Tag Archives: road safety

Norway removes wire rope barriers

Norway is removing wire rope barriers from a six-kilometre stretch of road near the capital of Oslo in a win for motorcyclist safety.
Riders have long regarded the roadside barriers as a danger.
The auditor’s report found there was no evidence to support the claimed safety benefits for motorcyclists and scooter riders.
It also found Victoria’s WRB rollout was almost $100m over budget, over time and under-maintained.
Australian rider groups have long called for the rollout of wire rope barriers to be halted.
In the wake of the Norwegian move, Motorcycle Riders Association of Australia spokesman Damien Codognotto has written to Victorian MPs calling for the barriers to be removed.
He says wire rope barriers are a deadly threat to bicycle, scooter and motorcycle riders.
“They say there’s no evidence to suggest wire rope barriers are more hazardous than other roadside, or centre-of-road treatments, which is why they are used all over the world, he says.
“Victorians road users know wire rope barriers are very dangerous. Victorians who ride overseas know that no country uses as much wire rope barrier as Victoria. Some countries have banned it. Some are pulling it out. Some are not replacing it.”
He disputes claims that wire rope barrier saves lives in the majority of car crash incidents.
The MRAA has called for a search of video and photo sources including Youtube, dashcam.com and media libraries for images of crashes involving wire rope barriers to see how many perform as promoted by Road Safety Victoria, formerly VicRoads.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Researcher explains roadworks speeds

Motorcyclist and road safety researcher Ross Blackman (pictured) has waded into our debate last week about whether roadworks speed limits are appropriate

Ross works with the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety – Queensland (CARRS-Q) at the Queensland University of Technology in the areas of both motorcycle safety and safety at roadworks.

Here is his take on roadworks speed limits:

Readers’ comments on the article offer a range of perspectives, some of which seem highly speculative. The article also makes a couple of potentially misleading points.

One of these is that roadwork speed limits in the US are only advisory. Although ‘work zone’ traffic management does vary across the many US jurisdictions, the country has produced comprehensive research and guidelines on work zone speed enforcement (see NCHRP Report 746) and has both regulatory and advisory limits. Highways in the US typically have many more lanes than Australian roads and the additional road space often allows more moderate speed limit reductions than required in Australia where roads are narrower. The US approach doesn’t achieve safe outcomes, with a current yearly average of around 600 fatal work zone traffic crashes according to NHTSA data.    

In the UK, the trialling and subsequent approval of 55 – 60mph (~100km/h) highway roadwork speed limits applies, according to Highways England, to situations ‘where they could be safely implemented’. These situations include specific scenarios and conditions, including implementing the higher limits for non-workdays and when no workers are present. They are not default limits for highway roadworks. While higher speed limits can be expected to produce greater compliance, this does not necessarily lead to greater safety. As noted in the TRL report on this issue, selection of roadwork speed limits ‘should be made on a case-by-case basis’. Calls for uniformity in roadwork speed limits are understandable. However, uniform limits would logically be set low to address the highest potential risk scenarios. This conflicts with other calls for flexibility, where different speed limits may be applied as appropriate to specific conditions.\

Australia

Resurfacing Roadworks midweek warriors regional

In Australia, highway roadwork speed limits are typically progressive, with initial warning signs (e.g. Roadwork Ahead/Reduce Speed) placed at least several hundred metres upstream of (before) a work area, followed by speed limit reductions down to 60km/h, and in some situations 40km/h. A 40km/h speed limit will only normally apply on high speed roads where there are no barriers in place and when workers may be operating close to the live traffic lane. Otherwise, the typical reduced speed limit on highways will be 60km/h. There would be very few, if any, situations where an immediate 100 to 40km/h speed reduction is applied without prior warning at roadworks. However, poor compliance with reduced speed limits on approach to work areas indicates that many motorists either fail to see or do not respond adequately to warnings and speed reduction requests. As noted in a 2017 Austroads Report, this is a source of downstream traffic conflicts and a major factor in rear-end crashes which are the most common roadwork crash types. Tailgaiting doesn’t help.   

