Tag Archives: Bike accessories

Aussie Quad Lock launches smart charger

My Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport features an Aussie-designed Quad Lock sitting proudly atop the handlebars.

It not only securely holds my iPhone so I can use it as a satnav, but also charges as I ride with a wireless charger hooked up via a long lead to the USB outlet under my seat.

However, that charging only works when the bike is switched on and it may not be totally waterproof although it hasn’t faulted yet.

Now the clever guys at Quad Lock have introduced a $A49.95 Smart Adaptor that they claim is waterproof, which is great for those on adventure bikes who may wade through water.

The device has an Ingress Protection (IP) rating or rating of IP66.

The first number measures protection from foreign bodies such as dust with 6 being the highest, while the second from 0-9 measures resistance to water, so it’s pretty good. Click here for more details.

It also features the option to have the device charged anytime the phone is on the mount, or only when the ignition is on or an auto mode.

The latter “smart” mode keeps the device switched off until input voltage rises above 13.5V and turns off when input voltage drops below 12.5V to avoid draining your battery drain.

You can easily switch between modes using the toggle. 

It also has in-line fuse and reverse polarity protection in the rare event of a fault. It can be hooked up to a USB outlet or your 12V bike battery.

I love the convenience my Quad Lock offers, but I recommend you also fit their vibration dampener as motorcycle vibrations can cause the camera in some iPhones to stop focusing and it’s not covered by your phone warranty.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Quad Lock just got better-er!

Aussie-designed Quad Lock to securely hold your hone on your motorcycle has just got even better-er!

It now comes in a Pro model which is made of hardier black anodised CNC machined aluminium.

This should make it even more durable than the already tough glass-filled nylon unit I have been using for several years now.

The Pro handlebar or fork-stem models are not only tougher, but also more handsome with the blue quick-release tab replaced by a black tab.

Quad Lock fork stem m mount

Even the stainless steel mounting screw is now a matching black colour.

We spend a fortune on CNC-machined levers, mirrors and other bike hardware, so why not our phone mounts?

Both mounts feature discreet cable routing for USB charger cables and increased spacer sizes for a wider range of handlebars and fork stem tubes.

You can also fit the vibration dampener which I recommend as motorcycle vibrations can cause the camera in some iPhones to stop focusing and it’s not covered by your phone warranty.

You can also add the wireless charger.

These “Pro” items are more expensive, as you would expect. 

The original handlebar mount was $59.95, but the Pro model is $89.95, while the fork stem mount was $74.95 and Pro is now $99.95.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Barkbusters release new guards

Harley-Davidson’s first adventure bike, the Pan America 1250 Special, is among the growing range of model-specific hand guard kits available from Australian hand guard specialist, Barkbusters.

That’s great, because the standard handguards are fairly flimsy.

It will arrive in Australia at the end of March.

Harley-Davidson Pan America Special
Harley-Davidson Pan America Special

Meanwhile, the new range released now includes guards for the new Ducati Mulistrada V4, V4S and V4S Sport ($A139.95), the new Honda CRF300L ($134.95) and the latest version of the ever-faithful Kawasaki KLR650 ($139.95).

Kawasaki KLR650 Barkbusters

They come with a choice of four tough plastic wind deflectors: sleek Jet, more wind protective VPS, Storm for maximum wind and rain protection and Carbon, made with carbon fibre, of course.

I’ve used Barkbuster guards before and they are simply the toughest around to protect your hands from injury and levers from breakage in crashes or even bumping into trees, etc.

They are made for our harsh conditions with heat-treated light aluminium, with two mounting points and bar-end weights.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Touratech launches new adventure suspension

The biggest improvement you can make to just about any motorcycle is to update the original suspension.

Most motorcycles are built with bargain suspension as standard. 

Even “exotic” or “luxury” brands tend to come with compromised suspension components and only special models have high-grade forks and shocks.

While many riders tend to replace mufflers and engine management systems to get greater power, the biggest improvement they can make to a bike’s performance is via the suspension.

We all know that better suspension will improve the bikes handling, but what does that actually mean?

Good handling isn’t necessarily stiffer suspension. 

It can result in “plusher” suspension that makes the bike corner better, steer more precisely and ride smoother over bumps.

It means the forks and shocks will respond faster to bumps keeping the wheels in contact with the ground which translates as better acceleration and braking.

This is no more important than on adventure bikes that travel on much more demanding terrain.

