Tag Archives: crash

Two riders die in overnight crashes

Police in NSW and Queensland are investigating two crashes in which riders died early last night (20 August 2019).

In one incident, police say a motorcycle was travelling eastbound along the Warrego Highway three kilometres from Minden about 6.30pm when the rider “has attempted to overtake two trucks and has lost control”.

“As a result, the motorcyclist has collided with one of the trucks and was pronounced deceased at the scene,” police say.

If you have information for police, contact Policelink on 131 444 or provide information using the online form 24hrs per day.

You can report information about crime anonymously to Crime Stoppers, a registered charity and community volunteer organisation, by calling 1800 333 000 or via crimestoppersqld.com.au 24hrs per day.

Rider dies in Tweed Heads crash

Just across the border, an 18-year-old male rider died when his moped collided wth a Holden Colorado about 6pm in the southbound lanes on Ducat Street.

The teenager was knocked off the moped and was struck by a northbound Toyota Prado.

He died at the scene.

Officers from Tweed/Byron Police District attended and established a crime scene.

The 42-year-old male driver of the Holden, and the 46-year-old female driver of the Toyota were uninjured.

They were taken to Tweed Heads Hospital for mandatory blood and urine tests.

The road was closed for about five hours while the scene was examined.

Inquiries continue and a report will be prepared for the Coroner.

Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact Crime Stoppers: 1800 333 000 or https://nsw.crimestoppers.com.au. Information is treated in strict confidence. The public is reminded not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

  • Our sincere condolences to the riders’ friends and families.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Cheap justice in rider’s roadworks crash

More than three years after a Darwin rider died in a roadworks crash (photo above), the court has dished out cheap justice for the life of the rider.

Queensland company BMD Constructions had faced fines of up to $1.5m for failing to comply with work health and safety obligations over the death of Darwin musician Peter “Pedro” Bonnell.

Instead, NT Worksafe has accepted an enforceable undertaking from the company to spend just $305,000 in activities to improve motorist as well as worker safety.

However, it seems most of the money will be spent on staff awareness of silicosis and mental health issues, rather than motorist safety.

Only $20,000 will be spent on bringing workers up to the Work Zone Traffic Controller (WZ2) qualification standard.

An undisclosed sum will also be spent on creating an “e-learning training package for general awareness of traffic management for the NT construction industry”.

Cheap justice

It seems like cheap justice for the life of a rider and does little to make other roadworks companies liable for shoddy roadworks and traffic management procedures.

Pedro died on April 20, 2016, when his motorbike crashed into a traffic diversion set up as part of the Tiger Brennan Drive duplication roadworks.

Justice moves slowly in roadworks crash death of Darwin rider and well-known musician Peter “Pedro” Bonnell
Darwin musician Peter “Pedro” Bonnell

NT Worksafe alleged the traffic diversion set-up was not in accordance with an approved traffic control diagram and not compliant with Australian Standards.

They also alleged BMD Constructions used interlocking crash barriers without reflective bollards that were not compliant with Australian Standards, and failed in other safety areas.

NT WorkSafe Acting Executive Director Mel Garde said it was appropriate to accept the enforceable undertaking as the traffic diversion set-up was not the sole contributing factor to the incident.

She says several of the activities in the sanction will up-skill the construction industry on traffic management, creating a safer environment for workers and the wider community.

“Traffic management is an important factor in maintaining a safe workplace,” she says.

“There is an obligation to not only protect workers from the hazards of oncoming traffic, but also to protect road users from potential hazards created by the worksite.

“The driving skill and experience of road users will vary widely so it is critical that traffic management plans and traffic diversions are compliant with Australian Standards, so that all road users can safely navigate them.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Bail refused in scooter hit-run crash

A 55-year-old driver who allegedly failed to stop after colliding with a Vespa scooter rider in Sydney has been refused bail in court today (16 August 2019).

Paul Andrew Brown faced court charged with failing to stop and render aid, negligent driving occasioning grievous bodily harm, and not exchange particulars.

Police say the matter involved an incident at 7.45pm on Wednesday (14 August 2019) when emergency services were called to the intersection of Wellbank and Spring streets at Concord, after a Vespa motor scooter and a Toyota Hilux ute collided.

Hit run bail
Image: Google Maps

“The driver of the utility allegedly failed to stop to render assistance and continued to drive north on Spring Street,” police say.

