Tag Archives: crash

Education most important road safety strategy

A clear majority of road users believe education is the most important road safety strategy, according to a preliminary review of a major survey on attitudes to road safety strategies.

Survey author Dr João Canoquena of the University of Notre Dame Australia says it is too early to reach conclusions from the survey.

“Road maintenance was mostly associated with motorcycle rider safety,” he says.

“Nearly half (47%) of the mentions of this road safety strategy were associated with motorcycle rider safety.

“Likewise, advertising of safety driving was more associated with motorcycle rider than any other road user group. In fact, 57% of the mentions of this strategy were linked with motorcycle rider safety.”

Volunteers needed

SA considers increasing rider ages education
We need you!

João says motorcycle riders dominated the survey after Motorbike Writer called for riders to ensure their voices were heard when transport authorities draft safety strategies.

Now João needs your help again.

He is seeking three volunteers to help him go through the results to rate the road safety options.

“We have collected over 800 safety strategy responses, divided into five categories (motorcycle rider safety, scooter rider safety, cyclist safety, pedestrian safety and car occupant safety),” Joao says.

“For a journal publication, I need to have the safety responses rated by at least two more people.”

João explains that rating involves placing the 800+ responses into categories such as education, training, enforcement etc. 

Volunteers will need some patience, commitment and Excel software to fill in the ratings.

You can volunteer by contacting João by clicking here and sending him an email.

Education wins in initial results

While the results are yet to be properly rated, an early reading of the results show that a clear majority of road users believe education is the most important road safety strategy.

Road safety strategies

Cyclist

Motorcyclist

Pedestrian

Scooter rider

Passenger

Total

Advertising of safety driving

0

8

1

3

2

14

Alcohol and drug testing

0

3

2

2

10

17

Distracted driving law enforcement

1

3

16

10

17

47

Driver and rider training

0

23

14

31

26

94

Graduated licensing schemes

0

7

1

7

2

17

In-vehicle technology

0

9

2

8

11

30

Lane filtering

0

10

1

6

0

17

Law enforcement

0

1

5

4

5

15

Mandatory helmet laws

4

10

0

12

3

29

Motorcycle-friendly road design

0

17

0

10

0

27

Pedestrian crossing rules

0

0

21

1

0

22

Pedestrian distraction awareness

0

0

26

0

0

26

Protective and reflective clothing

0

15

0

22

0

37

Regulation of vehicle equipment

0

5

0

0

36

41

Road maintenance

0

11

0

4

8

23

Safety road design

0

4

7

1

15

27

Speed limit management

0

7

33

12

7

59

Traffic separation

59

1

0

1

0

61

Total

64

134

129

134

142

603

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Take the online motorcycle safety quiz

A new motorcycle “Always On” safety campaign featuring an online 10-question quiz and video has just been launched by VicRoads but has already attracted some criticism.

Quiz quizzedABS VicRoads Always On safety campaign and quiz brakes

Most motorcycle representatives we spoke to are pleased there is a campaign about motorcycle safety.

However, there was some criticism of the quiz wording, the video edits and the over-reliance on electronic rider aids.

Motorcycle instructors and Victorian Government’s Motorcycle Experts Advisory Committee were consulted in the initial stages, but not the final edit.

MEAP rep Dean Marks says the test wording and video are consequently “flawed”.

“VicRoads will get eaten by experienced riders and instructors and the rest of the MEAP group and instructors,” he says.

Fellow MEAP rep and Victorian Motorcycle Council chair Peter Baulch says he hopes riders “get something out of the survey”.

However, he says the producers “have again adopted the ‘we know best’ attitude”.

Video errors include the rider entering a corner and gearing up, not down, and at a hairpin the rider accelerates instead of slowing.

Rider aids

One of the main flaws is the over-reliance on electronic rider aids such as ABS to save lives.

The video features a new Triumph Street Scrambler (good taste!) that comes with ABS and traction control.

ABS VicRoads Always On safety campaign and quiz brakes

The questionnaires states: “ABS stops wheel lock, traction control senses traction loss and stability control monitors the way you’re riding. These technologies work together to keep you on your bike.”

Peter queried the wording.