Even if you like the standard suspension on your adventure bike — and some of it is quite good — adventure riding on rough roads can take a heavy toll on suspension which could need updating in just a couple of years. 

In 2014, German adventure accessories company Touratech started producing a range of high-end suspension tailored specifically for adventure riders.

Touratech Suspension already has the Travel range for adventure bikes and dual bikes and Black-T series for custom bikes, scramblers and new heritage bikes. 

Now they have introduced a new E1 series of adventure suspension so their brand now covers more than 400 motorcycle models.

Touratech E1 suspension
Touratech E1 suspension

Touratech Suspension’s E1 adventure series includes mono shocks, twin shocks and replacement spring sets for the fork and the original shock absorber. 

The step-less progressively wound springs are claimed to combine sensitive response with high puncture resistance.

And there are replacement spring sets for some models to lower the bike for shorter riders.

The base parts are milled from the solid and a “generously dimensioned” damper rod made of 16mm thick chrome-molybdenum steel. 

The big damper tube ensures optimum heat dissipation so the temperature balance of the damper remains stable, even under heavy use.

Rebound damping of the shock absorbers can be adjusted over 50 clicks and the springs have a progressive rate that offers a plush ride on harsh bumps without bottoming out.

The preload of the spring can be adjusted manually.

The E1 series spring elements are manufactured in Europe and come with a two-year warranty. 

But don’t expect them to come cheap. A rear shock alone can cost up to $A2000.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Dashcam made for motorcycles

GPS company Navman have turned their attention to dash cams with a robust waterproof unit built especially for motorcycles.

Since about half of all riders having recently experienced a near-miss, it’s a good idea to have video proof of the perpetrator.

It could be a driver who opened a car open on you or a driver who didn’t check their blind spot for motorcycles.

Now Navman have a dash cam that you can fit to the front and back of your bike to record these incidents and provide proof of who was at fault.

The Navman MiVue™ M760D dash cam features two cameras with a 130 wide-angle glass lenses. 

Recording in Full HD 1080P at 30FPS and with the Premium STARVIS™ Low Light Sensor, it promises crisp images in all lighting conditions so you can see things such as number plates and faces.  

The 3-Axis G-Sensor and GPS Tagging stamps your footage with an exact location, time and speed at the time of an incident.

There is also a button on the GPS multifunction control box installed on the handlebar to activate emergency recording to prevent files from being overwritten. 

IdeasMotor App

With EZYSHARE Instantly via WIFI you can view footage in real-time and share it via the MiVue™ Pro mobile app. 

The MiVue™ M760D is IP67 waterproof, has a metal casing and full glass lens.

It costs $599 and may require professional fitting by an auto-electrician as it’s wired in.

However, you can get 20% off and free shipping if you buy using the code M760D20 on the Navman Australia website. Offer ends 31 October 2021.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

iPhone 13 accessories coming soon

No sooner has Apple announced its new iPhone 13 with an improved camera than accessories companies such as Quad Lock and Mujjo have announced accessories that will interest riders.

Quad Lock says you can order cases now for their handlebar-mounted units while touchscreen glove specialists Mujjo have also developed leather cases.

iPhone 13 will be available in four versions, all of which feature a new camera, a “powerhouse chip,” 5G connectivity and better battery life.

There are several features of the new iPhone 13 that riders should welcome.

Even the two base models come with exclusive-to-iPhone Ceramic Shield protective coating, so they should be better protected from damage when they fall off your handlebar mount or out of your jacket pocket. 

And you won’t need the waterproof covering if you mount them on your handlebars with a Quad Lock, RAM or other mounting device as they are IP68 waterproof.

That means they can be submerged under 1.5 m of water for half an hour, so they should withstand a heavy downpour while riding.

They also have a much brighter Super Retina XDR display with high contrast and a 28% increase in maximum outdoor brightness so you can easily see your navigation directions while riding.

Australian-designed Quad Lock iPhone 13 cases will cost $A34.95 and begin shipping later this month.

Quad Lock iPhone 13 cases

You can also get a waterproof poncho for $A29.95, and a tempered glass screen protector, but as we have pointed out, you may not need either since the new phone is better protected.

The case mounts directly to their clever and secure Quadlock system which you can now get with an attachment to power the phone via a cable or with a wireless charger.

Mujjo iPhone 13 leather cases

Meanwhile, touchscreen glove specialists Mujjo have also developed leather cases for the iPhone 13 so you don’t have to remove your gloves to access the screen.