The rider of the scooter, a 34-year-old woman, suffered serious injuries and was taken to Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, where she remains in a stable condition.

Officers from the Crash Investigation Unit found the ute parked in North Strathfield about 2.30pm yesterday (Thursday 15 August 2019).

After a short foot pursuit, police arrested Brown and took him to Burwood Police Station.

He was jailed overnight and appeared in Burwood Local Court this morning where he was again refused bail until his next scheduled court appearance on August 27.

Spare of incidents

The incident follows a worrying spate of hit-and-run crashes leaving motorcyclists injured and dead.

In NSW, the requirement for those involved in a crash to remain at the scene until police arrive was dropped in 2014, even if a tow truck is required.

However, the motorists must report the incident to police and remain at the scene if anyone is injured.

If they don’t, police can charge a motorist with failing to stop at the scene of an accident which is considered a serious offence.

Depending on whether someone is injured or killed in the crash, the motorist responsible could face serious charges with up to 10 years in jail.

Police say motorists leaving an accident scene where someone is injured decrease a victim’s chance of survival.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Rider hits traffic sign in fatal crash

A 50-year-old male riders has died after his motorcycle hit a roadside traffic sign in rural Nowra, on the NSW south coast.

Police say that just before 3pm yesterday (14 August 2019) “a motorcycle travelling south on Parma Road at Yerriyong was approaching a bend, when it hit a traffic sign pole”.

The rider was unable to be revived and died at the scene.

A crime scene was established by South Coast Police District officers who are “conducting inquiries into the circumstances surrounding the crash”.

Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact Crime Stoppers: 1800 333 000 or https://nsw.crimestoppers.com.au. Information is treated in strict confidence. The public is reminded not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

Our condolences to the rider’s family and friends.

Traffic sign hazards

Two Austroads reports in 2014 and 2016 identified there were too many changes in speed zones and too much roadside “furniture” causing a particular hazard to riders.

Despite these reports, wire rope barriers, speed signs and other hazards have proliferated on our roadsides.

While the 2016 report said the road environment accounted for only 2% of motorcycle road deaths in single-vehicle crashes between 1999 and 2003, “certain road elements have the potential to contribute to the actual outcome and severity of the crash”.

It said the first step was to identify roads that pose the highest crash risk to motorcyclists, then perform safety audits.

The report recommended a raft of motorcycle-specific road modifications including:

  • install flexible but durable materials or shields underneath barriers (no mention of wire rope barriers!);Wire rope barrier better roads austroads report
  • install attenuators or energy dissipaters on posts and poles;
  • relocate trees, poles, signs and other roadside objects;
  • recommended maximums for potholes, ruts and cracks before repair is vital;
  • rapid road repair including quick removal of oil, diesel and other spills;
  • fluoro warning signage at known crash zones;
  • better-designed crash barriers (read this Austroads view);
  • improve road surfaces for skid resistance, road camber, badly located drains, rough edges, etc; and
  • add advance stop lines at intersections with filtering lanes for motorcycles to reach the front of traffic.
Most of these recommendations have been ignored by governments at all levels.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

‘Dodgy’ parking bays still not fixed

A council’s failure to fix thin bitumen in parking bays that caused a parked motorcycle to fall over could cost them if other bikes suffer the same fate.

Toowoomba tiding trainer Tony Gallagher says although council has dodged paying him compensation, they are now aware of the problem and may not be able to dodge other similar future claims.

Tony told us in June that he watched as his parked 2001 Kawasaki ZRX1200R sank into thin bitumen and fall over in Crows Nest’s main street parking bays.

The incident caused about $1700 in damage to his bike that he uses in his business and ruined his $600 Shoei helmet.

Despite offering to do the repairs himself at a moderate cost, Toowoomba Regional Council insurance officer Josie Hooper told him council is not liable for compensation.Toowoomba riding trainer Tony Gallagher watched in horror as his Kawasaki ZRX1200R sunk into thin bitumen and tall over in a Crows Nest main street parking bay.

Her letters says their investigations found that council was unaware of “the specific characteristic of the road and/or car park you say caused the damage to the motorcycle”.

“Under Section 37 of the Civil Liability Act, a road authority such as Council cannot be held liable for claims that arise out of alleged lack of maintenance, repair, or inspection of a road if, at the time of the damage, the road authority was unaware of the defect which allegedly caused the damage,” she wrote in an official letter to Tony two months after his complaint.

