Tag Archives: Pants

Rider gear sacrifices safety for comfort

Motorcycle jackets and pants that have good breathability for the warmer riding months sacrifice safety standards, according to the latest test results from Australia’s internationally awarded MotoCAP motorcycle gear safety ratings service.

MotoCAP has now performed testing and issued safety and comfort ratings ratings for 354 items of rider jackets, gloves and pants.

The MotoCAP safety intitiative launched in September 2018 and is the first of its type in the world.

It has now added 14 more products to its online ratings of 172 jackets, 90 pairs of pants and 92 pairs of gloves.

The new safety ratings for seven jackets and seven pairs of pants range from one to three out of five stars for safety.

They show that you can’t have it all when it comes to safety and comfort in hot conditions.

Jackets and pants that have good breathability score low for safety and vice versa.

For example, the Bullit Easy Tactical Icon pants score just one safety star but a maximum five for beathability.

Meanwhile, Dainese Delta 3 leather pants performed well for safety with three out of five stars, but just two for breathability.

It’s not that we haven’t suspected the trade-off on comfort and safety, but it’s interesting to see that sciebce back up our suspicions.

The new ratings for jackets can be viewed here. The new ratings for pants can be viewed here.

Riders are urged to consider checking the safety and comfort ratings of gear before they buy.

Shapeheart Classic Handlebar Phone Mounting System

While some have disputed the veracity or usefulness of the tests, rider representative groups and road safety experts say MotoCAP at least makes riders more aware of wearing protective gear.

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), the Department for Infrastructure and Transport, Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Testing is carried out by the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials on behalf of the MotoCAP partners.

All gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

In 2019, MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

10 Best Motorcycle Pants For Women

Often overlooked when considering protective gear, your legs are actually quite vitally important in terms of controlling the average motorcycle. Stop and think for a moment about just how many things about a bike need your legs: balance during cornering, providing enough stability to press on levers operated by your feet, and a whole slew of other things that happen naturally as part of riding.

It is amazing, then, that many riders don’t protect their legs. We’ve all heard the excuses of “it’s too hot where I live,” “I don’t plan on crashing,” and “I can’t find anything that’s comfortable.” For those in hot regions, mesh pants. For those that can’t find anything comfortable, there are ranges of overpants and/or custom fit motorcycle gear that can be ordered. For those that don’t plan on crashing, well, no one plans on crashing, but it still happens!

To keep your legs safe, as well as keep you looking your best on the bike, here are the top ten motorcycle pants currently on the market. These are all either highly rated and reviewed, have special features about them, or are just damned good deals when it comes to the value-to-protection ratio. If you’re looking for more size options, check out our guides on Plus Size Jackets and Plus Size Pants for female riders.

Rokker RokkerTech High Waist Slim Women’s Jeans

Rokker RokkerTech High Waist Slim Women’s Jeans

Price: $439.00
Buy: Revzilla

Rokker is one of the more premium motorcycle clothing brands out there, with a history of moderately-expensive-but-worth-it protective gear. This holds true with the Rokkertech High Waist Slim jeans, a new introduction to their motorcycle pants lineup.

The Tech part of RokkerTech comes from the usage of in-house developed Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene, or UHMWPE, which has a pure fiber tensile strength twice that of steel. Around those fibers, Rokker weaves in cotton so as to form a denim feel and look, but which is, when finally sewn into a full garment, 15 times as strong as steel in abrasion resistance.

This is backed up by full D3O knee and hip armor, both of which are included. As well, the use of UHMWPE allows for the jeans to be sewn and bonded, instead of riveted, meaning there is no metal on the outside of the jearns to scratch and ding your bike’s paint job. Definitely designed for warmer weather, these riding jeans are one of the few that are single layer, so apart from the slight bumps where the armor is, they could pass for everyday fashion jeans without worry.

Spidi Moto Pro Women’s Leggings

Spidi Moto Pro Women’s Leggings

Price: $159.90
Buy: Revzilla

Spidi is often considered as a bargain brand, which is not saying anything bad about them. They are simply like Scorpion, making good gear available at lower-than-average retail prices. A perfect example of this are the Moto Pro leggings, a mix of high tech textiles and a low price.

The leggings are designed, as the name suggests, to fit tightly to the leg, much tighter than many riding jeans would. This is made possible through Spidi’s TEXTECH fiber, a blend of cotton and elastane. This blend means the leggings will stretch with you, while the cotton is of a high enough grade that it replicates Cordura levels of protection, without needing to license the name. That is, quite possibly, where most of the savings are on these riding pants.

Protective armor comes in the form of knee armor at CE level 1, and pockets inside the hip for optional hip armor. The leggings are single layer, and are highly abrasion resistant, so they can be worn either on their own, or if you wanted extra protection, could be worn under a pair of regular jeans, riding overpants, or with aramid/kevlar undergarments.

