Tag Archives: ev

Electric Savic nears half its first orders

Almost half of the first production run of Australia’s first full-size electric motorcycle, the Savic C-Series, has been allocated to paid-up customers.

Savic Motorcycles founder Dennis Savic (pictured above) says they are on track for their first customer delivery in December after coronavirus pandemic setbacks.

So far, 21 of their 49 units have been pre-ordered for their first production run of 2021.

“The company management remains confident that this initial run will be sold out by the end of the year,” they say on their latest email update.

“With the first Savic-developed motor on schedule to arrive at our workshop in September, the current goal remains to get the first five Alpha bikes on to the road by late December.

“This includes our homologation vehicle, which will undergo all the roadworthy and safety tests required for regulatory compliance and state-based registration.”2019 Savic electric motorcycle prototype orders giants

Savic C-Series

Savic Motorcycles will make 49 C-Series cafe racer electric motorcycles available in three variants.

Specification Alpha Delta Omega
Power 60kW 40kW 25kW
Torque 190Nm TBC TBC
Range 200km TBC TBC
Charge time 4-6 hours TBC TBC
0-100km/h 3s 900ms TBC TBC
Price (+ORC) $22,999.00 $15,999.00 $10,999.00

That’s much cheaper than the Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycle which launches in Australia next month at $A49,995.

Buyers of the first production models will also receive:

  • Exclusive company updates first;
  • Lifetime membership providing exclusive discounts for all future Savic rider gear; and
  • Live updates and images of their bike build as it happens.2019 Savic electric motorcycle prototype orders whirring

Each model comes with several battery pack options. The largest offered in the Alpha will provide range of up to 200km, while the smallest option in the Omega is expected to have about 50km range. 

Like all electric vehicles, peak torque is instantaneous and the Alpha will accelerate from 0-100km in 3.9 seconds.

By comparison, the LiveWire has city range of about 235km and highway range of about 150km and reaches 100km/h in three seconds.

Savic customers will be able choose a range of options in brakes, suspension, wheels, tyres and three colours – Spectre, Stealth, and Rustic.

Aftermarket upgrades will also be offered. 

The bikes feature a fully integrated, stressed, liquid-cooled motor and energy storage system.

Depending on the model and battery pack a customer selects, a single charge can provide up to 11kWh. That costs only $3 compared with about $15 for a petrol bike to travel 250km.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Yamaha accelerates its electric program

Yamaha has been developing electric vehicles for several years, but is now stepping up its electric program with a compact portable motor and an electric motocrosser.

The motor range is called an Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (IPMSM) with varying outputs from 35kw to 200kw.

They say they can be used in motorcycles and other vehicles.Yamaha electric program

Now Yamaha Motor Europe is also involved in a joint project with KNMV, Dohms Projects and SPIKE to build an electric motocross bike, EMX, to compete with 250cc models.

Benefits include higher torque and higher traction.

Yamaha electric program
EMC program

Electric program

So far, Yamaha has only produced the electric PES1 (Passion Electric Street) road bike and PED1 (Passion Electric Dirt), but neither is available in Australia.

Last year, Yamaha unveiled their EC-05 electric scooter with Gogoro lithium-ion battery packs you can easily swap at a convenient roadside vending machine.

Yamaha Gogoro battery swap electric scooter
Yamaha electric scooter with removable Gogoro battery

Yamaha is also co-operating with the other Japanese motorcycle manufacturers to standardise electric motorcycle and scooter technology, including charging infrastructure and swappable battery packs.

Last year, Yamaha also unveiled two electric scooters, an electric bicycle, an electric mobility scooter and an electric personal scooter at the Tokyo Motor Show.

Bu it’s not all electric power in Yamaha’s future.

The company is also considering water power, but we believe it may also have an electric water pump.

Yamaha water bike
Yamaha’s water-powered bike

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Evoke electric claims top range, fastest charge

Evoke Electric Motorcycles of Hong Kong is claiming their Evoke 6061 will have the world’s highest electric motorcycle range of 470km and the fastest charge time at just 15 minutes.

