Tag Archives: News

Show of concern for rider safety

Riders have been called to show their support and concern for their safety tomorrow ahead of a major Victorian Road Trauma Summit next Friday (31 May 2019).

Melbourne riders are asked to gather outside the ABC studios at 120 Southbank Boulevard tomorrow from 9-10.30am during a radio forum on safety that previews the government’s summit.

They are also urged to contact the talkback number (1300 222 774 or SMS 0437 774 774 rates apply) to voice their concerns about rider safety.

The ABC’s Jon Faine will host a panel on Radio 774 discussing the road toll and what can be done.

The panel includes the Traffic Accident Commission, VicRoads, Monash University Accident Research Centre and Police.

You can listen in here.

Victorian lives lostWhat to do if you have been involved in a motorcycle accident crash

So far this year, 26 motorcyclists have died on Victorian roads which is nine above the five-year average of 17 and 10 more than last year. Many more have been injured and there haas been a spate of hit-and-run accidents leaving riders dead or injured.

The state government’s summit on Friday will include experts from the TAC, VicRoads, VicPol, MUARC, RACV, Road Trauma Support Services Victoria and cycling and motorcycle advocates including the Victorian Motorcycle Council and the Motorcycle Expert Advisory Panel.

It will be hosted by Minister for Roads, Road Safety and the TAC Jaala Pulford and Minister for Police and Emergency Services Lisa Neville.

Community roundtables will also be held across regional Victoria where road deaths have spiked at 72 compared with 41 in metropolitan Melbourne.

The summit will build on the $1.4 billion Towards Zero road safety strategy, Jaala says.

Riders respond

Victorian Motorcycle Council spokesman John Eacott says there is an urgent need for an independent agency to gather and collate statistics.

Other issues include:

  • A proper campaign to educate all road users about filtering, both for safety and for congestion relief;
  • Urgent implementation of an advanced and/or refresher training programme for all riders with a government subsidy;
  • Completely stop any reference to ‘returning riders’ in any way, shape or form when discussing stats as there are no statistics available to identify any such subset; and
  • Funding for rural road upkeep – primary safety to prevent accidents instead of secondary safety spending to mitigate accident severity.

“The shock horror use of year-to-date fatalities instead of rolling 12-month or five-year averages is a constant irritation,” he says.

The Motorcycle Riders Association of Victoria believes the spike in the Victorian road toll has three main contributing factors:

  1. Inadequate crash data leading to bad policies and countermeasures;
  2. Neglected roads left in dangerous condition by VicRoads; and
  3. Incompetence in road management.

Spokesman Damien Codognotto says road authorities tend to blame the victims “rather than investigate and fix their own shortcomings”.

“The 2019 crash spike is not a spike in bad road user behaviour, it’s a failure in road safety policy and road management,” he says.

“Road authorities may divert attention from shortcomings in their systems with expensive media campaigns and/or road safety summits.”

The MRA is calling an independent office of road safety data, abolition of the motorcycle safety levy and a stop to the rollout of wire rope barriers with the funds saved used to repair neglected country roads.

“You can’t develop reliable road safety policies without reliable crash data collected in Australian conditions,” he says.

“Solving data problems is critical to motorcycle safety but the Victorian organisations dealing with our data do not want the public to think their systems are less than perfect.”