Scorpion EXO Maia Women’s Pants

Scorpion EXO Maia Women’s Pants

Price: $179.95+
Buy: Revzilla | Amazon

The Scorpion EXO Maia pants are a bit of an oddity, in a good way. To explain what is meant by that, we first need to look at what type of riding these pants are designed for. That style can simply be described as “touring.” It could be sport touring, cruiser touring, continental touring, it’s built for them all.

This is demonstrated by the way the pants are designed to protect the rider. Most of the protective polyfabric, which is rated at 600D, is in the seat, knees, and lower legs, all common sliding and impact areas. The other areas of the pants are then fitted with poly-mesh panels, which while not major impact areas, are still rated at about 300D. This is backed up by Sas-Tec CE level 1 knee armor, and pockets for Sas-Tec hip armor.

The pants are odd in that instead of focusing on making the whole thing out of full 600D, Scorpion put the heavy duty protection on slide and impact areas, and used the other areas to benefit ventilation and comfort. That is the odd bit about these pants. They’re heavy duty, but lightweight, meant to keep the rider comfortable for long or short rides, and above all, protected.

Dainese Delta 3 Women’s Leather Pants

Dainese Delta 3 Women’s Leather Pants

Price: $469.95
Buy: Revzilla

Dainese is one of the two major suppliers of racing gear for the MotoGP grid, and it shows with trickle-down tech that makes it into the latest and greatest of their consumer track and riding gear. The Delta 3 Perforated leather pants are just one more example of the top class of motorcycle racing impacting every day riding comfort and protection.

Using full tutu cowhide leather at 1.2mm or greater, the pants are heavily perforated on the thighs to allow for the most airflow to the hottest part of the legs. S1 bieleastic polyamide stretch fabric allows for comfort and protection in high movement areas such as the groin and knees. There are no adjustable vents on these pants, however, as they are considered race-grade.

In line with that powersports grade ideal, the pants come with full composite armor on the knees and hips that both meet and exceed CE level 2 requirements. The knee pucks are fully replaceable and are highly durable. The pants as a whole meet and exceed CE – Cat. II – 89/686/EEC Directive ratings, which translates to full track and race certification, although most race series will make you have a full one piece suit. It just shows the level of technology and detail Dainese is bringing down to the everyday sport rider.

Alpinestars Stella Missile Leather Pants

Alpinestars Stella Missile Leather Pants

Price: $449.95
Buy: Revzilla

Whereas the other racing fit pants on this list are pretty much a women’s version of a men’s set of pants, the Alpinestars Stella Missile pants are a completely different beast than the men’s Missile V2 leather pants. This is through both research and development with women that partake in racing championships, and feedback from everyday riders.

The same 1.3mm full cowhide leather is used, however the legs are tailored for smaller diameters, and the hips section has been widened, with adjustable straps for a perfect fit. The Stella Missile’s also feature the same GP-R knee slider pucks as the men’s pants for lap after lap on a track day without worry.

Armor comes in the form of Alpinestars Bio knee protectors, and there are pockets for hip armor as well. If you have a Stella Missile Women’s racing jacket, there is a full surround zip at the waist to connect the pants to the jacket to form a full suit.

Rev’it Maple Women’s Jeans

Rev’it Maple Women’s Jeans

Price: $189.99
Buy: Revzilla

Rev’It has been working day in and day out since their inception to include women into their gear lineups. This is because the Netherlands has a large cycling population, which has led to a higher number of female riders in the European country. And as all women are not built the same, Rev’It also has many styles of riding pants.

The Maple jeans are for those women that do not want a regular or relaxed fit, but also don’t want the jeans to be totally tight on their legs. Using a skinny fit, these jeans are made of 13oz Cordura denim, which has a minimum abrasion protection rating of 500D. Rev’It also includes their CoolMax lining, allowing sweat and heat to be wicked away and carried off by the air passing through and over the jeans.

For protection, there is a double layer of PWR polyester fabric in the seat and at the knees, to keep the Seesmart CE level 1 knee armor in place even during a slide. There are pockets for hip armor, and the jeans are certified CE 17092-4:2020 Class A, meaning street and regular commuting protection.

Rev’It Moto Women’s Jeans

Rev’It Moto Women’s Jeans

Price: $259.99
Buy: Revzilla

As we just mentioned in the Rev’It Maple overview above, not all women are built the same. The Rev’It Moto Jeans are, much like their men’s counterpart, designed to replicate the look and feel of a leather-based pant, but made using fabrics.

10 Best Motorcycle Pants For Men

As with the men’s version, Rev’It used heavyweight 12.5oz Cordura denim for the exterior, which gives an approximate 600D abrasion resistance rating. Underneath that, Seesmart CE level 1 knee pads are included with the jeans. The inner lining is made of Rev’It’s own PWR Shield polyamide mesh, which adds another 600D of abrasion resistance.