However, their Evoke 6061 “cruiser” isn’t produced yet. It’s still just a drawing and a projection of what it will achieve.

Furthermore, that’s 470km in the city where regenerative braking increases range. Highway range will still be impressive at 265km.Evoke electric motorcycle

They calculate range riding between 30-50km/h in the city and 140km/h on the highway.

Click here for more details on the vagaries of calculating electric motorcycle range.

That compares with the Energica Ego and Eva with up 400km (250 miles) of city range, Zero motorcycles with 360km if you use their optional  $US2295 Charge Tank and the Damon Hypersport with 320km (200 miles) of “real-world” range.

Damon Hypersport Premier and HS
Damon Hypersport

Fastest chargingEvoke electric motorcycle

As for their fastest charging claim, it will take 15 minutes to charge to 80% capacity and only at a CCS-enabled 125kW DC charging station.

Other electric motorcycle manufacturers claim 20-30 minutes using the same DC fast chargers.

The problem is that the more you use quick-charging on a battery the sooner the battery will become useless and need replacement.

Normal charging time from a mains outlet will be about three hours to 100%.

Evoke 6061 will cost $A33,500 ($US24,000, £19,000). That compares with the Harley-Davidson LiveWire launching next month in Australia at $A49,995.

LiveWire for pandemic recovery
LiveWire

The Evoke 6061 is powered by a 120kW PMSM motor and proprietary liquid-cooled 24.8kWh battery. That’s the world’s largest lithium ion battery pack in a motorcycle.

Evoke claims it will have a top speed of more than 230km/h.

It also features a laser-cut alloy frame, Spanish J. Juan brakes and LED lighting.

Evoke electric motorcycleThere is no word yet on when it will be produced, but orders have opened with a $US5000 deposit. Only 100 will be built.

Evoke also make an Urban Classic at $US8499 and an Urban S at $US7999, both with 200km of range.

Evoke electric motorcycle
Urban Classic

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Kawasaki electric with removable battery

Kawasaki is moving closer to producing its EV Endeavor electric motorcycle with new patent drawings showing a removable battery and motor.

Their electric prototype was shown at the EICMA motorcycle show last November.

Since then, Kawasaki has released teaser videos.

The first official video from the company shows the work they put into the project.

The second shows it has manual four-speed transmission.

Endeavour with removable battery

The new patent drawings show a very rudimentary bike shape with a boxy motor and battery.

Kawaskai Endeavour electric with removable battery and motor

Not as awe-inspiring as the bike in the video.

But it’s mainly a representation of how the motor and battery are removable.

That’s interesting, because all the Japanese motorcycle manufacturers last year signed an agreement to standardise electric motorcycle batteries and charging infrastructure.

Since then, Yamaha has been developing a system to swap the removable battery. So maybe Kawasaki is also developing a bike with a removable battery.

This drawing from the Kawasaki patent seems to show the bike being delivered to the dealer without the battery and motor.

Kawaskai Endeavour electric with removable battery and motor

While that could be to avoid problems with transporting potentially hazardous batteries, it could also mean the batteries are removable and therefore swappable.

So, instead of having to wait around for hours to charge a flat battery, you simply swap the removable battery with a fully charged unit in seconds.

Whatever it shows, it seems Kawasaki s moving closer to production of its Endeavour electric motorcycle.

For the moment, Kawasaki say the bike is simply proof of their technology and intentions.

Long-term project

It’s been a long-time project for the green team.

Back in 2013, Kawasaki filed a patent for an electric version of its baby Ninja, but the patent was only been published last year.

These  patent drawings also showed a removable battery and motor.

Kawasaki electric Ninja patent battery swap

In 2015, Kawasaki filed patents in the US for as many as 10 electric motorcycle designs.

In other Kawasaki patent filing for electric motorcycles, one has a substantial cooling element with a radiator.

Electric Kawasaki Ninja patents
Electric Kawasaki Ninja patent drawing

Heat is one of the biggest impediments to performance and battery life.

