Tag Archives: Helmets

Next gen BikeHUD nears completion

After almost four years of development, British tech company BikeSystems is finally about to release their next gen BikeHUD head-up display for motorcycle helmets.

It will feature a peripheral screen (called a “monocle”) that can display speed, satnav directions, a rearview camera and eventually bike information such as fuel, revs, etc.

Unlike some other HUD helmet devices, it does not include a Bluetooth intercom, but that may be added in later development.

BikeSystems has kicked off a Indiegogo crowd-funding campaign to raise $A69,579. They have so far raised more than $2000 so far.

Supporters of this campaign can expect deliveries to start in December 2019.

Prices start from £349 (about $A620) and there are various bundle discounts available saving up to 40%.

Founder Dave Vout says the next gen BikeHUD device will be available from March 2020 through their website.

They are also looking to set up a worldwide dealer network.

Next gen BikeHUD Next gen BikeHUD nears completion

The next gen BikeHUD weighs just 90g and comes with a tiny 8mm screen about the size of your little finger.

The multi-adjustable arm allows the rider to set the screen just under your left or right eye, so the image appears around 2m to one side of the bike’s front wheel.

“It’s close enough for your forward vision to see with the blink of an eye but won’t cause distraction,” Dave says.

“In fact, its positioning is almost exactly where car HUDs are located and in line with industry automotive recommendations.”

Speed is colour coded and the focus is set at infinity so you don’t go cross-eyed.

The screen/monocle fits to the helmet via a plate inside the lining using the helmet’s mounting studs.

The battery and receiver fit to the outer shell via self-adhesive Velcro-type tape.

(Our understanding is that NSW and Victorian police still believe external fittings render a helmet illegal, but NSW have been ordered not to fine riders until the issue is officially resolved.)

The rearview camera is fitted the back of your bike via a license-plate bracket. It provides a continuous live feed via an ultra-low latency wireless connection.

“That means you always know what’s happening behind you regardless of where your helmet is pointing,” Dave says.

There are no buttons to press, no helmet tapping and no spoken instructions required.

It simply shows all the information in a constant feed.

Price

BikeHUD “core” is the basic model with rearview and speed information and no need to connect to another device. It will cost £349 (about $A620).

“Smartphone-style batteries mean there is no installation to worry about and the whole thing just works,” Dave says.

From March you will also be able to link the device to your phone using the free BikeHUD app to get GPS navigation information.

“We intend also to add specialised Apps in future for racing/ track days and Dakar-style off-road competitions,” Dave says.

“We’ve already had basic talks with the MotoGP software sub-contractors.”

Next July, they will add the ability to link to your bike.

“For information such as engine revs, gear, indicators, oil pressure, ignition and fuel warnings we have a plug-in to the diagnostic port in an OBDII format,” Dave says.

“Precisely what we can display very much depends on the year, make and model of the bike.”

They are finalising battery size and power management, but expect both the monocle and camera to last 8–12 hours.

Dave says it should fit 90% of all helmets, including full, flip, jet, cruiser, pudding and most adventure or off-road helmets.

It comes with a two-year warranty.Next gen BikeHUD nears completion

Long time coming

In 2011, the company developed their prototype and launched launched the world’s first motorbike HUD system, BikeHUD in 2013.

Dave says the first model was “an early-adopter product” with limited technology and was only available from January 2014 to March 2015.

“The original unit was a chance for us to get the concept out there,” Dave says.’

“Over the next few years we received a huge amount of feedback from customers right across the world.

“There were three main suggestions that kept cropping up. Firstly, the monocle (screen) needed to be smaller. Secondly, the system needed a rear-view camera. And finally, it needed to be really simple to use.”

All features have been included in this next gen device.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Nolan deal to include active noise cancelling

Nolan helmets may soon have active noise-cancelling systems after signing a deal with Norwegian tech startup DAAL.

DAAL issued a media release saying their innovation would “give motorcyclists the chance to ride their bikes at highway speeds without the discomfort of tiring and potentially damaging wind noise”.

