Tag Archives: ev

Kawasaki electric has manual transmission

Kawasaki displayed its electric project electric bike at the EICMA motorcycle show and now has released a teaser video showing it has manual four-speed transmission.

While electric motorcycles can be twist-and-go, Kawasaki believes manual transmission “not only allows a greater speed range, it also allows the rider to have greater input when operating the bike”.

Manual transmission

That’s nothing new. We already could see from the prototype electric at EICMA that it featured gears and a chain rather than direct drive or twist-and-go throttle like many other electrics.

Many electric motorcycles have manual transmission.

The Brammo (later Victory) Empulse TT electric I rode in the USA in 2015 had manual transmission which they believed would make it easier for riders of normal bikes to make the transition to electric.

Victory Empulse TT electric motorcycle dial poised historic eventsMBW rides the Victory Empulse TT electric motorcycle

The new Kawasaki video doesn’t reveal too much else about the project except that it’s a Ninja-style sportsbike and it looks near to production.

It will be called the Kawasaki EV Endeavor.

However, with current record low petrol prices, we wonder whether there is much need for an electric Kawasaki at the moment!

The above video teaser is one of several about the Kawasaki EV Project appearing on YouTube.

This is the first official video from the company showing the work they put into the project.

They say it is mainly proof of their technology and intentions, but have not announced any timeline for a production bike.

It’s been a long-time project for the green team.

Back in 2013, Kawasaki filed a patent for an electric version of its baby Ninja, but the patent has only been published this year.

The drawings showed the battery and motor to the left of the motorcycle to demonstrate how it can be pulled from the tubular frame of the machine.

Kawasaki electric Ninja patent battery swap

That seems strange because only the battery would need to be replaced, although it would make maintenance on the motor easier.

That’s also strange as motor maintenance is not an issue with electric vehicles. They tend to be long-lasting and have low maintenance requirements.

However, it is believed the four Japanese companies are working on standardising electric motorcycles and probably batteries so they can be easily swapped when flat rather than waiting a long time to charge them up.

In 2015, Kawasaki filed patents in the US for as many as 10 electric motorcycle designs.

In other Kawasaki patent filing for electric motorcycles, one has a substantial cooling element with a radiator.

Electric Kawasaki Ninja patentsElectric Kawasaki Ninja patent drawing

Heat is one of the biggest impediments to performance and battery life.

I drove an early Tesla Roadster around Queensland Motorway and the instruments flashed red alerts for the battery heat after just four “hot laps.

The oil-and-liquid cooling system in the Kawasaki patent drawings are certainly more substantial than we have seen on any other electric motorcycle so far.

That would not only provide more range, but also greater performance.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Subscribe to an electric motorcycle

Riders can now subscribe through Blinker.com.au to hire the fun, dual-sport Grom-sized Fonzarelli NKD, the first Australian-made production electric motorcycle.

The Special Edition is capable of up to 120km range and 100km/h top speed and is now available through Blinker in Brisbane and Sydney for $120 a week.

The electric mini bike and a range of electric cars are being offered for subscription for the first time in Australia.

Blinker boss Michael Higgins says Aussie motorists will be able to experience electric vehicles without the added costs of buying one.

Subscription costs cover registration, insurance and maintenance, which is low for electric vehicles anyway. 

Subscribe online

Fonzarelli NKD electric mini motorcycleFonzarelli NKD

Customers can subscribe either online, or by visiting a Blinker partner dealership. 

Michael says the interest in electric vehicles has increased substantially in the past year and would continue to rise as “more people move towards a sustainable lifestyle”.

He says the adoption of electric vehicles “removes the need for fossil fuels, using batteries for power, ultimately reducing the impact of greenhouse gases and pollution on the environment”.

However, there are still issues with coal-fired power generation and the disposal of batteries. 

Fonzarelli electrics

Fonzarelli X1 electric scooterFonzarelli X1 electric scooter

If you are interested in buying a Fonzarelli NKD the Entry model costs $A9990 and has 60km of range and a top speed of 80km/h, while the Special Edition costs $14,990 and reaches 100km/h in five seconds.

The Redfern-based company makes the Fonzarelli in Adelaide and has also produced three electric scooters ranging in price from $5490 to $9890.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Enevate drops electric bike hurdle

Electric motorcycles could soon recharge to 75% capacity in as little as five minutes, according to Californian battery company, Enevate.