Combined, the outer and inner layers provide 1200D of total abrasion resistance, or about 10 seconds of resistance at 50 MPH. Of course, the faster you start the slide, the less time it will take to wear through, although these jeans are meant to give enough resistance that you will either start to tumble, or have enough time to slow down through friction to prevent the worst of road rash.

Klim Artemis Women’s Pants

Klim Artemis Women’s Pants

Price: $549.99
Buy: Revzilla

The masters of off-road ADV and exploring gear, Klim shifted their focus when it came to the Artemis gear. Using their expertise, they made the Artemis line of protective gear for women, without a men’s gear equivalent. This makes it, in the space of motorcycle PPE, one of the very few model lines that is specifically and only for the ladies of two wheels.

The Artemis are named appropriately, as these pants are designed to protect against almost any situation you could find yourself in while travelling off-road. Made of Klim’s exclusive Karbonite textile, the pants have a slide and ripstop rating ranging from 600D to 750D, depending on which part of the pants you are looking at. This is backed by full GoreTex, allowing the pants to be 100% waterproof while also breathable.

In making the Artemis line only for women, the ventilation mapping of the pants is oriented towards keeping the air flowing through and around the warmest bits. Two angled thigh vents, and two lower thigh exhausts, allow for cooling air to flow around the legs and wick away moisture and heat in equal measure. The inner mesh is also Klimatek, a specific mesh that helps carry that heat and moisture to the vents.

D3O CE level 1 armor protects both the knees and the hips, and can be replaced if needed with other CE level 1 armor, or optional CE level 2 versions. All in all, by keeping their focus on the woman rider, Klim has made a stellar product that is highly recommended and reviewed.

Rev’It Ignition 3 Women’s Pants

Rev’It Ignition 3 Women’s Pants

Price: $439.99
Buy: Revzilla

Rev’It themselves have the best statement about what makes the Ignition 3 pants so special: “Leather and mesh go together like salt and caramel.” Designed for the rider in hotter climates, the Ignition 3 pants are some of the best pants, of any type, you can buy for riding.

The outer shell is a combination of Monaco performance cowhide leather with a minimum thickness of 1mm, combined with high-strength Dynax mesh, 500D polyamide stretch zones, and Lorica fabric with waxed polyester for airflow. The leather is, of course, on all the high-abrasion zones should a slide occur, with the 500D polyamide allowing for both protection and stretch on secondary slide zones.

In adapting the Ignition 3 pants for women, the fit was made tighter in the legs and expanded a bit in the hips. As well, the knee protectors are still CE level 2 Seeflex, while the larger CE Level 1 Type B hip armor is provided. Apart from those changes, the pants are almost identical to the mens version, and the Hydratex fully removable waterproof liner is also included.

Rev’It Sand 4 H2O Women’s Pants

Rev’It Sand 4 H2O Women’s Pants

Price: $369.99
Buy: Revzilla

If you want to talk about over-engineering a set of pants, then you need to talk about the Rev’It Sand 4 H2O ADV and off-road pants. As the name suggests, this is the fourth iteration and evolution of the pants, and they came out just before the calendar flipped over to 2021. When it comes to four season riding capability, Rev’It’s Sand line-up is well worth looking at.

So what makes them over-engineered? Firstly, the outer layer is made of full 1000D polyester ripstop, which is enough protection for most other pants to get by with. But Rev’It wasn’t satisfied, and then put a Hydratex liner behind that, for waterproofing and breathability. Then, still not satisfied, they put a combination polyester and polyamide internal mesh liner, with a removable extra thermal liner, inside that is puncture and abrasion resistant.

Add in that the pants come with Seeflex CE level 2 knee and upper shin guards, and SeeSmart CE level 1 type B hip guards as standard, and you have a set of pants that is waterproof, can slide down the side of a mountain and not tear, is comfortable, can be worn in four seasons, and also can be adjusted via several straps and snap-tabs to fit perfectly.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

10 Best Motorcycle Pants For Men

It may be surprising to some, but legs are often one of the most overlooked parts of protection for many riders. They may have the best helmet, an awesome jacket, great gloves, and boots that will protect their feet for years but will ride in normal jeans. It’s a lab-proven fact that regular, off-the-shelf denim will stand up to a slide for less than a second, and after that, it’s your skin that’s touching the pavement.

This is why proper riding pants are important. All of our legs come in different shapes and sizes, from wide and short to thin and long, and every variation in between. It is for that reason that manufacturers often size their riding pants in different ranges.

As well, with developments over the past decade, riding jeans, with strong hybrid denim mixes backed by aramid or Kevlar, have become a vital market for manufacturers. It keeps the style of regular jeans but provides knee armor and the abrasion resistance of aramid/Kevlar. These, then, are the 10 best riding pants you can currently find on the market.