They say wind noise in a helmet can exceed 110dB that can cause tinnitus (ringing in the ears) over time. Click here for more information.

“This system also enables the rider to listen to music or talk to fellow riders in a quieter environment than today,” they say.DAAL Active noise-cancelling system for helmets

“By use of so-called active noise cancellation (ANC), the DAAL team has developed a technology that significantly reduces wind noise for the rider, without interfering with important traffic sounds like sirens and horns.

“For us, it is all about providing riders the freedom to get out there and enjoy the ride, without worrying about their hearing.”

Active noise cancelling

DAAL Active noise-cancelling system for helmets
Speakers, microphone and battery pack.

Sena was the first to introduce a helmet with an integrated electronic noise-cancelling intercom system.

However, DAAL founder and CEO Dag Axel Aarset says their system is different to other active noise-cancelling systems.

“Unlike generic noise cancellation headphones, our system is developed specifically to perform in the harsh and demanding noise environment inside a motorcycle helmet – and actually performs well for wind noise,” he says.

I have tried several active noise-cancelling earphones and agree that they can’t cope with loud wind buffeting. 

Active noise-cancelling systems generate a reverse sound wave of the background noise and play it through the speakers to cancel out the unwanted, harmful noise.

It requires a microphone next to your ear as well as speakers. There is also a power pack in the back of the helmet. However, they say their system weighs the same as other intercoms.

Daal Nolan noise cancelling helmet
DAAL tech being tested in a Nolan helmet

Tested and verified

Their prototype has been tested and verified for speeds up to 140km/h. The product is expected to be available in the market in 2020.

While the system is separate to an intercom, we imagine Nolan will integrate it with their N-Com Bluetooth intercom.

DAAL marketing manager David Schecroun says they “cannot go into the specifics of the project goals at this point”.

“We want our system to be compatible with both helmets and communication systems in the future,” he says.

Daal Nolan noise cancelling helmet
DAAL tech in testing

“The collaboration between DAAL and Nolan is a joint effort to make our technology as effective as possible within the constraints of the Nolan helmet, but we can and intend to work with other helmet manufacturers to make sure our technology can fit into more than one line of helmets. 

“Our long-term goal is to reach as many helmets as possible, probably through an aftermarket solution that may include some sort of communication features. 

“Today our focus is on the mutual benefits of collaborating with innovative first movers such as Nolan, where we can offer a competitive edge before ANC becomes the norm for motorcyclists, while at the same time we can see a clearer way towards the total market.”

They aim to launch their product globally in mid-2020.

DAAL was established in 2016 in Trondheim, the technology capital of Norway.

Italian helmet maker the Nolan Group was recently bought by French motorcycle company 2Ride Holding, makers of Shark helmets, Bering and Segura motorcycle clothing and Bagster bike luggage.

Damaging noise

Meanwhile, if you have issues with ringing in the ears after a long ride, we suggest you wear earplugs to reduce harmful wind noise

Alpine MotoSafe earplugs make riders safer sound
BUY Alpine MotoSafe earplugs now in our online shop

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Where to hang your motorcycle helmet

When you park your motorcycle at your local cafe or service station and don’t want to carry your helmet, you are faced with a wide choice of locations to hang your helmet on your bike.

But which is the safest?

The answer may depend on your motorcycle.

There is only one place you should NOT put your helmet and that is on the ground.

Ants or other bugs could crawl in and create some havoc several kilometres down the road when they suddenly start to bite or get in your eyes or ears!

So which is the safest and best place to store your helmet on your motorbike?

Panniers and top box

Can-Am Spyder F3 Limited hang
Can-Am Spyder F3 Limited has a huge top box that stores two full-sized helmets

The best place to secure your helmet is in big, lockable panniers or a top box if you are lucky enough to have them.

These keep your helmet in the shade, away from the elements and away from prying, thieving eyes.

It also cannot be damaged by someone bumping into or even knocking over your bike.

Helmet lockHang helmet

If your bike has a helmet lock, they are quite secure.

Unfortunately, some modern bikes don’t seem to have them.

There are also some problems with hanging it here.

