Tag Archives: Jackets

How will your rider gear cope this summer?

With the hotter weather approaching, riders can check the breathability standard of their gear on Australia’s internationally awarded MotoCAP online safety ratings service.

Sixteen new MotoCAP safety ratings have just been published, providing riders with safety ratings for 11 jackets and five pairs of pants.

Importantly, they also test the breathability and comfort of the gear in hot conditions which is an important primary safety factor.

The Richa Daytona 2 leather jacket performed best, receiving three out of five stars for safety yet two out of five for breathability.

The new ratings for jackets can be viewed here. The new ratings for pants can be viewed here.

MotoCAP has now performed testing and issued safety and comfort ratings ratings for 356 items of rider jackets, gloves and pants.

The MotoCAP safety intitiative launched in September 2018 and is the first of its type in the world.

Riders are urged to consider checking the safety and comfort ratings of gear before they buy.

While some have disputed the veracity or usefulness of the tests, rider representative groups and road safety experts say MotoCAP at least makes riders more aware of wearing protective gear.

The breasthasbility score also shows how the gear may perform when out on the road, something you can’t test for when trying it on in a store. 

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), the Department for Infrastructure and Transport, Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Testing is carried out by the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials on behalf of the MotoCAP partners.

All gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

In 2019, MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Call to test blow-up motorcycle vests

Detailed tests are required on the efficacy of blow-up vests and jackets as used by MotoGP riders, says Australian safety expert Dr Marcus Wigan.

The Emeritus Professor of Transport and Information Systems at Edinburgh Napier University says funding for such tests should be provided to the internationally awarded MotoCAP* motorcycle gear safety ratings service.

“Dr Liz de Rome’s MotoCAP initiative, eventually supported and taken up by the national governments, enables riders to discover the difference between many claims made and the actual performance of different clothing types from rider jeans to gloves. The results are often surprising,” Dr Wigan says. 

“Another under-used safety clothing is the range of blow-up vests that every MotoGP rIder uses with phenomenal results.Dr Marcus Wigan

“But MotoCap cannot do the incredibly useful Australian detailed tests and reports on their actual performance. 

“All it needs is the funding to do it; then the far more detailed and relevant results MotoCap is rightly famous for can be made available for Aussie use. 

“The costs are now down to that of upper-level ordinary protective clothing and proper promotion could reduce these costs and this access tremendously.” 

He says MotoCAP tests could also include assessments of the electromagnetic radiation interactions that stop pacemaker and implanted device users using them.

Dr Wigan is currently researching what these measures need to be and has been unsuccessfully trying to access available Victorian Motorycle Safety Levy to fund his study.

Currently $15.4 million collected by the levy is not yet allocated.

“I’ve had little success so far as there is almost no way of engaging with the bureaucrats (not motorcycle riders) who apparently control the levy,” he says.

“These people are inaccessible even to appropriate professionals, such as myself as an example, to discuss these issues.”

Last month, Retired industry veteran and Two Wheel Action Group spokesman Stuart Strickland OAM complained about the secrecy of the fund and the ministerial advisory panel on motorcycle issues.

*About MotoCAP

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), the Department for Infrastructure and Transport, Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Testing is carried out by the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials on behalf of the MotoCAP partners.

All gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

In 2019, MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Form And Function: Ashley Watson’s Waxed Cotton Jackets for Motorcyclists

From the green hills of the Central Hemisphere comes Ashley Watson.

Ashley is a designer who has been itching to update the laminated fabric of traditional motorcycle gear into a more classic, sustainable choice  – and he’s gone and done it with waxed cotton

a model wearing the Ashley Watson Armoured Jacket for motorcyclists

According to a report from MCN, The Eversholt MkII (don’t ask us to pronounce it) is a variant of the Eversholt – the first waxed cotton jacket made available from Watson, and one that he made sure to test on an extensive trip across Europe prior to its release. 

Quoted by Watson’s website as “one of the world’s most protective textile motorcycle jackets,” the Eversholt MkII passes CE testing with a triple-A rating and comes with a hybrid Dyneema/Aramid abrasive resistant lining that houses the latest D3O Armour.

an armoured jacket from Ashley Watson

And the sustainability is sound, considering the market’s alternatives.

“Waxed cotton can be easily maintained at home – making the garment function for longer…laminated waterproof fabrics (the alternative to waxed cotton) are woven from virgin synthetic yarns which are derived from fossil fuels”, says Watson. 

a close-up photo of the new GSX-s950, in Triton Blue.

