work with their proprietary accessories, not accessories from other suppliers.

Plug&Play plan to go into production in August and deliver from October.

Be aware there are risks to crowd-funding campaigns and you may not get a full refund if the project does not go ahead.

Plug&Ride has a flexible goal of $42,450 and has collected about a quarter so far with about 50 days to go.

How it works

RoadOne is basically a Bluetooth controller centre on your handlebars that uses their phone app to recognise voice commands, so you will require a helmet intercom to operate it.

You simply plug all the devices into a centralised box under your seat that is connection to the battery.

The device won’t drain your battery if you forget to switch the devices off when you park your bike as the app has a proximity feature that switches the unit off when you walk away.

It reactivates when you return to your bike.

Plug&Play also hope to raise up to $A170,000 capital to fund extra accessories such as a handlebar remote control instead of the app, a GPS, a radio and an anti-theft device that recognises when the bike has been moved and tracks its location.

They’re also researching an emergency SMS alert that sends a location text to a specified contact in the event of a crash.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Harley-Davidson CVO Road Glide unveiled

Harley-Davidson will return the Road Glide to its 2020 CVO range with a special Harley-branded Sena 30K Bluetooth unit that pairs to the BOOM! audio system.

The 2020 CVO Road Glide will cost $A55,995 ($NZ57,495) ride away which is $1000 more than the CVO Street Glide. It was last in the CVO Lineup in 2016 as a Road Glide Ultra with top box.

Harley-Davidson Australia says the Sena 30K Bluetooth unit will be included in the price.

The mid-year model announcement comes as Harley has also unveiled a 30th anniversary Fat Boy.

Harley-Davidson Fat Boy 30th anniversary birtdhay2020 Fat Boy 30th anniversary (Photography: Capture)

The new CVO Road Glide comes as the new Indian Challenger arrives with a 1770cc (108 cubic inch) liquid-cooled Powerplus engine.

Indian’s Challenger will cost $A39,595-$A39,995, depending on colour, compared with the Harley Road Glide Special with 114-cube (1868cc) engine at $39,250.

2020 CVO Road Glide new features2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Road Glide

  • Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (read more here); 
  • Kahuna Collection heated hand grips, shifter pegs, brake pedal cover, muffler end caps, rider and pillion boards;
  • Low-profile two-piece fuel tank console with lighted CVO logo;
  • Sand Dune monotone finish with pearl topcoat and subtle graphics highlighted by Smoked Satin Chrome, Gloss Black and Black Onyx finishes;
  • Screamin’ Eagle Heavy Breather air cleaner in Gloss Black; and
  • Wheels finished in Gloss Black/Smoked Satin.

Sena Bluetooth

MY20.5 Location Photogaphy CaptureHarley-branded Sena 30K

The CVO Road Glide comes with a single Sena 30K Bluetooth helmet headset that pairs to the Boom! Box GTS infotainment system.

It features Sena’s Mesh Intercom Network that automatically connects to a “near-limitless number” of riders in “public mode” to eliminate lost connections when someone rides out of range.

The headset can also connect with up to 16 riders in private mode up to 8km.

It not only allows intercom, phone calls, navigation prompts, radio and audio, all with voice commands, but also includes Apple Carplay if the phone is plugged into the bike’s charger.

A Quick Charge feature can provide up to five hours of additional talk time with a 20-minute charge.

CVO 117`MY20.5 Location Photogaphy Capture

Like all 2020 CVOs, it is powered by Harley’s largest-displacement factory-installed engine, the Milwaukee-Eight 117 engine (1923cc) with 169Nm of torque.

Harley also now make the Screamin’ Eagle Milwaukee Eight 131 Crate Engine which can be fitted to current CVO models.

131 Screamin' Eagle c rate motor131 Screamin’ Eagle crate motor

It features the same 114mm (4.5”) stroke as the 114 Milwaukee Eight, but has been bored out from 101mm (4”) to 109mm (4.31”).

Harley claims it makes 90kW (121hp) of power and 177Nm (131ft-lb) of torque when matched to the Screamin’ Eagle Street Cannon mufflers. It also requires an ECM calibration and Screamin’ Eagle Pro Street Tuner.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

EyeRide HUD has unlimited group chat

French company EyeLights already makes head-up display units for cars and is now planning to move into motorcycles with a revolutionary EyeRide connection system for large group intercom.

Instead of using Bluetooth to connect, it uses a data connection to a Discord app server.