Lives lost to midnight 23 May 2019, Victoria

2018 Lives lost 2019 Lives lost
85 131 (up 54.1%)
Fatalities (equivalent periods)
2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 5 year
average
99 104 113 100 85 100
Gender
Gender 2018 2019 Change % change 5 year
average
Female 26 33 7 27% 27
Male 59 98 39 66% 73
Unknown 0 0 0 0% 0
Road user
Road user 2018 2019 Change % change 5 year
average
Bicyclist 1 5 4 400% 4
Driver 39 60 21 54% 46
* *“>26 *“>62% Passenger 15 22 7 47% 18
Pedestrian 14 18 4 29% 15
Unknown 0 0 0 0% 0
Location
Location 2018 2019 Change % change 5 year
average
Melbourne 41 49 8 20% 47
Rural vic 44 82 38 86% 53
Unknown 0 0 0 0% 0
Age Group
Age Group 2018 2019 Change % change 5 year
average
0 to 4 0 1 1 100% 1
5 to 15 2 4 2 100% 2
16 to 17 0 3 3 300% 2
18 to 20 6 10 4 67% 8
21 to 25 5 8 3 60% 10
26 to 29 3 9 6 200% 9
30 to 39 15 14 -1 -7% 13
40 to 49 8 15 7 88% 13
50 to 59 16 22 6 38% 12
60 to 69 14 16 2 14% 12
70 and over 16 29 13 81% 17
Unknown 0 0 0 0% 0
Level of urbanisation
Level of urbanisation 2018 2019 Change % change 5 year
average
Provincial cities/towns 10 10 0 0% 8
Rural roads 45 83 38 84% 56
Small towns/hamlets 2 3 1 50% 1
** **“>35 **“>25% Unknown 0 0 0 0% 0
* includes pillion riders
** Melbourne Statistical Division includes some rural roads
Note: Fatality data is compiled by the TAC from police reports supplied by Victoria Police. Fatality data is revised each day, with the exception of weekends and public holidays. Data is subject to revision as additional information about known accidents is received, and as new accident reports are received and processed.
5 year average rounded to nearest whole number

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Third Queensland rider dies in past week

A third Queensland rider has died in the past week after a 32-year-old man hit a tree on his motorcycle at 1.30am today in Forest Lake.

Police Forensic Crash Unit investigations say he was travelling west on Johnson Road when he “failed to negotiate a left-hand bend, left road and collided with a tree”.

“The rider was thrown from the motorcycle and pronounced deceased at the scene.”

Investigations are continuing.

If you have information for police, contact Policelink on 131 444 or provide information using the online form 24hrs per day.

You can report information about crime anonymously to Crime Stoppers, a registered charity and community volunteer organisation, by calling 1800 333 000 or via crimestoppersqld.com.au 24hrs per day.

Rider deaths

So far this year 16 riders and pillions have died on Queensland roads which is one more than last year and about 50% down on the three previous years.RIP fallen riders crash lone

Last Saturday (18 May 2019), moped rider Umberto Williams, 32, of East Brisbane, died in a crash in Windsor, north Brisbane.

Police allege the BMW SUV was travelling northbound on Lutwyche Rd when it collided with the moped also heading north.

The BMW then veered into the southbound lanes and collided with a Subaru sedan driven by a 23-year-old Acacia Ridge man before also colliding with a Jeep.

Umberto and the Subaru driver died at the scene.

A 37-year-old Burpengary man has been charged with two counts of manslaughter and one of dangerous driving causing grievous bodily harm (excessive speed and fail to remain scene).

Yesterday, a 43-year-old rider passed away in hospital after being involved in a collision with a ute at a Kingaroy intersection on Thursday.

Police Forensic Crash Unit investigations indicate that the rider was heading east on Haly St about 1.50pm when his bike collided with the passenger side of a Ford utility turning from Glendon St.

The rider was thrown from the motorcycle on to the road.

A staff member of the Commercial Hotel on the corner says the ambulance “worked on the rider for some time”.

He was taken to Kingaroy Hospital before being airlifted to the Princess Alexandra Hospital where he passed away last night.

“There was damage to the passenger side door,” the hotel staffer says.

The ute’s driver, a 62-year-old man, was not injured in the crash.

Kingaroy Police say “no charges have been laid at this time”.

Riders dies after intersection collision
Haly St and Glendon St in Kingaroy

The crash occurred in a 50km/h area and Kingaroy Police say “speed may have been a contributing factor” but would not say which vehicle was speeding.

Police have not yet released the names of the rider or driver.

The Commercial Hotel worker says the rider and 62-year-old man driving the ute were both locals, but she did not know their names.

Investigations are continuing.

Our sincere condolences to the riders’ families and friends.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MV Agusta Fights AIDS at Cannes Film Festival

MO’s invite must’ve got lost in the mail to this year’s Cannes Festival, but we were there in spirit, as MV and Lewis Hamilton joined forces to bring in six times the retail cost of a Brutale 800 LH44 to battle AIDS. Good on them.

—————————————————————————————————-

MV Agusta Press Release:

Schiranna, Italy, May 24th 2019 – MV Agusta announces the donation of a limited edition Brutale 800 RR LH44 motorbike to amfAR, the foundation supporting AIDS research, auctioned off in Cannes at their star-studded yearly gala event, Thursday May 23rd, during the Cannes Film Festival.