Rev’It Ignition 3 Pants

Rev’It Ignition 3 Pants

Price: $399.99
Buy: Revzilla

Rev’It themselves have the best statement about what makes the Ignition 3 pants so special: “Leather and mesh go together like salt and caramel.” Designed for the rider in hotter climates, the Ignition 3 pants are some of the best pants, of any type, you can buy for riding.

The outer shell is a combination of Monaco performance cowhide leather with a minimum thickness of 1mm, combined with high-strength Dynax mesh, 500D polyamide stretch zones, and Lorica fabric with waxed polyester for airflow. The leather is, of course, on all the high-abrasion zones should a slide occur, with the 500D polyamide allowing for both protection and stretch on secondary slide zones.

The airflow through these pants is unbelievably high, allowing for maximum cooling while riding. However, should it start to look rainy or wet, the pants do have a fully removable Hydratex lining that is rated 3L and will get your home with your legs dry. The armor is in the form of Seeflex CE level 2 knee armor, and Seesmart CE level 1 armor at the hips.

Dainese Delta 3 Perforated Leather Pants

Dainese Delta 3 Perforated Leather Pants

Price: $469.99
Buy: Revzilla

Dainese is one of the two major suppliers of racing gear for the MotoGP grid, and it shows with trickle-down tech that makes it into the latest and greatest of their consumer track and riding gear. The Delta 3 Perforated leather pants are just one more example of the top class of motorcycle racing impacting everyday riding comfort and protection.

Using full tutu cowhide leather at 1.2mm or greater, the pants are heavily perforated on the thighs to allow for the most airflow to the hottest part of the legs. S1 bi-elastic polyamide stretch fabric allows for comfort and protection in high movement areas such as the groin and knees. There are no adjustable vents on these pants, however, as they are considered race-grade.

In line with that powersports-grade ideal, the pants come with full-composite armor on the knees and hips that both meet and exceed CE level 2 requirements. The knee pucks are fully replaceable and are highly durable. The pants as a whole meet and exceed CE – Cat. II – 89/686/EEC Directive ratings, which translates to full track and race certification, although most race series will make you have a full one-piece suit. It just shows the level of technology and detail Dainese is bringing down to the everyday sport rider.

Alpinestars Yaguara Drystar Pants

Alpinestars Yaguara Drystar Pants

Price: $329.95
Buy: Revzilla | Amazon

Alpinestars are famous for their waterproof yet breathable riding gear, and the Yaguara pants are just another example of what they like to term as “tech-touring” gear. As the name suggests, there are a lot of high-tech, advanced materials at work in these pants, both to keep you protected and keep you dry.

The outer shell is not made of any one material, but instead a blend of various polyamide and polyester textiles. This is then backed by a Drystar waterproof membrane, and the two layers are laminated together. This provides both excellent waterproofing and breathability, with the external layers combining to form an extremely durable fabric.

To further protection, there are ballistic nylon protection panels added to the heavy-duty wear and tear sections of the pants, including slide areas. Alpinestars’ Bio-Air knee protectors are standard and are rated at CE level 2. Hip pockets for armor are sewn in. And in case the already breathable material isn’t cool enough, there are four zippered vents for customizable cooling.

If you like the sound of the Yaguara pants, but want something with braces, then consider looking at the Alpinestars Andes V2 pants instead.

Klim Dakar Pants

Klim Dakar Pants

Price: $209.99+
Buy: Revzilla | Amazon

Klim prides itself on being a premium adventure and off-road touring company, and it shows since they’ve continually developed and produced some of the best gear in the sector. This shows with gear such as the Dakar pants, a premium off-road pant with protection and durability to last for weeks, or even months, on and off the road.

Starting off with the outer layer, there is 840D Cordura textile woven material with a highly water-resistant coating on the threads. This is joined by thick, abrasion, and melting-resistant leather on the lower legs for protection from both shrubbery and engine heat. Stretch fabric allows for optimal comfort around common pressure areas such as the groin, back of knees, back of the waist, and others.

There are multiple ventilation ports with full YKK zippers for durability and adjustability. Armor protection comes from both external TPU reinforcement on the knees, as well as internal knee and hip armor pockets for your personal choice of the armor type you’d like.

Alpinestars Missile v2 Airflow Pants

Alpinestars Missile v2 Airflow Pants

Price: $469.95
Buy: Revzilla | Amazon

For the rider that wants to hit the track but doesn’t like the full perforated leather feel of other pants, the Alpinestars Missile v2 leather pants are the most viable alternative. While the majority of the pants are made from leather, there are some materials used that allow for high airflow while also keeping up with the expected level of protection from track-viable pants.

