Tag Archives: nsw police

Two riders die in overnight crashes

Police in NSW and Queensland are investigating two crashes in which riders died early last night (20 August 2019).

In one incident, police say a motorcycle was travelling eastbound along the Warrego Highway three kilometres from Minden about 6.30pm when the rider “has attempted to overtake two trucks and has lost control”.

“As a result, the motorcyclist has collided with one of the trucks and was pronounced deceased at the scene,” police say.

If you have information for police, contact Policelink on 131 444 or provide information using the online form 24hrs per day.

You can report information about crime anonymously to Crime Stoppers, a registered charity and community volunteer organisation, by calling 1800 333 000 or via crimestoppersqld.com.au 24hrs per day.

Rider dies in Tweed Heads crash

Just across the border, an 18-year-old male rider died when his moped collided wth a Holden Colorado about 6pm in the southbound lanes on Ducat Street.

The teenager was knocked off the moped and was struck by a northbound Toyota Prado.

He died at the scene.

Officers from Tweed/Byron Police District attended and established a crime scene.

The 42-year-old male driver of the Holden, and the 46-year-old female driver of the Toyota were uninjured.

They were taken to Tweed Heads Hospital for mandatory blood and urine tests.

The road was closed for about five hours while the scene was examined.

Inquiries continue and a report will be prepared for the Coroner.

Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact Crime Stoppers: 1800 333 000 or https://nsw.crimestoppers.com.au. Information is treated in strict confidence. The public is reminded not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

  • Our sincere condolences to the riders’ friends and families.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Tips when pulled over for speeding

Motorists sometimes inadvertently convict themselves for speeding when they are pulled over by the police, says NSW traffic solicitor Chris Kalpage.

We have previously offered tips on what to do if pulled over by the police as well as tips from the police themselves!

Now, Chris has offered the following tips on what to do when pulled over specifically by NSW police for speeding, although the lessons are generally applicable around the world.

Chris Kalpage evidence pulled
Chris Kalpage on his Ducati

Recorded

If you are pulled over by a NSW highway patrol vehicle, the conversation is being recorded on both audio and video.

Even if it is not a highway patrol vehicle, the officer will make notes on your responses.

Often people are nervous and say things. It is sometimes safer not to make any admissions, especially if you do not have all the facts.

Even then, be wary of making admissions as they may seriously compromise your potential defence.

For example, where exactly do they say they observed you speeding and how did they assess your speed?

It can be the case that where you were alleged to be speeding is not where you have been pulled over by police. You may not have been speeding at the point they say you were.

In one case I defended, the in-car video clearly showed the bike passed the unmarked police car travelling in the opposite direction some 15km from where the rider was eventually pulled up. The rider obviously had no idea what the officer was talking about. 

Identity crisis

If a police officer comes knocking on your door accusing you of failing to stop, there are clearly issues about the potential identity of the rider, etc.

In another situation on the Wisemans Ferry, a Ducati 748R rider went past a police four-wheel-drive and they accused my client some days later.

We successfully defended the case over the accuracy of the police recording of the bike rego number and whether it was his bike at the scene.

You generally don’t know all the facts on the side of the road so why step on a potential landmine?

Assessing speed

LIDAR radar speed gun pulled
LIDAR radar speed gun

Generally there are four methods police use to assess speed, excluding fixed and mobile speed cameras. They are listed here in descending order of accuracy:

  1. The Lidar, which is a gun-like object which projects a laser beam and is aimed by the officer at an alleged specific target;
  2. The in-car radar which is a radar attached to the police car and uses a Doppler beam;
  3. Check speed which is a police officer following you and assessing your speed by using the car’s digital speedometer. It essentially shows their speed which may not be yours; and
  4. Police officer’s estimate, which has no objective measurement of speed.

Often the police will use one of the first three methods, combined with their estimate. 

Things to consider on the roadsideRider pulled over by police licence checks

If you have the presence of mind, ask the officer where specifically you are alleged to have been speeding and how they assessed your speed.

It is beneficial for you to take photographs of where the incident is meant to have taken place. If you have the capacity on your GPS or phone, record the exact longitude and latitude.

On country roads it may be difficult to pinpoint the exact location weeks later when you decide you want to challenge the allegation.

If the police officer was stationary when they alleged they observed you speeding, try to observe from that vantage point.

That will provide you with the officer’s visibility of your approaching vehicle and their maximum sighting distance.