“I actually think road safety messages to riders should shift from ‘get a better bike’ (that is, get bikes with ABS) to a message along the lines of ‘become a better rider’,” he says.

Mandatory ABSABS VicRoads Always On safety campaign and quiz brakes

ABS becomes mandatory in November on new motorcycles over 125cc, while bikes with lower engine capacities must have either combined brakes systems (CBS) or ABS.

While authorities promote ABS as reducing crashes by 30%, motorcycle experts dispute the figures and say it dangerously gives riders a false sense of security.

The 2009 Maids Report reverse engineered almost 1000 accidents and found that in 80-87% of crashes riders took no evasive action such as braking, sub-limit braking or swerving.

Therefore, ABS would have had no effect.

VicRoads blunders

It’s not the first time VicRoads has overstated the effect of ABS on road safety.

In 2016, university safety researcher Ross Blackman criticised a VicRoads brochure that stated: “A motorcycle with ABS enhances your riding skills and techniques by preventing the wheels from locking, skidding and sliding under.”

Quite simply, no technology makes you a better rider. It only helps compensate for poor skills or emergencies, he said.

The VicRoads brochure also suggested riders retro-fit ABS, but there is no known aftermarket product.

VicRoads apologised for the misleading information and error when we pointed them out.

ABS is simply no substitute for good rider skills and the only way to get them is through training and practice.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Lower speeds at regional intersections

A plan to temporarily lower speed limits on regional highway intersections when approaching side-road traffic is detected may not work for motorcycles.

The technology has been initially installed at the intersection of Glenelg Highway and Dunkeld-Cavendish Road and Penshurst-Dunkeld Road, near Dunkeld, Victoria, and will be rolled out across the state.

Watch this video to see how it works.

The problem for riders is that it uses the same inductor loop technology deployed at traffic lights that often fails to detect small motorcycles.

Click here to read how to improve your chances of detection by these loops.

Lower regional speeds

The new technology follows a recent call to reduce speed limits on unsealed country roads.

VicRoads says this new side-road-activated speed technology will trigger an electronic speed sign to lower the speed from 100km/h to 70km/h on the Glenelg Highway.

“There are no plans to install speed cameras through the side-road-activated reduced speed zones,” VicRoads told us.

However, we expect there may be extra policing at these intersections to enforce compliance.

The electronic speed limit sign will also be activated by vehicles waiting to turn right from Glenelg Highway on to either Dunkeld-Cavendish Road or Penshurst-Dunkeld Road.

Lower speed limits on rural intersections
Glenelg Highway image shows Dunkeld-Cavendish Road on the left and Penshurst-Dunkeld Road on the right (Google Maps).

“The reduced speed limit will stay activated until there are no more vehicles on the side roads waiting to enter or cross the main road,” VicRoads says.

VicRoads is also installing short lengths of “flexible steel guard fence” in front of the new electronic signs to reduce the risk of motorists crashing into them.

Local rider Anthony Morrison says he is concerned about the new technology.

“My concern naturally as a rider coming along a 100km/h zone and suddenly presented with a 70 speed sign with a car behind me is scary just like the 40 with flashing lights,” he says.

Click here for more on the 40km/h emergency vehicle rule.

History of crashes

VicRoads says 70% of fatal intersection crashes in regional Victoria occur on high-speed roads.

“Intersections in regional areas have a greater risk due to higher travel speeds, particularly where small side roads meet main roads,” VicRoads says.

“This intersection near Dunkeld has seen two crashes in the past five years, with one resulting in serious injuries.”

VicRoads claims the benefits of side-road-activated speeds are:

  • Instructing drivers on the main road to slow down if there are other vehicles approaching from side roads;
  • giving drivers on the main road more time to react if side traffic fails to give way;
  • giving drivers on side roads more time to assess gaps in traffic and enter the main road safely;
  • letting drivers know they’re approaching an intersection, which will prepare them for any merging traffic; and 
  • significantly reducing the severity of crashes due to the reduced speed limit when traffic is merging from side roads.

“A similar program in New Zealand has reduced serious and fatal crashes at intersections by 89% since 2012,” VicRoads says.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Lightning strike kills American rider

Riders on the Storm may be a great rock song, but it is not a good tip as one American motorcyclist unfortunately found last weekend when his helmet was hit by a lightning strike.

