Tag Archives: Jacket

Bull-It Tactical Hoodie jacket tested

The hoodie is becoming a big fashion trend among urban riders so now award-winning UK protective clothing company, Covec Limited has introduced a Tactical Hoodie to their Bull-It range.

It’s a comfortable and versatile jacket with some interesting features and suitable protection for the urban environment.

Bull-It Tactical Hoodie comes in black in sizes S to 4XL for £199.99 (about $A360).

Hoodie styleCovec Bull-It Tactical hoodie

I’ve been wearing this soft-canvas-feel jacket for a few weeks now and find it very comfortable both on and off the bike.

Apart from being a trendy style, the hoodie is also practical for extra warmth when you are off the bike.

I’ve worn a few hoodie motorcycle jackets and have found some annoying because the hoodie section flaps around and can slightly impede head movement.

Despite the fact that the hoodie can’t be removed or clipped down, it doesn’t affect head movement nor flap around. The pull cords do flap in the breeze, but they are soft and don’t annoy or distract.

It features a zip-out full-size quilted liner, but it’s not really a winter jacket. It’s more suited to temperatures between 12C and 30C.

A clever feature of the liner is the extra high corduroy-lined collar which snap-locks together and provides some protection from the cold so you don’t need to wear a neck sock.Covec Bull-It Tactical hoodie

The waist band and cuffs are elasticised for a firm fit and the cuffs also feature loops that go around your thumbs to prevent the wind pulling your sleeves up.Covec Bull-It Tactical hoodie

The two outside pockets have waterproof YKK zips and the taped seams are waterproof, but the pockets and the jacket outer shell are not waterproof, only shower resistant.

Inside are two pockets in the liner and two in the jacket itself which are difficult to access when you have the liner in.

The inside jacket pockets have Velcro’s fasteners but there are no fastenings on the liner pockets, so be careful when throwing your jacket over a cafe chair as your wallet could fall out as I found!

SafetyCovec Bull-It Tactical

This isn’t a jacket you would wear to a race track.

It’s more suited to the urban environment or for touring where comfort and flexibility play an important primary safety feature.

As MotoCAP chief scientist Chris Hurren explains in this video, there are different levels of abrasion, impact and seam-bursting protection required for different types of riding.

This jacket has not yet been tested by MotoCAP.

However, it features Covec yarn in the outer shell to boost abrasion resistance reinforced with Covec’s “Webtech” race-developed abrasion protection.

It has been tested to the new CE standard (17092) standard for AA protection.

They say it also has lower thermal conductivity which reduces chances of friction burns in a slide down the road.

It comes standard with CE 1621 Level 2-approved armour in the shoulders, elbows/forearm and back.

There are some reflective strips on the jacket for night visibility but they are fairly small.

It also features two elasticised loops in the bottom of the jacket that attach the jacket to the belt loops on your pants so they don’t become detached and expose your body in a crash.

The jacket would go well Bull-It’s Tactical cargo pants.

About Covec LtdBull-it Jeans win enterprise award

Covec Limited is the parent company of Bull-it Jeans.

In April 2020, they received the Queen’s Award for Enterprise recognising their export success to 14 different countries in Europe, Australia, North America and New Zealand.

Covec developed their protective textile material by re-engineering inflexible liquid crystal polymer to achieve abrasion resistance, weather-proofing, low thermal conductivity and improved strength.

Covec’s material is used in sportswear, military clothing and their motorcycle clothing brand, Bull-it, which makes jeans, leggings and jackets.

It is also licensed to a variety of global brands including Triumph Motorcycles, Rokker of Switzerland, KLIM USA, RevZilla, IXS and The Bike Shed Motorcycle Club.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Ulka Gear jacket becomes handy backpack

Carrying your helmet around with you can be a pain, but the Ulka Gear motorcycle jacket transforms into a handy backpack that also holds your lid, gloves, goggles and more!

These Indian-made jackets come in a Hakkit Forever touring and Hakkit V2 city version, both suitable for the hot Indian climate.