This starts with full 1.3mm premium bovine leather, with a lot of perforation on the thighs. Leather accordion panels over the knees allow for comfort, and an extended rear waist construction makes sure that the tailbone and spine are covered in the case of a slide. Where the airflow comes in is through the stretch panels at the groin and inner thigh, as well as on parts of the calf. These stretch zones, made of polyamides, are rated 600D on their own.

Kneel pucks allow for some full-lean apexes to be clipped without damage to your pants, and are of Alpinestars’ high durability GP-R construction. Nucleon CE level 1 knee armor is included, with pockets for optional hip armor. If you have a Missile Air jacket, of any version, the pants will also zip together with that to form a race suit.

REAX Alta Mesh Pants

REAX Alta Mesh Pants

Price: $199.00
Buy: Revzilla

The downside to a lot of motorcycle protective gear is that while it does protect the rider, it also heats up the rider. For this reason, mesh gear was developed, and REAX has one of the most affordable sets of mesh pants with the best protection with the Alta Mesh pants.

To provide the ventilation needed to keep a rider cool in hot weather, a lot of the inner leg, thigh, groin,  and some of the ankle areas of the pants are made of polyamide mesh. On areas that may suffer the impact or be slid upon, there is a combination of polyester 600D check pattern fabric, with polyamide 980D ballistic penetration resistant fabric at the knees and across the buttocks.

This is lined on the inside with a moisture-wicking mesh liner that is shaped to pull the most moisture and heat to the mesh portions inside the leg so that the cool air can wick it away from the rider. With Sas-Tec CE level 2 knee armor included, and pockets for Sas-Tec CE level 1 or 2 armor at the hips, for $199, you are getting the best of the best in mesh gear.

If you’re looking for something with real waterproof capabilities, the REAX Traveler Waterproof pants are also worth a look.

Rev’It Sand H2O Pants

Rev’It Sand H2O Pants

Price: $369.99
Buy: Revzilla

If you want to talk about over-engineering a set of pants, then you need to talk about the Rev’It Sand 4 H2O ADV and off-road pants. As the name suggests, this is the fourth iteration and evolution of the pants, and they came out just before the calendar flipped over to 2021.

So what makes them over-engineered? Firstly, the outer layer is made of full 1000D polyester ripstop, which is enough protection for most other pants to get by with. But Rev’It wasn’t satisfied, and then put a Hydratex liner behind that, for waterproofing and breathability. Then, still not satisfied, they put a combination polyester and polyamide internal mesh liner, with a removable extra thermal liner, inside that is puncture and abrasion-resistant.

Add in that the pants come with Seeflex CE level 2 knee and upper shin guards, and SeeSmart CE level 1 type B hip guards as standard, and you have a set of pants that is waterproof, can slide down the side of a mountain, and not tear, is comfortable, can be worn in four seasons, and also can be adjusted via several straps and snap-tabs to fit perfectly.

Knox Urbane Pro Pants

Knox Urbane Pro Pants

Price: $299.99
Buy: Revzilla

Knox is a company that only recently started to make waves in the North American market, as well as many international markets. They used to be almost exclusively European, being based out of the UK. Where most have heard of them before is with their excellent micro-lock armor that is often seen in motocross protection.

In terms of street gear, Knox took the road less traveled, and instead of riding “jeans,” they made riding “khakis.” Lighter weight, these pants are nonetheless extremely durable, made of high-strength stretch nylon infused with spandex to allow them to move and shape to the rider. They also included micro-lock armor for the knees and hips as standard, something you often have to pay extra for with other brands.

As these pants are lighter weight than the Cordura denim of most riding jeans, there may be thoughts that it won’t protect as well. Those worries are squashed when you see that these pants are EN17092-3:2020 Class AA certified, meaning that, if they had knee sliders, these pants would qualify for use on a track, and out-class most riding pants that only come with a single A rating. For reference, AAA certification is for full racing gear and is often only given to full riding suits.

Rev’It Moto Jeans

Rev’It Moto Jeans

Price: $259.99
Buy: Revzilla

Rev’It strikes again on this list with a super pair of motorcycle riding jeans named, oddly enough, Moto Jeans. While the title may be a bit self-apparent, the quality and protection offered through these jeans are nothing to joke about.

Starting with a leather-style pants base, Rev’It instead used heavyweight 12.5oz Cordura denim for the exterior, which gives an approximate 600D abrasion resistance rating. Underneath that, Seesmart CE level 1 knee pads are included with the jean. The inner lining is made of Rev’It’s own PWR Shield polyamide mesh, which adds another 600D of abrasion resistance.

Combined, the outer and inner layers provide 1200D of total abrasion resistance or about 10 seconds of resistance at 50 MPH. Of course, the faster you start the slide, the less time it will take to wear through, although these jeans are meant to give enough resistance that you will either start to tumble, or have enough time to slow down through friction to prevent the worst of road rash.