Benjamin Austin Lee, 45, is one of 12 unlucky American riders struck and killed by lightning since 2006.

Most have been struck when standing next to their motorcycle while stopped by the side of the road.

However, Benjamin’s helmet was hit by lightning while he was riding on Florida’s Interstate 95 on Sunday, causing him to crash.

It is not yet known if the lightning strike or his crash caused his death, but he was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police posted the above photo of the rider’s helmet showing the damage from the lightning strike.

The sad incident is a reminder that riding in a lightning storm is not advisable.

Lightning strike myths

lightning strike
Even a Vincent Black Lightning can’t outrun lightning

There are many myths about lightning that need to be struck out first.

The main myth is that rubber tyres ground a vehicle and prevent lightning from striking it.

It is also a myth that if you stand under a tree or picnic shelter or even a service station forecourt roof you are safe. You need to be inside a building with a roof and walls to protect you.

There is also no point in trying to outrun lightning as it travels at nearly half-a-million kilometres-an-hour!

Even the world’s fastest production motorcycle, the aptly named Lightning LS-218, wouldn’t stand a chance even though it can travel at 218mph (about 350km/h), hence the name.

Lightning electric motorcycle fast electric LiveWire electric bike race expensive
Lightning record-holding electric race bike

Cars don’t need to outrun a lightning storm as the lightning energy passes safely over the metal roof of the vehicle. However, it can fry the vehicle’s electrics and cause fires.

Drivers and passengers in convertibles and motorcycle riders and pillions have been known to be killed by lightning strikes even while moving.

Lightning safety tips

Five to 10 Australians are killed annually by lightning strikes and about 100 seriously injured. There are no figures available for motorcyclist deaths by lightning.

However unlikely it might be, here are a few tips you can follow to avoid becoming a lightning statistic.

  • Keep an eye out for storms by checking the various weather apps on your phone. You may also want to subscribe to a weather alert service that advises of severe weather.
  • If a storm is nearby, don’t wait until it hits as lightning can strike up to 25km in front of an advancing storm.
  • Pull over and seek shelter in a ditch or somewhere low. Don’t stand next to your bike, a tree, a pole or any other tall or metal conductor of electricity!
  • Don’t pull over next to a river, creek, dam, pool or any other body of water. While it will not attract lightning, it will conduct electricity.
  • If you pull over in a roadside park with no shelter, you might politely ask a parked driver if you can shelter in their vehicle. But don’t touch anything metal inside the car or talk on your mobile phone.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Rider fighting for life after vehicle changes lanes

A Townsville rider is fighting for his life after being seriously injured in a crash last night when a vehicle changed lanes.

Police say the rider was travelling northbound on the Ring Road at Douglas about 7pm (10 June 2019) when a vehicle is believed to have changed lanes.

The rider was forced to take evasive action, lost control and was thrown from his motorcycle.

He was located by passing motorists unconscious on the road and taken to the Townsville Hospital with life-threatening injuries.

The driver of the vehicle stopped at the scene and spoke with police.

Forensic Crash Unit is continuing its investigation.

If you have information for police, contact Policelink on 131 444 or provide information using the online form 24hrs per day.

You can report information about crime anonymously to Crime Stoppers, a registered charity and community volunteer organisation, by calling 1800 333 000 or via crimestoppersqld.com.au 24hrs per day.

Our sincere best wishes to the rider for a speedy recovery.

Lane-changing crashes

The lane-change crash is one of four common accidents involving motorcycles and other vehicles as shown in the above NSW Transport video.

It is often the combined result of a rider being in the driver’s blind spot and the driver failing to look before changing lanes.

We all know drivers don’t look for motorcyclists for a variety of reasons.

It can be haste, ignorance, arrogance and even the lack of fear for the consequences. After all, hitting a motorcycle is less damaging than hitting a truck or another car.

Detecting a vehicle that is about to change lanes can be difficult, especially at highway speeds as it only takes a small movement to make a car change lanes.