While EyeRide promises virtually unlimited group chats with others on the same network including non-riders, it relies on an internet connection and will use up your phone data.

Eyeride HUD screenEyelights EyeRide hud unit

Otherwise, EyeRide is like a standard Bluetooth intercom that supplies music, phone calls and GPS navigation prompts using Garmin HERE maps, but also has a small HUD screen for important information as in this video.

It is slightly transparent and on the right side, which may be fine in a country where you drive on the right.

We are not sure yet if it can be moved to the left for riding in Australia, New Zealand, the UK and other left-side countries as they haven’t released all the details yet.Eyelights EyeRide hud unit

The company plans to launch a Kickstarter shortly to get the product off the ground. (We will update with the link when it starts.)

We advise to be cautious of supporting Kickstarter programs as you may not get your money back if they don’t go ahead.

Given EyeLights already produce a car HUD system, they may be a little more secure than a normal speculative start-up.

HUD concerns

I haven’t used a HUD system yet in a helmet and can’t verify if it is a distraction or allows you to safely keep your eyes on the road.

However, I have driven several cars with HUD systems on the windscreen and found them extremely useful, safe and non-distracting.Eyelights EyeRide hud unit

Unfortunately, few of these aftermarket HUD systems or integrated HUD helmets have made it to market.

Infamously, Skully HUD helmets raised a record amount through crowd-funding then fraudulently spent it on fast cars and fast women and went bankrupt.

It was later bought and resurrected as the Skully Fenix AR, but we haven’t seen them here yet.

Skully Fenix AR head-up display helmet HUD revolutionSkully Fenix AR

Yet, almost every month new HUD systems and helmets are announced.

The latest smart helmets, unveiled at the recent Las Vegas Consumer Electronics Show, are one from Chinese cycling helmet company Livall and the Tali Connected from a French startup

Tali Connected and Livall smarter helmetsTali Connected and Livall HUD helmets

Meanwhile, the first aftermarket HUD company, NuViz, recently closed down, leaving owners stranded with no GPS function as their map licence expired, according to RideApart.

KTM invests in Nuviz-770 HUD technology smart helmetNuviz HUD unit

Like all new technology, there will be bugs and it seems HUD has had more than its fair share over the past few years.

That doesn’t mean HUD technology isn’t coming.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Sena introduces new 50 series intercom

Sena has introduced the next generation of Bluetooth helmet intercoms with the new 50 series that includes wifi capability to efficiently charge and automatically download firmware updates.

That means there is no longer any need to plug it into your computer, just plug in the wifi charger and connect to a nearby wifi source such as your phone’s hotspot.

Sena series 50 wifi connectorWifi charger

We expected a 40 series would be next after the 10 and 20 series.

However, they have skipped ahead to the 50 series which includes the 50R and slimline 50S.

Sena 50S 50 series bluetoothWhile the slimline model retains the easy-to-use “jog” dial, the 50R now comes with buttons.

Sena 50r 50 series bluetoothSena 50R

They claim charging time is 30% faster, but the 50S has a smaller battery so bluetooth talk time is limited to five hours or three hours on group chat.

There is no word from Sena Australia on pricing and when they will arrive, but we notice on their website they have added a section for the 50 series which is currently blank.

However, in the US they will cost $US329 (about $A475) for the 50S and $US299 ($A430) for the 50R which is only slightly higher than the current 30 series.

More reliable series

Critics of the current models say the Mesh 2.0 software that is supposed to provide faultless group chat is unreliable.

Sena claim the flaws have been fixed and rather than “daisy-chaining” group connections, you can now join in a group of nine with one connection.

Apart from more reliable group chat, they also claim there is experience less interference from surrounding obstacles such as blind corners, trees, buildings, etc.

The other major update is 7% more volume.

Sena don’t want to deafen riders, but they acknowledge that many riders now use filtered earplugs such as the Alpine MotoSafe which filter out harmful wind noise, but also slightly reduce the volume from intercom units.

Alpine Motosafe earplugsAlpine Motosafe earplugs

To improve rider comfort, speakers are now thinner and bevelled so they don’t hurt your ears under a tight helmet.

The 50 Series will also connect to digital assistants such as Siri or Google using standard voice commands of ‘Hey Siri’ or ‘Ok Google’. 

They claim their app has also been improved and restyled.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Domio Moto Bluetooth helmet speaker review

As much as we like the idea of wire-free vibration technology to introduce sound into a helmet, we just don’t think it works very well in the Domio Moto or Headwave Tag bluetooth units.