First, a thief can easily cut the strap and take your helmet. Yes, it destroys the helmet but thieves could just be using your helmet to steal your bike and make their getaway!

On some, your helmet may also be able to rock back and forth in the wind which could scratch its nicely painted surface, or worse, your visor.

Also, people squeezing past your parked bike might scratch your helmet or visor.

Your helmet is also exposed to the elements.

And because it is either upside down or on its side, you could come back to a helmet filled with rain, dust or even someone’s litter or cigarette butt!

SeatHang helmet

This is perhaps the easiest and most common method of temporarily storing a helmet on a bike.

Depending on the seat this can be safe or very precarious.

A passerby’s knock or even strong wind could send it tumbling and a drop from that height could write off the helmet.

It’s also very noticeable and easy for someone to steal.

Your helmet is also open to the elements, although by being the right way up, at least it won’t collect rain like it does when on a helmet lock. Just remember to close the visor!

If you do store it on the seat, the most secure way so it won’t roll off is to have the visor facing the side with the sidestand.

Tank

Like the seat, it depends on the bike and is open to the same problems of security.

Hang it on the handlebars

The quickest and easiest place to hang a helmet is on the handlebars.

This can be secure, especially if you can get it over bar-end mirrors to stop it slipping off.

However, this can still be a precarious position where the helmet can easily fall if the bike is bumped.

It could also compresses the interior foam liner if you hang it with the helmet facing down. Compressing the liner can make your helmet fit more loosely and decreases its ability to protect your head in a crash.

However, it may be ok if your helmet allows you to rest it on the chin bar as in the photo above.

You can buy special helmet hooks or use a carabiner to hang it off the bars via the Double-D clasp (if it has one).

Helmet Hook How to protect and clean your visor hang
Helmet hook

But again, you have the problem of the helmet filing with rain and dust and being stolen.

If you do hang your helmet on the bars, make sure it’s the right bar as this is safer than the left bar which slopes down when the bike is on its sidestand.

FootpegsHang helmet

The same goes for hanging your helmet on the footpegs.

It may seem more “secure” because it is not in plain sight, but I saw a pedestrian walk past a bike and accidentally kick the helmet because it wasn’t easy to see.

The helmet, rolled about 50m down the road. A write-off!

If you do hang it off the footpegs, make sure it’s on the right side, opposite the side stand, as they can slide off the down side because of the bike’s lean.

Cables and alarms

If you choose to hang or store your helmet on your bike, it may pay to secure it with a wire locking cable.

Some are made of tough titanium and some even have alarms if moved.

Check out this robust helmet lock!

Andras and Thomas Torkos wth DSD Motoring Helmet lock

Strap

If your bike doesn’t have a secure place for storage, you can always carry your helmet in the bag it came in or buy one of these convenient EZ-GO shoulder straps.

EZ-GO helmet strap hang
EZ-GO helmet strap
  • Where do you store your helmet? Leave your comments below.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Argon transforms helmet into Iron Man

Argon Transform hi-tech helmet accessory transforms a standard helmet into an Iron Man helmet with head-up display, bluetooth, GPS and more.

Singapore start-up Whyre claim their Argon Transform is the world’s first dual-camera Augmented Reality attachment for a motorcycle helmet.

The $US795 ($A1140) unit doesn’t look too different to us from several others which are available or coming to market soon.

They include the HUDWAY Sight and Kiwi-designed Reyedr which is still seeking funding.

It also follows a growing wave of smart helmets that integrate HUD, and other tech into a motorcycle helmet.

The latest is the Australian-designed Forcite MK1 which has an LED light strip rather than HUD and includes a HD, wide-angle camera, Bluetooth and VOIP intercom and handlebar-mounted control unit.

Test Forcite smart helmet
Forcite

The advantages of aftermarket tech is that you can swap it to your new helmet when you retire the old one.

Argon TransformArgon Transform HUD

The Argon Transform comes as several Bluetooth-connected stick-on units for the side, front and back of the helmet, plus a screen on the inside of the chinbar.Argon Transform HUD

They combine a see-through head-up display with a Bluetooth handlebar controller, inbuilt GPS unit, plus front and back cameras.