The event, one of the most celebrity-dense of the entire Festival, took place at prestigious Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc in Cap d’Antibes, and included the LH44 Brutale designed by amfAR Gala Cannes Event Chair Lewis Hamilton. Produced as a limited edition series of only 144 units, it features the British champion’s number “44”, which he ran victoriously on all Formula 1 tracks. The 140 HP, 3 inline-cylinder engine Brutale 800 LH44 is a true design icon inspired by a racetrack legend. It did very well at the auction as it reached more than six times its retail price.

Over the years, amfAR has managed to raise more than $220 Million through their yearly gala auction in Cannes, funding AIDS research around the world. The amfAR gala auction, this year in its 26th edition, is a highly anticipated event for Festival regulars and featured, in addition to MV’s Lewis Hamilton Brutale, a number of paintings, sculptures and other highly exclusive items.

Timur Sardarov said: “I am delighted MV Agusta could support amfAR in their efforts to fight AIDS. I know many of the guests who attended the event are MV fans, and some of them already are proud MV owners. The Brutale 800 RR LH44 is a rare gem, and I am proud that it contributed to help amfAR continue with the incredible work they’re doing.”

About amfAR:

amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research, is one of the world’s leading nonprofit organizations dedicated to the support of AIDS research, HIV prevention, treatment education, and advocacy. Since 1985, amfAR has invested nearly $550 million in its programs and has awarded more than 3,300 grants to research teams worldwide.

 

The post MV Agusta Fights AIDS at Cannes Film Festival appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

Another state may allow helmet-less adults

There soon may be another state in the US that allows adults to choose for themselves whether they wear a motorcycle helmet or not.

Missouri recently voted to repeal both its helmet and abortion laws, although the former is yet to be signed off by the Governor.

If it does, there will be 19 states with motorcycle helmet laws for all riders.

They are: Alabama, California, DC, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington and West Virginia.

Only Illinois, Iowa and New Hampshire have no helmet use law.

Adults only

The remaining states have varying laws requiring minors to wear a motorcycle helmet while six of those states require adults to have $10,000 in insurance and wear a helmet in their first year of riding.

Adult riders are varyingly considered 18 or 21. Missouri says riders over 18 should be all.owed to decide on helmet use.

There has been a steady move toward liberalising US helmet laws in recent years.

But here’s an interesting example.

In 1977 Texas moved from a universal helmet law to an adult helmet option like Missouri wants.

There followed a 35% increase in motorcycle fatalities. Texas reinstated its universal helmet law in 1989 and deaths dropped by 11%. The law makers changed their minds yet again in 1997 to cover only riders younger than 21 and deaths leapt 31%.

As Dudley (William H Macy) tells Woody (John Travolta) in “Wild Hogs”: “62% vof all motorcycle fatalities could be prevented with the use of an approved DOT helmet.”

Liberal helmet laws adults
Wild Hogs

According to the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, for every 100 motorcyclists killed in crashes while not wearing a helmet, 37 could have been saved had they worn helmets.

Yet, the use of motorcycle helmets in the US continues to decline to about half from 71% in 2000.

While the US public health institute the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found the most common injuries in motorcycle crashes are to the riders’ feet or legs, the next most common location for non-fatal rider injuries was to the neck and head, accounting for 22%.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Riders dies after intersection collision

A 43-year-old rider has passed away in hospital overnight after being involved in a collision with a ute at a Kingaroy intersection yesterday (23 May 2019).

Police Forensic Crash Unit investigations indicate that the rider was heading east on Haly St about 1.50pm when his bike collided with the passenger side of a Ford utility turning from Glendon St.

Riders dies after intersection collision
The rider was heading along Haly St and the ute came from Glendon St on the right (All images from Google Maps)

The rider was thrown from the motorcycle on to the road.

A staff member of the Commercial Hotel on the corner says the ambulance “worked on the rider for some time”.

He was taken to Kingaroy Hospital before being airlifted to the Princess Alexandra Hospital where he passed away last night.

“There was damage to the passenger side door,” the hotel staffer says.

The ute’s driver, a 62-year-old man, was not injured in the crash.

Kingaroy Police say “no charges have been laid at this time”.