Company spokesman Bill Blanning tells us they are “talking to motorcycle and scooter makers worldwide” about their Li-ion batteries that use silicon-dominant anodes. 

“We are not ready to disclose that just yet. Stay tuned,” he says … and we will!

“Electric motorcycles can do very fast charging at EV DC fast-charging stations.

“We believe that cooling systems would need to be beefed up and feasible for extreme fast charging of motorcycles while parked.”

Enevate claims

The Californian company has more than 200 patents worldwide and licences its products to many automotive manufacturers.

Here are their claims about their battery:

  • 30% more range, higher energy density;
  • >100% better low temperature performance;
  • Safer battery with no lithium plating.
  • Enables lower cost and affordable EVs
  • 10-times faster charging; and
  • 5-minute Extreme Fast Charge.

The best way to show their charging and range claims in action is in this video using two slot cars.

Given the claimed 30% increased range, in Harley-Davidson’ electric LiveWire it would equate to range of more than 300km in the city and almost 200km on the highway.

Low temperature performance means you would be less likely to get stranded if riding up in the alps.

While Enevate doesn’t give any secrets away about how it is made, the fact that it uses less lithium is another safety, economic, environmental and humanitarian benefit.

Bill explains: “Li-ion cell safety issues are typically caused by contamination or lithium-plating.  For today’s conventional graphite Li-ion cells available, lithium plating typically happens at very high charge rates and/or charging at low temperatures.  Enevate’s technology does not have any lithium plating and can be safer than conventional graphite cells.”Enevate batteries

The company says the size and expense of batteries is a hurdle to widespread adoption of electric vehicles.

It’s also a particular hindrance to motorcycles which weigh less and usually cost a lot less than cars.

However, we have seen electric motorcycles at ridiculous prices. For example, the LiveWire costs almost $US30,000 in the US and could cost more than $A40,000 when it is launched here late this year.

Enevate say their batteries have much higher energy density which means they can be smaller and therefore a lower cost component of the whole vehicle cost.

Their claim that recharging will be 10 times faster means that electric motorcycles such as the LiveWire that take all night to recharge from a standard AC output could recharge in less than an hour.

Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycleHarley-Davidson's electric LiveWire short circuitLIveWires on DC fast chargers

If the rider has access to a DC fast charger, that time can drop to about five minutes with the Enevate battery which compares with Harley’s claim of 30 minutes for the LIveWire.

The big hurdle in Australia is our lack of such infrastructure, but it is gradually being installed across the nation’s highways.

https://motorbikewriter.com/solutions-electric-vehicle-charging/

Enevate isn’t the only company claiming faster recharge times.

Canadian company GBatteries are making the same claim with their batteries that use a special micro-pulse technology.

https://motorbikewriter.com/recharge-electric-motorbike-5-minutes/

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Call for incentives to build electric bikes

The Australian Government should offer incentives for the fledgling electric vehicle industry in the wake of the demise of domestic automobile manufacturing, says Savic Motorcycles.

Founder Dennis Savic (pictured above) plans to kickstart production of Australia’s first full-size electric motorcycle, the Savic C-Series, this year.

He says the process of accessing a government investment grant or low-interest loan was too arduous.

“We would like more help from the government through grants,” he says.

“But the process is so long and arduous that it simply takes too long to get through, and the timing/circumstance has to be borderline perfect.

“I looked at it and found the process so arduous that I would lose far too much time to make it worthwhile,” Denis says. 

“But I understand why their process is significant.”

He says he would also like to see tax and other incentives for electric vehicles as are offered in other countries to help his fledgling industry.

2019 Savic electric motorcycle prototype ordersDenis Savic

“As far as giving specific ideas on incentives, I’m afraid I’m probably not experienced enough on government capability and legislation governance.”

In come countries, incentives to riders consist of tax rebates, free tolls and exemption from CBD bans.

Incentives call

His call for incentives for the industry and riders comes in the wake of the recent announcement that Holden would exit Australia next year.

“We’re an Australia electric motorcycle business,” he emphasises.

“We developed our own technology and we’re kicking off production this year. 

“We need all the help we can get, but we’re lucky to have really supportive investors and first customers.”