Again, take photographs from that vantage point. Take notice of anything that may have obstructed the officer’s vision in tracking your vehicle.

Try to assess the distance you travelled from when the officer first observed you to when they started their test. This distance will depend on your alleged speed. Consider the following:

  1. What is the maximum sighting distance the officer had from where they were standing or where their vehicle was parked;
  2. From the maximum distance, how far had you travelled when the officer finished their test? Often we roughly work that out from when they step out on to the road or when they turn their lights on if facing you or if you get shown the reading on the Lidar; and
  3. If they are mobile, we use either when they turn their lights on as they are approaching or, at the worst, the “crossover point”. That is the point at which they go past you and are no longer getting a reading from your vehicle.

Disclaimer

Chris Kalpage evidence pulled
Chris Kalpage

This article is for your information and interest only. It is based on New South Wales law only. It is not intended to be comprehensive, and does not constitute and must not be relied on as legal advice. Please be aware that every case is different and the matters raised may not be of specific relevance to your situation but may have a general application. Seek specific advice tailored to your circumstances.

Chris can be contacted via email (mailto:kalpage@aol.comor phone 0418211074.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Rider hits traffic sign in fatal crash

A 50-year-old male riders has died after his motorcycle hit a roadside traffic sign in rural Nowra, on the NSW south coast.

Police say that just before 3pm yesterday (14 August 2019) “a motorcycle travelling south on Parma Road at Yerriyong was approaching a bend, when it hit a traffic sign pole”.

The rider was unable to be revived and died at the scene.

A crime scene was established by South Coast Police District officers who are “conducting inquiries into the circumstances surrounding the crash”.

Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact Crime Stoppers: 1800 333 000 or https://nsw.crimestoppers.com.au. Information is treated in strict confidence. The public is reminded not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

Our condolences to the rider’s family and friends.

Traffic sign hazards

Two Austroads reports in 2014 and 2016 identified there were too many changes in speed zones and too much roadside “furniture” causing a particular hazard to riders.

Despite these reports, wire rope barriers, speed signs and other hazards have proliferated on our roadsides.

While the 2016 report said the road environment accounted for only 2% of motorcycle road deaths in single-vehicle crashes between 1999 and 2003, “certain road elements have the potential to contribute to the actual outcome and severity of the crash”.

It said the first step was to identify roads that pose the highest crash risk to motorcyclists, then perform safety audits.

The report recommended a raft of motorcycle-specific road modifications including:

  • install flexible but durable materials or shields underneath barriers (no mention of wire rope barriers!);Wire rope barrier better roads austroads report
  • install attenuators or energy dissipaters on posts and poles;
  • relocate trees, poles, signs and other roadside objects;
  • recommended maximums for potholes, ruts and cracks before repair is vital;
  • rapid road repair including quick removal of oil, diesel and other spills;
  • fluoro warning signage at known crash zones;
  • better-designed crash barriers (read this Austroads view);
  • improve road surfaces for skid resistance, road camber, badly located drains, rough edges, etc; and
  • add advance stop lines at intersections with filtering lanes for motorcycles to reach the front of traffic.
Most of these recommendations have been ignored by governments at all levels.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Second NSW motorcyclist’s body found

A second NSW rider has died today (3 August 2019) in what police describe as a single-vehicle accident and later been found by passing motorists.

NSW Police say a 25-year-old man has died in a “single-vehicle motorcycle crash” in the state’s southern highlands overnight.

“About 4.50am, a motorist travelling along Golden Vale Road, Sutton Forest, contacted emergency services when they drove upon a motorcycle crashed on the side of the road,” police say.

Officers from The Hume Police District, along with NSW Ambulance paramedics, attended and found the rider, a 25-year-old man, deceased at the scene. He is yet to be formally identified.

Police also discovered the body of a young male rider who crashed in Dubbo overnight about 5am today (3 August 2019).

Reports on both incidents will be prepared for the Coroner.

Anyone with information about either of these incidents is urged to contact Crime Stoppers online or phone 1800 333 000. Information is treated in confidence. Do not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

Police reports

Police media releases and statements that claim these as single-vehicle accidents before any investigation is concluded raise the spectre that the riders were at fault.

Such assertions should not be made until investigations are completed. Other vehicles, cyclists, pedestrians or a stray animal could have caused the crashes.