Of all the touchscreen gloves we have used, these are the best, although they are not armoured for rider protection, but they do plan to introduce motorcycle-specific gloves soon.

Mujjo say their craftsman-made leather cases come with added protection on the bottom and a raised bezel around the rear camera to protect the protruding lenses against scratches from abrasive surfaces.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Aussie Quad Lock speeds up new products

Smart phones have been making navigation easier and safer for riders and keeping them in contact and entertained with the help of handlebar mounts such as the Aussie Quad Lock.

Now the Sydney-based company is keeping pace with the rapid development of smartphones by 3D printing their cases and mounting systems.

This means they will quickly release suitable products for the new era of foldable phones unfolds (lame pun intended).

It’s good news for tech-savvy early-adopter riders (read BMW owners).

Quad Lock has joined forces with Singapore 3D printing company Ultimaker to speed up the development of new mounts such as their award-winning Quad Lock Vibration Dampener.

Quad lock
Quad Lock with vibration dampener

This device is important to protect your phone as the vibration can affect its camera’s ability to autofocus.

Imaginables, partner of Ultimaker in Australia, served as a support partner to Quad Lock delivering various types of Ultimaker 3D printers.

Together they Lock developed a flexible research, design and development process that gathered lab and field test feedback almost as quickly as they could design and print the new part. 

Various types of Ultimaker printers were used to print prototypes strong enough to withstand hours of testing on a vibration test rig, from which the team gathered valuable feedback and data. 

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

CFMOTO unveils MT800 accessories

CFMOTO Australia is gearing up for the launch of their first non-learner adventure motorcycle models, the 800MT Sport and 800MT Touring, late this year.

Last month they announced pricing and now they have unveiled a wide range of accessories.

The 800MT Sport in Starlight Black will cost just $12,990 ride away and the up-spec Ocean Blue 800MT Touring is only $1000 more.

They will come with a three-year, unlimited kilometres warranty under CFMOTO current ‘2 plus 1’ deal.

Now the importers have announced a wide-ranging line-up of genuine accessories for the Aussie-bound duo.

In addition to a huge catalogue of standard-fitment features, 21 items will also be available across the full accessories’ gamut: luggage, protection and ergonomic alternatives such as a higher seat, handlebar riser mounts and oversized rally pegs.

The accessories range is as follows:

LUGGAGECFMoto 800mt

Aluminium top case (36 litres): $699

•    High-strength reinforced corners  for the shock and stress of off-road riding

•    Perfect match with the original mounting bracket

•    Waterproof, dustproof scratchproof inside lining

Aluminium side case (RHS 28 litres, LHS 35 litres): $699 eachCFMoto 800mt

•    High-strength reinforced corners  for the shock and stress of off-road riding

•    Perfect match with the original mounting bracket

•    Waterproof, dustproof scratchproof inside lining

Rear tail bag (40 litres): $399

CFMoto 800mt

•    Constructed from waterproof and wear-resistant nylon fabric

•    Wide range of internal pockets and strapping

•    Top access port (waterproof zipper), internal nylon waterproof bag

•    Double-end roll mouth, items accessible from both sides

•    Converts to a backpack when not fitted to bike.CFMoto 800mt

Side bag assembly: RHS $599, LHS $499

•    Isolation plate which protects the bag and its contents from exhaust heat

•    Made of wear-resistant waterproof 1000D fabric, with a waterproof zipper to achieve an all-inclusive waterproof and dustproof seal

•    Can be used as a backpack or tail bag

•    10kg maximum load

The 800MT Sport and 800MT Touring will go on sale with factory-fitted pannier mounts.

PROTECTIONCFMoto 800mt

•    Headlight guard (silver or black): $179

•    Radiator protector (silver or black): $169

•    Lower crash bars (silver): $299

•    Spotlight guards : $99

•    Front brake caliper guards: $59

•    Front brake fluid reservoir guard: $59

•    Rear brake fluid reservoir guard: $59

•    Dashboard protective film: $12

ERGONOMICSCFMoto 800mt

•    High seat (up 30mm to 855mm): $199

•   Oversized rally pegs: $119 each

•    Handlebar riser mounts: $89CFMoto 800mt

MISCELLANEOUS

•    Oversized side stand seat (800MT Sport only): $59

•    Front fender extension: $39

•    Device extension bar: $99

MORE 800MT ACCESSORIES INFORMATION 

The 800MT Sport and 800MT Touring are powered by KTM’s 799cc parallel twin, which produces 70kW (95hp) at 8000rpm and 88Nm at 6600rpm.