Whyre claim the front and rear units weigh only 150g and balance each other out.

Argon Transform HUD
Rear camera

Riders will be able to see tailor-made info such as caller ID, GPS navigation arrows and speedometer, as well as what’s behind them. Video is recorded and stored on an SD card or accessed via an Argon app.

Argon Transform HUD
Rider’s view of the periphery screen

It will also allow riders to access specific ride statistics, Argon settings, a social community and a logbook that records last maintenance dates, spare part changes/cost etc.

The intercom has range only up to 100m, but the speakers are claimed to have active noise-cancelling which should mean clear sound without background wind noise and no need for earplugs.

Argon Transform HUD
(Never put your helmet on the ground like this unless you wants ants or other bugs in your helmet!)

The offline built-in GPS does not require data and operates in remote areas where phone reception is weak.

Argon claims the lithium-polymer battery will last for eight hours on a charge. 

Whyre has launched an Indiegogo Campaign to get a $US25,000 and is already a third of the way there.

Early customers will get the Argon Transform for $US398 ($A570) compared with the retail price of $US795 ($A1140). They plan to ship in February 2020.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Shark gobbles up Nolan helmets

Italian helmet maker the Nolan Group has been bought by French motorcycle company 2Ride Holding, makers of Shark helmets, Bering and Segura motorcycle clothing and Bagster bike luggage.

Nolan Group make Nolan, X lite and Grex helmets and N-Com Bluetooth intercoms. 

An official statement about the merger does not give any assurances on whether production will be moved from Italy.

However, it does say 100% of Nolan Group’s products are “conceived, designed and created in Europe, and a good majority of them are even manufactured in the European territory”.

We believe many products in the 2Ride Holding range are made in South East Asia.

2 Ride Holding president Patrick François says they have already begun to work together and intend to “optimise all this Italian, French and European expertise in order to offer our global consumers more protective and easier-to-use products”.

Nolan and Shark helmetsNolan N-87 helmet in scratched chrome

Nolan helmets were the most trusted brand in Australia in 2015, the first year of the Canstar Blue customer satisfaction ratings.

Our assessment of the respected UK SHARP helmet safety ratings found Shark was the most prolific helmet brand in the survey with 24 helmets and all but one scored four or more stars, making it the safest, statistically.

Strategic alliance

The official press statement says the “strategic alliance” between these two European companies “attests to their intent on making significant inroads into the global marketplace and will enable them to pursue their geographic expansion plans”.

“With €150 million in sales revenue and a workforce of around 1000, the Nolan Group distributes its products in over 80 countries worldwide and enjoys a global leadership status in the market of protective equipment for motorcycle and outdoor sports,” it says.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

AGV AX9 is a versatile helmet

The versatile new AGV AX9 helmet can be worn as an adventure helmet, MX lid with goggles or even a touring helmet with its quickly removable peak and visor.

Once removed, there is no unsightly attachment hardware to affect the shell’s aerodynamics or aesthetics.

It is available in black or white for $699, multi-colours for $799 or matt carbon for $899 and comes in sizes XXS (51-52cm) to XXXL (65-66cm).

versatile new AGV AX9 helmet
AGV AX9 colour line-up

This is not the first such versatile helmet as Shark has had the Explore-R for several years at $599 and it includes the attached goggles, whereas the AGV AX9 doesn’t.

Shark Explore-R motorcycle helmet ax9
Shark Explore-R motorcycle helmet

Both have lightweight carbon variants weighing about 1.3kg. The AGV fibre-composite models weigh 1.4kg.

AX9 tested

AGV claims their helmet “reaches new standards in aerodynamics and ventilation” in wind tunnel and laboratory tests.

There are five adjustable vents including an adjustable chin guard vent so the rider can direct air flow exactly where the want it.

It also has moisture-wicking cheek pads and top liner and a water-resistant neckroll to prevent water from channelling inside the helmet.

Removable and washable cheek pads are made from Ritmo fabric, the crown pad is made of durable Shalimar and the base is made of moisture-resistant Shalimar and Nubuck to keep the helmet dry when you take it off.