Both stick to the outside of your helmet and pump the sound into your helmet via vibrations. At $A264, the Domio Moto is cheaper than the Headwave Tag ($A329).

Our 2016 review of the Headwave system found it was too quiet, had poor sound quality, there was no stereo effect and the sound was drowned out by wind noise at anything over about 60-70km/h.

Headwave Tag turns your helmet into a speaker domio
Headwave tag

In June we published an article about Domio launching a Kickstarter crowd-funding campaign for their similar unit.

Not only did we express some concern about the sound quality based on our Headwave experience, but also the complaints about delivery from annoyed customers.

The Canadian company contacted us and said they had since updated the product, production had started and they were satisfying orders.

They also offered us one for review, but it has taken about five months to arrive.

Domio Moto reviewDomio Moto Bluetooth speaker

Let’s start with the positives.

The advantages are that you have no messy wires and there are no speakers uncomfortably pressing against your ears.

Sadly, the Domio Moto audio system isn’t any better than the Headwave system.

Sound quality is dull and mono only, there is little bass, and the sound is drowned out by wind noise at speeds over 60km/h on a bike without a windscreen and 80km/h on bikes with screens.Domio Moto Bluetooth speaker

I also tried them with filtered earplugs to drown out the wind noise. These are very effective with traditional Bluetooth units where the speakers are next to your ears as the filters are directional.

However, in this case, the sound is non-directional, so with the earplugs in I could hardly hear the music even at slow speeds.

Domio sits in a cradle and they provide you with two so you can swap from helmet to helmet, while the Headwave unit sticks directly to the helmet, so it will only go on one helmet.

After my Headwave review, the makers accused me of not sticking it on properly, yet I had followed all their instructions.

Again, I followed the instructions this time to the letter: I found a smooth surface on the helmet with no joins or vents; I cleaned it carefully; and I firmly stuck it on with the supplied cradle.Domio Moto Bluetooth speaker

Since it comes with two cradle fittings, I was able to trial it on two full-face helmets.

You can stick it anywhere on the helmet, they say. I tried one on the top and one on the back, but you could also put it on the side.

The poor sound results were the same for both helmets.

The legality of stick-on attachments is still up in the air. Also, there is some concern that stick-on units could cause head rotation and subsequent spinal injury in an accident. However, test results on such attachments will not be available until next year.

Click here to read more on these legal and safety issues.

The Domio at least has a lower profile than the Headwave.

Good vibrations

While both systems use vibration to send the sound into your helmet, they call them different terms.

Domio say they use “micro-vibration technology” and Headwave Tag call it “surface transduction”. It’s basically the same thing.

It’s difficult to explain, but the sound certainly surrounds your head because there is no discernible source such as from speakers next to your ears like in conventional Bluetooth helmet systems.

So it doesn’t really matter whether you put it on the back or one side.Domio Moto Bluetooth speaker

However, it does not have any spatial or stereo effect because it’s coming from one source which is transmitted throughout the helmet via vibration.

The simple controls only allow switching on/off, pause/play and volume up/down. To select, advance or replay tracks, you would need your music source or phone within reach on the handlebars.

Like the Headwave Tag, the Domio Moto doesn’t have a microphone, so it is speakers only. That limits its use to listening to music and satnav instructions.

However, Domio Moto Pro ($A338), scheduled to ship in January, includes a wireless, noise-canceling “air mic” that, like the sound unit, sticks to the outside of the helmet. It uses “beamforming” technology which is a process that focusses a WiFi signal.

Domio Moto Bluetooth speaker
Domio Moto Pro with kic

Verdict

While traditional bluetooth systems have lots of messy wires and uncomfortable speakers next to your ears, sound quality is usually pretty good.

Domio and Headwave may be tidy and comfortable, with reasonable sound, but they are almost useless once over 60-80km/h, depending on whether you have a windscreen.

Commuters may love them!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Narrate your video while you ride

Sena’s new 10C Evo helmet intercom arrives this week with a slimmer profile and an integrated 4K camera that allows you to narrate and include background music.

Tracey Pola of Sena Australia says the $589 unit will arrive this week and the entire shipment is pre-sold.

The popularity of both intercoms and cameras to record rides for entertainment and evidence in the case of accidents is increasing.

So units that combine the two should be winners, especially in such a compact unit as this Sena 10C Evo.