Now Tony has taken to Facebook to publish a video railing against council’s “corruption” and lack of accountability.

Parkings not fixed

In the eight-minute video, Tony points out that although the hole has been patched, council has not done anything to rectify the problem of the thin bitumen in the parking bays.

He says that now council is “fully aware” of the problem they will be liable to pay compensation to any rider who suffers the same fate.

Tony’s bike was parked in a car parking bay, not one of the 16 special motorcycle bands allocated when Crows Nest became a Queensland’s second motorcycle friendly town in 2017.

Tony says council needs to take more responsibility for their facilities.

“It is not unreasonable to be able to park your motorcycle safely in a town that is motorcycle friendly,” he says.

Crows Nest Motorcycle Friendly Town spokesman Ron Anderson told us he is not aware of any other motorcycles falling over in parking bays in town.

Fall from grace

Toowoomba riding trainer Tony Gallagher watched in horror as his Kawasaki ZRX1200R sunk into thin bitumen and tall over in a Crows Nest main street parking bay.
Tony Gallagher

“The bike was parked for at least 10 minutes, maybe 15, before falling over. I saw it fall over,” Tony told us in June.

“The bitumen beneath the sidestand failed and the stand sunk into the ground several inches.”

He says witnesses can prove his bike did not roll off the stand and was parked facing uphill.

Tony contacted council who patched the hole before he left town on the day.

Toowoomba riding trainer Tony Gallagher watched in horror as his Kawasaki ZRX1200R sunk into thin bitumen and tall over in a Crows Nest main street parking bay.
Patch repair

“The staff member who did the repair apologised to me,” Tony says.

“I would argue that they could have reasonably known that there was a fault with the road surface as there have been issues with the adjoining footpath and kerbing.

“As TRC are fully aware of these issues, the quality of the road surface where vehicles park should have been investigated and rectified prior to this incident. As such TRC have breached their duty of care.

“I went back the following Monday on my GPZ and noticed parking bays further up the hill are decaying — not obvious in the park I was in.”Toowoomba riding trainer Tony Gallagher watched in horror as his Kawasaki ZRX1200R sunk into thin bitumen and tall over in a Crows Nest main street parking bay.

The incident occurred on a mild April day, so there was no problem with melting tar.

He returned to the site in June and said there was moisture coming from the patched repair.

Tony says the bitumen is about 10mm thick with mud underneath and suspects an underground water problem.

Many riders put down a squashed soft drink can or some other sort of “puck-style” item for their stand on soft ground.

However, riders would not reasonably be expected to use one on an asphalt surface.

TRC says riders can report road damage to Customer Service on 131 872. Customer Service will create a ticket in the system to have the incident investigated by the relevant team in Council.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Police crash report demonises riders

A police report that claims riders of high-powered motorbikes are over-represented in the crash statistics demonises riders as “thrill seekers” and is “absolutely meaningless”.

Victorian Motorcycle Council media spokesman John Eacott says the scant Victorian Police assessment of crash statistics is “akin to claiming that more blue cars crash than white cars”.

Victoria Police compiled crash data for the Melbourne News Ltd paper, Herald Sun, which showed that 27 out of 67 deaths in 2017 and 2018 involved bikes bigger than 1000cc. About 10% of crash police reports did not detail engine capacity.

Another 28 riders died in the 500-1000cc category while riders of bikes under 500cc had fewer deaths but sustained more injuries.

The crash data did not include any information about the increase in motorcycle licences or motorcycle registrations, although bikes under 500cc are 37% of registrations and 18% of fatals in 2017/18, according to VicRoads.

Stats furphy

John also points out that there are no statistics kept in Victoria to equate accidents with the kilometres travelled by any type of bike.

Earlier this year, John pointed out the furphy of police and road safety authority claiming returned riders are the biggest safety risk partly because it did not factor in kilometres travelled.

“As with the mythical ‘returning rider’ (which still remains undefined and therefore without evidence based stats) this is another furphy,” he says.

The report that “cherry picked statistics” only served to demonise riders, he says.

The “Hun” sought comment on the cops’ report from Stuart Newstead of the Monash University Accident Research Centre who declared riders are “thrill seekers”.

John rejected the “emotive” comment that demonises riders as a poor reflection on MUARC with no supporting evidence-based data.