Scorpion EXO Covert Pro Jeans

 Scorpion EXO Covert Pro Jeans

Price: $159.95
Buy: Revzilla | Amazon

Scorpion is well known for making superb gear like helmets at affordable prices. The EXO Covert Pro jeans are just another example of this steadfast determination to make riding less expensive while keeping the rider safe. As well, because of using a specific cut, the exterior of the jeans are large panels which increases the total stability of the material, instead of multi-seam smaller panels.

That material is Cordura 373 GSM denim, which is highly abrasion-resistant on its own, made up of 85% cotton and 15% high-strength nylon. This is backed by 250 GSM DuPont Kevlar from the base of the knees all the way to the waist, as this is the most common sliding area. From the base of the knee to the ankle cuff, a mesh lining helps keep the jeans open for airflow and allows for heat and moisture to be wicked away.

The only downside to the EXO Covert Pro is that while there are pockets at the knees and hips for armor, the jeans don’t come with any pre-installed. The pockets are fairly universal, although Scorpion recommends Sas-Tec Level 2 knee armor and Sas-Tec level 1 or 2 hip armor.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP now rates more than 300 rider gear items

Australia’s internationally awarded MotoCAP motorcycle gear safety ratings service has now performed testing and issued safety and comfort ratings ratings for 340 items of rider jackets, gloves and pants.

The MotoCAP safety intitiative launched in September 2018 and is the first of its type in the world.

It has now added 16 more products to its online ratings of 165 jackets, 83 pairs of pants and 92 pairs of gloves.

The new safety ratings for 13 jackets and three pairs of pants range from one to three out of five stars for safety.

All pairs of pants from DriRider (Titan and Xena ladies pants) and Macna (transfer) tested were rated at just one star.

The Dainese Prima72 leather jacket was the top jacket performer with three stars.

Dainese Prima72 jacket
Dainese Prima72 jacket

Riders are urged to consider checking the safety and comfort ratings of gear before they buy.

While some have disputed the veracity or usefulness of the tests, rider representative groups and road safety experts say MotoCAP at least makes riders more aware of wearing protective gear.

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), the Department for Infrastructure and Transport, Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Testing is carried out by the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials on behalf of the MotoCAP partners.

All gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

In 2019, MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP helps riders choose Christmas gear

Just in time for Christmas, Australia’s internationally awarded MotoCAP motorcycle gear safety ratings service has added 16 new items.

The addition of safety and comfort ratings for ten jackets and six pairs of pants brings the total number of items of clothing to 239, comprised of 115 jackets, 56 pairs of pants and 73 pairs of gloves.

Alpinestars GP Plus R V3 leather jacket
Alpinestars GP Plus R V3 leather jacket

In the latest round of testing, the Alpinestars GP Plus R V3 leather jacket performed well, receiving four stars for safety.

Importantly as we start summer, the RJays Samurai 3 leather jacket also performed well for both safety and breathability, scoring three out of five stars in both categories. That comfort rating is pretty good for a leather jacket.

Rays Samurai 3 jacket
Rays Samurai 3 summer jacket

The MotoCAP safety intitiative that rates motorcycle jackets, pants and gloves, launched in September 2018 and is the first of its type in the world.

The new ratings can be viewed here.

All gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

Click here to find out how products are selected for rating in secret.

International award

Last year, MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Testing is carried out by the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials on behalf of the MotoCAP partners.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Pando Moto Jeans: Blacker, Safer, Comfier

Lithuanian motorcycle clothing company Pando Moto claim their updated Steel Black 02 single-layer riding jeans for men and women are not only safer, but also more comfortable and blacker.

So we put them to the riding test.

I hope to never have to test the safety of the jeans and they have not yet been tested by Australia’s MotoCAP clothing comfort and safety ratings system.

Pando moto jeans

However, Pando Moto use new Dyneema single-layer denim and include SAS-TEC TripleFlex armor for knees and hips which make the jeans officially approved as personal protective equipment under EN 17092, level AA (speed 70km/h).

Dyneema is a Dutch invention which blends the abrasion-resistant material into a single-layer denim that meets CE standards for protection without the need for a separate layer.

Compared with the Steel Black 9 jeans I reviewed last year, they do look blacker. The previous jeans look more of a dark blue.

The cut is like that of a pair of fashionable jeans which broadens the utility as they can function as a ‘regular’ pair of jeans.

I have now put them to the comfort test for the coming hot summer weather in Australia.

Pando moto jeans

Thanks to the single-layer fabric protection they feel so lightweight and flexible when riding and remain cool up to ~32+ degrees.

They are also comfortable due to the ultra-thin armour.

Bosch split-screen instruments

In fact, you can’t even tell they have the armour in them, unlike some riding jeans which look ridiculous with their knobbly knee armour.

It can be fiddly to install the armour, but just turn them inside out and it’s a 2-minute job.