A front view of the new Ashley Watson Eversholt MkII

“The adhesive used to bond the layers of these fabrics together means that they can’t be recycled. In effect, this means that after a relatively short lifecycle, a jacket made from a laminated fabric will become landfill and take centuries to decompose.”

The jacket is rounded up to the neat sum of £765, as Watson is apparently making each by hand in his shed – adding to the exclusivity of the jacket. Watson is also limiting this batch to 300 units – though we hope in future he will consider expanding his brilliant ideas to the colonies.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Rider gear sacrifices safety for comfort

Motorcycle jackets and pants that have good breathability for the warmer riding months sacrifice safety standards, according to the latest test results from Australia’s internationally awarded MotoCAP motorcycle gear safety ratings service.

MotoCAP has now performed testing and issued safety and comfort ratings ratings for 354 items of rider jackets, gloves and pants.

The MotoCAP safety intitiative launched in September 2018 and is the first of its type in the world.

It has now added 14 more products to its online ratings of 172 jackets, 90 pairs of pants and 92 pairs of gloves.

The new safety ratings for seven jackets and seven pairs of pants range from one to three out of five stars for safety.

They show that you can’t have it all when it comes to safety and comfort in hot conditions.

Jackets and pants that have good breathability score low for safety and vice versa.

For example, the Bullit Easy Tactical Icon pants score just one safety star but a maximum five for beathability.

Meanwhile, Dainese Delta 3 leather pants performed well for safety with three out of five stars, but just two for breathability.

It’s not that we haven’t suspected the trade-off on comfort and safety, but it’s interesting to see that sciebce back up our suspicions.

The new ratings for jackets can be viewed here. The new ratings for pants can be viewed here.

Riders are urged to consider checking the safety and comfort ratings of gear before they buy.

Shapeheart Classic Handlebar Phone Mounting System

While some have disputed the veracity or usefulness of the tests, rider representative groups and road safety experts say MotoCAP at least makes riders more aware of wearing protective gear.

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), the Department for Infrastructure and Transport, Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Testing is carried out by the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials on behalf of the MotoCAP partners.

All gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

In 2019, MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

10 Best Motorcycle Jackets For Women

Let’s face reality here: it’s only really been in the past two decades that women’s jackets have been coming out in force. Before then, in what was historically a “male-dominated hobby,” women had to make do with either custom gear or modifying men’s gear to fit. We put the quotations there because ever since the 1970s, we know that women made up a good portion of riders, usually hovering in the 5 to 10% ridership range.

Flash forward to 2021, and now women account for about 22% of riders, worldwide. That is refreshing to see and has forced even a lot of the “old school” to recognize that there are badass ladies all over the globe that will swing a leg over and crank the right wrist. It’s also refreshing to see that in what was once traditionally a male-dominated sport, road racing and even MotoGP are seeing more and more women rising in their ranks.

What this means is that many of the big manufacturers and gear makers have had to adapt to provide proper racing suits and gear for these women. This, naturally, has led to the traditional trickle-down style of motorcycle gear from racing to street, which means that more and more jackets, pants, boots, gloves, and other pieces of gear are appearing every month.

Rev’It Eclipse Women’s Jacket

Rev’It Eclipse Women’s Jacket

Price: $179.99
Buy: Revzilla

Rev’It is one of those companies that has made women’s protective gear pretty much since their incorporation, as there are quite a few female riders in the Netherlands. On top of that, they have a history in both circuit racing and enduro racing, so both the full leather track jackets and hot weather mesh jackets are packed full of cutting-edge design.

The Eclipse is just one such example of this, with an open, flowthrough style mesh that would seem to not have any abrasion resistance at all. However, that mesh is made of polyester ripstop material, as is the main chassis of the jacket. While the solid panels are rated to 600D, the mesh itself commands a respectable 400.

With adjustable bicep and wrist closures, full YKK zippers, two external pockets, and one internal pocket, the Eclipse is also quite fashionable to boot. The armor comes in the form of Knox Flexform in both the shoulders and elbows, which feels extremely light but carries CE-rated impact protection. An optional back protector can be fitted to the jacket.