Be warned that police in Victoria and South Australia still believe cameras attached to helmets render the helmet non-compliant.

However, since we have not heard of any police fining a rider for having an intercom on a helmet, you may be able to fool the cops by telling them it’s just an intercom!

Sena 10C Evo

The new 10C Evo intercom will pair with four other units with range up to 1.6km (1 mile).

It includes all the usual intercom functions, as well as FM and pairing with a device up to 15m away.

Despite also including a 4K (30 frames per second ) camera, the unit is now 10% slimmer at 95mm long, 59mm tall and only 31mm wide. That’s only about 5mm wider than their 30K unit.

Narrate videoSena 10C Evo allows you to narrate over your video

However, the big attraction with this integrated unit is that you can easily narrate over the video.

You can even add background music with their Smart Audio Mix tech – all on the fly!

No need for editing all this into the video later on.

You can start recording at the touch of a button and voice prompts will keep you updated on your videoing.

There is also a video tagging function to save important events from a continuous loop of video to create highlights.

Apart from video, it will also take photos in still shot, burst, or time-lapse mode (one shot every second or every 2, 5 or 10 seconds).

A full battery charge will provide about 20 hours of talk time and 90 minutes of video recording.

The 10C EVO accepts MicroSD cards up to 128 GB.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Neckmike intercom headset for riders

Neckmike intercom is similar to those tactical headsets you’ve seen the good guys using in Hollywood blockbusters.

It’s the product of a two-person Swedish company that produces headsets for military and first responders.

But co-founder Carl Franzén says they don’t just make them for use in combat or special ops, so they sent me their civilian version suitable for active use such as motorcycling, skiing and cycling.

The Neckmike M4+ bluetooth intercom bundle includes a handlebar controller and costs $US219.99 (about $A320) from Tactical Headsets.

Neckmike from Tactical headsets
Neckmike and handlebar control come in handy zipped container

 

Advantages

Most helmet intercom microphones are useless against wind noise, even when they have those little foam “socks” over them or have active noise cancellation.

As the name suggests, Neckmike uses a neck microphone that straps around your throat with two different collar sizes.

The mic is positioned right up against the skin of your throat so it doesn’t get any wind noise at all.

People I have spoken to on the phone, even when wearing an open-face helmet, say the voice quality is superb.

They couldn’t even tell I was on a motorcycle travelling at highway speeds.

Surprisingly the nec mic isn’t uncomfortable on a trip.

Neckmike from Tactical headsets
Neck mic

Another advantage of this unit is that it uses earbuds rather than speakers.

These silicon earbuds won’t irritate your ears and are passive noise cancellers if you shove them in far enough.

There are three different sizes of earbuds included to match your ear size.

They are comfortable for all-day use sop long and your helmet has ear recesses.

They also reduce damaging wind noise which can lead to rider fatigue, tinnitus and permanent hearing loss.Neckmike Case

Pairing is quick and easy and re-pairing when you power on is foolproof every time.

They don’t advise what bluetooth level it is and I couldn’t connect to other brands of intercom.

You can also download their free Zello app that turns your smartphone into a “push to talk” (PTT) device, using the 3G and 4G network.

So you can simply add other Neckmike users to your app channel and you’re connected at the touch of a button, although it only works if you have phone signal.

Disadvantages

Neckmike from Tactical headsetsOur main concern with the Neckmike is that they take ages to fit each time you put your helmet on or take it off.

There are too many messy wires as well as a velcro strap to hold the neck mic in place. It all gets in the way of the helmet strap.

The waterproof controller has seven buttons — way too many — and they are all so small you can’t discern which is which when trying to find them with gloved fingertips.

And the volume controls are upside down with the down volume button on top and vice versa. Very strange.

However, the handlebar control does make controls easier to access and operate.

We also don’t like the fact that you have to hold the power button for up to six seconds to switch on and off.

Carl says the earbud speakers are made with hi-fi elements from a “renowned Danish company” and we found the audio quality very clear for speech.

However, it is a bit shrill and high-frequency-oriented for playing music.

Uses

Neckmike Case
Bundle comes with M4 intercom and handlebar controls

We acknowledge that some riders are critical about intercom communication and audio entertainment while riding.

However, there are other riders who love music and being able to stay in touch. It’s also a safety device on group rides.

Plus there are professionals who need to be in contact for work while riding such as couriers and moto-journos like me!

For the latter, this Neckmike is ideal as the microphone and earbuds are perfect for making and receiving calls and intercom communication.