The issue of roadwork speed limits at unattended and apparently inactive sites (and associated complacency among motorists) is one that has attracted considerable research attention and of which road authorities are acutely aware. From a safety perspective, there are several important issues here. One is that the task of installing and removing signage is in itself a high risk activity for traffic controllers – this is a situation where workers are known to have been killed or injured, such that in many cases it may be considered safer overall to leave signage in place. Reduced speed limits may also be left in place at inactive sites where conditions may be hazardous. The most obvious for motorcyclists may be loose or rough surfaces, but there are other potential hazards such as altered delineation, lane width and lack of line markings, for example. Speed reductions may also be left in place for some time after the completion of work to allow loose aggregate to be embedded in newly laid asphalt by passing traffic. While a roadwork site may not present any apparent hazards for some road users, numerous serious and fatal crashes do occur at inactive sites.

We all want better roads, for our safety as well as our enjoyment. Improvement and maintenance of this infrastructure unfortunately involves some disruption and inconvenience, for motorcyclists as well as other road users. I wonder if some of the people complaining about road conditions are also among those who complain about roadworks. Current arrangements and traffic control measures are far from perfect, but work is ongoing in Australia and elsewhere to improve the safety, efficiency, and management of roadwork operations. Driving or riding through roadworks sometimes causes delays, which can usually be anticipated and managed with a little preparation. Working on roads is a high-risk occupation and those involved have a right to return home safely at the end of the day, just as all road users do, including motorcyclists. 

     

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Nexx adds stealth carbon helmet

Portuguese helmet manufacturer Nexx has added a matte black stealth version to its X.R2 carbon range called the Dark Vision.

But is it just adding to our dangerous “invisibility” on the road?’

Sorry Mate I Didn’t See You (SMIDSY) crashes are among the most common involving motorcycles.

I have written many articles about the numerous studies into the SMIDSY phenomenon.

The causes are just as numerous and include:

However, safety is a shared responsibility, so riders have to accept some of the blame in SMIDSY crashes and should do their best to avoid them by being seen and heard.

This can mean moving around on the road to attract attention, slowing down, beeping the horn to alert drivers and some suggest a loud muffler can help.

While I don’t advocate mandatory bright riding gear, a rider on a matte black bike with a matching helmet and jacket must admit they are a stealth machine that is camouflaged to match the tarmac.

Many riders choose black because it doesn’t show the road grime as much as lighter colours.

And no motorcycle accessories manufacturer ever went broke making loads of black gear.

However, we really can’t lay 100% blame on a driver for not seeing us if we dress that way.

Stealth helmet

Nexx X.R2 Carbon stealth helmet
Dark vision

Getting back to the Nexx stealth helmet, like the X.R2 Carbon and Carbon Zero, the Dark Vision Carbon has a lightweight carbon fibre shell in two sizes — XS-L and XL-XXXL.

The only difference is that it is matte black with a tiny yellow stripe on the chin.

It includes their Air Dynamic System with five intakes on the front and four exhaust vents on the back, so it should be cool in summer.

Inside is a three-layer EPS to absorb impact absorption and a removable and washable CoolMax 3D lining.

It also has Ergo Padding System which means you can select different sized padding for a perfect fit.

Other features are a double D-ring fastener, chin spoiler and anti-scratch polycarbonate Lexan visor with central lock system that has a FastShot system for quick removal.

NEXX helmets usually rate three out of five stars in the highly acknowledged SHARP helmet safety ratings.

The entire production process of NEXX helmets is done in Portugal and not outsourced to other countries as many other helmet manufacturers do.

They boast a team of more than 160 workers skilled in helmet shell sculpture, leather manipulation, stitching, paintwork and engineering. Every helmet has to pass more than 50 control steps.

There is no word yet on prices in Australia, but they are available overseas for $US599.95 (about $A830).

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Riders risk being torn to shreds on trial surface

Riders could be torn to shreds by a rough “tyre-shredding” road surface designed to stop “hoons” doing burnouts and drifting, according to an ex-bike cop and now riding instructor.

George Foessel joined Queensland Police in 1983 and became a bike cop and a driver/rider trainer as well as a qualified crash investigator.

“My concern is how the surface will impact on the two-wheeled community in the event of a fall,” says Greg who now trains riders at Motor School.

Greg Foessel is now a rider instructor

Shreds tyres

Brisbane City Council has trialled the special abrasive road surface at known hoon burnout locations in Chuwar and Willawong and will soon release their findings.

The road surface consists of bitumen spray sealed with a highly modified rubberised binder and sharp, angular aggregate stones.

It is designed to have high friction to prevent spinning tyres. If a driver or rider does manage a burnout, the rough aggregate shreds tyres quickly.

