Tag Archives: MotoCap

Alpinestars gloves score top safety rating

Alpinestars GP Plus R2 motorcycle gloves (pictured) have become only the second pair of gloves to be awarded a full five stars for safety by MotoCAP.

The internationally awarded safety and thermal comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing has added 15 more gloves to its list of tested gear.

The Australian safety intitiative, launched in September 2018, is the first of its type in the world.

It has now rated 201 items of clothing, including 50 pairs of pants, 90 jackets and 61 pairs of gloves.

Of those gloves, only the Alpinestars costing $225 and Ducati Corse C3 ($442) – both racing-style gloves – have scored a full five stars.

Ducati Corse C3 glovesDucati Corse C3 gloves

Only three others scored four stars, five got three stars, 20 received two stars, 23 got one star and the rest were awarded just half a star.

No comfort ratings

While MotoCAP also supplies thermal comfort and waterproofing on jackets and pants, it does not provide a comfort rating for gloves.

That is despite some of the gloves tested having perforations for airflow.

However, they do test for waterproofing.

Comfort is a big factor among baby boomers when selecting gloves, according to a Canstar Blue customer satisfaction survey that also found Millennial riders buy for style.

Transport for NSW says that to measure for comfort a large square of fabric must be obtained.

“There is not enough material in a glove to obtain a sample for the thermal comfort measure,” they say.

All gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

Click here to find out how products are selected for rating in secret.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP wins international safety award

Australian safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing, MotoCAP, has won a Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) road safety award.

MotoCAP, which was launched in September last year, is the first of its type in the world and has now rated 171 items of clothing, including 43 pairs of pants, 82 jackets and 46 pairs of gloves.

FIM award

Guy Stanford - Mobile phone while riding - darrk visor helmets filtering laws autonomous consensus hipsters kill defect award
Guy Stanford

The award, presented this morning (2 December 2019) in Monaco along with 40 other recipients, has been applauded by Australian Motorcycle Council chair Guy Stanford.

“We are very pleased with the FIM award which demonstrates the value of the MotoCAP program worldwide,” he says.

“Clothing manufacturers’ advertising is not always a credible source of what is useful when a crash happens or heat fatigue arises in the Australian summer.”

MotoCAP gives clothing two separate star ratings – one for protection and one for heat management (“comfort”).

AMC Protective Clothing sub-committee chair Brian Wood also points out that MotoCAP tests the whole garment, unlike European Protective Clothing Standards which only tests samples of fabrics, fastenings and stitching.

“(It) gives the motorcycle community more information when they are making choices about the clothing they wear when riding,” he says.

MotoCAP history

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched testingMotoCAP is the outcome of almost 20 years research and consultations, led by Dr Liz de Rome, with the support of the Australian Motorcycle Council. The key milestones include:

  • 2003 – The Motorcycle Council of NSW (MCC) obtained a grant from the Motor Accidents Authority of NSW (MAA) to investigate the features of effective motorcycle personal protective equipment (PPE).The outcome was a report and the establishment of websites for the MCC and the Accident Compensation Commission (NZ) to provide information about protective clothing and other motorcycle safety issues to riders in Australia and New Zealand.
  • 2005 – A national PPE industry seminar was held by the MCC with the support and funding of the MAA to consider the implications of the European Standards for PPE. A proposal to establish an Australian star rating scheme for PPE was canvassed and supported by the participants.
  • 2006 – The roads authority of Victoria (VicRoads), commissioned a report investigating the options for a star rating scheme compared to industry standards for PPE.
  • 2007 – The National Roads and Motorists Association (NRMA) funded a survey of novice riders to establish their knowledge, information sources and usage of PPE.
  • 2008 – Swann Motorcycle Insurance funded a study of the injury reduction benefits of the clothing worn by injured and un-injured riders involved serious crashes. The study confirmed the potential for PPE to reduce the risk and severity of injuries, but also identified high rates of garment failure under crash conditions. The study also validated the impact risk zones framework of the European standards against clothing damage and rider injuries in real world crashes.
  • 2008 – PPE researcher invited to give a presentation on protective clothing research to members at the AMC Annual Conference.
  • 2009 – AMC successfully lobbied Federal Government for funding to publish and distribute a guide to riders on the features of effective motorcycle protective clothing ‘The Good Gear Guide’.
  • 2010 – 2012 – The State of Victoria, Parliamentary Road Safety Committee convened a series of meetings to “inquire into, consider and report… on motorcycle safety.” The formation of a star rating scheme for motorcyclists’ apparel was supported by Recommendations 51 – 53. (Parliamentary Road safety Committee 2012)
  • 2011–-  The Australian and New Zealand Government Injury Insurance agencies commissioned industry consultations and research into the development of a model for providing riders with reliable information when buying motorcycle protective gear.
  • 2011 – The Victorian Transport Accident Commission (TAC) organised a series of state-wide seminars – entitled “What’s Safe?” – which covered the testing and other assessments of motorcyclists’ clothing, of which riders, retailers and clothing suppliers were amongst the interested parties who attended.
  • 2012 – The TAC conducted feasibility studies including community and industry consultations to establish support for a PPE ratings program.
  • 2014 – the NRMA ACT Road Safety Trust funded an investigation of the impact of thermally inefficient PPE worn in hot conditions on rider fatigue, reaction times and mood.

    Testing motorcycle in the thermal chamber (from left) research assistant Liz Taylor, volunteer rider Dr Greg Peoples, Liz de Rome and Nigel Taylor. rating award
    Motorcycle gear tested in a thermal chamber with (from left) research assistant Liz Taylor, volunteer rider Dr Greg Peoples, Liz de Rome and Nigel Taylor.

  • 2014 – The AMC formed a Protective Clothing Sub-Committee which developed a Position Statement on Protective Clothing from a rider’s perspective.
  • 2014 2015, 2016 – AMC Annual Conferences invited PPE researchers to provide updates on research progress on protective clothing.
  • 2015 – The AMC collated and listed CE approved gear available in Australia on its website to assist riders in choosing suitable gear. The AMC joined the Australian and New Zealand Working Group tasked to develop a 5 Star Rating scheme.
  • 2015 – The Motorcycle Protective Clothing working group formed, consisting of 10 members from government agencies and motoring clubs, led by the TAC.
  • 2015 – NSW Parliamentary Stay Safe Committee Inquiry into motorcycle safety recommended that a star rating scheme for motorcyclists protective clothing be developed (Staysafe Committee 2015).
  • 2015 – The NSW Minister for Roads, announced the establishment of a national project to develop a consumer rating program for motorcycle protective clothing and to encourage manufacturers to provide a range of more effective protective clothing suitable for Australian conditions (NSW Government 2015).
  • 2016 – The science program ‘Catalyst’ produced a segment on motorcycle protective clothing, this was broadcast by the national broadcaster, the Australian Broadcasting Commission (ABC) 
  • 2016 – The Transport for NSW, Centre for Road Safety (CRS) assumed the lead role for the Motorcycle Protective Clothing working group and commissioned the development of test protocols for a PPE star rating scheme in consultation with industry (de Rome et al 2016). The CRS actively sought interested parties, and the consortium grew to 20 members.
  • 2016 – Dr Liz de Rome and Dr Chris Hurren from Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials were contracted to the consortium to develop test and rating protocols for motorcycle protective clothing.