The wide anti-scratch visor comes with a Max Vision Pinlock anti-fog insert and has six hold positions to allow extra air.

Their adjustable peak has been wind-tunnel tested to prevent lift which can cause neck pain after riding for some time at highway speeds.

AGV claims they also lab-tested the noise level at 97dB at 110km/h.

That’s still fairly loud and we recommend using earplugs for long rides to avoid short-term fatigue and long-term tinnitus.

Alpine MotoSafe earplugs make riders safer sound
BUY Alpine MotoSafe earplugs now in our online shop

AX9 safetyversatile new AGV AX9 helmet

AGV claims the helmet far exceeds ECE 22.05 safety standards.

Safety features include a shell, neck roll and chin shape that reduces impact pressure and the subsequent risk of collarbone injury.

Between the outer shell and the interior fabrics, AGV has fitted a multi-density EPS with four different foam densities, so it has maximum protection in any size.

It comes with a standard double-D chin strap for secure fastening.

ARK communicationversatile new AGV AX9 helmet

The AX9 is also set up to accommodate their soon-to-be-released integrated ARK aerodynamic communication system at $399.

It was developed by Sena not only for the AX9, but also Sportmodular, K-5 S and K6.

They claim it will seamlessly communicate with up to four riders simultaneously at the click of a button.

Range is said to be up to 1.6km and it features Sena’s Advanced Noise Control ambient noise control for quiet phone and intercom conversations.

It integrates a built-in FM radio tuner with station scan and save function.

The ARK can be applied to the helmet with an AGV Intercom Adapter without affecting the aerodynamic shape.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Your chance to test Forcite smart helmet

Here’s your chance to be a test pilot for the Forcite smart helmet that integrates a camera system, navigation and intercom in the shell and was developed right here in Australia.

The ultralight and ultra-hi-tech smart helmet will hit the market in December, but you can test it in July and August.

CEO and co-founder Alfred Boyadgis says their 6500 early supporters or “test pilots” can register to test the MK-01 helmet on their Launch Tour around Australia.

Dates are listed below and you can click here to register to attend.

Test Forcite smart helmet

The tour kickstarts with a track-day in Sydney and demo events in all states and territories.

“Throughout the tour, we will be gathering and utilising all the valuable feedback our Test-Pilots give us to further improve and refine the MK-01 helmet to make it the best we possibly can before delivering it to them in December,” their invitation says.

Test pilots will also be able to buy a limited-edition founder carbon composite helmet with gold logos for under $1000.Forcite smart helmet funding

Forcite sales director Dylan Ross says the planned retail price for the helmet when it comes to market in December 2019 will be $A1299.

Flaws fixed

In this video he admits that their earlier Mach 1 model had a few flaws such as the camera position on the top.

He says that the top-mounted camera worked for sports bike riders, but those sitting upright mainly videoed the sky. And if the rider raised their visor, it obscured the camera.

The 160-degree camera has now been repositioned in the chin area.

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Chin bar helmet

Alfred also confirms that they have not altered the physics of the helmet which still complies with European ECE22.05 standards.

He says none of the lightweight electronics (<200g) is embedded in the foam lining to ensure the integrity of the helmet’s protection.

The Forcite helmet’s electronics are powered by two ceramic batteries that are guaranteed not to rupture or ignite in a crash.

Uni design project beginnings]

The Forcite helmet evolved from an undergraduate UNSW design project with co-founder Julian Chow.

It followed Alfred’s “near-death experience” when he crashed his motorcycle in an oil spill about five years.

He says he broke his knee and cracked his helmet in half. The attached action camera almost penetrated his skull.

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Alfred with Mach 1 and founder helmets

The helmet is based on similar smart helmets Forcite has developed for other industries, and the business recently received mentoring in the UNSW 10X Accelerator. 

They say their helmet and software package give riders “greater situational awareness and allows them to overcome their lack of visibility on the road by communicating essential information about their ride in a completely safe manner”.

It can also alert riders to nearby safety hazards with audio and light signals in the chin bar.