Road surface trial shreds tyres and riders
These gloves would be shredded if they hit the road at speed

“I totally understand the need to curtail the activities of a few reckless people and the initiative definitely has merit,” Greg says.

“However, I feel that if the surface shreds tyres then it may also shred motorcycle protective clothing and any exposed skin.  This in itself could impose more severe injures who come into contact with this surface.

“I feel that the surface may need to be re-evaluated whilst in the trial phase to ensure there is not an increased risk to cyclists and motorcyclist who may inadvertently come to grief in these areas.”

Despite his concerns and the fact that BCC has yet to release its findings, the Queensland Liberal-National Party (LNP) already plans to roll out the “tyre-shredding surface” at more burnout spots.

The say the road treatment causes increased tyre wear.

Road surface trial shreds tyres and riders
Close-up of rough surface

“If you are driving normally or are on a push bike or motorcycle you are able to ride over the road surface with no issues,” they say.

Bicycle Queensland CEO Rebecca Randazzo says they were not consulted about the trials but are interested in the results.

Council trials

A Brisbane City Council spokesperson says that during their first 12-month trial on Allawah Road, Chuwar, the number of hooning complaints dropped.

Road surface trial shreds tyres and riders
Burnout marks just outside the trial area

I inspected the Chuwar trial and noticed burnout marks just outside the trial area, so it hasn’t totally stopped “hoon” activity in the area.

“Following its success, Council applied a road treatment to a second trial site at Gardens Drive, Willawong in November 2019,” the BCC spokesperson says.

“We have been working with the Queensland Police Service, analysing crash data, undertaking pavement testing, evaluating survey data and analysing community feedback to evaluate the effectiveness of the trial surface.”

“We expect to release the information next month.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Are roadworks speeds set too low?

While roadworks speeds in some jurisdictions can be as low 40km/h (25mph), the UK may be heading toward a standard 60mph (about 100km/h) on highway roadworks.

Speed limits through roadworks are reduced for the safety of road workers.

However, some riders question the low speeds when work is not happening and when workers are behind steal barricades or even up a side road.

Riders also claim their lives can be jeopardised by the sudden and dramatic drop in speed, especially when they are being tailgated by a large truck!

The problem stems from roadworks speeds being positioned too far ahead of the actual work and limits sometimes set too low, according to the RACQ.

Roadworks speeds

In most states of Australia, the roadworks speed limit is an enforceable 40km/h. Highway speed limits can vary right down to 40km/h, depending on the type of works.

In New Zealand, the lowest roadworks speed is 30km/h. In the USA roadworks speed limits are only advisory.

In the UK, highway roadworks speed limits are much higher from 40-60mph (64-100km/h).

To move toward a standardised speed limit for roadworks on UK highways, Highways England began a trial of 55 and 60mph speed limits in some roadworks.

They found “safety wasn’t compromised and customers preferred driving at 60mph”.

They have now asked roadworks companies to reconsider their speed limits.millions roadworks rain

Uniform speeds

Australian riders are also calling for more sensible and uniform roadworks speeds.

Russell Saunders of the Queensland-based Motorcycle Advocacy Group  says “inappropriate speed limits” are a concern.

“Forty kilometres an hour on multilane roads is not sensible and the maintaining of those speeds when no work is being undertaken is just plain stupid,” he says.

“Those limits should be lifted when no road workers are in attendance, such as on weekends.

“I have ridden in many other countries and have formed the opinion that we are the worst for excessive over compensation towards ‘safety’.”

The Motorcycle Riders Association of Victoria also claims speed limits are often set with “blanket rules based on opinion rather than science”.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Rider donates bike to safety advocate

A motorcycle safety advocate who crashed his motorcycle has been gifted a Honda VFR800 as a replacement after launching a GoFundMe page to try to raise funds for a bike so he can continue his advocacy work and support his sick wife.

John Nelson, 63, says he crashed his Honda NT700V Deauville in country Victoria in June 2019 while taking a friend to pick up his new motorcycle.

John Nelson safety advocate
John’s written-off Honda

Due to his injuries and other health issues, he can no longer work.

He also could not afford comprehensive insurance and now cannot afford a replacement bike which he needs as his only form of transport.

“I need a bike to continue my advocacy work and to support my wife who is becoming very ill from complications with Type 2 Diabetes,” John says.

“My need for another bike is so that I will be able to do my thing.”