Roland Sands Mia Women’s Jacket

Roland Sands Mia Women’s Jacket

Price: $525.00
Buy: Revzilla

Roland Sands, with the Mia jacket, ticks off two-rider fashion styles in one go, without sacrificing any protection. The retro and cafe crowd will love the classic British asymmetrical styling, while the sport and the sport-touring crowd will love the aggressive fit with the included thermal lining that doubles as a hoodie when the leather is taken away.

That leather is one-grain style better than cowhide, as it is oiled buffalo leather at 1.0 to 1.2 mm thicknesses. In areas requiring stretch, premium-grade elastic ripstop polyester is used. The hoodie liner is also breathable and waterproof, meaning that even if you have to do a dash from the bike to your front door in a downpour, simply flip up the hood and you’ll get there dry.

Protection comes in the form of Knox micro lock CE level 2 armor at the shoulders and elbows, with the leather jacket’s inner mesh liner holding a back protector pocket for optional armor. Accordion panels at the elbows and a quilted stitch design around the shoulders allow the jacket to move freely, despite being pre-curved for a front tuck position. Ventilation comes via some very well hidden shoulder intakes and vents, which keep the jacket looking premium when zipped up.

Alpinestars Alice Women’s Jacket

Alpinestars Alice Women’s Jacket

Price: $479.95+
Buy: Revzilla | Amazon

If Roland Sands has the women’s cafe market cornered, it’s fair to say that Alpinestars, realizing there was a gap to step through, made a sporty cruiser jacket with the Alice. Carrying all the right looks of the double-breasted front flaps, the asymmetrical zipper, and the relaxed arm curvature makes this both a classic and a modern sports cruiser jacket, all in one.

Don’t let its old-school looks fool you into thinking it’s not armored to the nines. Alpinestars has included their super lightweight, breathable Nucleon Flex armor, which is certified to CE level 2, at the shoulders and elbows, with a forearm extension on the elbow armor. This is carried in a mesh-backed cowhide 1.3mm leather chassis, with a back protector pocket for optional armor.

As with other jackets of the sporting style, the thermal liner of the jacket is easily detached and serves as a hoodie. Ventilation is hidden well in the underarm stretch panels, allowing just enough air to pass to wick away heat without being overly cold.

This is a jacket that would look at home being used while riding either Honda Rebel 500 or an Indian Roadmaster. Classic, timeless styling with modern armoring deserves a spot on this list.

Roland Sands Riot Jacket

Roland Sands Riot Jacket

Price: $650.00
Buy: Revzilla

Roland Sands strikes again with a superb classic English cruiser jacket. Solidly in the retro cruiser fashion sense, the Riot jacket would look perfectly at home being worn in the crowd at an Iron Maiden or Judas Priest concert as much as it does astride a Royal Enfield or a Triumph Bonneville.

Much more of a summer cruise jacket, the Riot is made of microperforated top grain cowhide sourced from Blackstone, which means it is soft, supple, and abrasion resistant with a thickness of 0.9mm throughout. The asymmetrical zipper is, of course, full YKK, and is of the bronze classic style. Quilted leather highlights and aggressive cuff YKK zippers make the jacket scream “Rock n Roll!” in that quintessential British understated-but-loud way.

The jacket is also, of note, made with a very aggressive black dye process, as the color will lighten the more it is exposed to UV light until it reaches the classic light black that well-worn leather fashion jackets eventually reach. This is also the only jacket recommended on this list that does not come with pre-installed armor. However, pockets for elbow, shoulder, and back protectors are ready to accept your own choice of the best armor, from Alpinestars’ Nucleon Flexto Icon’s D3O and Rev’It’s SeeSoft.

Alpinestars Stella T-GP Plus R V3 Air Jacket

Alpinestars Stella T-GP Plus R V3 Air Jacket

Price: $239.95
Buy: Revzilla | Amazon

With the increase in women’s participation in BSB, ASA, MotoGP feeder series, and the like over the past three decades, Alpinestars has had a lot of exposure to creating gear that is suitable to both genders, or those in-between genders. For the men, the T-GP Plus R v3 Air is one of the best mid-range sport and track rated jackets you can get, and by simply adding a Stella to the front of that name, that same legendary jacket is available to women.

The Stella T-GP Plus R v3 Air, apart from being one hell of a mouthful of words, is made of 600D highly abrasion-resistant polyester. Interspersed between these polyester panels, abrasion-resistant, tightly woven polyfabric mesh allows just enough air to wick away heat, but not chill you to the bone. A full mesh lining also helps boost that airflow’s effectiveness in carrying away sweat and warm air.