If you are a courier or tourer who won’t be taking off your helmet frequently, this unit would be suitable.

They are also ideal for use with open-face helmets thanks to their noise-cancelling microphone and earbuds.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Aerodynamic ARK bluetooth intercom for AGV

AGV is the latest helmet manufacturer to partner with leading Bluetooth company Sena to develop a special aerodynamic ARK intercom for their helmets.

So far, the ARK intercom is only compatible with the AX9 Adventure range, K5-S Sports range and Sport Modular Touring.

The AGV ARK intercom costs $399, but you have to also buy a helmet-specific base at $29.95. However, for a limited time, riders can save money by buying the compatible helmets and SRK in “combo deals”. 

Sena’s ARK intercom is a sleeker and more aerodynamic unit than their usual intercoms.

Instead of the handy “jog dial” rotating knob common to most Sena intercoms, it has buttons.

These may not be as easy to use as the jog dial, but there is also a handlebar remote available at $149.

Sena ARK bluetooth intercom for AGV helmets
Handlebar remote

ARK features

Australian distributors Link International say the ARK unit features 30 minutes of “quick charging” which equals four hours of intercom use. 

It is compatible with the Sena SF Utility App which allows users to configure device settings and accessing quick guides and the Sena RideConnected App that allows intercom with a virtually limitless number of riders over an extensive range, so long as they are connected to a mobile network.

Other Sena features are: voice prompts for functions; FM radio; microphone noise control to reduce wind and background noise; music sharing with another intercom; multi-way conference intercom. 

It also has audio overlay which allows phone calls, GPS instructions and intercom conversations to be heard over audio from the radio, music or GPS app instructions in the background with reduced volume.Sena ARK bluetooth intercom for AGV helmets

Specifications 

  • 10 hours of talking time 
  • Three-way conference phone call with intercom participant. 
  • Microphone mute option 
  • Smart Volume 
  • Audio Boost 
  • Voice activated phone answering and intercom start. 
  • HD quality crystal clear and natural sound. 
  • Bluetooth Audio Recording 
  • SENA firmware upgradeable 
  • Water resistant 
  • Bluetooth 4.1 supporting profiles: Headset Profile, Hands-Free Profile (HFP), Advanced Audio Distribution Profile (A2DP), and Audio Video Remote Control Profile (AVRCP). 

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Noise-cancelling Mplus earphones for riders

Indian earphone company SoundPeats will next month release the Motikom Mplus earphones, the world’s first active noise-cancelling Bluetooth intercom for riders.

There is no price yet, but if you sign up now for their email newsletter, you can get 40% off their launch price.

The Mplus headphones have an awkward-looking neckband which is the controller with wires connected to the earbuds.

It seems there is also a microphone attachment with Bluetooth intercom reception up to 150m.

Noise cancelling

Passive noise cancelling earphones simply seal in your ear and dampen some background noise. Active noise cancelling uses a reverse soundwave to neutralise background noise.

We have tried wearing Bose and Sony active noise-cancelling earphones before under our helmet and they just can’t cope with the wind noise on a motorcycle at highway speeds.

Wind noise can sometimes be over 100dB even under your helmet, which can lead to hearing loss and/or tinnitus.

Sena was the first to have a helmet with noise cancelling intercom although it is not yet available in Australia. We suspect this is because of difficulties gaining Euro approval since the French ban riders and drivers from wearing earphones while riding/driving.

Digilens and Sena develop cheaper HUD helmet
Sena Momentum INC noise-cancelling helmet

There are several other noise-cancelling helmets coming to market soon from start-ups and Nolan Helmets.

Mplus claims

Mplus noise-cancelling earphones
Mplus noise-cancelling earphones

SoundPeats claim the Mplus has five-level noise cancelling that uses their trademarked “HDNC technology” to cope with highway speed wind noise.

Like the noise-cancelling helmets, they also claim the reduction of background noise helps to enhance important emergency noises such as sirens, horns and screeching tyres.

SoundPeats have promised to send us a set when they are launched next month, so we look forward to trialling them.

Rider earphones

Mplus noise-cancelling earphones
Truengine 2 wireless earbuds

Meanwhile, SoundPeats also make non-noise-canceling earbuds suitable for riders such as Truengine 2, the first dual-driver hifi wireless earbuds.

They claim their TruEngine Crossover tech delivers “incredibly detailed stereo sound with powerful bass, clear treble, and balanced separation, creating a wider sound field for a totally immersive audio experience”.