The 32-year volunteer for motorcycle safety advocacy had hoped to replace his written-off Honda by kickstarting a funding campaign.

We published an article about his plea on Monday and shortly after John (surname withheld by request) of Melbourne offered his 2014 Honda VVFR800 for free.

“I saw the article on Motorbike Writer (I check it out every day or two) and thought I’d get in touch,” he says.

“I am an Irishman that has ridden bikes for more than 40 years and Australia has been good to me.

“I wanted to give something back to my Australian mates and it looks like he has given a lotto the motorcycle community.

I have two bikes now, a Kawasaki Ninja 1000SX and my trusty VFR800.

Honda VFR800
2014 Honda VFR800

“The VFR has been well cared for over 22,000km and has rego til next February. It has new front discs/pads and Angel GT tyres that have done 3-4000km. It will need chain/sprockets soon, but that’s it. I don’t want a cent.

“I discussed this with my wife and it’s all good.

“Us bikers have got to look after each other.”

John Nelson says he was astounded at how quickly he got a response.

He plans to pick up the bike from John on Saturday.

Rider safety advocate

The former bus driver and truckie has worked with and made representations to a number of organisations, panels and committees, including:

  • Victorian Parliamentary Inquiry into motorcycle safety;
  • Victoria Police;
  • VicRoads;
  • Transport Accident Commission;
  • Federal Office of Road Safety; and
  • Australian Transport Safety Board.
    John Nelson safety advocate
    John (right) with Melbourne safety experts

“I was very active in the 1990s and the 2010s, but have stepped up in the past five years,” he says.

“My resources and funding are non existent. I don’t have a computer, just an old iPhone.

“I have made a significant contribution for motorcyclists’ safety and I want to continue my work.

“I have a few significant achievements in this game, breaking down some barriers in recognition of the Elizabeth St bike precinct in Melbourne and lobbying for and achieving registration and licensing of motorcycles (mostly Harleys) for joy rides for the public.”

John is also a qualified Tour Guide and motorcycle tourism consultant to regional shires.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Safety advocate seeks motorcycle funds

A motorcycle safety advocate who crashed his motorcycle has launched a GoFundMe page to replace it so he can continue his advocacy work and support his sick wife.

John Nelson, 63, says he crashed his Honda NT700V Deauville in country Victoria in June 2019 while taking a friend to pick up his new motorcycle.

John Nelson safety advocate
John’s written-off Honda

Due to his injuries and other health issues, he can no longer work.

He also could not afford comprehensive insurance and now cannot afford a replacement bike which he needs as his only form of transport.

“I need a bike to continue my advocacy work and to support my wife who is becoming very ill from complications with Type 2 Diabetes,” John says.

“My need for another bike is so that I will be able to do my thing.

“I don’t think that 32 years as a volunteer is going to upset anyone if I ask for help to continue with my passion for motorcycling and safety.”

He hopes to replace his written-off Honda with another NT700V Deauville and has kicked off his GoFundMe campaign to raise $7000. So far he has $100 from two donors.

John Nelson safety advocate
John’s Deauville before the cxrash

Rider safety advocate

The former bus driver and truckie has worked with and made representations to a number of organisations, panels and committees, including:

  • Victorian Parliamentary Inquiry into motorcycle safety;
  • Victoria Police;
  • VicRoads;
  • Transport Accident Commission;
  • Federal Office of Road Safety; and
  • Australian Transport Safety Board.
    John Nelson safety advocate
    John with Melbourne safety experts

“I was very active in the 1990s and the 2010s, but have stepped up in the past five years,” he says.

“My resources and funding are non existent. I don’t have a computer, just an old iPhone.

“I have made a significant contribution for motorcyclists’ safety and I want to continue my work.

“I have a few significant achievements in this game, breaking down some barriers in recognition of the Elizabeth St bike precinct in Melbourne and lobbying for and achieving registration and licensing of motorcycles (mostly Harleys) for joy rides for the public.”

John is also a qualified Tour Guide and motorcycle tourism consultant to regional shires.

Click here to help John get a replacement bike.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP testing women’s riding gear

As Australia’s internationally awarded MotoCAP safety and thermal comfort testing and ratings system for motorcycle clothing has surpassed 200 tested items, there seems to be a paucity of women’s gear.

The safety intitiative, launched in September 2018, is the first of its type in the world and has now rated 202 items of clothing, including 105 jackets, 50 pairs of pants and 47 pairs of gloves.

