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Aprilia RS 125 and Tuono 125 First Look Preview

The Aprilia RS 125 gets an updated engine and other updates in 2021.

The Aprilia RS 125 gets an updated engine and other updates in 2021. (Piaggio Group/)

Aprilia has unveiled new versions of its RS 125 sportbike and Tuono 125 naked motorcycles for 2021, though they won’t be making an appearance Stateside. The updates affect a range of elements, including the engine, electronics, and aesthetics.

The RS 125 can be fit with an optional electronic quickshifter.

The RS 125 can be fit with an optional electronic quickshifter. (Piaggio Group/)

Starting with the engine, both models benefit from a revised 124.2cc single which features an updated combustion chamber, new intake and exhaust ducts, and a new iridium spark plug. Valve function is updated to optimize the new intake system, and the throttle body is repositioned to help improve airflow to the cylinder head. There’s a new exhaust system as well, all contributing to more aggressive torque delivery. Peak power also comes on lower in the rev range. The bikes get a new Marelli MIUG4 ECU and revised final drive.

RELATED: 2021 Aprilia RX 125 and SX 125 First Look Preview

The mill sits inside a die-cast, twin-spar aluminum frame, and braking is provided by an improved system that features a four-piston radial caliper and 300mm disc at the front and single-piston, 220mm disc at the rear. The braking system is further improved by way of the new two-channel Bosch ABS system. Suspension is provided by a 40mm USD fork at the front and single shock at the rear, providing 4.3 inches and 4.7 inches of travel, respectively.

These two little rippers get freshened up for 2021.

These two little rippers get freshened up for 2021. (Piaggio Group/)

Both have a class-leading 3.8-gallon fuel tank and come with an underseat storage compartment. Riders can choose to have a USB charging port added on and can also upgrade either bike to include electronic quickshift. Lighting is full LED in 2021, and both bikes get new instrument panels that are compatible with the Aprilia MIA multimedia platform.

Both models get a new instrument panel.

Both models get a new instrument panel. (Piaggio Group/)

Designers freshened up the look of both bikes to better resemble their older siblings, the RS 660 and Tuono 660.

The Tuono 125 in Lightning White.

The Tuono 125 in Lightning White. (Piaggio Group/)

The RS 125 will come in two colorways, Aprilia Black or Sintesi Blue. There will also be a GP Replica edition that mimics the look of the RS-GP. It will come with the electronic quickshifter and single-seat tail fairing cover standard. The Tuono 125 will come in Aprilia Black, Lightning White, or Arrow Grey.

The Tuono 125 in Arrow Gray.

The Tuono 125 in Arrow Gray. (Piaggio Group/)

2021 Aprilia RS 125 & Tuono 125 Technical Specifications and Price

Price: N/A
Engine: 124.2cc, DOHC, liquid-cooled inline single-cylinder; 4-valve/cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 58.0 x 47.0mm
Compression Ratio: 12.6:1
Fuel Delivery: EFI
Clutch: Wet, multiplate
Transmission/Final Drive: 6-speed/chain
Frame: Twin-spar aluminum
Front Suspension: 40mm USD fork; 4.3 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Single shock; 4.7 in. travel
Front Brake: 4-piston caliper, 300mm disc w/ ABS
Rear Brake: 1-piston caliper, 220mm disc w/ ABS
Wheels, Front/Rear: 6-split-spoke light alloy
Tires, Front/Rear: 100/80-17 / 140/70-17
Rake/Trail: N/A
Wheelbase: 53.1 in.
Seat Height: 32.3 in. (RS 125)/31.9 in. (Tuono 125)
Fuel Capacity: 3.8 gal.
Claimed Curb Weight: 317 lb.
Warranty: N/A
Available: TBD
Contact: aprilia.com

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

2021 Honda CB650R MC Commute Review

The 2021 Honda CB650R ($9,199) rightfully places itself among Big Red’s sport standard lineup, placed between the entry-level and relatively affordable CB300R and the larger-displacement CB1000R. This middleweight certainly offers an engaging and entertaining experience for most experienced riders, while serving as an approachable platform for riders with fewer miles under their belts.