We’ll see (or hear) as they are also sending these for review.

They will be available at a prelaunch price of just $US69 (about $A100).

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

EJEAS Bluetooth helmet intercom review

If you’re sick of fiddling with the fiddly screws to mount your Bluetooth intercom, this budget EJEAS Quick20 is worth considering with its excellent audio quality.

It is Chinese made (as most Bluetooth units probably are!) and costs just $A185 each ($US129, €113,103) through their EJEAS website.

Quick clasp

EJEAS Quick20
Slimline unit

This unit is as slim as the top-of-the-line Sena 30K which is good for reducing drag and wind noise.

It features a fast-attaching bulldog-clip-type clasp attachment, so there is no need for fiddling with small allen keys and tiny screws that you can drop and lose.

EJEAS Quick20
Clasp attachment

The clasp simply grips the side of your helmet. There is also a stick-on pad and velcro attachment, if you prefer or your helmet doesn’t have access.

I thought the clip-on clasp might shake loose, but it hasn’t moved after prolonged riding in high winds and on bumpy roads.

However, the control unit doesn’t lock into the clasp firmly and while it won’t shake loose, you can bump it off when taking off your helmet, so be careful.

Bluetooth

As for the quality of the Bluetooth 4.2, it’s excellent.

It will only link up with one other EJEAS unit and won’t connect to other Bluetooth brands I have, but it does work very well between the two units.

It pairs quickly to your phone, GPS or another EJEAS intercom with handy audio prompts and always re-pairs when you turn the units on.

In fact, if you go out of range, it will revert to music or FM if you’ve been listening to them and will automatically reconnect once back in range.

They claim range up to 1200m, but it starts getting crackly about 800mm and you need line-of-sight connection.

Deploying the antenna improves reception a little as well as improving weak FM signals.

EJEAS Quick20
Use the antenna

Controls

The button arrangement is similar to the Sena units with a rotating knob and central “multi-function button” (MFB) that is easy to access even with thick winter gloves.

However, the raised motorcycle icon which is the on/off and intercom button can be difficult to find with thick gloves.

There is a separate FM button on the back and a “RST” reset button on the top that quickly turns off the unit.

Not sure why you need the RST button as you can turn the unit off and on using the motorcycle icon button by holding it for two seconds. Perhaps that’s a second you can save!

EJEAS Quick20

I also found that holding the MFB button two seconds only ever switched the unit on at the second attempt.

The rotating button handles both volume adjustment and radio station selection or skipping/replaying music tracks. To toggle between functions you have to hit the MFB again which makes it a little confusing.

Selecting FM stations is also difficult as there is no audio prompt to tell you the station you have selected.

Audio

The thick and large diameter speakers provide excellent audio quality with nice bass and plenty of volume.

But that makes them quite bulky, so they may not fit in some helmets.

They are a snug fit in my Harley-Davidson Vintage Stripe helmet which has deep ear recesses.

However, there are soft foam covers you can fit to the speakers to improve comfort against your ears.

It also comes with a choice of boom microphone for open-face helmets and bud mic for full-face.

Despite the loud wind noise in this helmet, the microphones effectively dampen background noise even at highway speeds.

Switching between music and intercom or phone calls is easy with a touch of a button.

But there is a delay of several seconds during which time you might think it’s not working and hit the button again.

After a while, you learn to have some patience and trust it will work.

Messy wires

One thing I don’t like is the messy speaker and mic wires.

Also, the plug is big and hangs low, getting caught on the collar of some of my jackets as I turn my head.

Even though this is made in China, the instructions are well written in easy-to-understand English. But the print is way too small for me to see even while wearing my reading glasses!

Conclusion

If you want high-quality audio and only need two-way intercom, the EJEAS Quick20 is well worth the money.

EJEAS Quick20 bluetooth intercomEJEAS Quick20

  • Bluetooth: 4.2
  • IP Rating: 65
  • Talk range: 1200m
  • Bluetooth Protocol: A2DP, AVRCP, HFP & HSP
  • Frequency Range: 2402MHz ~ 2480MHz
  • Battery Capacity: 530mAh
  • Standby Time: 300 hours
  • Talking Time: 8 hours
  • Charging Time: approx. 1 hour
  • Operating Voltage: 3.7V
  • Charger Requirements: DC5V/500mA
  • Working Temperature: -10~40℃

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com