Protection is in the form of Alpinestars’ Nucleon Flex CE level 1 armor, with the shoulders being additionally armored with GP Lite slide shields. As sport riders will often choose between vest-style back protection or using jacket pockets, no back protector is included. However, Alpinestars has included both chest and back protector pockets, suitable for Nucleon KR-Ci CE level 2 armor.

A definite warm-weather riding winner, those that ride sportbikes where it never really snows have a go-to jacket that can be armored up as the need arises.

Dainese Racing 3 Perforated Women’s Jacket

Dainese Racing 3 Perforated Women’s Jacket

Price: $579.95
Buy: Revzilla

If you want a sport riding jacket that is both warm-weather rated and contains the abrasion resistance of leather, Dainese has you covered with the Racing 3 Perforated women’s jacket. The “mortal enemy” of Alpinestars on the MotoGP grid, Dainese uses a special treatment on all the leather they use for track and street gear, naming it “tutu leather.”

This leather is always 1.2mm or greater in thickness, while the treatment makes it highly water-resistant, supple, and reinforces the abrasion resistance through chemical bonding. And if that wasn’t enough protection for you, the stretch panels between the leather chassis panels are made of S1 bi-elastic, a Dainese and Cordura co-development that mixes the elasticity of regular polyfabric with the 500D+ abrasion resistance of pure Cordura.

The jacket is also microperforated in key areas and includes zip closure vents in the upper chest, with intake and exhaust vents on the sides of the jacket. Protection comes in the form of Dainese composite CE level II elbow and shoulder armor, with the shoulders being covered by an aluminum impact and slide plate that is mounted on a composite base, meaning the plate is replaceable. The jacket features a back protector pocket suitable for a Dainese G1 back protector, or a Dainese D1 airbag vest can be worn under the jacket itself.

It’s a premium leather and polymer jacket that passes CE EN 1621.1 and CE Category II – 89/686/EEC Directive protection standards, meaning it is ready for track use. Dainese themselves note that the jacket does tend to run on the tighter sport fit side, so they recommend buying one size up from your measurements.

Klim Artemis Women’s Jacket

Klim Artemis Women’s Jacket

Price: $699.99
Buy: Revzilla | Amazon

If you have spent even two seconds at the local gear store’s ADV and off-road touring gear section, Klim is a name that is plastered literally everywhere. Specialists in the long-distance touring style of gear, both on- and off-road, the Artemis is a design that is not shared with any other jacket in their lineup, making this one of the very few women’s only jackets.

Named after the Ancient Greek goddess that protected nature, the Artemis does a very good job at protecting whoever is within its confines. A true three-season touring jacket, this jacket is made of Klim’s own Karbonite textile, which is rated at least 600D, and up to over 750D, abrasion-resistant across multiple certification tests. Behind the chassis sits a full GoreTex membrane layer, which itself is over a Klimatek mesh layer that acts to both wick away hot air and sweat, and supports the jacket on the body.

In making the Artemis specifically for women, Klim did not have to worry about ventilation for the male torso, so airflow has been mapped specifically for the female torso. Ventilation is controlled via two centerline chest vents, two cross-core vents, 2 forearm vents, and two bicep vents, all of which exhaust out two massive vertical back vents.

Protection beyond abrasion is reinforced by D3O level 1 armor in the back, shoulders, and elbows. The Karbonite fabric is also penetration resistant, so no sharp rocks on an off-road trip should leave much more than a small bruise and a memory. The collar is comfort-lined to not be abrasive to the neck, and both sides of the collars can be pinned back to the upper chest to allow ventilation air to pass down from the neck roll into the body of the jacket.

If you are going to be off-road for any duration, you really cannot get a better ADV jacket than the Artemis. It’s designed for, built for, made for the active off-road riding woman, and it shows!

Merlin Madison Women’s Riding Shirt

Merlin Madison Women’s Riding Shirt

Price: $159.00
Buy: Revzilla

The latest trend in protective gear in 2021 has been the major push forward with armored shirts and hoodies. Either out of a desire to not look “kitted up,” or purely for comfort, there are varying degrees of quality with these newer pieces of gear, and Merlin has been at the forefront of the highest-rated, best quality shirts.