Editor’s note: We rode the CB650R during its US press introduction during the 2019 Honda CB650R First Ride Review and later in the 2019 Honda CB650R MC Commute Review. Peruse this content for added information about Big Red’s four-cylinder naked bike.

In this episode of MC Commute, we review the 2021 Honda CB650R as we ride to the <em>Motorcyclist</em> HQ.

In this episode of MC Commute, we review the 2021 Honda CB650R as we ride to the <em>Motorcyclist</em> HQ. (Jeff Allen/)

Following a successful introduction to the US market in 2019, Big Red has made a number of revisions to the middleweight CB for increased practicality and performance. Honda addressed issues with the CB’s ergonomics, suspension, and engine performance with good, well-balanced results. This middleweight grows more attractive to all riders, while still elegantly dressed in Honda’s Neo-Sports Café styling.

Powering the CB650R is a 649cc inline-four engine. While the bore measurement is identical to the competition-inspired CBR600RR, Honda increased the stroke to achieve the displacement.

Powering the CB650R is a 649cc inline-four engine. While the bore measurement is identical to the competition-inspired CBR600RR, Honda increased the stroke to achieve the displacement. (Jeff Allen/)

Honda chose a 649cc inline-four liquid-cooled powerplant for the CB650R, which sees a number of revisions aimed at improving emissions for the ’21 models year. Engineers made changes to the ECU mapping, camshaft lobes, and intake valve timing, as well as an all-new exhaust system with a new catalyst and muffler. An added benefit is an increase in peak output, which we recorded on our in-house Motorcyclist dyno. The CB650R produced a peak 81.9 hp at 10,900 rpm and 43.0 pound-feet of torque, which is a slight improvement to the 80.6 hp and 42.1 pound-feet that our last 2019 test unit recorded.

The CB650R sees a number of revisions in the 2021 model year. This LCD display has been repositioned to combat sun glare, while fonts have been changed to increase visibility of important information.

The CB650R sees a number of revisions in the 2021 model year. This LCD display has been repositioned to combat sun glare, while fonts have been changed to increase visibility of important information. (Jeff Allen/)

Opening the throttle on the CB650R offers approachable yet engaging acceleration, though an overly abrupt initial response is felt at slower speeds. The engine runs relatively vibration free and offers a comfortable highway ride settling in around 6,000 in top gear. The slick-shifting and well-spaced six-speed gearbox makes for easy work on both acceleration and deceleration. If I had one major gripe in the powerplant, the lack of clutch feel hinders the CB’s ability to efficiently accelerate away from a stop.

A pair of four-piston Nissin calipers clamping to 310mm discs bring the CB650R to a halt, even if lack of feel at the kever hinders their true stopping potential.

A pair of four-piston Nissin calipers clamping to 310mm discs bring the CB650R to a halt, even if lack of feel at the kever hinders their true stopping potential. (Jeff Allen/)

But the CB650R is an overall delightfully neutral ride, which benefits from a Showa Separate Function Big Piston fork (SFF-BP) for the ’21 model year. Although giving up some small-bump compliance over rough pavement for big-hit support needed in sporty scenarios, the suspension offers a likable balance. It’s light on its feet too. The CB tipped the Motorcyclist scales at a considerable 445 pounds with its 4.1-gallon fuel tank topped off, but corners effortlessly in a composed and confidence-inspiring manner. The OE-equipped Dunlop Sportmax D214 tires do an excellent job of connecting the Honda to the tarmac with great grip and feel.

The headlight on this CB650R is LED, as it is the same unit used on the larger-displacement CB1000R.

The headlight on this CB650R is LED, as it is the same unit used on the larger-displacement CB1000R. (Jeff Allen/)

Braking performance is less inspiring, unfortunately. Brought to a halt by dual four-piston Nissin calipers up front, the Honda’s outright stopping power is adequate. Where the issue lies is in the brake lever’s lack of feel and unimpressive initial bite. It requires a lot of lever pull to unlock its braking potential, but also lacks the ability to communicate the amount of pressure being applied to the discs. An upgrade in an aftermarket brake pad may help. But if there is a positive, ABS is standard and offers seamless intervention when needed.