However, riders can take these steps to avoid such accidents:

  1. Spend as little time as possible riding in another vehicle’s blind spot;
  2. If you can see the driver’s eyes in their wing mirror, then they can (but not necessarily will) see you;
  3. Look for any movement in the driver’s head or hands as this could indicate they are about to change lanes;
  4. Be aware of slight changes in the vehicle’s lane position as it could mean they are leaving the lane;
  5. If you’re lucky, they will indicate first, so you have time to slow and take evasive action;
  6. When passing vehicles take a wide berth, look for an escape route and pass them promptly, even if it requires a bit of extra speed; and
  7. Check your own mirrors in case another vehicle is following you as that will affect your avoidance strategy.

You can also alert drivers to your presence by blowing your horn or flashing your lights.

However, these may be illegal in some jurisdictions and could give the false message that you are letting them merge into your lane.

Don’t trust loud pipes to save you. Most drivers have their windows up, air-conditioning on and the radio turned up loud, so they may not hear you, anyway.

Besides, your pipes are facing away from the driver.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Sydney rider dies in Bali scooter crash

Sydney motorcycle dealer Peter Raymond Robinson, 59, has died in Bali when a truck ran through a red light and hit his scooter on Friday (7 June 2019).

Bali police have arrested the truck driver, 24-year-old Dicky Agung Wijaksana.

Graphic CCTV footage of the crash was posted on Instagram showing Peter’s head being run over by the truck’s rear wheel. We have chosen not to publish the video.

Bali scooter crash
Peter’s damaged scooter

Bali dangers

One Aussie tourist dies every nine days on the popular Indonesian tourist island.

In the past three months, three Australians have been killed in scooter crashes.

In April, Queensland father Erran Braddick, 32, died after being hit by a truck in Canggu, north of Seminyak, and in March Frankie Avalon Fonohema, 27, of Melbourne died after a scooter crash with a motorcycle, also in Canggu.

Our sincere condolences to their family and friends.

Holiday scooters

Bali scooter crash
Bali is a beautiful place to ride … but dangerous

Many Aussies holiday in Bali and many hire scooters and motorcycles to tour the island.

It is an offence to ride without a helmet in Bali and offenders will cop an on-the-spot fine.

If you try to bribe an officer, you could cop an extra fine.

Yet many tourists choose to flout the law and run the risk.

It is not suggested that any of these riders did not wear a helmet.

In fact, the CCTV images show Peter was wearing a helmet and no amount of rider gear could have saved him.

We suggest that all riders heading overseas take extra care to acclimatise to the traffic.

Road rules and traffic behaviour can be radically different to what you would be used to.

Riders should also ensure they have adequate travel insurance to cover them in case of an unfortunate accident.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

5 Tips That Could Help You Avoid a Motorcycle Accident

(Sponsored post for our North American readers)

In the U.S., 5,286 people died from motorcycle accidents in 2016. Sadly, there is a much higher risk for fatalities in motorcycle accidents than car accidents. While there is no way to guarantee your safety on a motorcycle, there are a few things you can do to decrease your chances of an accident.

1. Use the Recommended Safety Gear

Certain places have rules mandating riders to wear protective gear on motorcycles. But even if your state does not require you to wear a helmet or other safety gear, you should. Doing so can keep you safe.

For instance, a safety vest makes you more visible to other drivers. Without one, you could go unnoticed by a driver switching lanes. But with one, you are more visible. They might see you before changing lanes or making a turn.

2. Go at a Safe Speed

If you drive too quickly, you put yourself at risk. When you speed, other drivers may not have time to react to you. You also have less control of your motorcycle. If there is a hazard in the road or a sudden traffic jam, you might not be able to stop in time.

Usually, a safe speed is the posted speed limit. But there is an exception. In bad weather, you should drive slower than usual. The roads are more dangerous, and you need to be able to stop suddenly. If you drive a safe speed, you can keep control on slippery roads or in windy conditions.

3. Remain Alert

Most people are guilty of distracted driving at some point in their life. Although the act is always dangerous, it’s even more hazardous on a motorcycle.

You need to always remain alert on your motorcycle. Sometimes, other drivers won’t see you. To avoid an accident, you must pay attention to all of the other vehicles on the road. When you pass through gaps in traffic, be on the lookout for cars changing lanes. You should also have extra caution at intersections and stop signs.