Looking like your average long-sleeved plaid shirt that isn’t out of place on a farm, the Madison shirt is much more than just a fashion statement. The Buffalo Plaid fabric, itself tear-resistant, is backed by a full, interwoven, 100% DuPont Kevlar lining that is rated to 1000D abrasion. A light mesh lining keeps things comfortable, as does a relaxed street fit, while the kevlar holds CE level 1 elbow and shoulder armor in place. There is a pocket in the mesh liner for a back protector as well.

What looks like a button up front is in fact a storm flap closure over a full YKK zip, with YYK zippered vents cleverly hidden along the tops of the chest pockets. The pockets have small inner pockets designed to hold hand-warmer packs, and if that wasn’t enough, the whole shirt is water-resistant but breathes easily.

If understated but superb protection is in your checklist for gear, or if you just want a good all-around riding shirt that pairs beautifully with some riding jeans and boots, Merlin has just the shirt for you.

Helite Xena Women’s Airbag Jacket

Helite Xena Women’s Airbag Jacket

Price: $800.00
Buy: Revzilla

To say that this jacket is revolutionary is understating just how important it is. It may not look like much, it may even look bland compared to some of the other options on this list, but Helite has made a women’s fit jacket that has the single most important protection feature that any jacket can have. Enter the Xena, a leather sport touring and cruiser jacket with a built-in, tether deployed rider airbag system.

Made from premium 1.2mm cowhide leather, the Xena hides stretch polyfabric under a cleverly designed panel at the top back of the jacket, whose importance we will discuss shortly. As well, the sides and lower back feature floating leather on stretch panels, allowing the jacket to keep a tight, close fit at all times. The arms are relaxed in their curvature, making it comfortable for long-distance cruising.

The importance of both the large stretch panel at the top of the back and the stretch panels on the sides and lower back is so that if you do come off your bike, in any way, shape, or form other than stepping off of it when it’s parked, a tether attached to a solid point on your motorcycle yanks an activation valve open, inflating the airbag hidden in the liner of the jacket in 0.1 seconds. This airbag, along with the full Sas-Tec CE level 2 back, shoulder, and elbow armor, provides extreme impact protection into the high tens of G’s.

As it is a tether-operated system, with no fancy electronics or GPS sensors, it works every time you need it to. In fact, the airbag will self-deflate over about half an hour, and as long as the jacket has not been penetrated by any object or otherwise damaged, all you need to do to reset it is replace the spent 60cc CO2 cartridge in the right lower front of the liner, and it’s ready to deploy again.

For disguising a life-preserving safety feature in a fashionable cruiser and sport-touring jacket, while it is expensive, nothing is more expensive than your life. Either this or the wearable Helite Turtle 2 airbag vest, comes highly recommended.

Dainese Lola 3 Women’s Jacket

Dainese Lola 3 Women’s Jacket

Price: $599.95
Buy: Revzilla | Amazon

Much like a couple of the other jackets in this list, if you’re going for a retro look that hides otherwise superior protective features, Dainese has a retro jacket for you in the Lola 3. Just looking at it, you’d think it was a slightly heavier track jacket, or a zip-up spring jacket to wear on the walk to the grocery store.

However, the Lola 3 is so much more. Combining high-grade Iride matte leather with S1 bi-elastic polyfabric panels and Dainese Pro-Armor impact zones, the jacket passes both prEN 17092 Class A jacket protection and EN 1621.1 armor class 1 standards. The Pro-Armor elbow and shoulder protectors are also rated CE level 1, which, while not as protective as CE level 2, allows for the armor to be more flexible and comfortable, while still being able to take an incredibly harsh whack without passing the impact to you.

And the piping on the jacket is not just for fashion, either. It is fully reflective material in an artificial shape, so the eye at night recognizes an artificial shape among the organic clutter of the environment in their headlights. A pocket for an optional Dainese G1 or racing G2 grade protector is inlaid into the TechFrame internal comfort liner just in case that person doesn’t see you.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP now rates more than 300 rider gear items

Australia’s internationally awarded MotoCAP motorcycle gear safety ratings service has now performed testing and issued safety and comfort ratings ratings for 340 items of rider jackets, gloves and pants.

The MotoCAP safety intitiative launched in September 2018 and is the first of its type in the world.

It has now added 16 more products to its online ratings of 165 jackets, 83 pairs of pants and 92 pairs of gloves.

The new safety ratings for 13 jackets and three pairs of pants range from one to three out of five stars for safety.

All pairs of pants from DriRider (Titan and Xena ladies pants) and Macna (transfer) tested were rated at just one star.

The Dainese Prima72 leather jacket was the top jacket performer with three stars.