Prices are quoted in Indian rupee and translate to about $A170 to $A210 plus postage.

Handy jacket

Ulka Gear is the brainchild of company founder and former national circuit racer and trainer Shahnawaz Karim.

“When hitting the open roads, the biker’s gears including helmet, jackets etc. is of paramount significance thus offering maximum functionality,” he says in the official press release.Ulka Gear GHakkit Forever handy jacket

I understand the pulse of the motorcycle bikers and aim to provide with a motorcycling experience.

“We designed a convertible jacket which has weathered the test of time and aim to become one of the most iconic items of clothing for motorcyclist.

“I am optimistic that we would emerge in times to come as India’s most efficient rider’s apparel brand and global brand to reckon with.”

Ulka Gear GHakkit Forever handy jacketHakka V2 city jacket

The handy Ulka gear jackets are available in different sizes from XS to 3XL and they say they are unisex with an adjustable waist.

Other features include CE-approved back, shoulder and elbow armour and abrasion-resistant Cordura material.

Ulka Gear GHakkit Forever handy jacketHakkit Forever touring jacket

If you are riding in the rain, the pockets are “water-resistant” which is not the same as waterproof but there is a waterproof rain cover you can wear over the jacket. U can also wear it inside for warmth.

Hakkit Forever also has a pocket on the left forearm for your mobile phone.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP ratings for more than 200 items

Australia’s internationally awarded MotoCAP safety and thermal comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing has added 15 jackets to its list of more than 200 tested items.

The safety intitiative, launched in September 2018, is the first of its type in the world.

It has now rated 202 items of clothing, including  105 jackets, 50 pairs of pants and 47 pairs of gloves.

Latest MotoCAP testing

In the latest round of testing, MotoCAP has added 15 textile and leather jackets.

The RST Adventure III textile jacket shares the equal highest safety rating awarded to a textile jacket yet, having received three out of five stars.MotoCAP now rates more than 200 items

The Ixon Frantic leather jacket adds to the range of high performing leather jackets, having received four out of five stars for safety.MotoCAP now rates more than 200 items

Click here for all the MotoCAP jackets ratings.

International award

Last year, MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

MotoCAP gives clothing two separate star ratings – one for protection and one for heat management or comfort.

Clothing manufacturers’ advertising is not an extremely useful resource for protection in a crash or from the extremes of an Australian summer.

Australian Motorcycle Council Protective Clothing sub-committee chair Brian Wood points out that MotoCAP tests the whole garment, unlike European Protective Clothing Standards which only tests samples of fabrics, fastenings and stitching.

“(It) gives the motorcycle community more information when they are making choices about the clothing they wear when riding,” he says.

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Testing is carried out by the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials on behalf of the MotoCAP partners.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Warranty issues on motorcycle clothing

If you’ve ever had motorcycle gear fail through wear and tear or a crash, it could be covered by the Australian Trades Practices Act and/or the manufacturer’s warranty.

But first, click here to see the difference between a product failure and rider error.

Consumer protection

If it’s a genuine product failure, then it is deemed “not fit for purpose” and the Act will offer consumer protection.

The problem is that “fit for purpose” can be difficult to quantify and prove.

However, if the garment makes a specific claim that is not met, then that is a pretty clear case of product failure.

Otherwise, if it fails to meet basic acceptable standards such as the zipper failing, you should be due a repair, refund or replacement.

LDM ExoFlex jacketYKK zips

Most protective motorcycle clothing brands vie for consumer dollars by also offering manufacturer warranties that go above and beyond the basic statutory requirements.

They can vary from one year to as many as seven years.

A one-year warranty may be sufficient to reveal any issues if you are a regular rider.

However, weekend warriors or monthly riders may require a longer warranty period to identify any problems.

Warranty conditions

Riders should also note that a warranty is only as good as the fine print exclusions and conditions.

For example, some warranties may exclude track use and even crashes which is strange since surely the main reason to buy protective motorcycle clothing is to protect you in a crash.