Ipswich Bike Nights John Eacott support sentence Returned riders safety risk is a furphy time limit demonises
John Eacott

As we have said before, any report that falsely demonises riders increases the public perception that riders have a death wish and are therefore not worthy of consideration by other road users.

We have contacted transport departments in several states for relevant statistics to show the full picture that includes registrations, engine sizes, crashes, etc.

However, they say it will take several days or even weeks to collate the data.

We will advise when we have received the full picture.

Riders and drivers warned

Meanwhile, in the wake of a recent spate of fatal crashes in Queensland, RACQ spokesperson Lauren Ritchie has issued a warning not only to riders but also drivers.

“Riders don’t have the same level of physical protection as drivers and sadly they’ll always come off second best so it’s important they’re taking precautions like riding to conditions and wearing all their safety gear,” she says.

“It’s critical riders don’t ride beyond their capabilities because when things go wrong on the road, there’s little room for error.”

However, Ms Ritchie adds that drivers also must play a part in keeping motorcyclists safe.

“Motorists can make simple adjustments to their driving like taking the time to look specifically for motorcycles and being vigilant in checking their mirrors or over their shoulder when changing lanes. Those extra seconds looking could save a life.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Crashed rider calls for lane filter training

A rider who was rear-ended because he hadn’t been taught to lane filter has called for the skill to be included in learner and advanced rider-training courses.

Shannon Wynter, age 37, of Caboolture, Queensland, says he was rear-ended because he lacked the training and therefore confidence to lane filter.

See his video below which shows front and back perspectives. (Fast forward to 4:30 minutes for the crash.)

“If I had been confident at lane filtering, I would have zipped out of the lane as soon as the traffic slowed down and the woman that ploughed into me would have hit another car instead,” he says.

“I had no idea what was coming from behind, but if I was regularly lane filtering and had that confidence to just switch out before the traffic stopped completely in front of me, it would have been much better for all involved.

“Lane filtering should be a taught and confidence built during the L period.

“Perhaps something else that can be taught, is if you’re on a highway and it’s coming to a stop, don’t just get to the side of the lane, straddle the line; even if you don’t intend to filter as it takes you out of the line of fire.”
Crashed rider calls for lane filter trainingCrashed rider calls for lane filter training
Shannon and his scooter before the crash

Shannon says he was wearing all the gear in thew above photo at the time of the accident.

“I was extremely lucky and came off with only bruises, a small fracture in my ankle and some over-extended back and neck muscles.,” he says.

Shannon says a truckie and two motorcyclists helped him off the road after the crash.

Lane filter training

“Lane filtering should be a required part of the learn training instead of the message that after three months of riding with a supervisor, and you’re off your Ls/Ps, you get to lane filter.”

Shannon also says motorcycle rider training schools should offer lane filtering as a course.

We  could not find any schools that offer such a course, but we have heard of at least one that had offered it, but could not get any takers.

“Sadly, I don’t think anyone would show much interest (in a lane-filtering course),” Shannon says.

“Many people are way too cocky or money shy. It’s something that would probably have to be mandatory.”

New rider

Shannon says he has only got his full licence a few months ago to ride with his fiance while on holiday in Taiwan.

Crashed rider calls for lane filter training
Shannon’s Honda Forza scooter

“Everyone there rides or has ridden,” he says.

“As chaotic as it is, it’s pretty safe because almost everyone who’s got a car started on a bike.

“You see car drivers over there actively looking out for riders.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Young rider killed in overnight crash

A 23-year-old male rider has died after his motorcycle left the road and hit a tree in Coffs Harbour overnight.

Police say emergency services were called to Donn-Patterson Drive, near Bonalbo Close, about 1.30am (Thursday 8 August 2019).

“The rider was treated at the scene before being taken to Coffs Harbour Hospital, where he later died,” police say.

“He is yet to be formally identified but is believed to be a 23-year-old man.”

Our sincere condolences to the young man’s family and friends.

Officers from Coffs/Clarence Police District attended and established a crime scene, which has been examined by specialist forensic police.

An investigation into the circumstances surrounding the crash has commenced and a report will be prepared for the Coroner.

Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact Crime Stoppers: 1800 333 000 or https://nsw.crimestoppers.com.au. Information is treated in strict confidence. The public is reminded not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

Overnight crashesnight riding tips ovenight

This is the fourth death of a male rider in his 20s in overnight crashes in NSW and Queensland over the past three weeks.