Claiming that such incidents are single-vehicle crashes can confirm in the minds of the public that riders have a death wish and do not deserve their respect and consideration.

These are dangerous assertions that jeopardise the safety of all riders.

Crash stats

In fact, the statistics show that more motorcycle fatalities are in multi-vehicle crashes.

And in half of those the rider was not at fault.

Motorcycle Council of NSW chairman Steve Pearce said he feared police assumed crashes riders were guilty until proven innocent.

“I think there is a view that riders are more likely to be at fault in accidents involving motorcycles and that speed is the common factor,” Steve says.

“We see this in single-vehicle accidents involving a motorcycle, where the rider is automatically deemed to be at fault.

“This ignores factors such as road condition, line markings, recent roadworks, lack of signage.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Police find body of crashed motorcyclist in Dubbo

NSW Police have discovered the body of a young male rider who crashed in Dubbo overnight.

Police say officers from Orana Mid-Western Police District were travelling along Cobbora Road near

Myall Street, Dubbo crash
Myall Street, Dubbo (Image: Google Maps)

, about 5am today (3 August 2019) when they found the crashed motorcycle and rider.

They believe the motorcycle “left the road and crashed into a fence”.

The man, believed to be a 24-year-old, died at the scene. He is yet to be formally identified.

Our sincere condolences to the rider’s family and friends who have not yet been contacted.

A crime scene has been established and an investigation into the circumstances surrounding the crash has commenced.

A Coroner’s report will be prepared.

The Golden Highway between Myall Street and White Street currently remains closed. Please check www.livetraffic.com before travelling.

Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact Crime Stoppers: 1800 333 000 or https://nsw.crimestoppers.com.au. Information is treated in strict confidence. The public is reminded not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

Crash stats

It would be wrong to assume this is a single-vehicle accident. Since it occurred in suburban Dubbo, it could have involved another vehicle or a stray pet.

Statistics show that more motorcycle fatalities are in multi-vehicle crashes. And in half of those the rider was not at fault.

Motorcycle Council of NSW chairman Steve Pearce says he fears police assumed crashed riders are guilty until proven innocent.

“I think there is a view that riders are more likely to be at fault in accidents involving motorcycles and that speed is the common factor,” Steve says.

“We see this in single-vehicle accidents involving a motorcycle, where the rider is automatically deemed to be at fault.

“This ignores factors such as road condition, line markings, recent roadworks, lack of signage.”

Any claims that such incidents are single-vehicle crashes can confirm in the minds of the public that riders have a death wish and do not deserve their respect and consideration.

These are dangerous assertions that jeopardise the safety of all riders.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Riders charged over third-party GoPro evidence

NSW Police are charging riders with traffic offences based on GoPro video evidence obtained from other riders, says Sydney lawyer and Ducati 1098S rider Chris Kalpage.

There have been many incidents of riders being charged after self-incriminating evidence was found on their GoPro footage, mobile phone data, GPS and even bike data loggers.

However, Chris says he knows of at least two occasions where NSW Highway Patrol have sifted through the GoPro video of riders to find offences by other riders they may have been following.

He says these riders have been fined for speeding, crossing unbroken and double lines, wheelies, etc.

GoPro evidenceShoei helmet with a GoPro action camera mounted

“I have had matters where a person may spend the day riding with their GoPro videoing their heroics coming up behind other riders who unknowingly may be transgressing,” says Chris, 61, who has been riding since he was 15.

“The rider with the GoPro is spotted at the end of the day by police and pulled over for some transgression that the officer has seen and confiscate their GoPro.

“Subsequently they play the video back at the station and then pay visits to anybody they see on the video.

“The police will then attend the premises of the registered owners of the bikes that they have seen on the videos and place a notice of demand asking that they identify who the rider was at the relevant time.”

Police rights

Chris says police may be within their legal rights to confiscate your GoPro or any other device if “certain prerequisites exist”.

In some places, such as America, police may first have to obtain a search warrant. In Australia, they don’t, so long as the search is lawful.

If police conduct a lawful search, they can seize your camera, SD card, phone, GPS or bike data.

A lawful search is where you give police permission to search you or when the officer has a “reasonable suspicion” that you could have an item containing evidence of an offence.

A crash is a situation where police might exercise their right to collect relevant evidence from victims, offenders and bystanders.