Other features such as pockets and key tag are great; similar to the previous generation.

The jeans cost €399 ($A554, $US402), which is not cheap, but they are certified safe for urban riding and are comfortable and so stylish you could wear them out without having to remove the armour.

They come in a small array of sizes from 29” waist to 34”.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Leggings Still Fail Safety Test

Women riders’ tight-fitting leggings may look great, but they still fail the safety test, according to the Australian MotoCAP safety and comfort ratings system.

The highest safety rating MotoCAP has given to leggings is only two out of a maximum of five stars given to the $269 Resurgence Sara Jane Leggings.

All four other brands of leggings tested so far have only rated half a star.

They are also the best performing ladies textile pants rated so far.

Of course, leggings are not designed form maximum protection on a racetrack, but to be worn around town where fashion and comfort also rate highly.

MotoCAP chief scientist Chris Hurren points out that urban and country riders need different levels of abrasion, impact and seam-bursting protection in their riding gear.

He explains the differences in this video from MotoCAP, the world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing which launched on 18 September 2018.

The leggings are among 13 items recently added to the 266 items of clothing MotoCAP has so far tested. They include 64 pants, 125 jackets and 77 gloves.

Last year, MotoCAP won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Macna Launch Summer Riding Pants

European riding gear manufacturer Macna have released Bora Pants designed to complement their new Aerocon Adventure Jacket for the coming Aussie summer.

Like the jacket, the pants meet stringent new European CE safety standard EN17092 protection standards.

They are made of 600D Ripstop Polyester Nylon and Polyester Mesh which makes them light, yet tough.

Macna Summer Riding Pants

For summer riding comfort, they feature air vents through the legs and thighs, plus heat shields on the lower legs to protect against hot engines and header pipes.

Safety features include RISC Level 1 ventilated CE knee armour and CE hip protector prepared pockets for hip armour which is not included.

Other features are anti-slip material on the backside, adjustable waist, plus pockets in the thigh and lower leg.

Triumph Bonneville 900 Street Twin

Macna Summer Riding Pants

They come in men’s sizes S/ 30” to 3XL/ 40” in black at $A249.95.

Since Australian distributors Link International began importing European riding gear from Macna in 2017, we have reviewed several items and found them all to be technically clever, comfortable and safe.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Pando Moto update Steel Black jeans

Lithuanian motorcycle clothing company Pando Moto have updated their Steel Black 02 single-layer riding jeans for men and women which are claimed to be tougher and blacker.

We reviewed the Steel Black 9 jeans last year, but the new 02 version has updated the Dyneema technology to make them tougher.

Dyneema is a Dutch invention which blends the abrasion-resistant material into a single-layer denim that meets CE standards for protection without the need for a separate layer.

Updates also give the pants an even darker sheen inside and out.

They say their 13oz single-layer stretch denim has 25% Dyneema and is CE approved personal protection equipment under EN 17092, level AA (speed 70km/h) safety.

Steel BlackPando Moto Steel Black riding jeans

They are also more expensive than the Steel Black 9 ($A470) at $590 and come in a small array of sizes from 29” waist to 34.Pando Moto Steel Black riding jeans

Using the same updates, and Moto has released a version for women called Kissaki DYN 01 with the same slim-fit design and same price. They also come in five sizes from 27W to 34.Pando Moto Steel Black riding jeans

Both come with SAS-TEC Triple flex armour knee and hip armour.

Safety

The benefits of single-layer protective jeans is that they are lighter while still having abrasion protection.

That makes them better for urban riding and more comfortable when you get off the bike to visit your favourite restaurant.

However, single-layer protective material does sacrifice some protection as explained in our article quoting Dr Chris Hurren, a research scientist at Deakin University in Geelong where he and his laboratory work on protective motorcycle clothing.

It is worth noting that in another article, Chris points out that urban and country riders need different levels of abrasion, impact and seam-bursting protection in their riding gear.

He explains the differences in this video from MotoCAP, the world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing which launched on 18 September 2018.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

How long does waterproof gear last?

Have you ever found out the hard way that waterproof gear has a use-by date after which it is totally useless?

Two pairs of boots, two pairs of gloves, a jacket and several pair of pants have failed me after as little as five years of periodic use.

This is despite the fact that I look after my gear and store it in a cool, dry cupboard.

Waterproof warranty

I’ve checked all my waterproof gear and none offers a lifetime guarantee.

Also, note that “weatherproof”, “water-resistant” and “water-repellent” are not the same as “waterproof”. These terms mean the garment is rarely watertight even in light showers when you are riding.

And check whether it says the gear is 100% watertight. Some may also include an Ingress Protection (IP) rating.

This rating consists of two numbers. The first from 0-6 measures protection from foreign bodies such as dust, while the second from 0-9K measures resistance to water. Click here for more details.