While the Coroner is yet to investigate the matter, we cannot pass judgment on what happened.

There could be a number of reasons for the crash, but night riding is particularly dangerous and has its own set of hazards.

It;’s not only dangerous in the country, but also suburbia where this crash happened.

At night there can be wildlife and stray pets on the road that are difficult to see until too late.

Drunk pedestrians and drivers could also have been involved.

We have put together 10 safe tips for riding at night and hazards to look out for.

Click here to read our tips on how to be a safe night rider.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Second NSW motorcyclist’s body found

A second NSW rider has died today (3 August 2019) in what police describe as a single-vehicle accident and later been found by passing motorists.

NSW Police say a 25-year-old man has died in a “single-vehicle motorcycle crash” in the state’s southern highlands overnight.

“About 4.50am, a motorist travelling along Golden Vale Road, Sutton Forest, contacted emergency services when they drove upon a motorcycle crashed on the side of the road,” police say.

Officers from The Hume Police District, along with NSW Ambulance paramedics, attended and found the rider, a 25-year-old man, deceased at the scene. He is yet to be formally identified.

Police also discovered the body of a young male rider who crashed in Dubbo overnight about 5am today (3 August 2019).

Reports on both incidents will be prepared for the Coroner.

Anyone with information about either of these incidents is urged to contact Crime Stoppers online or phone 1800 333 000. Information is treated in confidence. Do not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

Police reports

Police media releases and statements that claim these as single-vehicle accidents before any investigation is concluded raise the spectre that the riders were at fault.

Such assertions should not be made until investigations are completed. Other vehicles, cyclists, pedestrians or a stray animal could have caused the crashes.

Claiming that such incidents are single-vehicle crashes can confirm in the minds of the public that riders have a death wish and do not deserve their respect and consideration.

These are dangerous assertions that jeopardise the safety of all riders.

Crash stats

In fact, the statistics show that more motorcycle fatalities are in multi-vehicle crashes.

And in half of those the rider was not at fault.

Motorcycle Council of NSW chairman Steve Pearce said he feared police assumed crashes riders were guilty until proven innocent.

“I think there is a view that riders are more likely to be at fault in accidents involving motorcycles and that speed is the common factor,” Steve says.

“We see this in single-vehicle accidents involving a motorcycle, where the rider is automatically deemed to be at fault.

“This ignores factors such as road condition, line markings, recent roadworks, lack of signage.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Police find body of crashed motorcyclist in Dubbo

NSW Police have discovered the body of a young male rider who crashed in Dubbo overnight.

Police say officers from Orana Mid-Western Police District were travelling along Cobbora Road near

Myall Street, Dubbo crash
Myall Street, Dubbo (Image: Google Maps)

, about 5am today (3 August 2019) when they found the crashed motorcycle and rider.

They believe the motorcycle “left the road and crashed into a fence”.

The man, believed to be a 24-year-old, died at the scene. He is yet to be formally identified.

Our sincere condolences to the rider’s family and friends who have not yet been contacted.

A crime scene has been established and an investigation into the circumstances surrounding the crash has commenced.

A Coroner’s report will be prepared.

The Golden Highway between Myall Street and White Street currently remains closed. Please check www.livetraffic.com before travelling.

Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact Crime Stoppers: 1800 333 000 or https://nsw.crimestoppers.com.au. Information is treated in strict confidence. The public is reminded not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

Crash stats

It would be wrong to assume this is a single-vehicle accident. Since it occurred in suburban Dubbo, it could have involved another vehicle or a stray pet.

Statistics show that more motorcycle fatalities are in multi-vehicle crashes. And in half of those the rider was not at fault.

Motorcycle Council of NSW chairman Steve Pearce says he fears police assumed crashed riders are guilty until proven innocent.

“I think there is a view that riders are more likely to be at fault in accidents involving motorcycles and that speed is the common factor,” Steve says.

“We see this in single-vehicle accidents involving a motorcycle, where the rider is automatically deemed to be at fault.

“This ignores factors such as road condition, line markings, recent roadworks, lack of signage.”

Any claims that such incidents are single-vehicle crashes can confirm in the minds of the public that riders have a death wish and do not deserve their respect and consideration.

These are dangerous assertions that jeopardise the safety of all riders.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com