Interestingly, one company also offers a crash guarantee on some of their gear, promising a replacement if the damage cannot be repaired for half the cost of a new item.

However, they do not cover gear that has been cut off by a first responder.

MotoCAP senior researcher Dr Chris Hurren awardChris Hurren and his Honda GB400

Dr Chris Hurren who researches protective materials for a living and worked with Dr Liz de Rome and others to produce the protocol used by MotoCAP for testing says a suitable warranty should cover materials, closures and seams.

“It should cover defects from manufacture and use of faulty components during assembly,” he says.

“A warranty will also allow a manufacturer to see what is giving problems with their garments and allow them to find an alternative as they will see trends in components or seam failures.

“Most warranties will not cover general wear and tear or ageing from extended use but these are sensible as they are out of the control of the manufacturer.”

CE approved

Link International product manager Ron Grant points out that a major benefit of buying European CE-approved riding gear is that once approved, manufacturers are not allowed to change material, stitch lines, manufacturing plant, etc.

If they do, the garment has to be re-submitted for testing at an average cost of about $10,000 per garment.

“This guarantees product consistency,” Ron says.

“Non-CE brands usually place an order for jackets, don’t actually go to the factories for quality control checks, cannot guarantee the material used is the same quality as last production, nor even guarantee who is making the gear as there is potential the factory the product was ordered from may sub-contract production to someone else,” he warns.

Ron says one of the biggest issues facing the industry is not just trying to teach riders what garment is better than the other, but also the necessity to actually wear safety gear.

“Recently I saw a guy on a new sports bike with brand new boots, leather jacket, gloves, top-of-the-range helmet and board shorts,” he says.

“Every day I see guys geared up on their way to work wearing runners or lace up work shoes. Or no jacket. Or shorts. Or normal jeans. The other day I saw a guy fanging over Mt G with a pretty young lady on the back with a string top and skimpy shorts.”

He says the onus is on experienced salesperson to expertly advise customers so they buy the right gear for their use.

“Of course, that is all negated when buying online,” he says.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Motorcycle riding gear failures

Your motorcycle jackets, pants, gloves and boots that are supposed to protect you in a crash, can sometimes experience failures of the most basic test of simple wear and tear.

However, it is important to differentiate a product failure from a rider error.

Product failures

We recently bought a pair of motorcycle gloves (pictured above) that split the stitching at the cuff after a few weeks of normal riding.

The gloves had a one-year warranty and the shop contacted the distributor who replaced them.

Motorcycle riding gear failures glovesSame failure

Only a few weeks later the second pair failed in exactly the same way.

Obviously there appears to be an inherent design fault in the gloves.

This is not the only example of motorcycle protective gear failing the basic wear and tear test.

Dr Chris Hurren who researches protective materials for a living and worked with Dr Liz de Rome and others to produce the protocol used by MotoCAP for testing has also experienced basic wear failures.

While trying on a pair of protective denim pants in a store, the top button above the zip pulled apart and fell off.

“This was obviously a problem that the manufacturer knew about as the garment came with a spare metal button however in reality should the product have been in the market place in the first place,” he says.

“This failure before even leaving the store should be a quick indicator of the build product of a garment.”

It’s not Dr Hurren’s only personal encounter with a wear failure.

After spending $700 on a leather jacket, he found the zip failed after two years.

“I have since observed new jackets hanging in store from the same manufacturer with a zip that was corroded and already causing trouble during use,” he says.

“The addition of a low-cost zip to a high-cost jacket significantly reduces its working life.

“Closures like zips, buttons and clips often have higher loading due to body size and may be strained to failure during impact grip with the road in a crash.”

MotoCAP senior researcher Dr Chris HurrenDr Chris Hurren

Rider error

However, some complaints about protective clothing failures can be due to rider error, not product failure.

Waterproof claims are a classic example, says Link International product manager Ron Grant.

“You can have the best jacket in the world, but if you don’t get all the closures correctly positioned, ensure your shirt collar or cuffs aren’t exposed (which creates a wicking point for water entry) you will still get wet,” he says.