I drove an early Tesla Roadster around Queensland Motorway and the instruments flashed red alerts for the battery heat after just four “hot laps.

The oil-and-liquid cooling system in the Kawasaki patent drawings are certainly more substantial than we have seen on any other electric motorcycle so far.

That would not only provide more range, but also greater performance.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

User-pays incentive for electric vehicles

An automotive group is calling for a”fairer” distance-based user-pays road tax system and incentives to encourage more people to take up electric vehicles.

The Motor Trades Association of Queensland call supports the Queensland-based Motorcycle Advocacy Group Facebook group who last month called for rego to be scrapped and a user-pays tracking system for electric vehicles.

Future mobility

MTAQ CEO Dr Brett Dale says the uptake of electric scooters and motorcycles will have a “huge place in the future of mobility”.

“They are undoubtably more environmentally friendly and the uptake should be supported with a focus on safe riding,” he says.

“We all know the future of mobility will be underpinned by electrification and micro-mobility options will be a big part of that future.

“Government needs to support the new clean technology revolution through incentives for all vehicles that contribute to a reduction in carbon emissions.

“A fair user-pays system would appear to be the most equitable and costs should be determined by the volume of kilometres driven, where the vehicle has travelled (city congestion), the emissions and possibly the size of vehicles.”

Cost incentive

He says the expense of electric vehicles is a major impediment to their uptake.

For example, the new Harley-Davidson electric LiveWire will cost $A49,995 ($NZD53,995).

Harley-Davidsoxn LiveWire electric motorcycle year one day
Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycle

That’s more expensive than all but the Harley CVO range and Trike Glide Ultra Classic. It is more expensive than the feature-laden Ultra Limited tourer at $A41,495 ride away and Freewheeler Trike at $45,995.

Dr Bell says Canada, China, USA, India, Japan and many European countries provide price subsidies and tax reductions, exemptions and credits to encourage the uptake of EVs.

Motorist taxes

Providing an incentive to buy electric vehicles could have two major ramifications for the community if there is a shift from petrol-powered to EVs.

One would be a power drain on the already stressed electricity grid.

However, some EV manufacturers such as Damon Motorcycles are including or considering a system were the vehicle actually puts stored power back into the grid, propping it up during peak load times.

Damon Hypersport Premier and HS
Damon Hypersport

The other issue is that road maintenance and construction could be impacted by EV users avoiding the 50c-a-litre fuel tax that contributes $13 billion a year.

However, Dr Dale says a user-pays system based on distance would help fill the funding gap.

More benefits

Dr Dale also points out that the MAG call to scrap rego would benefit people with multiple vehicles.

“It makes sense that second vehicles in particular, are not paying premium prices in registration,” he says.

“Certainly motorcycles can fall into that category and a user-pay system is far more reasonable.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Kawasaki electric has manual transmission

Kawasaki displayed its electric project electric bike at the EICMA motorcycle show and now has released a teaser video showing it has manual four-speed transmission.

While electric motorcycles can be twist-and-go, Kawasaki believes manual transmission “not only allows a greater speed range, it also allows the rider to have greater input when operating the bike”.

Manual transmission

That’s nothing new. We already could see from the prototype electric at EICMA that it featured gears and a chain rather than direct drive or twist-and-go throttle like many other electrics.

Many electric motorcycles have manual transmission.

The Brammo (later Victory) Empulse TT electric I rode in the USA in 2015 had manual transmission which they believed would make it easier for riders of normal bikes to make the transition to electric.

Victory Empulse TT electric motorcycle dial poised historic eventsMBW rides the Victory Empulse TT electric motorcycle

The new Kawasaki video doesn’t reveal too much else about the project except that it’s a Ninja-style sportsbike and it looks near to production.

It will be called the Kawasaki EV Endeavor.

However, with current record low petrol prices, we wonder whether there is much need for an electric Kawasaki at the moment!

The above video teaser is one of several about the Kawasaki EV Project appearing on YouTube.

This is the first official video from the company showing the work they put into the project.