Riders’ rights

GoPro Chris Kalpage evidence
Chris on his Ducati

Chris says NSW Police are going to the home of the registered owners of bikes they have seen on video and formally demanding they identify the rider at the relevant time.

Of course, he advises riders approached by police to identify themselves to first contact their lawyer.

“They often wont show you the video and you will have to take it on faith that you were the relevant bike that was seen on someone’s GoPro footage,” he says.

“In the absence of your election the police have no evidence as to who the rider may have been.”

Chris says it could be difficult for police to substantiate a speeding offence based on the video of a following rider.

“It may be that the speedo of the GoPro rider’s bike can be seen but then it would amount to whether the rider is speeding to catch up with the bike in front or is keeping a consistent distance, and visual over a reasonable period of time,” he says.

“Similarly how do we know whether the GoPro rider’s speedo is accurate? After all, many of us change the sprockets of our bikes which can affect the speedo accuracy.”

He advises that there are many factors in video GoPro evidence that may be challenged, including the legality of the seizure of the evidence.

Click here for our advice to riders about confiscation of a device which may have incriminating evidence.

If you have any questions about this topic or other traffic-related matter, you can ask Chris by leaving your question in the comments section below.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Crashed rider found lying on a bridge

A 52-year-old motorcyclist has died after a passing motorist found him lying near his crashed bike on the Nottingham Road Bridge yesterday afternoon (3.25pm 24 April 2019).

NSW Police say it is unknown how long the man had been lying on the road.

He was attended at the scene near Wee Jasper, NSW, by Ambulance Paramedics but sadly died a short time later.

Our condolences to his family and friends.

Police are investigating and have asked anyone with information or dash cam footage to contact Crime Stoppers or phone 1800 333 000.

Information is treated in strict confidence. The public is reminded not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

A report will be prepared for the Coroner.

Police reports

Unlike Queensland police who report these as single-vehicle accidents, the NSW Police media release made no mention of a likely cause except that he had obviously “come off his bike”.

Police media releases and statements that claim these as single-vehicle accidents before any investigation is concluded raises the spectre that the riders were at fault.

Such assertions should not be made until investigations are completed. Other vehicles, cyclists, pedestrians or a stray animal could have caused the crashes.

In this rural incident, stray livestock or a kangaroo could be at fault. The Wee Jasper area can be plagued with kangaroos.

Claiming that such incidents are single-vehicle crashes can confirm in the minds of the public that riders have a death wish and do not deserve their respect and consideration.

These are dangerous assertions that jeopardise the safety of all riders.

Crash stats

In fact, the statistics show that more motorcycle fatalities are in multi-vehicle crashes.

And in half of those the rider was not at fault.

Last month, Motorcycle Council of NSW chairman Steve Pearce said he feared police assumed crashes riders were guilty until proven innocent.

“I think there is a view that riders are more likely to be at fault in accidents involving motorcycles and that speed is the common factor,” Steve says.

“We see this in single-vehicle accidents involving a motorcycle, where the rider is automatically deemed to be at fault.

“This ignores factors such as road condition, line markings, recent roadworks, lack of signage.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Driver committed over motorcycle hit-run

A Sydney woman has been committed to stand trial after driving her car on the wrong side of the road and crashing into a motorcycle, injuring the rider and his pillion.

Molly Cahill, 22, of Sans Souci appeared in Sutherland Local Court today. She was committed to stand trial on June 18 on two charges of dangerous driving occasioning grievous bodily harm, negligent driving occasioning grievous bodily harm, failing to stop and render assistance after impact and not keeping left of a dividing line.

The crash scene (All images: Channel 7 Sydney) committed committed
The crash scene (All images: Channel 7 Sydney)

Her bail conditions of a strict curfew, passport confiscation and daily reports to police were continued.

The injured rider is Tony Nissirios, 38, and his injured pillion is his female partner Sam, 26. They were transported to St George Hospital.

Tony suffered multiple leg fractures and Sam had a broken wrist. Their current conditions are not confirmed at this stage but it was feared Tony would need his leg amputated.The crash scene (All images: Channel 7 Sydney) committed

Committed driver bailed

Police will allege Cahill was driving a Peugeot hatchback on the wrong side of Forest Road in Peakhurst about 1.20am (Monday 8 April 2019) when she hit the motorcycle head-on.

The rider and pillion were thrown from the bike and suffered multiple fractures.

Police will allege the driver left the scene, dumped her car nearby and texted “I think I’ve hit someone”.