Government incentives he would like to see include the Accelerating Commercialisation grant on a dollar-for-dollar basis, rent support and additions to the R&D claim. 

Show and tell2019 Savic electric motorcycle prototype orders giants

Meanwhile, potential Savic customers can get a better look at the bike and more technical details this week during a special Facebook “Show & Tell @ Fab9” this Friday at 6pm (AEDT).

This is a first for us, and we’re excited to delve into some of the engineering details and features our vehicles will have,” he says.

“We will also share a few stories of our tougher times and other challenges.”

Denis says they should have a Savic C-Series running within a week with a prototype ready in about a month for testing.

They are currently (pun intended) looking for premises in Melbourne to run their research and development as well as production in collaboration with a Taiwan facility.

Savic C-Series

Savic Motorcycles will make 49 C-Series cafe racer electric motorcycles available from November in three variants.

Specification Alpha Delta Omega
Power 60kW 40kW 25kW
Torque 190Nm TBC TBC
Range 200km TBC TBC
Charge time 4-6 hours TBC TBC
0-100km/h 3s 900ms TBC TBC
Price (+ORC) $22,999.00 $15,999.00 $10,999.00

That’s much cheaper than the Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycle which launched last year in the US at about $US30,000 ($A44,000).  It will be available in Australia late next year. Pricing is yet to be confirmed.

Denis says he hope to make his bikes available for test rides at the Australian Motorcycle Festival in Wollongong in November.

Buyers of the first production models will also receive:

  • Exclusive company updates first;
  • Lifetime membership providing exclusive discounts for all future Savic rider gear; and
  • Live updates and images of their bike build as it happens.2019 Savic electric motorcycle prototype orders whirring

Each model comes with several battery pack options. The largest offered in the Alpha will provide range of up to 200km, while the smallest option in the Omega is expected to have about 50km range. 

Like all electric vehicles, peak torque is instantaneous and the Alpha will accelerate from 0-100km in 3.9 seconds.

By comparison, the LiveWire has city range of about 235km and highway range of about 150km and reaches 100km/h in three seconds.

Savic customers will be able choose a range of options in brakes, suspension, wheels, tyres and three colours – Spectre, Stealth, and Rustic.

Aftermarket upgrades will also be offered. 

The bikes feature a fully integrated, stressed, liquid-cooled motor and energy storage system.

Depending on the model and battery pack a customer selects, a single charge can provide up to 11kWh. That costs only $3 compared with about $15 for a petrol bike to travel 250km.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Switch designs electric eSCRAMBLER

New Zealand electric motorcycle company Switch is seeking funding to homologate its stylish go-anywhere eSCRAMBLER and bring it to market in 2022.

Founder Matthew Waddick has already produced an electric conversion kit for a Honda Cub as part of his Shanghai Customs company and is now working on the eSCRAMBLER through Switch.

“We are going to be looking for partners and investors over the next few months for both projects Shanghai Customs and Switch,” says Matthew who says he had to “flee China” last month due to the coronavirus.

“It’s a little early yet for costing, the only thing we can say is that it will be very competitive in the pricing with the business model we are going for.

“No way we are going to price this out of the market.”

eSCRAMBLERSwitch electric eSCRAMBLER

The minimalistic eSCRAMBLER is based on a conventional polished-aluminium, double-cradle frame with upside-down forks, monoshock and 18-inch wheels with knobby tyres for all-terrain use.

It will also feature GPS tracking, three speed modes, USB charger, cruise control, regenerative braking to recharge the battery and Spanish JJuan brakes with Bosch ABS.

eSCRAMBLER includes some tasty parts such as CNC-machine triple clamps and footpegs, leather seat, LED lighting and a digital display that looks like a mobile phone.

One of the design features is how the 50kW motor and swingarm are coaxially mounted, allowing the Gates carbonfibre belt drive to maintain proper tension.Switch electric eSCRAMBLER

Matthew has partnered with ex-Yamaha Advanced Labs industrial designer and former Danish Flat Track racing champion Michel Riis to design and develop the eSCRAMBLER.

They are targeting up to 150km of range, 150km/h top speed and 0–100km/h in 3.2 seconds.

Switch also plan to have a fast charging system.

Wow factorSwitch electric eSCRAMBLER

Matthew says electric motorcycles are not new anymore.