Also note that your supposedly waterproof gear may only be guaranteed to be impervious to water in some areas or just have watertight pockets.

Waterproof warranties are typically the same as the garment which is usually from one year to about three years.

Manufacturers could fit jackets and pants with more robust and heavier waterproof membranes and offer longer warranties.

However, that would impact on comfort, weight and price.

So it’s important to look after your waterproof gear.

Failures

Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide Limited Road Glide Boom Box rain wet infotainment audio techno
Caught in the rain

One of the main problems with waterproof failures is that you may not notice a fault in your gear when you put it on.

You only find out when you go for a ride and get caught in the rain.

And even the most minor fault, crack or split can suck in moisture when you are riding at highway speeds!

There can be a number of reasons for waterproofing failures:

  • Waterproof leather gear is usually the first to give in because it can age and crack;
  • Boots can develop minuscule cracks in the soles from simply walking around in them;
  • Racing boots with bolt-in toe sliders can become loose as they repeatedly hit the ground, allowing in water;
  • Waterproof pants can develop small tears in the lining or you can dislodge the glued-on taped seams if you pull them on while wearing your boots;
    Waterproof pants
    Waterproof pants lose their taped seams and lining from years of use
  • Folding waterproof garments can cause them to wear and split at the creases;
  • Carrying waterproof gear on your bike scrunched up on a rack and secured by Occy straps can cause rips and wear;
  • Gore-Tex pants and jackets should last a long time, but the outside layer can get worn from rubbing in areas such as the armpits, crutch and backside;
  • Zippers can become rusted from rain and road grime and even waterproof zippers can become gummed up by dust and bugs; and
  • Machine washing your gear can remove or destroy the watertight capabilities of some materials.

Waterproof care

King Canute found he could not hold back the tide and maintaining waterproof riding gear can be similar.

However there are some things you can do:

  • Boots will last longer if you only wear them on the bike and do limited walking.
  • Regular treatment of leather with shoe polish, special softeners and waxes such as Dubbin may help prolong their waterproof life;
  • Take your boots off before pulling on waterproof overpants;
  • Re-spray your textile gear with waterproof sprays;Nikwax Gloveproof waterproofs gloves
  • Store your gear in a cool, dry cupboard;
  • Hang your jackets and pants and never fold them;
  • Always allow wet gear to dry in a well-ventilated area out of direct sunlight before storing;
  • Carry waterproof gear in a safe place in your backpack or bike luggage, preferably rolled up, not folded;
  • Give zippers an occasional spray with silicon or rub them with an appropriate wax to help the zipper slide smoothly and last longer; and
  • Leather gear requires special attention. Click here for our comprehensive tips on how to look after your leather gear.

WashingWater crossings

Riding in the rain or even doing water crossings not only get your gear wet, but also dirty.

So you should periodically wash your gear before storing it away.

When washing your gear, always follow the manufacturer’s instructions. They usually stipulate a hand wash or gentle, warm-wash machine cycle.

Long, hot machine washing cycles can limit the waterproofed life of a garment.

Never use fabric softener when washing and most manufacturers warn against tumble drying or ironing.

However, note that some materials, such as Gore-Tex, actually require tumble drying or ironing after washing to restore their waterproof qualities. Watch this instructional video.

User error

Sometimes it’s not the gear that fails, but the rider, says  Link International product manager Ron Grant.

“The majority of wet claims I believe are mainly due to incorrect usage or fitment,” he says.

“You can have the best jacket in the world, but if you don’t get all the closures correctly positioned, ensure your shirt collar or cuffs aren’t exposed (which creates a wicking point for water entry) you will still get wet.

“If you wear gloves over your cuff, water penetrates through the jacket stitching in the chest and arms, runs down between the outer shell and the outside of the waterproof liner (so the rider is still dry) and drains straight into the gloves. This is not a glove issue but a rider fitment issue.

“Likewise with waterproof boots. I see riders buy ‘shorty’ waterproof boots and then complain they get wet feet.

“If you have a look at their rain pants when their feet are on the pegs, the rain pants may ride up just enough to allow water into the boots.”

Ron Grant tests waterproof gear
Ron Grant tests waterproof gear

Ron warns that water will finds its way into that 1% vulnerable area in your whole riding ensemble and spoil your ride.

He says he left for work recently in the pouring rain on his Triumph Tiger 800 fitted with a new, large touring screen to protect him from the elements.

“This new screen creates a bit of a vacuum between the screen and I could see water droplets swirling around in front of me around my throat area,” he says.

“I didn’t really think about this too well, but I had pulled my neck-sock on before fitting my jacket as it’s more comfortable that way.

“The droplets eventually soaked my neck-sock which wicked the water downwards wetting my jumper and shirt. My waterproof jacket didn’t fail, it was the dummy wearing it that failed!”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com