This Showa monoshock features a seven-step preload adjustability. It offers a great balance of small-bump compliance and big-hit support.

This Showa monoshock features a seven-step preload adjustability. It offers a great balance of small-bump compliance and big-hit support. (Jeff Allen/)

Honda also made revisions to the CB650R’s ergonomic setup, most notably rolling the handlebar position slightly forward for a more neutral position. Overall, it’s a comfortable ergonomic setup. The reach to the bar is relaxed, while the up-and-back footpeg placement adds a hint of aggression to the rider triangle, which helps in hustling the Honda through quick successions of corners. The measured 32.0-inch seat height allowed for an easy flat-foot contact for this 5-foot-7 tester and helps in low-speed maneuvers and navigating dense traffic. Finally, the LCD display perched in front of the handlebar has been re-angled to combat glare and given larger fonts so the rider can easily identify vital information at speed. A nice touch, Honda.

Dressed in Honda’s Neo-Sports Café styling, the CB650R is one of three sport standard models in the lineup.

Dressed in Honda’s Neo-Sports Café styling, the CB650R is one of three sport standard models in the lineup. (Jeff Allen/)

The 2021 CB650R undeniably earns its spot in Honda’s lineup. Appropriately placed between the sport standard Honda models, this middleweight holds a place as a great all-around machine that strikes a balance of performance and versatility, while serving as an approachable steppingstone to the open-class market.

The 2021 CB650R is an approachable middleweight option for the Honda enthusiast. At $9,199, it may not exactly be a budget option, but is no stranger to Honda’s premium fit and finish.

The 2021 CB650R is an approachable middleweight option for the Honda enthusiast. At $9,199, it may not exactly be a budget option, but is no stranger to Honda’s premium fit and finish. (Jeff Allen/)

Gearbox

Helmet: Shoei RF-SR

Jacket: Alpinestars Newman Overshirt

Pants: Alpinestars Victory Denim

Boots: Alpinestars Faster-3 Rideknit

2021 Honda CB650R Specifications

MSRP: $9,199
Engine: 649cc, DOHC, liquid-cooled inline-four; 4 valves/cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 67.0mm x 46.0mm
Compression Ratio: 11.6:1
Transmission/Final Drive: 6-speed/chain
Motorcyclist Measured Horsepower: 81.9 hp @ 10,900 rpm
Motorcyclist Measured Torque: 43.0 lb.-ft. @ 8,000 rpm
Fuel System: PGM-FI w/ 32mm throttle bodies
Clutch: Wet, multiplate assist/slipper clutch
Frame: Steel diamond
Front Suspension: 41mm inverted Showa Separate Function Fork; 4.7 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Showa shock, spring-preload adjustability; 5.0 in. travel
Front Brake: Radial-mount 4-piston calipers, 310mm discs w/ ABS
Rear Brake: 1-piston caliper, 240mm disc w/ ABS
Wheels, Front/Rear: Cast aluminum; 17 x 3.5 in. front, 17 x 5.5 in. rear
Tires, Front/Rear: Dunlop Sportmax D214; 120/70-17 front, 180/55-17 rear
Rake/Trail: 32.0°/4.0 in.
Wheelbase: 57.0 in.
Motorcyclist Measured Seat Height: 32.0 in.
Fuel Capacity: 4.1 gal.
Motorcyclist Measured Wet Weight: 445 lb.
Availability: Now
Contact: powersports.honda.com

 

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

2021 Yamaha YZF-R1M MC Commute Review Gallery

Yamaha’s 2021 YZF-R1M ($26,099) continues to be pure excellence. We love the function and versatility of its Ohlins semi-active suspension.

Yamaha’s 2021 YZF-R1M ($26,099) continues to be pure excellence. We love the function and versatility of its Ohlins semi-active suspension. (Jeff Allen/)

Draped in full carbon fiber bodywork (including the tail section), Yamaha’s YZF-R1M looks like a bespoke piece of hardware for cruising around the street, or, setting fast lap times at the circuit.