However, in women’s gear only eight leather jackets, eight textile jackets, seven textile pants and three gloves have been tested.

The lack of women’s gear is a common criticism we receive here about the MotoCAP testing.

However, it should be pointed out that the testing is actually quite representative of the proportion of female riders in the community which is estimated to be about 10-12%.

In fact, the women’s gear tested represents 12.9% which does not account for the fact that gloves are often sold as unisex, rather than for men or women exclusively.women's gear female riders testing

Testing methodology

Dr Chris Hurren*, a research scientist at Deakin University in Geelong where he and his laboratory work on protective motorcycle clothing, explains the MotoCAP methodology for selecting gear for testing.

“We have all of the instore women’s gear in the purchasing database alongside the instore men’s gear,” he says.

“The algorithm determines what will be purchased and it does not discriminate between men’s and women’s apparel.

“Appropriate proportions of both are being purchased.

“We have tested women’s gear in each of the categories of MotoCAP.

“If you compare the percentages tested with what is hanging in store the ratio of men’s to women’s is quite similar.”

In the past 24 months, all garments reported on the MotoCAP website have been purchased covertly by MotoCAP purchasing staff.

None has been supplied by distributors or manufacturers.

* Dr Hurren worked with Dr Liz de Rome and others to produce the protocol that is used by MotoCAP for their testing regime. He has also written a series of four articles for Motorbike Writer on the new European clothing standard which you can start reading by clicking here.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Wire rope barriers discriminate against riders

Apart from being considered dangerous by motorcycle riders, wire rope barriers are also unfair and discriminate against motorcycle and scooters riders, says an Australian university road safety professor.

The professor who wishes to remain anonymous points out that WRBs are officially acknowledged as posing more danger to riders and therefore discriminate against them.

Many riders refer to WRBs as “people slicers” and “cheese graters”.

The professor says WRBs also do not address the “Towards Zero” policy because it excludes one road user group, albeit a minority.

He says road safety initiatives should be addressed to all road users, not the majority.

His comments have been endorsed by Victorian Motorcycle Council chair Peter Baulch whose state is one of the most prolific in its use of WRBs.

WRBs discriminate

The professor gave two excellent analogies of how WRBs discriminate against riders:

  1. Accessibility: If you build a building it should be accessible to all user groups. Now, if we use the road groups’ arguments, stairs are a healthy option for the majority of the building user group so there is no need to install elevators. Could you imagine the trouble they would get into in today’s society if they were to follow this approach? But this is the approach they take with crash barrier installation.
  2. Occupational health and safety: If you have a piece of equipment then you need to make sure it is safe for all to use. This requires the installation of guarding to protect the user. Imagine a work safety assessment of a piece of equipment where a person had lost their hand! The owner of the equipment says to the government work safety assessor: “It is okay, we are not liable because we installed guarding that protected 96% of the users. This user fell outside the scope that we allowed for but their injuries are okay because the machine was guarded for almost all of the users.” I will leave the outcomes of the law suit to your own imagination.

Safety for all road users

VMC chairman Peter Baulch city
VMC chairman Peter Baulch

Peter says he will use two of the professor’s analogies in the VMC’s fight against the barriers.

He points out that some European countries are no longer installing WRBs, others are removing previously installed WRBs the Northern Ireland Department for Infrastructure recently acknowledged that “wire rope and steel post type crash barriers are hazardous to motorcyclists’ safety in a collision”.

“We now have the situation … providing a clear acknowledgement that WRBs do actually present a dangerous hazard to motorcyclists, where in fact, such a hazard did not previously exist,” Peter says.

Therefore, WRBs discriminate against a portion of road users who are endangered by their installation.

He points out that the representative bodies on the panels that advise the Roads Minister and VicRoads, including VicPol, TAC, VicRoads, DoJ, Ministers Office, agreed the following:

On the topic of road safety, there are two key principles. The primary one is that road safety is a shared responsibility amongst all road users. The other principle is that the road safety of one road user group should not come at the expense of the safety of another road user group.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Duel: Double Vs single-layer denim

With summer just around the corner, riders will be considering riding pants and may be wondering whether traditional double-layer protection is better than the new single-layer materials.

Traditional double-layer jeans and riding pants have a separate layer of protective material, usually Kevlar, and sometimes even a third layer of mesh to “wick” the sweat away and protect against the scratchy material.