“You can’t wow people by just being electric; you need to do better than that,” he says.

“We want people to understand this bike, see how it is all put together – to demystify electrics and especially not hide that we have a box full with cells.

“However, the design was not as easy as it looks – in fact it was incredibly difficult. Generally, making a complex product look simple is one of the hardest things to do and this is especially true with electric bikes.”

While the road-legal version will be released in 2022, they will put the bike through its paces this year on the Scandinavian flat tracking circuit.

Matthew says they already have some world champions “lining up to have a thrash”.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Suzuki slow to plug into electric revolution

Suzuki has been slow to plug into the electric motorcycle revolution, but looks like finally joining the other Japanese motorcycle manufacturers, at least in the Asian market.

The big four Japanese manufacturers have all been slow in announcing their intentions with electric motorcycles and scooters.

However, in April 2019, electric vehicle website Electrek claimed Honda, Yamaha, Kawasaki and Suzuki has signed an agreement to work on standardising electric motorcycle batteries and charging infrastructure.

No doubt it’s hoped to avoid the Beta/VHS situation where new video recording technology went two different ways.

Standardised batteries and charging infrastructure would mean plugs on bikes and sockets on charging points would suit all electric motorcycle models.

Perhaps a standardised battery size, shape and output would also lead to a battery swap solution which would be quicker than waiting for a bike to recharge.

Slow revolution

By comparison with their major counterparts, the usually innovative Japanese motorcycle companies have been slow to join the electric vehicle revolution.

Yamaha released the PES1 (Passion Electric Street) road bike and PED1 (Passion Electric Dirt) off-roader for limited sale, mainly in Europe.

Yamaha PES1 electric motorcycles product standardiseYamaha PES1 electric motorcycle

Kawasaki has filed a patent for a water-cooled electric.

Honda has a hybrid scooter and an electric self-balancing prototype.

Honda reveals electric self-balancing concept Honda Riding Assist-e self-driving standardiseHonda electric Assist-e self-balancing bike

Meanwhile, Suzuki has been the slow coach with no patents, no announcements, nothing!

Until now.

Autocar India reports that Suzuki Motorcycle India MD Koichiro Hirao says they are working on an EV platform for India.

There is no word on what that EV platform will be; motorcycle, scooter, mobility scooter!

Nor is there any word about whether they would be available outside the country.

India is becoming a major player in the EV market with a host of companies from start-ups to major manufacturers now making them.

This comes in the wake of tough new emissions regulations in the overcrowded and polluted country.

Learn electric terms

Living with petrol-powered motorcycles all our lives, we now find we will have to learn a lot of new terms in the coming electric revolution.

We certainly don’t profess to know much about electrical terms.

But here is a very non-technical, idiot’s guide to the main terms. (Electricians may find this quite amusing!)

Volts: This is a measure between two points in an electrical circuit, sort of like the water pressure in pipes. The mains plug in your house has 240V (230V in UK, 110V in USA) and your motorcycle battery has 12V.

Amps: Together with the voltage, it determines the flow rate of the current. High amps with a low voltage means a lot of current flowing slowly, like a fat, lazy river. Low amps with a high voltage means a faster flow of less current, sort of like when you squeeze the end of a hose and the water spurts out.

Watts: It you multiply the volts by the amps you get the watts, which is the output power of the electric motor. You should already be familiar with kilowatts which are 1000 watts. One kilowatt is 1.34% of one horsepower or one horsepower is 0.75% of a kilowatt.

Sporty Harley-Davidson electric LiveWire parade silicon standardiseHarley’s LiveWire electric motor

Kilowatt hours: This is the capacity of the battery. Think of how many litres you can fit in your fuel tank. A one watt-hour battery will power a 1W electric motor for one hour. The new Lightning Strike Carbon Edition has a 20kWh battery which means it can produce 1kW of power for 20 hours.

That’s just a start.

There are a lot of other factors involved and other terms for battery energy-density (watt-hours per kilogram), charging terms (AC, DC and fast chargers) and a variety of range calculations that take into regenerative charging.

Click here to read more about the complexities of range.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Cagiva online to return as electric

Since 2018, MV Agusta has been working on reviving the Cagiva name, but with an electric motor, and now new boss Timur Sardarov (pictured above) confirms it is still part of their plan.