4. Stay Out of Blind Zones

If a car driver decides to change lanes, they usually look at their side and rearview mirrors. However, this doesn’t give them complete visibility. You may be in their blind zone. If you want to avoid an accident, you need to try to stay out of the blind zones of other vehicles.

To accomplish this, you should stay near the front of other vehicles. If possible, stay in another driver’s line of sight. You should also avoid riding between traffic lanes and parked vehicles. When you venture too close to a parked car, you risk a passenger opening their door and hitting you. Additionally, you risk a pedestrian stepping out in front of you.

5. Stay Up-to-Date on Maintenance

Whether you use your bike regularly or only on rare occasions, you need to stay up-to-date on your maintenance. This means keeping all of its parts in good condition. You should regularly check your brakes, lights, tires, and exhaust. If you fail to do so, a malfunction could cause you to be involved in an accident.

No matter how carefully you might drive, you could find yourself a victim of an accident. If you do, the stakes are high. You could lose your life or suffer from a permanent injury. With the help of a motorcycle accident lawyer in Miami, you can seek compensation for your injuries. You could receive money for your medical bills and more.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Rider dies in crash with turning truck

A 34-year-old male motorcycle rider has died in a crash with a truck that appears to have been turning across his path.

The accident happened about 2.15pm yesterday (7 June 2019) in Garfield Road East, Riverstone, in Sydney’s north-west.

Police have been told the motorcycle was travelling east along Garfield Road East when it collided with a Hino truck which was believed to be turning right on to Edmund Street.

The top photo shows the view the truck driver would have before turning right into Edmund St.Truck crash turning

The rider was treated by NSW Ambulance paramedics but died at the scene.

The male driver of the truck was uninjured.

Officers from Quakers Hill Police Area Command established a crime scene and commenced an investigation into the circumstances surrounding the crash.

A report will be prepared for the information of the Coroner.

Any charges arising from the incident are not expected until the Coroner concludes their report.

Our sincere condolences to the rider’s family and friends.

Common crashes

Most accidents involving motorcycles and other vehicles occur when the other vehicle is turning across their path.

The result can be lethal as the rider hits the vehicle in a t-bone fashion, rather than a glancing blow.

There are a number of scenarios of turning-vehicle crashes where the rider is completely blameless and others where they are at partial or complete fault.

But in the end, it doesn’t matter whose fault it is if the rider is dead.

These are the four most common crash situations where the other motorist is turning, often without looking for motorcycles:

  1. Oncoming driver turns across the rider’s path to enter a property or side street;
  2. Vehicle pulls out of a side street into the path of the motorcycle;
  3. Motorist pulls over to perform a u-turn without looking; and
  4. A vehicle in front suddenly turns without indicating just as a rider is overtaking them.

Look for these signs

We all know drivers don’t look for motorcyclists for a variety of reasons.

So riders need to assume the worst and look out for these signs in the above impending SMIDSY (Sorry Mate, I didn’t See You) situations:

  1. If an approaching vehicle has its indicators on, assume they may turn without giving way to you and look for movement of the wheels and the driver’s head turning;
  2. Be suspicious of all vehicles coming out of side streets (left or right) and again check their wheels and the driver’s head to see if they have seen you;
  3. Treat any vehicle that pulls over as a possible u-turn or at least that they will suddenly open their door and step out in front of you; and
  4. If the vehicle in front suddenly slows, don’t take the opportunity to pass them. Be cautious that they could be about to make a turn, even if they haven’t indicated.

How to avoid SMIDSY crashesTurning crash

In all the above four situations, slow down and be prepared to take some sort of evasive action, looking for a possible escape route.

If the driver is on a side street or oncoming, try to make eye contact with them.

Make yourself seen by moving in your lane.

You can also alert drivers to your presence by blowing your horn or flashing your lights, although these may be illegal in some jurisdictions and could give the false message that you are letting them cross your path.

Don’t trust loud pipes to save you. Most drivers have their windows up, air-conditioning on and the radio turned up loud, so they may not hear you, anyway.