Draped in full carbon fiber bodywork (including the tail section), Yamaha’s YZF-R1M looks like a bespoke piece of hardware for cruising around the street, or, setting fast lap times at the circuit. (Jeff Allen/)

The YZF-R1M stands out with its polished aluminum swingarm versus the standard model’s painted piece.

The YZF-R1M stands out with its polished aluminum swingarm versus the standard model’s painted piece. (Jeff Allen/)

The ‘21 YZF-R1M employs Ohlins latest and greatest semi-active electronic suspension with a gas-charged fork. The suspension offers versatile performance with a few pushes of a button.

The ‘21 YZF-R1M employs Ohlins latest and greatest semi-active electronic suspension with a gas-charged fork. The suspension offers versatile performance with a few pushes of a button. (Jeff Allen/)

The 998cc CP4 engine offers a growling exhaust note that sounds unlike any other inline four engine.

The 998cc CP4 engine offers a growling exhaust note that sounds unlike any other inline four engine. (Jeff Allen/)

The Tuning Fork brand pairs exclusivity with performance, and function with its ‘21 YZF-R1M superbike.

The Tuning Fork brand pairs exclusivity with performance, and function with its ‘21 YZF-R1M superbike. (Jeff Allen/)

Introduced for the 2015 model year, the YZF-R1M is the pinnacle of Yamaha’s production sportbike technology.

Introduced for the 2015 model year, the YZF-R1M is the pinnacle of Yamaha’s production sportbike technology. (Jeff Allen/)

Yamaha’s YZF-R1M is a hoot to ride, especially at the racetrack where its advanced rider aids and 165-horsepower I4 engine make for the ultimate play date.

Yamaha’s YZF-R1M is a hoot to ride, especially at the racetrack where its advanced rider aids and 165-horsepower I4 engine make for the ultimate play date. (Jeff Allen/)

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

2021 Honda CB1000R Black Edition Preview

The 2021 Honda CB1000R Black Edition will be available May 2021 starting at $12,999.

The 2021 Honda CB1000R Black Edition will be available May 2021 starting at $12,999. (Honda/)

Honda gives its CB1000R naked some love for 2021 with a sophisticated blacked-out look and a few choice upgrades. The bike will be available this May starting at $12,999.

Editor’s Note: We test rode the liter-sized CB during the 2018 Honda CB1000R Pairs Elegance And Performance and 2018 Honda CB1000R MC Commute Review articles/videos.

The new styling gives the machine its 2021 moniker, the CB1000R Black Edition, and touches just about every visible part of the bike. Honda used black plating and black anodizing techniques on the subframe, swingarm pivot plates, exhaust system, front suspension, and handlebar clamp among numerous other places.

In addition to the bold new colorway, the CB1000R gets a new three-level quickshifter for clutchless upshifts. A slip/assist clutch smooths out wheel hop on hard downshifts.

Honda fitted a new 5-inch TFT instrument panel to the bike also.

The CB1000R Black Edition is powered by a 998cc inline-four fit with ride-by-wire and four ride modes. Honda Selectable Torque Control is included to help dial performance in a variety of conditions. It utilizes a steel backbone frame suspended by a Showa SFF Big Piston fork, fully adjustable, and a Showa shock with spring preload and rebound damping adjustability. Four-piston radial-mount calipers grip two full-floating 310mm discs at the front while a single-piston caliper and 256mm disc handle braking duties at the back.

Honda utilizes LED lighting throughout, highlighted by a classic round headlight that emphasizes the brand’s Neo-Sports Café aesthetic, of which the CB1000R is a hallmark example. Other premium design features include a flangeless fuel tank, aluminum alloy detailing, a new rear splash guard that mounts directly to the swingarm, and a passenger seat cover.

The only available colorway for 2021 will be, you guessed it, Graphite Black.