“Cagiva production will resume next year, at the latest in early 2021, and will be dedicated to electric urban mobility,” he told Italian site Motociclismo.

The interview is unclear about what the electric vehicle will be: scooter, motorcycle, e-bike?

“But we will not make scooters, they will be motorcycles,” says Timur who took over from Giovanni Castiglioni last year.

Cagiva Raptor Customised BMW R nineTCagiva V-Raptor

Then he seems to contradict himself.

“Easy to drive and below 4kW, because at the moment no-one who produces beyond this threshold can generate profits.

“In six or seven years, it will probably be possible to reach the profit with vehicles equivalent to 350cc.”

Cagiva return

MV Agusta boss Giovanni Castiglioni classicGiovanni when he was still boss in 2018

When I met with MV Agusta boss Giovanni Castiglioni in July 2018, he talked about the electric Cagiva project and said he believed in the potential of electric bikes.

“There is a market for high-performing light bikes and that’s how the Cagiva electric bike project started,” he told me.

“From my pure personal experience, the torque, power and throttle response is great. You can have fun and you don’t scare the cows and the deers. It’s actually enjoyable.”

He said Cagiva electric bikes would start with 80km of range and reach 320km in the next five years with a range of bikes from commuters to off-road.

But he also said MV would not go into electric bikes because there is no market for high-performing electric street bikes.

John Kocinski's Cagiva V594 grand prixJohn Kocinski’s Cagiva V594

“People think the electric bike is for losers and the reality is it is not.

“But at the moment, its potential is in cities for short-range commuting from home to the office or for short trips.

“We don’t yet live in a world where you can live with an electric car. I would like to buy a Tesla, but only for driving from home to the office. I travel a lot by car and I can’t start my journey by doing a flight plan like in a plane.

“The charging infrastructure needs to improve first.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Electric motorcycles leave giants in lurch

Start-ups making electric motorcycles and scooters are leaving behind the giants of traditional motorcycle manufacturing, according to American motorcycle industry guru Robert Pandya.

“The motorcycling environment, technology, and customer are simply changing faster than our industry is adapting,” says Robert, a former Indian Motorcycle executive and now a senior motorcycle industry consultant.

“Sure there are exceptions, but by and large the same training methods, rider expectations and experiences have dominated the mindset, attention and sponsorship dollars of the major OEM’s (original equipment manufacturer).”

He says the start-ups and non-traditional companies are leaving the motorcycle giants in the lurch on electric motorcycles.

Robert Pandya Indian Scout giantsRobert Pandya

“Very interesting brands like CAKE, Zero and Damon (full disclosure I’m on Damon’s advisory panel) are exploring the future of riding in truly compelling ways that major brands seem to only dabble with,” he says.

Damon Hypersport electric motorcycleDamon Hypersport

“Why for instance is there not already an electric PW-50 style motorcycle from Yamaha?

“What an opportunity!

“Simple speed limiters, geo-fencing and throttle smoothing programs would be such a valuable tool for dealerships seeking to expand local ridership.

“Team Red, Yellow and Green would surely follow – only to the benefit of all of us in the community.”

Giants slow to plug in

Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycleHarley-Davidson electric LiveWire in action

Harley-Davidson is the only traditional motorcycle manufacturer to bring a full-size road electric motorcycle to market.

But their LiveWire is very expensive at about $A44,000, compared with start-up producing bikes at about half the cost.

Harley also plan a host of smaller electric motorcycles and scooters as well as electric bicycles.

Harley-Davidson Scooter smallHarley electric scooter

Several other traditional motorcycle giants have talked about producing electric motorcycles but some have only produced electric scooters and off-road/trials bikes.

Meanwhile, small start-ups such as Denis Savic’s Australian Savic Motorcycles are forging ahead with full-size electric motorcycles at affordable prices.

2019 Savic electric motorcycle prototype ordersDenis Savic with Australia’s first electric motorcycle, the Savic

Global slump

The global slump in motorcycle and scooter sales has been exacerbated by the recent sales slide in China and India which is now the biggest motorcycle market in the world.

While their motorcycle growth rate has been huge in recent years, the growing middle class now seem to be aspiring more to cars than motorcycles.

In “mature motorcycle markets” where premium motorcycle brands rule, the sales figures are terrible.