“The majority of wet claims I believe are mainly due to incorrect usage or fitment.

“If you wear gloves over your cuff, water penetrates through the jacket stitching in the chest and arms, runs down between the outer shell and the outside of the waterproof liner (so the rider is still dry) and drains straight into the gloves. This is not a glove issue but a rider fitment issue.

“Likewise with waterproof boots. I see riders buy ‘shorty’ waterproof boots and then complain they get wet feet.

Draggin Hydro waterproof jacket and pantsDraggin Hydro waterproof jacket and pants

“If you have a look at their rain pants when their feet are on the pegs, the rain pants may ride up just enough to allow water into the boots.”

Riders also have a duty to maintain and treat their gear appropriately.

For example, zippers can get dry from dust and bugs etc. An occasional rub over with a candle or an appropriate wax on the zipper teeth will help the zipper slide smoothly and last longer.

Likewise, screwing up a zip in waterproof liner and securing it under a couple of Occy straps can damage the waterproof coating allowing water to enter the jacket. 

Warranty

If your riding gear has experienced a genuine product failure, you may be due a replacement or repair under warranty.

Click here to find out more about warranties.

Have you ever had motorcycle gear fail a basic wear test? Leave your comments below.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Multiple material layers are safer for riders

Riding gear with multiple layers usually rates higher for abrasion safety than comparative gear, according to the MotoCAP safety and thermal comfort ratings system for motorcycle jackets, pants and gloves.

For example, leather alone provides about four seconds of protection before failure, but backing the leather with foam, 3D mesh or a leather patch can improve resistance up to 10 seconds.

The Doc explains multiple layer protection

MotoCAP senior researcher Dr Chris Hurren awardChris Hurren and his Honda GB400

Dr Chris Hurren who works at MotoCAP’s National Association of Testing Authorities-accredited laboratory at Deakin University, explains:

The reason it works is because when a garment hits a moving surface it is partially damaged by the initial contact with the road. If there is more than one layer and the outer layer is able to withstand bursting open on initial impact. It then protects any further layers from being damaged and the result is that the combination lasts longer.

MotoCAP, which was launched in September last year, has now rated 201 items of clothing, including 50 pairs of pants, 90 jackets and 61 pairs of gloves.

Last year MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

Dr Hurren provides a more scientific explanation for how layers of material offer better rider protection.

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched targetMotoCAP testing equipment at the Deakin Uni Geelong campus

Physics wise, the failure of protective materials is from ripping out of fibres by the macrostructure of the road. This is the same for leather and textiles as leathers are also made up of fibres.

Abrasion damage is affected most by force and area. A small force on a large area will have low abrasion, the same force on a smaller area will have increased abrasion. So considering a glove our body puts a fixed amount of force down the arm on to the ground. If we have the palm of our hand in contact with the ground then the area involved in abrasion is much larger than if we have only the side of the hand and little finger even though the force remains the same.

This is why a little finger in a glove should have a double layer of leather to better protect it than the palm where the force is spread over a larger area. 

Alpinestars GP Plus 2R glovesAlpinestars GP Plus R2 motorcycle gloves are only the second pair of gloves to be awarded a full five stars for safety by MotoCAP.

When we first hit the road the downward force is very high as we are falling from some height to hit the surface either in a low or high side crash. Of course a high-side crash will have more downward momentum than a low side. This results in large initial tearing of fibres from the surface of the outer material that leads to premature failure.

Once our downward momentum is stabilised and turned into forward momentum only the weight of our body is applying force to cause abrasion. When we have two layers the first one is damaged in the initial hit with the road and then the second layer when exposed is pristine and can withstand a longer abrasion time. It may also have sample of the previous layer present at the early stages of the second layer abrasion further helping abrasion resistance. 

Now all of this does not work if the outer material is weak or really stretchy. In both of these cases the outer layer bursts open on impact and the second layer is loaded up and stressed as well. This is why we see a number of the protective layer lined hoodies and ladies leggings performing poorly in MotoCAP. The outer layer bursts open on impact loading the protective layer up to forces it was not designed to be exposed to.