They say it is mainly proof of their technology and intentions, but have not announced any timeline for a production bike.

It’s been a long-time project for the green team.

Back in 2013, Kawasaki filed a patent for an electric version of its baby Ninja, but the patent has only been published this year.

The drawings showed the battery and motor to the left of the motorcycle to demonstrate how it can be pulled from the tubular frame of the machine.

Kawasaki electric Ninja patent battery swap

That seems strange because only the battery would need to be replaced, although it would make maintenance on the motor easier.

That’s also strange as motor maintenance is not an issue with electric vehicles. They tend to be long-lasting and have low maintenance requirements.

However, it is believed the four Japanese companies are working on standardising electric motorcycles and probably batteries so they can be easily swapped when flat rather than waiting a long time to charge them up.

In 2015, Kawasaki filed patents in the US for as many as 10 electric motorcycle designs.

In other Kawasaki patent filing for electric motorcycles, one has a substantial cooling element with a radiator.

Electric Kawasaki Ninja patentsElectric Kawasaki Ninja patent drawing

Heat is one of the biggest impediments to performance and battery life.

I drove an early Tesla Roadster around Queensland Motorway and the instruments flashed red alerts for the battery heat after just four “hot laps.

The oil-and-liquid cooling system in the Kawasaki patent drawings are certainly more substantial than we have seen on any other electric motorcycle so far.

That would not only provide more range, but also greater performance.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Subscribe to an electric motorcycle

Riders can now subscribe through Blinker.com.au to hire the fun, dual-sport Grom-sized Fonzarelli NKD, the first Australian-made production electric motorcycle.

The Special Edition is capable of up to 120km range and 100km/h top speed and is now available through Blinker in Brisbane and Sydney for $120 a week.

The electric mini bike and a range of electric cars are being offered for subscription for the first time in Australia.

Blinker boss Michael Higgins says Aussie motorists will be able to experience electric vehicles without the added costs of buying one.

Subscription costs cover registration, insurance and maintenance, which is low for electric vehicles anyway. 

Subscribe online

Fonzarelli NKD electric mini motorcycleFonzarelli NKD

Customers can subscribe either online, or by visiting a Blinker partner dealership. 

Michael says the interest in electric vehicles has increased substantially in the past year and would continue to rise as “more people move towards a sustainable lifestyle”.

He says the adoption of electric vehicles “removes the need for fossil fuels, using batteries for power, ultimately reducing the impact of greenhouse gases and pollution on the environment”.

However, there are still issues with coal-fired power generation and the disposal of batteries. 

Fonzarelli electrics

Fonzarelli X1 electric scooterFonzarelli X1 electric scooter

If you are interested in buying a Fonzarelli NKD the Entry model costs $A9990 and has 60km of range and a top speed of 80km/h, while the Special Edition costs $14,990 and reaches 100km/h in five seconds.

The Redfern-based company makes the Fonzarelli in Adelaide and has also produced three electric scooters ranging in price from $5490 to $9890.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Enevate drops electric bike hurdle

Electric motorcycles could soon recharge to 75% capacity in as little as five minutes, according to Californian battery company, Enevate.

Company spokesman Bill Blanning tells us they are “talking to motorcycle and scooter makers worldwide” about their Li-ion batteries that use silicon-dominant anodes. 

“We are not ready to disclose that just yet. Stay tuned,” he says … and we will!

“Electric motorcycles can do very fast charging at EV DC fast-charging stations.

“We believe that cooling systems would need to be beefed up and feasible for extreme fast charging of motorcycles while parked.”

Enevate claims

The Californian company has more than 200 patents worldwide and licences its products to many automotive manufacturers.

Here are their claims about their battery:

  • 30% more range, higher energy density;
  • >100% better low temperature performance;
  • Safer battery with no lithium plating.
  • Enables lower cost and affordable EVs
  • 10-times faster charging; and
  • 5-minute Extreme Fast Charge.

The best way to show their charging and range claims in action is in this video using two slot cars.

Given the claimed 30% increased range, in Harley-Davidson’ electric LiveWire it would equate to range of more than 300km in the city and almost 200km on the highway.