The helmet also provides video and audio recordings of the ride and it can be controlled via a smartphone app.

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Mobile app monitors helmet technology

All the technology is integrated inside the helmet with no external attachments.

Alfred says helmet attachments are illegal in NSW and being investigated by standards bodies in many countries.

(Our understanding is that NSW and Victorian police still believe external fittings render a helmet illegal, but NSW have been ordered not to fine riders until the issue is officially resolved.)

He says helmet attachments add weight to a helmet and at high-speed impact, can crack helmet shells, leading to death or injury.

There is also concern that they can cause dangerous head rotation in a crash.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Sena adds Savage open-face helmet

Bluetooth giant Sena has moved into helmets with integrated intercom systems over the past couple of years, adding full-face helmets, a half-helmet and now the open-face Savage.

Last year I reviewed the Sena Momentum full-face helmet and I was so impressed it has now become my go-to helmet. Read my review here.

Sena Momentum Lite Bluetooth helmet hi-fi savage
Sena Momentum Lite Bluetooth helmet

But I remain a little sceptical about the quality of sound and noise-damping of the brow-mounted microphone in their Savage open-face and Calvary half-helmets.

Sena Cavalry motorcycle half helmet with bluetooth unit savage
Sena Calvary

I’m hoping to test the Savage soon.

Meanwhile, check out this promotional video which seems to indicate the sound quality defeats wind noise.

Sena Savage

The Savage is now available in Australia in matte black in medium, large and XL sizes at about $A500, depending on where you buy it.

You can also buy optional long and short peaks and we imagine the three press studs would also fit many visors suitable for other open-face helmets.

It is the first open-face helmet with Bluetooth 4.1, connecting with three other riders up to 1.6km.

Controls are simplistic, but the jog dial and single button should work as well as other Sena products we have tested.

Sena says it comes with “HD quality speakers” built into the ear cavities.

The microphone is located in the upper rim of the helmet and features their Advanced Noise Control to reduce wind noise.

Like other Sena units, it is an intercom and has integrated 10-station FM radio which can be accessed hands-free with voice controls.

Bluetooth connection to your phone also allows access to make and receive phone calls, use Siri, listen to music and hear GPS directions.

Talk time is 11 hours and the lithium polymer battery charges in three hours.

The composite fibreglass shell helmet weighs just 1100g and features removable and washable padding, with a nylon double-D-ring fastener.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December

Australian motorcycle helmet startup Forcite has promised its ultralight and ultra-hi-tech smart helmet will hit the market in December.

The Forcite helmet integrates a camera system, navigation, intercom and active noise-cancelling in the shell. It also features an electronically tinted visor that changes tint within a few milliseconds.

CEO and co-founder Alfred Boyadgis says their early supporters or “test pilots” will soon be able to buy a limited-edition founder carbon composite helmet (pictured above) with gold logos for under $1000.

Forcite sales director Dylan Ross says the planned retail price for the helmet when it comes to market later this year will be $A1299.

Flaws fixed

In this video he admits that their earlier Mach 1 model had a few flaws such as the camera position on the top.

He says that the top-mounted camera worked for sports bike riders, but those sitting upright mainly videoed the sky. And if the rider raised their visor, it obscured the camera.

The 160-degree camera has now been repositioned in the chin area.

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Chin bar helmet

Alfred also confirms that they have not altered the physics of the helmet which still complies with European ECE22.05 standards.

He says none of the lightweight electronics (<200g) is embedded in the foam lining to ensure the integrity of the helmet’s protection.

The Forcite helmet’s electronics are powered by two ceramic batteries that are guaranteed not to rupture or ignite in a crash.

December delivery

Forcite smart helmet funding

Last year Forcite invited riders to test the helmet in Australia and the US and received more than 2000 registrations to be test pilots. 

Those test pilots will soon be able to try out the helmet on a closed track at a Sydney racetrack.

It will be followed by a “Launch Tour” with demo events in select dealerships around the country.

Dylan says they will disclose the names and locations of participating dealerships soon.