GoGo Gear Kevlar armoured leggings from BikieChicLeggings

An example of this would be a para-aramid liner gets 3 seconds abrasion time under a piece of denim but only 0.8 seconds under a hoodie fleecy fabric. Stretch causes problems because it lengthens the time and force of the initial road impact causing larger forces to be put through the outer fabric. 

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

What is the best wet weather riding gear?

What is the best motorcycle gear for riding in wet weather? Unfortunately, there is no simple answer.

It depends on the weather, how far you are riding, where you are going, the type of bike you are riding etc. Click here to read about Murphy’s Law of riding in the rain for a laugh.

Wet weather

If l’m riding on a hot day with the occasional storm I may not even stop to put gear on as the rain just acts as a type of air conditioning.

When the storm stops, the moisture in your gear will dry off in about 5-10 minutes if you keep going, anyway.

Also, if I’m riding a bike with a decent windscreen, I’ll simply huddle up behind the screen and keep going. It’s only when you stop on such a bike that you get wet.

Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide Limited Road Glide Boom Box rain wet infotainment audio technoOnly my knees got wet on this Harley full-dresser!

If I’m on a short ride, I may decide to just stop and have a coffee to wait out the passing weather.

But if I’m on a long trip and will be in the saddle for hours, wet weather, especially in winter, can turn into annoying and fatiguing puddles in your crutch unless you have decent wet weather gear.

There are three main types of wet weather riding gear.

  • Old-fashioned rain coat and wet pants that go over the top of your gear;
  • Waterproof inner liners that zip in and out of your jacket and pants; and
  • Laminated jackets and pants that are both weatherproof and breathable.

Waterproof versus weatherproofWet weather riding

Before we go into the advantages and disadvantages of each of the above, let’s first talk about “waterproof” and “weatherproof”.

Don’t be fooled into thinking something that is claimed to be weatherproof will keep you dry.

It will only protect you from light rain for a short period of time. 

To check waterproof ability, check the label for an “IP rating” which stands for “Ingress Protection”.

It consists of two numbers. The first from 0-6 measures protection from foreign bodies such as dust, while the second from 0-9K measures resistance to water.

Click here for more details.

If you pour a bit of water over an item of clothing it may bead, rather than saturating the material.

Don’t be fooled into thinking it is waterproof. It could just have a waxy or water-resistant coating.

This will have little or no waterproofing effect when you are riding. A good example is waxed cotton gear. It works for a short time, then almost draws water in like a sponge!

Furthermore, it will gradually wear out and need reapplication, especially after a ride in the rain or after washing.

Draggin Hydro waterproof jacket and pantsDraggin Hydro waterproof jacket and pants

I’ve also tested some gear by wearing it and being hosed at close quarters. While I stayed dry, the same gear did not work when I was riding as the pressure and duration of rain on a ride is much higher than a quick hose-down.

To be truly waterproof on a motorcycle where rain is hitting you at speed, you need a moisture IP rating of 6 and above.

Rain coating

Nelson-Rigg waterproof Aston rain suitNelson-Rigg waterproof Aston rain suit

The main advantage of wearing a rain coat or pants is that they are usually made of plastic or rubber which are “virtually” waterproof.

I say “virtually”, because you need to ensure the jacket and pants overlap and there are secure cuffs, pant bottoms and collar closures to stop the water getting in. Obviously you need waterproof gloves and boots as well.

Covers are also the cheapest option and can be worn over just about any type of gear. Even MotoGP racers will sometimes wear them.

When the wet weather stops, take them off, flick them out to dry and pack them away. Easy!

But there are several disadvantages with this gear, the first of which is that they are bulky and take up valuable luggage space.

They are often difficult to pull on over your gear and require you to take off your boots while standing in puddles of water at the side of the road.

Murphy's Law of riding in the rainMrs MBW has struggled into her wet gear with her handbag tucked underneath.