Low temperature performance means you would be less likely to get stranded if riding up in the alps.

While Enevate doesn’t give any secrets away about how it is made, the fact that it uses less lithium is another safety, economic, environmental and humanitarian benefit.

Bill explains: “Li-ion cell safety issues are typically caused by contamination or lithium-plating.  For today’s conventional graphite Li-ion cells available, lithium plating typically happens at very high charge rates and/or charging at low temperatures.  Enevate’s technology does not have any lithium plating and can be safer than conventional graphite cells.”Enevate batteries

The company says the size and expense of batteries is a hurdle to widespread adoption of electric vehicles.

It’s also a particular hindrance to motorcycles which weigh less and usually cost a lot less than cars.

However, we have seen electric motorcycles at ridiculous prices. For example, the LiveWire costs almost $US30,000 in the US and could cost more than $A40,000 when it is launched here late this year.

Enevate say their batteries have much higher energy density which means they can be smaller and therefore a lower cost component of the whole vehicle cost.

Their claim that recharging will be 10 times faster means that electric motorcycles such as the LiveWire that take all night to recharge from a standard AC output could recharge in less than an hour.

Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycleHarley-Davidson's electric LiveWire short circuitLIveWires on DC fast chargers

If the rider has access to a DC fast charger, that time can drop to about five minutes with the Enevate battery which compares with Harley’s claim of 30 minutes for the LIveWire.

The big hurdle in Australia is our lack of such infrastructure, but it is gradually being installed across the nation’s highways.

https://motorbikewriter.com/solutions-electric-vehicle-charging/

Enevate isn’t the only company claiming faster recharge times.

Canadian company GBatteries are making the same claim with their batteries that use a special micro-pulse technology.

https://motorbikewriter.com/recharge-electric-motorbike-5-minutes/

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Call for incentives to build electric bikes

The Australian Government should offer incentives for the fledgling electric vehicle industry in the wake of the demise of domestic automobile manufacturing, says Savic Motorcycles.

Founder Dennis Savic (pictured above) plans to kickstart production of Australia’s first full-size electric motorcycle, the Savic C-Series, this year.

He says the process of accessing a government investment grant or low-interest loan was too arduous.

“We would like more help from the government through grants,” he says.

“But the process is so long and arduous that it simply takes too long to get through, and the timing/circumstance has to be borderline perfect.

“I looked at it and found the process so arduous that I would lose far too much time to make it worthwhile,” Denis says. 

“But I understand why their process is significant.”

He says he would also like to see tax and other incentives for electric vehicles as are offered in other countries to help his fledgling industry.

2019 Savic electric motorcycle prototype ordersDenis Savic

“As far as giving specific ideas on incentives, I’m afraid I’m probably not experienced enough on government capability and legislation governance.”

In come countries, incentives to riders consist of tax rebates, free tolls and exemption from CBD bans.

Incentives call

His call for incentives for the industry and riders comes in the wake of the recent announcement that Holden would exit Australia next year.

“We’re an Australia electric motorcycle business,” he emphasises.

“We developed our own technology and we’re kicking off production this year. 

“We need all the help we can get, but we’re lucky to have really supportive investors and first customers.”

Government incentives he would like to see include the Accelerating Commercialisation grant on a dollar-for-dollar basis, rent support and additions to the R&D claim. 

Show and tell2019 Savic electric motorcycle prototype orders giants

Meanwhile, potential Savic customers can get a better look at the bike and more technical details this week during a special Facebook “Show & Tell @ Fab9” this Friday at 6pm (AEDT).

This is a first for us, and we’re excited to delve into some of the engineering details and features our vehicles will have,” he says.

“We will also share a few stories of our tougher times and other challenges.”

Denis says they should have a Savic C-Series running within a week with a prototype ready in about a month for testing.

They are currently (pun intended) looking for premises in Melbourne to run their research and development as well as production in collaboration with a Taiwan facility.

Savic C-Series

Savic Motorcycles will make 49 C-Series cafe racer electric motorcycles available from November in three variants.