Australia last year suffered its third consecutive year of sliding motorcycle/scooter/ATV sales, with the top category of road bikes alarmingly down by a third over the past four years.

It’s worse in America where road bike sales slumped 19% in the first nine months last year.

There was an increase in motorcycle sales in several European nations last year.

However, it should be noted that the increase is largely due to the huge growth of electric motorcycles and scooters, as well as e-bikes which are counted in official European motorcycle sales figures.

Claudio Domenicali and Ducati e-bikesDucati boss Claudio Domenicali introduces their e-bikes

Interestingly, the US Custom Department has declared electric bicycles are “motor cycles”.

The the line between what is a bicycle, scooter, motorcycle or e-bike is becoming more and more blurred.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Harley-Davidson goes small in 2020

The world’s most iconic big-bike manufacturer, Harley-Davidson, is thinking small for 2020 with the launch of a small-capacity motorbike in China, electric bicycles and an electric scooter.

Baby Hog

Harley-Davidson HD350Harley-Davidson HD350

Last June Harley-Davidson announced plans for a joint venture with China’s Qianjiang to produce a motorcycle under their HD350 project, indicating a 350cc engine.

However, it could be even smaller as they now call it the HD338, presumably powered by the Benelli 338cc twin-cylinder engine from the Benelli 302S as Qianjiang also owns and makes the former Italian brand of motorcycle.

The baby Hog will hit the showrooms in China in June and India by the end of the year.

There is no word on whether it will be exported to any other markets, but we suspect it will be sold throughout Asia.

Harley-Davidson Australia says they won’t be coming here.

They aren’t the only mainstream motorcycle manufacturer with small designs on China.

A month after Harley announced its HD350 plan, Italian manufacturer MV Agusta confirmed they would make 350-500cc bikes and Ducati signed away its naming rights to Chinese scooters.

Electric bicycles

Harley electric bicycles sharing subHarley electric bicycle

Electric balance bikes for kids are already available in US stores.

They will soon be joined by pedal-assisted electric bicycles for bigger kids.

rude boy bicyclesHarley e-bikes

There is no word on these products coming to Australia yet.

Electric scooter

Harley electric LiveWire ID specsHarley electric scooter concept

We saw their electric scooter concept in Portland, Oregon, last year when we attended the world launch of their LiveWire electric motorcycle.

It was the same as the concept images from last January.

However, a new image (top of page) and patent plans have emerged showing a much more developed scooter with upside down forks and a removable battery.Harley-Davidson Scooter small

A removable battery is a smart move as many electric motorcycles and scooters are now considering them for either battery-swap vending machines or so riders can take them into thier home or office to charge inside.

Comment

We applaud Harley for branching out.

However, we wonder about the economic sustainability of low-margin smaller bikes.

They would need to sell these in very high volume.

If not, then it is just draining research and development funding from their core product.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Carry electric bike battery inside to charge

One of the problems with electric motorcycles is finding somewhere to charge the battery, but a Chinese company believes the answer is in removable batteries you can carry inside to a power point for charging.

Removable batteries could be a way forward for electric motorcycles and scooters with several Japanese and Chinese companies now using or considering them.

Their idea is that they can be swapped at vending machines when they run flat.

Yamaha Gogoro battery swap electric scooterYamaha electric scooter with removable Gogoro battery

However, Shanghai scooter company Niu has unveiled their RQi scooter prototype which has removable two-piece Panasonic lithium battery packs which can be charged up on household mains outlets.

Niu RQi Carry battery inside to chargeNiu RQi portable battery

It makes a lot of sense if the battery packs are light and small enough to carry inside.

We are used to charging our phones and portable devices when we get to work or return home, so one more battery wouldn’t make much difference.

Harley-Davidson’s electric scooter concept also has a removable battery with a handle so you can carry it inside for charging.

Harley electric LiveWire ID specsHarley electric scooter

Niu don’t specific charging time, but they say the two packs would provide range of about 130km in combined city/highway riding.

The RQi scooter, unveiled at the recent Las Vegas Consumer Electronics Show, is powered by a 30kW mid-drive motor with a top speed of 160km/h.

Other features are TFT dash, traction control, belt drive, 5G connectivity for GPS and anti-theft tracking, and an adaptive headlight that lights up the inside of corners as used by companies such as BMW and KTM.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com