Dainese Prima72 jacket
Dainese Prima72 jacket

Riders are urged to consider checking the safety and comfort ratings of gear before they buy.

While some have disputed the veracity or usefulness of the tests, rider representative groups and road safety experts say MotoCAP at least makes riders more aware of wearing protective gear.

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), the Department for Infrastructure and Transport, Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Testing is carried out by the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials on behalf of the MotoCAP partners.

All gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

In 2019, MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Impact pads would make garments safer

Australia’s internationally awarded MotoCAP motorcycle gear safety ratings service has added ratings on safety and comfort for eight jackets and eight pants to its growing list of tested products.

The new ratings brings the total number of items of clothing to 297, comprised of 125 jackets, 80 pairs of pants and 92 pairs of gloves.

Draggin Holsehot jeans top-scored on safety with four out of fives, followed by the Klim Artemis with twi stars.

Only one safety star was awarded to Merlin Route One Hardy, BME Waterproof Herren, Melbourne’s Saint Unbreakable Straight, Bull-It Easy Tactical Cargo, Triumph Urban Jeans and Macna Club.

While the Holeshot jeans performed well, MotoCAP says it could have done better if the knee and hip impact protectors were better quality.

Many of the others did not feature both sets of armour, marking them down on impact protection.

It was a similar situation in the jackets.

The new ratings for jackets can be viewed here. The new ratings for pants can be viewed here.

Deakin Uni Institute for Frontier Materials Senior Research Fellow and Honda GB400 rider Chris Hurren says there is a need for a holistic approach to safety.

MotoCAP senior researcher Dr Chris Hurren
Dr Chris Hurren

He says rider jackets and pants should include proper impact protection, as well as high abrasion resistance.

Chris says many garments don’t come with impact protectors or only a few protectors.

“Some of the garments could be five star if they just had a full set of certified protectors,” he says.

“Then it’s the rider’s choice if they want to throw them away if they don’t want to wear them.”

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), the Department for Infrastructure and Transport, Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Testing is carried out by the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials on behalf of the MotoCAP partners.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

UK helmet maker gets into gear

British motorcycle helmet manufacturer Ruroc will next month branch out into rider gear under a new brand called Enginehawk. 

Company spokesman Elijah Weir says that since launching their motorcycle helmets they have had “tons of requests from our community asking ‘what jacket is that’ every time we put a post out on social media”. 

“We’ve made some serious waves in the helmet industry and the aim is to do the same in the motorcycle gear market,” he says.

“The aim is to revolutionise the motorcycle industry and redefine safety-approved gear.

“Our mission is to help save lives and re-invent what motorcycle gear can be and we believe with the help of people like yourself we can most definitely make this happen.”

The company has launched their Enginehawk Instagram page with photos of the Predator jacket which is the first of their range of 10 leather and textile jackets and a thermal vest that will be unveiled over coming days:

Ruroc Enginehawk jackets

The brand will be officially launched on 27 April 2021 with full details and pricing.

The company make the following promises about their jackets:

We strive for perfect fit. Gear that doesn’t restrict you. Gear that looks great on all body shapes and sizes. Gear that makes you look like a f*king bad ass.

We only use the highest grade materials that will hold up in a slide. We will only use premium impact armours.

We make gear that looks great on and off the bike. The goal is to make garments riders to want to wear even when they aren’t riding, because that’s the only way to make sure they are when they do.

We keep our prices accessible despite using the most premium materials and manufacturing processes available. We will do this by selling direct to the rider through our website. Our customer is the rider, not the store.

If they are as good as their Atlas 2.0 helmet which we reviewed here, they should be a welcome newcomer to the market.

Atlas 2.0 helmet
Atlas 2.0 helmet

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP helps riders choose Christmas gear

Just in time for Christmas, Australia’s internationally awarded MotoCAP motorcycle gear safety ratings service has added 16 new items.

The addition of safety and comfort ratings for ten jackets and six pairs of pants brings the total number of items of clothing to 239, comprised of 115 jackets, 56 pairs of pants and 73 pairs of gloves.

Alpinestars GP Plus R V3 leather jacket
Alpinestars GP Plus R V3 leather jacket

In the latest round of testing, the Alpinestars GP Plus R V3 leather jacket performed well, receiving four stars for safety.

Importantly as we start summer, the RJays Samurai 3 leather jacket also performed well for both safety and breathability, scoring three out of five stars in both categories. That comfort rating is pretty good for a leather jacket.