The 800MTs also have a slipper clutch, Bosch electronic fuel injection and a ride-by-wire throttle with three riding modes: rain, off-road and road.

The 800MT Sport and 800MT Touring share the same 19-litre fuel capacity, expansive rider and pillion seats, tubular steel frame, fully adjustable KYB suspension, crash bars, 825mm seat height, adjustable screen and Spanish J.Juan brakes with ABS.

The major point of differentiation between the two is in the rolling stock: cast wheels on the Sport as opposed to spoked tubeless wheels on the Touring. Wheel sizes are 19-inch front and 17-inch rear – an ideal compromise for road and off-road riding.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Two custom kits for Ducati Monster

Ducati Australia has announced pricing for two customisation kits that make personalising a Monster even easier.

The Monster has always been a customisation favourite for owners using either factory accessories or aftermarket accessories from various manufacturers plus custom paint jobs.

Now Ducati has made it easier to personalise the naked bike using their extensive catalogue of factory accessories with an online configurator. 

It allows you to preview what your bike will look like before you commit to buying the accessories.

Many motorcycle manufactures now use these convenient online configurators; a feature you can’t get that from aftermarket accessories providers.

Ducati’s Monster configurator goes even further, including Ducati-approved accessories from premium Italian company Rizoma.

Ducati Monster
Rizoma accessories

Their billet aluminium accessories include handlebar balancing weights, footpegs, brake fluid and clutch fluid reservoirs.

The configurator will also let you see what the two new accessories kits and two decal sets will look like.

The Pixel kit costs $A1132.56 and consists of a tank cover, seat side panels, seat cover, headlight fairing and front mudguard.

worker holding up examples of patented solid-state batteries
Ducati Monster
Pixel kit

As the name suggests, the $A762.30 GP kit gives it a more race or Ducati Corse look with a special tank cover and seat side panels.

Ducati Monster
GP kit

Both kits are available for all three colours of the Monster and Monster Plus: Ducati Red, Dark Stealth and Aviator Grey. 

These are complemented by two sticker kits, Corse and Logo, also available for all colours of the bike.

The new Monster and Ducati Performance accessories can now be ordered from all Ducati dealerships.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Is your handlebar mount damaging your phone?

I recently found photos taken on my iPhone 11 were blurry because the autofocus wouldn’t lock on.

The phone was under warranty so I rang to have the camera fixed and was immediately asked whether I rode a bicycle or motorcycle.

When I said yes, they asked if I had a handlebar mount.

So obviously they are aware of an issue where having your phone or camera mounted to your handelbar can cause vibration issues that can damage the delicate workings of your device.

I’d be careful what you admit to as it could void your warranty.

Several handlebar mounting devices for cameras, GPS, phones, etc now come with vibration isolation attachments.

One of the most popular is the Aussie invention, Quad Lock, which offers a vibration mount for just $A24.95.Quad lock

It’s a small price to pay for the insurance of protecting your expensive device.

I have been mounting my phone to the handlebars using a Quad Lock with a wireless charger for several years without any issues … until now.

Having your phone charged while you are out on a ride is not only a convenience, but also a safety device.

If you get lost, crash or fall ill, having a fully charged phone means you can ring emergency and they can track you.

The Quad Lock is available for motorcycles, scooters, cars, bicycles and runners.

You can buy the mount (RAM, handlebar or mirror), the case to suit your iOS or Android phone, a waterproof covering if required, plus accessories such as the charging units and isolation mounts separately or as a pack to save money.

To mount your phone, hold it at a 45-degree angle until it slots into place, then twist it clockwise to a vertical or horizontal position where it remains securely in place.

To remove the phone, simply push the blue tab (or ring on the wireless charger mount) and rotate anti-clockwise.

That makes it useful if you are riding along and see something worthy of a photo – no fumbling in your jacket for your phone, just grab it and take the shot, then re-attach it. (Obviously, stop first!)

Although it is very secure, it does vibrate which makes it impossible to use the camera or video function on the move.

And as we’ve now found, that vibration can cause damage, especially if you ride on rough roads or off-road.

Quad Lock even lists a variety of motorcycles – mainly twin cylinder models – that can cause vibration issues.

Be aware that it may be illegal in your jurisdiction to even touch the phone while riding, although the laws are a bit vague, says the Australian Motorcycle Council.

If you want to access any of the touchscreen facilities, you would need to have special gloves with touch-sensitive finger pads.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com