Riders dies after intersection collision
Haly St and Glendon St in Kingaroy

The crash occurred in a 50km/h area and Kingaroy Police say “speed may have been a contributing factor” but would not say which vehicle was speeding.

Police have not yet released the names of the rider or driver.

The Commercial Hotel worker says the rider and 62-year-old man driving the ute were both locals, but she did not know their names.

Investigations are continuing.

Our sincere condolences to the rider’s family and friends.

So far this year 15 riders and pillions have died on Queensland roads. That is the same number as last year and about 50% down on the three previous years.

Intersection crashes

Two out of every three accidents (66.7%) occur at intersections, according to the 2017 US Motorcycle Crash Causation Study.

Most accidents involving motorcycles and other vehicles occur when the other vehicle is turning across their path.

The result can be lethal as the rider hits the car in a t-bone fashion, rather than a glancing blow.

Check our tips for avoiding these types of crashes.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Wheelchair rider seeks badges, patches

A Croation rider who was sidelined into a wheelchair in 2008 by an incurable muscle weakness disease is calling for help to collect motorcycle badges, patches, stickers and flags.

Boris Ivančić says he has been a rider since his teens, but contracted Lou Gehrig’s disease and has not been able to ride for the past 11 years.Wheelchair rider Boris Ivančić  seeks badges, patches

“My condition stopped my body riding a bike but didn’t stop me being a biker in my mind – forever and eternal,” he says.

“I do have things which are making lonely days bright — my friends and my hobby.

“This hobby of mine is collecting patches, stickers, flags and motorcycle group labels from all over the world.

“My wish is to get as many as I can.”

Wheelchair rider Boris Ivančić  seeks badges, patches
Boris and friends

Boris has decorated the wall of his house in Klis with the motorcycle memorabilia and he still has plenty of walls to spare.

If you can help Boris fulfil his dream, send your badges, patches, etc to Boris Ivančić at Gizdići 46, Kris, Splitsko-Dalmatinska, Croatia.

Lou Gehrig’s disease

Wheelchair rider Boris Ivančić  seeks badges, patches
Lou Gehrig

The debilitating disease is named after famous American baseball player Lou Gehrig.

It’s actually amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, which is an incurable neuromuscular illness. 

The disease forced Lou Gehrig to retire from pro baseball at the age of 36. He died from the disease two years later. 

There is still no known cause nor cure for the disease.

It is painless, noncontagious, but cruel with the body failing and the mind fully aware to the end.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Randy Mamola To Race IndianxWorkhorse Sprint Racer

Randy Mamola is racing once again!

Begin press release:


Indian Motorcycle has announced that Grand Prix legend and crowd favourite Randy Mamola will be campaigning the Workhorse Speedshop racer in the full Sultans of Sprint series as the modified Scout Bobber, named ‘Appaloosa’, made its first public appearance today at The Reunion in Monza.

Built by Brice Hennebert of Workhorse Speedshop to honour the Indian Scout’s 100th anniversary, ‘Appaloosa’ is named after the famous breed of horse. Brice explains, “I wanted a name that could link Workhorse, Indian Motorcycle and speed. As soon as I discovered that the American horse breed Appaloosa was one of the world’s fastest horses, I knew I had the name for an American sprint bike built by Workhorse. After putting so much into this build, I’m excited to see the reaction to it and I can’t wait to see Randy blast it down the racetrack.”

Randy Mamola says, “I’ve always been a big fan of Indian Motorcycle and I’m really looking forward to racing this amazing creation. It’s great to be part of this project, especially during the Scout’s 100th anniversary. With the Sultans of Sprint being such a unique series, it’s going to be a lot of fun soaking up the atmosphere, meeting the crowds and putting on a show for them.”

Outfitted with a bespoke racing suit created by Alpinestars, inspired by the racing suits they provide for the Indian Wrecking Crew, Randy will be competing in the Factory Class under race number #19 to celebrate 1919, the year the original Indian Scout was first revealed. In the Factory Class, motorcycles must be four-stroke (air or water cooled) with no limit regarding the engine capacity providing that the tuned bike does not exceed a power-to-weight ratio limit of 0.65bhp/kg.

‘Appaloosa’ is the culmination of over 700 hours of design and fabrication by Workhorse and has been supported with technical expertise and premium components from project partners Akrapovič, Beringer Brakes, MOTOREX, Öhlins, and Vibrant Performance.