She was later arrested at her Sans Souci home and taken to Kogarah Police Station. She was granted bail the following day in Sutherland Local Court.

The crash scene (All images: Channel 7 Sydney) committedSpate of hit-run incidents

The incident follows a worrying spate of hit-and-run crashes leaving motorcyclists injured and dead.

Concern over motorbike hit-run crashes collision injured
A recent hit-run crash in Melbourne

In NSW, the requirement for those involved in a crash to remain at the scene until police arrive was dropped in 2014, even if a tow truck is required.

However, the motorists must report the incident to police and remain at the scene if anyone is injured.

If they don’t, police can charge a motorist with failing to stop at the scene of an accident which is considered a serious offence.

Depending on whether someone is injured or killed in the crash, the motorist responsible could face serious charges with up to 10 years in jail.

Police say motorists leaving an accident scene where someone is injured decrease a victim’s chance of survival.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Police drop charge against rider

Police prosecution have dropped charges against an army veteran rider who claimed he was assaulted by police at a March 2018 charity ride.

Michael “Magic” Parr faced a charge of not obeying the direction of police for this incident caught on video.

It occurred at Woodenbong on March 3 on the 26th annual Good as Gold ride.

The video shows Magic Parr being confronted by Senior Constable Murphy of the NSW Police Strike Force Raptor.

The hearing was scheduled for April 2019 in Kyogle Local Court, but police prosecution contacted him to say they would not proceed. No reasons have been given.

At the time, Magic made a formal complaint to police of alleged unlawful assault when the officer shoved him.

However, NSW Police Force Professional Standards Unit rejected the complaint, saying the officer’s shove was a “single approved check drill in accordance with his training”.

Click here to read the full reply.

Police Harassment charity ride profiling charge

“Police policing their own is an endemic problem,” Magic says.

“There needs to be an external body to handle complaints about police.

“People are being abused and give up making complaints because they know it will not go anywhere.

“Now police feel they can do anything they like.”

Magic says had been looking forward to his day in court.

Handlebar defect

Magic also successfully fought a handlebar defect notice issued at the charity ride.

“The judge found in my favour and was critical of police methods for measuring handlebar heights,” Magic says.

“The judge said their methods were inherently inaccurate as it needs to be done under strict guidelines to ensure the measurements are accurate.”

When Magic arrived at Kyogle Court last year, he was immediately approached by Murphy who asked to see his licence.

“He also checked my bike again,” Magic says.

Veteran assault charge
Magic on his Harley

Murphy appeared in court as a support witness to the officer who issued all the defect notices on the day.

“So anyone who had bar height infringements, especially if close to the allowed range, are probably inaccurate and wrong and they should fight them.

“However, most people can’t afford the time off work to go to court and just pay the fine and move on.

Police Harassment charity ride charges charge
The ride was roadblocked

“The whole purpose of Strikeforce Chapel on the day was to stop the ride by whatever means.

“I believe the (measurement) error was deliberate.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Police action in 2 states over rider deaths

Police in NSW and Victoria have launched special operations in response to a rapid escalation in rider deaths so far this year.

The NSW action comes after the deaths of three riders in as many days.

Meanwhile, Victorian Police Operation Kinetic will add 300 shifts over the next 10 weeks to increase patrols of the state’s roads follows a doubling of motorcycle fatalities this year.

Victorian Motorcycle Council chairman Peter Baulch says the extra patrols were to be expected given the high rider toll.

NSW deaths

The three NSW deaths over the weekend were:

  • Just after 4.30pm on Sunday (24 March 2019), emergency services were called to the Great Western Highway at Meadow Flat, following reports a motorcyclist had come off his bike. Officers from Chifley Police District attended and found the 59-year-old man had died at the scene.
  • About 8.30am on Saturday, a motorcycle and a utility collided on Putty Road, Howells Valley, about 50km south of Singleton. The motorcycle rider, a 44-year-old man, sustained serious injuries and was flown to John Hunter Hospital, where he later died. The driver of the utility, a 58-year-old man, was uninjured. He was taken to Singleton Hospital for mandatory blood and urine tests.
  • Just before 7.30pm on Friday, emergency services were called to the New England Highway near Whittingham, after a motorcycle and two cars collided. Officers from Hunter Valley Police District rendered assistance. The 50-year-old rider died at the scene.

Our condolences to their families and friends.