Rays Samurai 3 jacket
Rays Samurai 3 summer jacket

The MotoCAP safety intitiative that rates motorcycle jackets, pants and gloves, launched in September 2018 and is the first of its type in the world.

The new ratings can be viewed here.

All gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

Click here to find out how products are selected for rating in secret.

International award

Last year, MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Testing is carried out by the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials on behalf of the MotoCAP partners.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

The History and Evolution of the Leather Motorcycle Jacket

The Iconic Leather Jacket

The leather motorcycle jacket is an icon. It’s as much a style choice as a piece of protective motorcycle gear. The leather jacket now is offered in a wide variety of styles and this has only improved its popularity. 

This iconic garment, and extremely important piece of motorcycle gear, has changed and evolved over time. It’s made its way into popular culture and the very history of the world. The leather jacket is now one of the pieces of clothing we should all have in the closet whether your ride or not. 

Because of the importance of the leather jacket, I thought it best to take a look at the history of the leather jacket, and specifically the leather biker jacket. Let’s start at the beginning. 

Where Did Things Start?

leather jackets in The Wild One

The original company behind the leather jacket design that has become so popular is Schott NYC. This New York company started making leather jackets in 1913. 

The company made leather jackets of all kinds and in 1928, it produced its first leather motorcycle jacket. It was named the Perfecto and a version of it is still manufactured today. The jacket was a hit thanks to smartly placed pockets and a large zipper. Most other leather jackets at the time had buttons, and this zippered design was far superior. 

These jackets and versions similar were then used in the military in WWII. This helped their popularity in many different circles. They were specifically used in the air-force, but versions appeared in other branches of the military as well. 

The leather motorcycle jacket that Schott designed was successful, but it wasn’t until the 1950s that it really skyrocketed to success and birthed a whole slew of copycat designs and other spinoff designs. 

In 1953, heartthrob Marlon Brando wore one in The Wild One movie. This movie was very popular and became a legendary film for the world of motorcycling. Schott’s jacket was suddenly known by most Americans. From there, it spread around the world and became a cultural icon and a symbol of counterculture. 

Shifting into the 1960s, the classic biker jacket design that Schott pioneered was associated with carefree attitudes and rock and roll this furthered its counterculture identity. The design could be seen pretty much everywhere, and it became even more of a stylish thing to wear. 

This trend of the leather jacket as a stylish garment continued in the 1970s and on into the 1980s with the leather jacket, and specifically the biker jacket design, as a symbol of someone who was individualistic and free-spirited. 

This symbolism of the leather jacket continued into the 1990s and is still prevalent today. These days there are far more styles and variations of the classic leather jacket, but the image of a person who wears one was solidified early on and continues to thrive today. 

How Have Things Evolved?

woman in leather jacket

The leather jacket is a style choice today. It’s also one of the best ways to stay safe and comfortable while riding a motorcycle. Leather has inherent qualities that allow it to be one of the best materials for protective motorcycle gear. 

The classic design that was pioneered by Schott persists. However, other companies have taken on the design and made it their own. Also, plenty of other designs have made their way into people’s wardrobes and on their backs when riding motorcycles. 

There are now bomber-style jackets, shearling leather jackets, hooded leather jackets, casual leather jackets, and more. These come in at a wide variety of price points, but you’ll often find the truly excellent jackets come with a high price tag. In other words, you tend to get what you pay for. 

The style has evolved, but so has the construction and the materials used. There are now plenty of grades of leather that are used and the pockets, zippers, and cuts of the jackets have evolved and changed as the trends do. 

What’s most surprising about the leather jacket is that it’s actually very similar to the originals from the 1920s, and the rebellious identity that comes with leather jackets persists to this day. 

The Modern Leather Motorcycle Jacket

leather motorcycle jacket

While any well-made leather jacket can be worn on a motorcycle and provide some protection, there are numerous leather jackets specifically designed for motorcycle riders. Many of these jackets offer far more than full-grain leather as protection. 

You’ll often find motorcycle jackets feature padding and armor in the shoulders, elbows, and back. They also have vents for airflow and additional pockets designed specifically for motorcycle riders. 

There are also motorcycle jackets that aren’t leather, but they lack the sense of style that all leather jackets have. If you want to find yourself a good leather motorcycle jacket, check out the jacket reviews on our website and our sister website Web Bike World.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com