Specification Alpha Delta Omega
Power 60kW 40kW 25kW
Torque 190Nm TBC TBC
Range 200km TBC TBC
Charge time 4-6 hours TBC TBC
0-100km/h 3s 900ms TBC TBC
Price (+ORC) $22,999.00 $15,999.00 $10,999.00

That’s much cheaper than the Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycle which launched last year in the US at about $US30,000 ($A44,000).  It will be available in Australia late next year. Pricing is yet to be confirmed.

Denis says he hope to make his bikes available for test rides at the Australian Motorcycle Festival in Wollongong in November.

Buyers of the first production models will also receive:

  • Exclusive company updates first;
  • Lifetime membership providing exclusive discounts for all future Savic rider gear; and
  • Live updates and images of their bike build as it happens.2019 Savic electric motorcycle prototype orders whirring

Each model comes with several battery pack options. The largest offered in the Alpha will provide range of up to 200km, while the smallest option in the Omega is expected to have about 50km range. 

Like all electric vehicles, peak torque is instantaneous and the Alpha will accelerate from 0-100km in 3.9 seconds.

By comparison, the LiveWire has city range of about 235km and highway range of about 150km and reaches 100km/h in three seconds.

Savic customers will be able choose a range of options in brakes, suspension, wheels, tyres and three colours – Spectre, Stealth, and Rustic.

Aftermarket upgrades will also be offered. 

The bikes feature a fully integrated, stressed, liquid-cooled motor and energy storage system.

Depending on the model and battery pack a customer selects, a single charge can provide up to 11kWh. That costs only $3 compared with about $15 for a petrol bike to travel 250km.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Switch designs electric eSCRAMBLER

New Zealand electric motorcycle company Switch is seeking funding to homologate its stylish go-anywhere eSCRAMBLER and bring it to market in 2022.

Founder Matthew Waddick has already produced an electric conversion kit for a Honda Cub as part of his Shanghai Customs company and is now working on the eSCRAMBLER through Switch.

“We are going to be looking for partners and investors over the next few months for both projects Shanghai Customs and Switch,” says Matthew who says he had to “flee China” last month due to the coronavirus.

“It’s a little early yet for costing, the only thing we can say is that it will be very competitive in the pricing with the business model we are going for.

“No way we are going to price this out of the market.”

eSCRAMBLERSwitch electric eSCRAMBLER

The minimalistic eSCRAMBLER is based on a conventional polished-aluminium, double-cradle frame with upside-down forks, monoshock and 18-inch wheels with knobby tyres for all-terrain use.

It will also feature GPS tracking, three speed modes, USB charger, cruise control, regenerative braking to recharge the battery and Spanish JJuan brakes with Bosch ABS.

eSCRAMBLER includes some tasty parts such as CNC-machine triple clamps and footpegs, leather seat, LED lighting and a digital display that looks like a mobile phone.

One of the design features is how the 50kW motor and swingarm are coaxially mounted, allowing the Gates carbonfibre belt drive to maintain proper tension.Switch electric eSCRAMBLER

Matthew has partnered with ex-Yamaha Advanced Labs industrial designer and former Danish Flat Track racing champion Michel Riis to design and develop the eSCRAMBLER.

They are targeting up to 150km of range, 150km/h top speed and 0–100km/h in 3.2 seconds.

Switch also plan to have a fast charging system.

Wow factorSwitch electric eSCRAMBLER

Matthew says electric motorcycles are not new anymore.

“You can’t wow people by just being electric; you need to do better than that,” he says.

“We want people to understand this bike, see how it is all put together – to demystify electrics and especially not hide that we have a box full with cells.

“However, the design was not as easy as it looks – in fact it was incredibly difficult. Generally, making a complex product look simple is one of the hardest things to do and this is especially true with electric bikes.”

While the road-legal version will be released in 2022, they will put the bike through its paces this year on the Scandinavian flat tracking circuit.

Matthew says they already have some world champions “lining up to have a thrash”.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com