2021 Honda CB1000R Black Edition Technical Specifications and Price

Price: $12,999
Engine: 998cc, DOHC, liquid-cooled inline-four; 4 valves/cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 75.0 x 56.5mm
Compression Ratio: 11.6:1
Fuel Delivery: PGM-FI w/ 44mm throttle bodies, ride-by-wire
Clutch: Wet, multiplate, slip/assist and quickshifter
Transmission/Final Drive: 6-speed/chain
Frame: Steel backbone
Front Suspension: Showa 43mm SFF-BP USD fork, fully adjustable; 5.2 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Showa shock, spring preload and rebound damping adjustable; 5.2 in. travel.
Front Brake: Radial-mounted 4-piston calipers, 310mm floating discs w/ ABS
Rear Brake: 1-piston caliper, 256mm disc w/ ABS
Wheels, Front/Rear: 17 in./17 in.
Tires, Front/Rear: 120/70-17 / 190/55-17
Rake/Trail: 24.7°/3.8 in.
Wheelbase: 57.3 in.
Seat Height: 32.7 in.
Fuel Capacity: 4.3 gal.
Claimed Curb Weight: 467 lb.
Warranty: 12-month, transferable, unlimited-mileage limited warranty
Available: May 2021
Contact: powersports.honda.com

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

How To Use A Motorcycle Chain Tool

Has your motorcycle chain seen better days? When it’s time to replace the chain on your streetbike, special tools make the job a whole lot easier. Today on MC Garage, we’re going to show you how to use a chain tool.

Here at the Motorcyclist office, we are blessed with a supply of perfectly prepped new motorcycles from manufacturers to review. It’s not often that we have a bike in our possession long enough to need a fresh chain. Case in point: this 2020 Husqvarna Svartpilen 701. Obviously, the chain is still in working condition but we are replacing it anyway, as an example. Ideally, we recommend replacing the sprockets at the same time as the chain, but for the sake of demonstration we will not be doing that today.

Break The Chain With A Motorcycle Chain Tool

First thing you need to do is remove the old chain. This requires “breaking” the chain. The breaking method is disconnecting the continuous loop, and I’ve seen some wild ways of doing this… I actually witnessed a friend use a pair of bolt cutters on his dirt bike chain. But to be fair, he isn’t a man of subtle and refined measures, and would probably fish with dynamite. We prefer using a chain tool.

Editor Justin Dawes demonstrates how to remove the drive chain from a motorcycle.In this episode of MC Garage we demonstrate how to remove the drive chain from a motorcycle.Albert Beltran

This D.I.D KM500R chain tool will press the rivets out of the chain using a hardened steel pusher pin applying tremendous force using the mechanical advantage of a threaded plunger, and the leverage of a couple of box-end wrenches. Just open up the tool, and place the U-shaped holder around the chain. Turn the pin around in the holder so that it protrudes. Slide the body in and set it in the “A” position so the pin lines up with the hole on the U holder. This is where the old riveted pin will exit the chain.

Line up the pin with the riveted pin, and hold the tool with one wrench while turning the pin holder clockwise to tighten the pin holder assembly. Simply put, this tool is a miniature press; turn to add more force until the riveted pin is pushed through. Back the tool out, and the old chain is broken. Time for the new chain.

Install The New Chain

Here’s a tip: When cutting the chain, push the pin out of the forward pin when working on the bottom of the chain. This gives you a free link to attach the new master link and chain to, so you can just pull the new chain through the front sprocket. Also don’t clean the shipping grease off until installed on the bike, especially if it’s an X-ring chain. You need lubrication to remain in the master link pins to be held in by the X-ring.

Install The Master Link

Now it’s time to install the new master link. Make sure the pins are greased. Lubrication is important to the life of your chain, and once the link is installed, the internal lubrication is sealed by the X-ring. If you don’t have enough lube, it can lead to early wear of the master link.

Slide in the master link and make sure the X-rings are in place. Place the X-rings in the pins sticking through and mount the link plate. Then install the U holder with the riveted pinheads lined up in the depressions. Flip the pin around in the pin holder and line up the pressure plate with the link plate with the holder marks lined up in the “A” position. This gives even pressure across the entire pressure plate and thereby the link plate. Turn and tighten until it is properly seated.