Make sure you get pants that have long waterproof zips up the legs so you can put them on without having to remove your boots.

Since they are waterproof, they also don’t breathe and in summer storms, you will sweat and boil.

On the flip side, as they are windproof, they create an extra layer of warmth in winter even when it’s not raining.

They are also fairy loose and flap around a lot which can be annoying, tiring and the flapping bits can get caught in footpegs, etc. Some come with tabs to pull them tighter.

Many modern rain coats and pants feature a mesh lining that not only makes them easier to pull on and off, but also creates an air layer that helps prevent sweating.

Liners

garbage bag wet liner - hacksHow about a cheap garbage bag wet liner!

Many modern motorcycle jackets and pants come with zip-in liners for both thermal comfort and moisture protection.

The liners don’t have to withstand the exposure of an outer rain coat, so they can be lighter and thinner material which makes them more comfortable and easier to pack away when not in use.

Gear with these liners can be reasonably expensive and you will find you only get what you pay for.

Check the IP rating and look for waterproof zips and tape over seams to ensure no leaks.

Some will have their own internal pockets. Otherwise, they will prevent you from accessing the pockets in your main jacket which can be a nuisance.

The biggest disadvantage is that the outer jacket and pants still get wet.wet mud water crossing adventure forget

This not only makes your gear heavy but will also introduce substantial windchill on a wintry day.

And when you get to your digs for the night, you will have a saturated jacket and pants to try to dry overnight before the next day’s adventures.

You can probably tell that I am not a fan of liners.

Manufacturers often claim the liner makes them suitable for all seasons.

However, I reckon anything that claims to be suitable in all conditions is usually a compromise.

Laminated gear

Five reasons to go riding in the rain Ducati GT1000 waterproof wet rainLaminated suit

These jackets and pants are super-hi-tech with material that not only keeps out water, but allows your skin underneath to breathe and not sweat.

They have tiny holes that are small enough to prevent water coming in but still allow body heat and vapour to escape.

Some even have vents to keep you cool in summer with a storm flap over the top to keep the wet weather out. Clever!

However, I’ve found that in areas where the material is pulled tight against your body, such as at the elbow, knee or your backside, the moisture can still get in.

Since you don’t need to carry extra layers and liners, there is no impact on your luggage space and they are the most convenient option as you don’t have to stop and zip in a liner or pull on a covering.

They are often quick drying and usually coated with an extra moisture repellent.

Although if you get off your bike after a ride in the rain and walk into a cafe, you will still leave a small puddle of water on the floor!

There are three big disadvantages with laminated gear: fashion, cost and effectiveness.

Ok, ok, I know. You don’t care about fashion.

KTM rally suit jacket textileWould you?

But do you really want to look like you are about to participate in a military band parade?

Most of these laminated jackets and pants simply look ridiculous.

If you don’t care what you look like, you may still care about the cost as laminated gear is the most expensive option.

In this case, cost and effectiveness against wet weather go hand in hand.

There is a vast difference in effectiveness related to cost.

While laminated suits are getting cheaper each year, a bargain outfit will not protect you from anything more than light showers.

If you want decent ingress protection, you can pay several thousand dollars for a full suit. And the more effective it is, the stiffer the material which makes them quite uncomfortable on a long trip.

Conclusion

Murphy's Law of riding in the rainSomewhere over the rainbow … it’s not raining.

It really depends on the type of wet weather, duration of your ride and your style of bike, but I still reckon a rain coat and pants is the best option.

If you can’t fit it in your luggage, put it in a plastic bag and tape it to your tank!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Biker Jacket the only one you’ll ever need?

An American motorcycle clothing company is about to launch the Biker Jacket that they claim is the only motorcycle jacket you will ever need.

The Biker Jacket, from Rybak Riding Gear & Apparel in Brooklyn, incorporates innovations such as fingerless gloves and magnetic drawstrings plus converts to a vest.

This video explains it all.