“But you can certainly announce that we’ll be travelling to Melbourne, Adelaide, Perth, Tasmania, Brisbane, North Queensland, Canberra and multiple locations in Sydney/Greater Sydney region,” he says.

We’re still confirming some of the structural components of the Launch Tour, but we are going national with this and getting in front of as many riders as we can.

“This isn’t juiced-up internet hype, this is a product with real-world usability, built by riders with input from the riding community over several years.” 

The good news is that riders who attend the demo days and order the helmet will get it at a discounted price under $1000. They promise delivery in December.

Uni design project

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Alfred with Mach 1 and founder helmets

The Forcite helmet evolved from an undergraduate UNSW design project with co-founder Julian Chow.

It followed Alfred’s “near-death experience” when he crashed his motorcycle in an oil spill about five years.

He says he broke his knee and cracked his helmet in half. The attached action camera almost penetrated his skull.

The helmet is based on similar smart helmets Forcite has developed for other industries, and the business recently received mentoring in the UNSW 10X Accelerator. 

They say their helmet and software package give riders “greater situational awareness and allows them to overcome their lack of visibility on the road by communicating essential information about their ride in a completely safe manner”.

It can also alert riders to nearby safety hazards with audio and light signals in the chin bar.

The helmet also provides video and audio recordings of the ride and it can be controlled via a smartphone app.

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Mobile app monitors helmet technology

All the technology is integrated inside the helmet with no external attachments.

Alfred says helmet attachments are illegal in NSW and being investigated by standards bodies in many countries.

(Our understanding is that NSW and Victorian police still believe external fittings render a helmet illegal, but NSW have been ordered not to fine riders until the issue is officially resolved.)

He says helmet attachments add weight to a helmet and at high-speed impact, can crack helmet shells, leading to death or injury.

There is also concern that they can cause dangerous head rotation in a crash.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Motorcycle helmet light for rider visibility

New York designer and rider Joe Doucet has designed a helmet wth an LED light that switches to red when decelerating to improve rider visibility and avoid rear-end crashes.

Joe has benevolently decided not to apply for a patent nor manufacture the helmet but make the technology available to others in the interests of rider safety.

“I opened up the intellectual property to any company who chooses to produce a version of the helmet. Weighing the potential of saving a life against a royalty check is an easy decision to make,” he says.

However, he’s not the first to develop such technology that includes a light linked to an accelerometer.visibility

Helmet lights add visibility

There have been several products designed to increase the visibility of riders and attract the attention of tailgating motorists.

They include the French Cosmo helmet light that sticks on the back of any helmet and the inVIEW helmet light that not only indicates when brakes are applied or a rider slows down on the throttle, but also shows a rider’s intention to turn.

Young French couple Fanny, 19, and Jonathan, 20, also launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund their Spektre idea for illuminated tape to light up your motorcycle helmet. It only received 5% of its $A42,000 goal.

Jonathan and Fanny created the Spektre light tape for your helmet visibility
Spektre

The idea of lighting up a helmet may not be novel, but it also doesn’t seem to have kick started with a lot of riders.

Safety light

A helmet light makes some sense to improve the visibility of riders as the taillights on a bike are low and drivers in heavy traffic may not see them because of the bonnet (hood) of their car, SUV or truck.

Together with an accelerometer that senses the bike slowing down — even under engine braking and no brake application as many riders do — it may help reduce rear-ender crashes.

These are one of the most common forms of accident for motorcycles, but there are things you can do to prevent them including lane filtering where it’s legal.

Click here for tips on how to avoid rear-enders.Helmet Light rear-ender crash safety visibility

While Joe has decided to not produce his helmet, it appears he has created a few prototypes in an open-face format.

If he was really interested in ultimate safety surely he would have made them in full-face versions.

After all, the chin area is the most likely to hit the ground first in a crash as this Icon helmet shows.

Icon Airframe Statistic motorcycle helmet modular light visibility
Icon Airframe Statistic motorcycle helmet shows impact areas by percentage

Joe’s concession to safety is that the shell is a combination of kevlar and polycarbonate.

The designer has also worked with companies such as BMW, Nike and Samsung.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com