Rivet The Master Link In Place

Lastly, it’s time to rivet the new master link’s pins which will hold the link plate in the proper place until it’s time for a new chain. Pull the pressure plate out, set the holder to the “B” position in the tool, and line up the small nipple inside of the hole in the master link pin. Then once again tighten. The pin will flare locking the master link plate in its place. Tighten until the flare contacts the link plate. No more, no less.

Too much force and you can fracture or tear the metal pin at the flare, then there is a chance of a failure of the entire master link when it breaks free because of the weak flared rivet end. Not enough force will result in a loose link plate that will let the internal grease past the X-ring and the extra slop can wear the link pins prematurely.

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

Ride Motorcycles With Valentino Rossi And Dainese 2020

A similar opportunity was presented in 2019, and as with the previous iteration, the four tickets will be auctioned off to the highest bidders, with proceeds going to the Marco Simoncelli Foundation. Those who are lucky enough to make the cut will receive a riding helmet as a gift, along with photo and video services.

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

2020 Triumph Rocket 3 R And 3 GT Review First Ride

As we turned onto the highway, that power I sought showed itself in spades. A tidal wave of torque, to the tune of 163 pound-feet (claimed) greets the rider from 2,000 rpm to 5,000. And backed with 165 hp, the Rocket’s engine keeps pulling all the way to 6,000 rpm before plateauing at its 500-rpm-higher redline (7,000 rpm). The deep purr of the engine grew with the revs, winding up to a throaty growl but never a roar. I wanted an exhaust note to match the size and power of the engine. Muted by the muffler, the Rocket never really opened up and pulled at my heartstrings like I hoped it would—an aftermarket pipe would go a long way here.

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

Is This Custom Zero SR/F The Future Of Motorcycles?

Eccles drew inspiration from dragbikes, saying, “Dragbikes were an inspiration with the XP, you’re literally riding the motor. This is a deceptively powerful bike and I wanted to physically embody that raw power.” Other sources of inspiration include rally car aerodynamics and experimental aircraft. Scroll through the photos to see how all of this inspiration was embodied into a custom electric motorcycle.

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Road Glide First Look Preview

The new CVO Road Glide against a more conventional model; while anyone can order a standard-issue Road Glide, the CVO model will be as rare as hen’s teeth.The new CVO Road Glide against a more conventional model; while anyone can order a standard-issue Road Glide, the CVO model will be as rare as hen’s teeth.Harley-Davidson

The new CVO Road Glide, available in any color as long as it’s Premium Sand Dune (a sort of satiny eggshell with a pearl topcoat), stands out against its darker-hued stablemates and goes by Harley’s lettering nomenclature as FLTRXSE. It also cuts a unique niche for itself, not being a massive touring bike (Limited), three-wheeler (Tri Glide), or more conventional bagger (Street Glide, whose fork-mounted fairing and less streamlined bodywork conveys more nostalgia than sleekness).

This CVO’s paint is available only in one color: Sand Dune monotone, which is finished with a pearl topcoat. Look closer, and you’ll see gloss black and black onyx finishes.This CVO’s paint is available only in one color: Sand Dune monotone, which is finished with a pearl topcoat. Look closer, and you’ll see gloss black and black onyx finishes.Harley-Davidson

The Road Glide packs a Milwaukee-Eight 117 V-twin, a CVO-specific powerplant Harley says is the largest, most powerful engine it has ever offered. Feeding the mill is a high-performance Screamin’ Eagle Heavy Breather intake for better airflow into the engine. The nearly 2-liter twin produces 125 pound-feet of torque thanks to the revised intake and more aggressive camshaft; horsepower output is not quoted. Larger-diameter, 21-inch front and 18-inch rear split seven-spoke wheels add an airier look to the Road Glide’s profile, while aerodynamically resculpted bodywork ensures bits like the Fang front spoiler don’t adversely affect high-speed stability. A wind tunnel-tested shark nose fairing promises adequate protection from gusty breezes (as do heated handgrips), with triple slipstream vents to reduce uncomfortable buffeting. Mounted to the fairing are Daymaker LED reflector headlamps for appropriately blinding forward vision at night. Although the panniers won’t exactly swallow bulky objects like helmets, the molded saddlebags do incorporate One Touch latches for single-handed operation.