The company has almost doubled its $US10,000 Kickstarter goal with more than two weeks to go, so the Biker Jacket should come to market mid-year.

It will cost from $US238 for the textile hoodie version to $US524 for the leather/textile combo version. There are early bird discounts for Kickstarter backers.

You can also buy  just the vest section ($US174) and a cap ($US49) that converts to a face mask.

Biker Jacket features

Biker Jacket features include a detachable and collapsible hood, retractable sleeve cups, detachable sleeves, an interchangeable face panel, built-in ventilation, two-way zipper, magnetic catch plates so pull strings don’t dangle and flap around.

We often criticise motorcycle jackets for not having enough pockets, but this has 10!

They also have pockets or pouches to place CE armour. It doesn’t say if it comes with the jacket, but we think you can buy it as an option or fit your own. 

Customers have the option of jacket materials: abrasion-resistant Dyneema denim, cotton or leather.

The Dyneema and leather jackets have water-resistant properties, but are not waterproof.

And you can mix and match, such as having leather sleeves with a Dyneema vest section or vice versa.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP adds 15 safety and comfort ratings

The internationally awarded MotoCAP safety and thermal comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing has added 15 more items to its list of tested gear.

The Australian safety intitiative, launched in September last year, is the first of its type in the world.

It has now rated 186 items of clothing, including 50 pairs of pants, 90 jackets and 46 pairs of gloves.

Safety and comfort

Macna Vosges Nighteye comfortMacna Vosges Nighteye

Of the newly rated jackets, two were leather which scored two stars for safety. All the others were textile and scored just one star for safety except the Alpinestars T-Core Air Drystar and Macna Vosges Nighteye which scored two stars.

The best of the newly added jackets  for beating the current heatwave was the $500 Spidi Ventamax (top image on this page) which scored three stars for thermal comfort. The others scored from half a star to two stars.

Best of the newly rated pants are the Bull-It Covert Blue which scored two stars for safety and three for comfort and the BMW City denim trousers which only scored one safety star but four for comfort.

International award

Last month, MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

MotoCAP gives clothing two separate star ratings – one for protection and one for heat management or comfort.

Clothing manufacturers’ advertising is not an extremely useful resource for protection in a crash or from the extremes of an Australian summer.

Australian Motorcycle Council Protective Clothing sub-committee chair Brian Wood points out that MotoCAP tests the whole garment, unlike European Protective Clothing Standards which only tests samples of fabrics, fastenings and stitching.

“(It) gives the motorcycle community more information when they are making choices about the clothing they wear when riding,” he says.

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Testing is carried out by the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials on behalf of the MotoCAP partners.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Alpinestars airbag vest fits any jacket

Alpinestars has joined Dainese and Furygan in making an airbag vest that fits underneath any jacket.

Airbags were first included with a leather jacket or suit usually for racing where it is now mandatory in some categories.

They were followed by airbag vests that could be worn over the top of a jacket, or vests that were only suitable with a particular jacket.

Now this new age of airbag vests can be worn under any jacket, making them suitable for everyday riding protection.

We’re not sure exactly what happens when you wear one of these new vests underneath a tight motorcycle jacket. When it explodes, does it rip your jacket open like the Incredible Hulk?

The manufacturers say they work just fine if you zip out a thermal liner. They also say these vests provide thermal protection.

So in an Aussie summer, they could be awfully hot and uncomfortable, even with a flow-through ventilated jacket!

Alpinestars Tech-Air 5Alpinestars airbag vest

Alpinestars will unveil their Tech-Air 5 airbag at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas on 7 January 2020. 

It works via accelerometers that detect a crash.

The vest connects via Bluetooth to the Alpinestars Tech-Air smartphone app which shows whether the vest is armed, unarmed or triggered. Not sure why you need that because surely you will know when it’s been triggered!

There are no more details such as price or how much it costs to have the airbag re-armed after it’s been triggered.

The most important detail is whether you can re-arm it yourself like the Furygan or you have to send it back to the manufacturer like the Dainese vest.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com