After completely stripping the Scout Bobber, Brice cut and narrowed the original fuel tank, retaining the side profile, to create a cover for a new aluminium fuel cell which holds just 2.5 litres for sprint racing. With the fuel cell in place, work focussed on the riding position, a critical element for quick starts. A new sub-frame was fabricated to better support the rider under hard acceleration and combines with lower clip-on handlebars and drag-style foot controls to tilt the rider forward and keep weight over the front wheel.

To further enhance traction when the flag drops, Brice designed and welded an extended aluminium swingarm. With parts CNC machined from his drawings by Beringer Brakes, the swingarm is mated to advanced, fully adjustable suspension technology from Öhlins. Matching the STX 36 piggyback rear shock absorbers, Öhlins also supplied Retro 43 front forks and a steering damper to ensure the best possible grip and stability enabling the full performance of the bike to be utilised.

With a rolling chassis and elements of the streamlined fairing starting to take shape, Brice took Appaloosa to Akrapovič where a bespoke titanium exhaust system was created for maximum power and the best possible sound. Without making any internal modifications, engine power has been increased to 130hp with a combination of the Akrapovič exhaust, a racing ECU, Power Commander, direct intake, Nitrous Oxide Injection system and MOTOREX oil. To get the power to the tarmac, the original belt drive has been converted to chain drive and a quickshifter ensures swift and precise gear changes.

Bringing the rapid racer to a controlled stop is the complete 4D Aerotec braking system from Beringer Brakes. The 4D system features two Ø230mm discs per caliper for increased power over standard single discs as well as reduced inertia to aid acceleration. Beringer Brakes also supplied the handlebar controls and buttons as well as CNC machining many of the parts designed by Brice.

Using hosing supplied by Vibrant Performance the cooling system has been simplified for weight reduction and for a cleaner look around the engine. Additional components from Vibrant such as welded dash connectors, fuel and water tank caps and heat protection hoses add finishing touches to Appaloosa.

As well as competing in the Sultans of Sprint championship, Indian Motorcycle also plans to have the bike on static display in the UK at The Bike Shed (24 – 26 May) and during Wheels & Waves in France (12 – 16 June).

Sultans of Sprint Championship 2019

18 – 19 May The Reunion Monza, Italy
22 – 23 June Café Racer Festival Monthléry, France
31 Aug – 1 Sept Glemseck 101 Leonberg, Germany


















The post Randy Mamola To Race IndianxWorkhorse Sprint Racer appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

HJC Helmets Presents Officially Licensed, DC Motorcycle Helmets

HJC continues its lineup of comic-themed helmet graphics, this time with the DC comic franchise in addition to its Marvel-themed helmets.

Begin press release:


When you think of a superhero, who comes to mind?  You’re likely thinking of a hero from the DC Universe.  HJC Helmets is thrilled to announce a licensing agreement with DC to produce exciting new graphics inspired by DC Super Heroes. The first to launch are two popular characters from DC’s Justice LeagueTM movie.

BatmanTM: the most well-known superhero of all time. Although he doesn’t possess any superpowers, Bruce Wayne’sTM wealth, physical strength, fighting abilities, and genius intellect come together to create Batman, the protector of Gotham CityTM.  This superhero’s dark and mysterious character is best represented by his bat suit and logo.  HJC’s RPHA 11 Batman motorcycle helmet replicates the advanced technology with matte patterns and textures found on Batman’s suit. The famous bat logo is included in the graphic on the top and rear of HJC’s top-of-the-line sport helmet, the RPHA 11.

This helmet may not increase your speed on a race track, but the i70 Flash will have people questioning if they just saw The FlashTM ride by on a motorcycle.  The lightning-fast superhero is featured on HJC’s brand new i70 helmet, a sport-touring, full face helmet that features an internal, drop-down sun visor.  The extremely lightweight and compact shell sports a modern and sleek design that fits very well with The Flash graphic. The i70 Flash captures the hero’s iconic lightning bolts contrasted on a detailed red graphic.

Stay tuned as HJC announces product release dates and more graphics from HJC Helmets & DC.