The front three-quarter view reveals clean lines and sleek contours.The front three-quarter view reveals clean lines and sleek contours.Harley-Davidson

Although it seems contrary to the old-school potato-potato vibe, Harley’s suite of tech manages to plant the CVO (somewhat reluctantly) into the 21st century. For starters, H-D Connect is Harley’s subscription-based cellular connectivity package that allows cellphones to tap into key info on the bike’s mechanical health, security status, and service needs. The Reflex Defensive Rider Systems uses cornering ABS and traction control along with features like a drag-torque slip control system to manage the motorcycle’s dynamics. The CVO also gets a wireless headset linked to the Boom! Box which uses 600 watts to power bi-amped speakers, and integrates a 6.5-inch touchscreen with navigation and Apple CarPlay.

An aerodynamically tested and developed fairing promises smooth high-speed riding.An aerodynamically tested and developed fairing promises smooth high-speed riding.Harley-Davidson

While custom bits like the Kahuna Collection muffler end caps and brake pedal cover are sure to garner attention, the CVO Road Glide’s ultimate secret weapon is its rarity: With only one or fewer bike available per dealership, this small-batch bike likely won’t last long.

Although it lacks the attractiveness of the Screamin’ Eagle Heavy Breather air cleaner, the left of the CVO still manages to look sharp.Although it lacks the attractiveness of the Screamin’ Eagle Heavy Breather air cleaner, the left of the CVO still manages to look sharp.Harley-Davidson

2020 Harley-Davidson CVO Road Glide Specifications, Features, And Price

PRICE $40,999
ENGINE 1,923cc (117ci) OHV four-stroke V-twin
BORE x STROKE 103.5mm x 114.3mm
COMPRESSION RATIO 10.2:1
FUEL DELIVERY Electronic sequential port fuel injection
CLUTCH Hydraulically actuated, wet
TRANSMISSION/FINAL DRIVE 6-speed/chain
FRAME Tubular steel
FRONT SUSPENSION 49mm dual bending valve; 3.6-in. travel
REAR SUSPENSION Hand-adjustable shock; 2.2-in. travel
FRONT BRAKES 4-piston caliper, dual 300mm discs w/ ABS
REAR BRAKE 4-piston caliper, 300mm disc w/ ABS
WHEELS, FRONT/REAR Split seven-spoke; 21.0-in. / 18.0-in.
TIRES, FRONT/REAR 130/60-21 / 180/55-18
RAKE/TRAIL 26.0°/6.8 in.
WHEELBASE 64.0 in.
SEAT HEIGHT 25.9 in.
FUEL CAPACITY 6.0 gal.
CLAIMED CURB WEIGHT 893 lb.
WARRANTY 24 months, unlimited mileage
AVAILABLE Now
CONTACT harley-davidson.com
The Screamin’ Eagle Heavy Breather air cleaner steps up the CVO’s street appeal.The Screamin’ Eagle Heavy Breather air cleaner steps up the CVO’s street appeal.Harley-Davidson
Dual-disc 300mm brakes work in conjunction with a series of electronic aids to maximize safety.Dual-disc 300mm brakes work in conjunction with a series of electronic aids to maximize safety.Harley-Davidson
Apart from the red and black CVO graphics at the rear, the new bike manages to look strictly sparse and minimal.Apart from the red and black CVO graphics at the rear, the new bike manages to look strictly sparse and minimal.Harley-Davidson

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com

2020 Ducati Scrambler 1100 PRO Preview

Ducati staged the first public appearance of its two, top-of-the-line Scrambler 1100 PRO models at ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena, California, for students, teachers, journalists, fans, and influencers. The move also marks the start of a design challenge posed to students of the lauded college, which is to design the Scrambler of the future. Students will submit designs directly to Ducati’s design team, and the winning student will receive an internship at the Ducati Design Center in Borgo Panigale, Italy.

Source: MotorCyclistOnline.com