More recent double-layer designs have done away with the mesh as the protective layer has become more soft and breathable.

However, double-layer pants can be quite heavy and hot in summer.

Single-layer pants promise to be lighter and cooler. They have the protective fabric woven into the material so there is no need for a separate layer of protection or mesh.

Which is best?

I have tested both types and you can read my reviews by typing “jeans” or “pants”  in the search field at the top of this page.

For a more scientific answer, I contacted Dr Chris Hurren, a research scientist at Deakin University in Geelong where he and his laboratory work on protective motorcycle clothing.

MotoCAP senior researcher Dr Chris Hurren award single layer
Chris Hurren and his Honda GB400

He also worked with Dr Liz de Rome and others to produce the protocol that is used by MotoCAP for their testing regime.

Dr Hurren has written a series of four articles for Motorbike Writer on the new European clothing standard which you can start reading by clicking here.

Verdict: Single Vs double layer

This is the unedited verdict from Dr Hurren:

From the testing conducted by MotoCAP on ‘Protective Denim’ products, the best performance has been in multi-layer products where a separate protective liner is present inside the jeans.

The most important part to protect in a pair of pants is the Zone 1 and Zone 2 areas (defined in EN13595-1:2002).

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched testing

The abrasion time results for each of the abrasion risk areas are reported for each garment in the MotoCAP garment five-page test report.

This table shows the abrasion time in seconds for the protective material in the high-risk zone along with the amount of coverage for that zone of the protective layer.

Manufacturer Product Protective layer abrasion time Zone 1/2 coverage
Multi-layer protection
RST T125 Standard Aramid 1.12 70
RST Vintage 1.17 85
DriRider Rapid 1.27 100
Rjays Reinforced Original Cut 1.34 95
PMJ Rider Jeans 1.83 50
Bull’it SP120 Lite Heritage Easy 2.03 100
Resurgence Indigo sport 2.46 100
Triumph Pure Riding 2.63 100
Bull’it Covert Blue Straight 3.64 100
Draggin Jeans Cargo 3.71 100
Triumph Hero Riding 3.74 100
Rev’it Lombard 4.04 90
Harley Davidson Genuine Performance Riding 4.08 100
Bull’it SR6 Oil Skin 17 Straight 4.72 100
Draggin Jeans Next Gen Seamless 7.77 100
Draggin Jeans Twista 7.86 100
Neo Jeans Kevlar Men’s Stretch 0.74 100
Single-layer protection
BMW City Denim Trousers 0.41 100
Levis 501 Normal Denim Jeans 0.56 100
Resurgence New Wave 0.92 100
Saint Model 2 1.51 100

All of the products achieving over two seconds of abrasion time were multi-layer products. Two seconds of abrasion time would equate to approximately 16 metres of sliding distance on chip seal.

The Saint single-layered product performed the best of the single layered products reported on so far.

Saint Unbreakable Technical Black Denim Slim Fit Jeans
Saint Unbreakable Technical Black Denim Slim Fit Jeans

All three single-layer products fall towards the bottom of the multi-layered product performance levels.

I have also included the test results for a normal pair of Levis 501 non-protective jeans for reference against the single-layer products.

Textile Vs denim

I have done a similar comparison for protective textile pants and the multi-layer products again perform better than the single.

Where the multilayer includes a foam of some type and more than one layer of protective textile, the abrasion times go up. Where a leather patch is used, the abrasion time is also improved.

With almost all protective textile pants, improvement is generally only done in the knee area with the risk in the side of the leg and bottom overlooked. This is not the same for denim.

For the single-layer textile pants, the higher performing times of one-second-plus are generally achieved by 1000+ denier polyester or nylon woven textile. Products around the 600 denier range typically get 0.4-0.6 seconds.

Almost all of the protective denims (single and multi) perform well when compared to protective textile pants.

Comfort

As for the comfort ratings of gear tested by MotoCAP, the term has been changed to “breathability”.

Dr Hurren explains why:

There has been a lot of feedback from riders on the use of the word comfort. The solitary word comfort can mean many different things to different people. Many were misconstruing it with tactile comfort (tightness, fit, flexibility, skin feel) which is of course different for each person and next to impossible to quantify.

Breathability is felt to better reflect the dimension that is measured for MotoCAP. The concept of a breathable membrane in a jacket is well known within the rider community. It is hoped that the adoption of breathability will cause less confusion and will better convey the suitability of a garment for hot weather use.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com