The post HJC Helmets Presents Officially Licensed, DC Motorcycle Helmets appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

Randy Mamola To Ride Indian Scout At Sultans Of Sprint

The folks at Indian Motorcycle continue to come up with off-the-wall ideas that kick ass and you are looking at their latest venture: Appaloosa. This is a one-of-a-kind custom Scout Bobber built by the famous fabricator Brice Hennebert of Workhorse Speedshop. It was designed to compete in the Sultans of Speed Sprint series in Europe, and Grand Prix legend Randy Mamola has agreed to pilot this wild stallion in the upcoming competitions.

“I’ve always been a big fan of Indian Motorcycle and I’m really looking forward to racing this amazing creation,” Mamola says. “It’s great to be part of this project, especially during the Scout’s 100th anniversary. With the Sultans of Sprint being such a unique series, it’s going to be a lot of fun soaking up the atmosphere, meeting the crowds, and putting on a show for them.”

For those of you who are not aware of the Sultans of Speed then you can check out the video below. But basically it is a gathering of classic-style motorcycles, built in whatever retro cool style you can come up with, that drag race from point A to point B at the behest of a flagger dressed in rockabilly garb. It’s old-school racing that those crazy kids of Europe really enjoy.

For this particular project, Indian had the goal of commemorating the 100th anniversary of its Scout, which was first released in 1919, hence Appaloosa will compete with the number 19 on the plate. This motorcycle has been designed with sprint racing in mind too. The fuel tank has been narrowed and the controls are set up in a drag racing configuration that will have Mamola splayed out with his weight forward, along with an extended swingarm for maximum traction. The jet-fighter-inspired bodywork should help shield Mamomla’s mass while it slices through the air.

With companies like Akrapovič, Öhlins, and Beringer Brakes helping Workhorse get it completed, you can be sure this bike will be as impressive on the track as it is to look at. Especially with the free-spirited Mamola at the controls.

“I wanted a name that could link Workhorse, Indian Motorcycle, and speed,” Hennebert explains. “As soon as I discovered that the American horse breed Appaloosa was one of the world’s fastest horses, I knew I had the name for an American sprint bike built by Workhorse. After putting so much into this build, I’m excited to see the reaction to it and I can’t wait to see Randy blast it down the racetrack.”

In addition to competing in the Sultans of Sprint championship, Indian Motorcycle also plans to have the bike on display in the UK during The Bike Shed (May 24–26) and at Wheels & Waves in France (June 12–16).

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

Indian Motorcycle Announces New Rental Program

Have you been itching to take an Indian motorcycle on an extended test ride? Have you ever dreamed of riding the best roads America has to offer but don’t have time to haul or ride your bike to get there? These are some of the questions that motorcyclists find themselves asking time and time again, and Indian Motorcycle has come up with the answer with its first-ever rental program: Indian Motorcycle Rentals.

With 10 dealerships currently participating in the program’s rollout, motorcyclists can now explore alternative options to car rentals when traveling, but the possibilities don’t end there. Prospective Indian buyers now have the ability to put some serious miles on bike before forking over the dough to buy one. But the locations of the initial participating dealerships is especially exciting. Two are along the California coast, three are in the Smoky Mountains region, one is on the East Coast, one is along the Mississippi River, one is in central Texas, and one is situated inland of Los Angeles. The riding possibilities are nearly endless in those areas, and many of the local roads are world-renowned for riding.


Related: Rent Yamaha Motorcycles Throughout The US


An important part of the program is the availability of different models in the Indian fleet so that renters can select the best possible motorcycle for their specific needs and skill set. With fleet vehicles being updated every 12 to 18 months, renters can enjoy riding a current model year motorcycle with every rental.

Reserving a rental Indian motorcycle is easy and can be done online through the dealership’s rentals page. Of course, a motorcycle license or endorsement is required, but having personal motorcycle insurance is not. If you’re currently in between bikes or thinking about getting your first one, Indian Motorcycle Rentals covers riders under the program’s insurance as long as the renter signs the proper waivers.

Naturally, proper motorcycle riding gear is required, which includes a full or three-quarter helmet, eye protection, long pants, and closed-toed shoes. Rental locations will have helmets available, since lugging a helmet around can be a pain, but renters are responsible for the rest.

Rentals are available for periods as short as four hours or as long as several weeks, allowing for just about any kind of need a rider may have. For more information, visit Indian Motorcycle Rentals.

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com