Steve Pearce Motorcycle Council of NSW treasurer texting distracted sentence siege rider deaths
Steve Pearce in action

Motorcycle Council of NSW chairman Steve Pearce says he is “always saddened” to hear of rider deaths.

“I think we all consider the effect on families and friends, and also the emergency services who have to attend the accident scene,” he says.

“A day out enjoying an activity which gives us so much joy can quickly change for the worse.”

Dangerous riding

NSW Police say they prosecuted several riders over the weekend for traffic dangerous offences:

  • About 12:20pm on Sunday, Highway Patrol motorcycle officers observed a motorcycle travelling towards them on the incorrect side of the road, while overtaking another vehicle across double yellow lines. The rider was issued an infringement notice for ‘not keep left of the dividing line’, fined $337, and lost three points.
  • About 3.35pm on Sunday, Hunter Valley Highway Patrol were carrying out “stationary speed enforcement” on the New England Highway at Lower Belford when they detected a motorcycle travelling at 169km/h in a 100km/h zone. Police activated lights and sirens and directed the rider to stop. A 25-year-old Dubbo man has been issued a traffic infringement notice for speeding by more than 45km/h and his licence was suspended.
  • About 11:20am on Saturday, at Carrathool, officers detected a rider at 160km/h in a 110km/h zone while overtaking another vehicle. The 19-year-old provisional licence-holder was arrested for  a blood/urine analysis and issued an infringement notice for exceeding the speed limit over 45km/h. He was fined $2345, his licence was suspended for six months and his registration for three months.

    Rider deaths
    Rider stopped by NSW Police for speeding

Vulnerable riders

NSW Assistant Commissioner Michael Corboy of the state’s Traffic & Highway Patrol Command said there had been 18 rider deaths so far this year. That’s six more than at the same time last year.

“Drivers and riders alike need to make sure that they are doing the right thing and sharing our roads safely,” he says.

“Highway Patrol officers will continue out in force to prevent further harm to NSW road users; however, we need the help of the public to stem the current rise in fatalities.”

Steve provided these statistics that show motorcyclists are vulnerable road users:

  • 17% of motorcycle fatalities involve alcohol levels over the legal limit;
  • Excessive speed is attributed to 54% of motorcycle fatalities; and
  • 8% of motorcycle fatalities involve fatigue.

He says the highest number of motorcycle fatalities are in the age group under 30 while fatalities in the 50-59 age group tripled over the past 10 years. Males are the majority of fatalities (96%) and 17% of motorcyclists killed do not hold a valid Licence. 

“These statistics don’t mean we should stay home,” Steve says.

“We just need to understand the risks we face as motorcyclists, and apply some basic risk strategies before we ride out.”

NSW Motorcycle Council rider advice 

Ride to conditions: More than any other road user, motorcyclists are vulnerable to road conditions. If it doesn’t feel safe to continue, then stop and wait until conditions improve. You are the best judge. Toughing it out generally is an indicator of subjecting yourself to additional risk. 

Risk assessment: The best road riders are risk managers. Take your own risk assessment before you go out for a ride. How much experience have I had with the type of riding I am about to start? Am I totally comfortable on the motorcycle I am riding? How fit am I? is the motorcycle well serviced and ready to go? If you have any doubts about your ability, readiness or fitness, its probably a good idea to stay home and polish the beast! There will be plenty of other opportunities to ride.

Training and experience: There are plenty of rider training schools offering skills development and refresher courses. If you can’t get to a course, spend some time on the Rider Risk video series on YouTube for riding and survival tips.

Rest every couple of hours: Plan your ride. On your way there will be some great places to stop and rest, and enjoy the local hospitality and scenery. Taking a regular break will keep you fresh and alert.

Don’t drink and ride: This is one of the easiest strategies we can implement to survive.

Speeding: It’s not the speed that is the problem, it’s what happens when a speeding rider has to cope with either changing road conditions or the random act of another motorist. Trees, guardrails, other moving objects, slippery road markings, gravel and potholes are not your friends when you come off a speeding motorcycle. Leave it for the racetrack.

Wear the best gear available: Research indicates that wearing the best protective gear available leads to a much better chance of survival. Why? Comfort and protection. If in doubt, refer to the testing results on the MotoCAP website and the MCCNSW Helmet videos.

https://www.motocap.com.au/

http://www.mccofnsw.org.au/a/402.html

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com