Besides, in all these situations, your pipes are facing away from the driver.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Top Causes and Ways to Avoid Motorcycle Accidents

(Sponsored post for our North American readers)

Some people consider riding a motorcycle, not just a pure hobby, but  a lifestyle. Sense of adventure, excitement, and passion are some of the significant reasons why motorcycle enthusiasts ride. However, it can also be dangerous. Several factors can contribute to motorcycle accidents. And, both new and trained riders should know the common causes of this kind of accident and how they are going to avoid them. If you are among the motorcycle enthusiasts, the following information could help you on your next ride.

1.Hitting A Patch of Gravel or Sand

There are times that a rider may come across the rough patch across the road where it can cause panic as well as the loss of control over the vehicle. Tip: Give yourself a perfect time to register and then, respond to the obstacles. Make sure to have an open field of vision so that you can see your surroundings.

  1. A Car Turning Left in Front of You

Motorists may collide with your motorcycle while they are turning left around the corner and this kind of accident can be either due to the inattention of the drivers or you are in their blind spot. Tip: You can prevent this kind of collision by slowing down and gauging the other vehicle that is going to turn left. 

  1. A Car Hitting You from Behind

In a case where you are halting at an intersection or crosswalk to avoid something in front of you when a driver behind does not see you, it can result in them plowing into your bike. This kind of accident is known as “rear-ender.” Tip: make sure to slow down gradually before halting. You can also pull over to the roadside at intersections and then flash your brake lights to alert the other vehicles of your presence.

  1. Front Brake Was Locked

A cop, a deer, or a group of people suddenly appear in front of you, and you grab a fistful of your front brake. This kind of action can make your motorcycle cartwheel down the road. Tip: You need to learn how to use your front brake. Although it may be counter-intuitive, it can help you slow down much quicker than with engine braking.

  1. A Car Door Opened

A terrible motorcycle accident may occur if drivers fail to check the way is a clear before they pull out of a car park or open their door. Tip: To avoid a motorcycle accident caused by this circumstance, try to avoid riding closely to parked vehicles on a busy street. On the other hand, if it is impossible to avoid, you can ride at a regulated speed and be alert to signs of activities in parked vehicles.

A motorcycle ride can cause you incomparable excitement and happiness, but at the same time, road accidents. If you encounter these accidents, you can consult a motorcycle accident attorney to help you settle things and safely continue your lifestyle.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

George Clooney opens up on scooter crash

Movie star George Clooney says he is giving motorcycling a rest after a scooter crash in Italy last year that split his helmet in half.

Clooney, along with his friend Brad Pitt, is a great lover of motorcycles. He has been photographed on a variety of bikes including BMWs, Moto Guzzis, Harleys and Triumphs.

George Clooney crash accident
Clooney riding with a friend

Even though he crashed in Sardinia in June last year, he is only now talking about the incident because he is spruiking his new Stan series Catch 22.

He has been telling various media organisations that the crash happened while he was filming the TV series.

Clooney’s scooter crash

George Clooney crash accident
Clooney’s crashed scooter

Clooney says a Mercedes driver pulled out in front of his max-scooter when he was travelling at about 110km/h.

He was thrown from the scooter and the impact split his helmet in two and knocked him out of his shoes.

Now, we have two questions: What sort of helmet was it and was he wearing sneakers or elasticised boots?

We’ve seen photos of him on motorbikes and he doesn’t seem to be wearing decent motorcycle gear. Sometimes he just wears sneakers, jeans, no jacket and even no helmet!

George Clooney crash accident
At least the boots look sturdy!

That may be fine for putt-putting around Lake Como’s quaint villages where he lives.

However, if he’s travelling 110km/h on a maxi-scooter, surely he should be wearing proper motorcycle protective gear.

Set an exampleGeorge Clooney crash accident

Having celebrities riding motorcycles is great for motorcycling as it inspires people to follow suit.

But it’s not a great advertisement for motorcycling if they crash without wearing proper gear.

He needs to set an example to other riders.

It’s also not great for motorcycling when he says he may be giving up on riding.

He actually says: “If you get nine lives, I got all of them used up at once — so I can let go of motorcycle riding for a while.”

Notice he is not giving up for ever!

Hopefully, if he gets back on a motorcycle or scooter he will wear proper gear and promote the importance of wearing the correct protection.

If he’s still concerned about riding again, maybe he should read our tips for getting back in the saddle after a crash!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com