    MotoCAP senior researcher Dr Chris Hurren award
    Chris Hurren and his Honda GB400

  • 2016 – The test protocols were distributed for comment to the motorcycle accessories industry in Australia and New Zealand including local manufacturers and importers.
  • 2017 – Liz and C hris were contracted to trial the test protocols fr a 12-month period, allowing time for industry to respond. Product test results were released on a confidential basis to the relevant local manufacturer or importer.
  • 2018 – The doctors were contracted to the consortium to conduct testing of motorcycle protective clothing for publication under the MotoCAP program.
  • 2018 – The Motorcycle Clothing Assessment Program, or MotoCAP, and the accompanying website, www.motocap.com.au, were launched in September by the MotoCAP working group, with products tested at the Deakin University Institute for Frontier Materials. At launch, there were 20 products rated on the website. At the time of this submission, there were 128 products on the website, with the site frequently updated.

Under MotoCAP, the National Association of Testing Authorities-accredited laboratory at Deakin University, led by Dr Chris Hurren, tests and rates the protective performance and thermal management of a random sample of the motorcycle jackets, pants and gloves available in Australia and New Zealand.

The CRS publishes the results on the MotoCAP website on behalf of the consortium.  The ratings use the same test methods as current European standards, and rather than using a simple pass/fail score, they allow products to be ranked and rated on their relative performance, allowing riders to choose the most appropriate gear for their riding conditions.

The draft test protocols have been distributed widely across the Australian and New Zealand industry, including to importers and manufacturers, to enable industry to test their own products against the MotoCAP requirements.

  • MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP rates 160 jackets, pants, gloves

MotoCAP has added eight more jackets and two more pairs of pants to its safety and thermal comfort ratings, bringing the total to 160.

The world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing began in August last year.

It has now rated 160 items of clothing, including 43 pairs of pants, 47 pairs of gloves and 70 jackets.

This release adds a third well-performing women’s jacket to the range of dedicated female gear rated on their website.

The DriRider Paris leather jacket (pictured above) scored three out of five stars for protection, and two out of five stars for thermal comfort, matching the rating of the current highest performing ladies jacket, the Dainese Mike.

Dainese Mike Lady jacket
Dainese Mike Lady jacket

Ratings system

While some claim the ratings system is flawed, it at least now has a decent amount of clothing rated and provides a guide for buyers.

Click here for the full list of 160 motorcycle jackets, pants and glove ratings.

Transport for NSW says there has been “interest from some manufacturers to have their items rated”.

However, all gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

MotoCAP chief scientist Chris Hurren says urban and country riders need different levels of abrasion, impact and seam-bursting protection in their riding gear.

He explains the differences in this video.

Click here to find out how products are selected for rating in secret.

  • MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP now rates 150 jackets, gloves, pants

MotoCAP has rated six more jackets to reach 150 safety and thermal comfort ratings for jackets, pants and gloves, including only their second women’s jacket.

The world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing began in August last year.

It has now rated 150 items of clothing, including 41 pairs of pants, 47 pairs of gloves and now 62 jackets, including their second women’s jacket.

While some claim the ratings system is flawed, it at least now has a decent amount of clothing rated and provides a guide for buyers.

Women’s jackets

The first women’s jacket was the Dainese Mike Lady jacket which only joined the list last August.

It scored a protection rating of three out of five stars while this round the women’s Macna Freeride textile jacket scored only one star.

However, it rated three out of five stars for thermal comfort.Jackets women's Macna Freeride

Click here for the full list of 150 motorcycle jackets, pants and glove ratings.

Transport for NSW says there has been “interest from some manufacturers to have their items rated”.

However, all gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

Click here to find out how products are selected for rating in secret.

  • MotoCAP is a partnership between Transport for NSW, State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA), VicRoads, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), Royal Automobile Club of Victoria (RACV), Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC), Lifetime Support Authority (LSA), Western Australian Police: Road Safety Commission, Department of State Growth, Insurance Australia Group (IAG), Australian Motorcycle Council and Accident Compensation Corporation in New Zealand.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Gloves and jeans fail safety tests

Motorcycle gloves and jeans have once again scored a big fail in the independent Australian MotoCAP safety ratings while the jeans scored well for thermal comfort.

The latest round of testing includes five pair of jeans and four gloves.

Only one set of gloves scored two safety stars, while the rest scored just one.

It follows August results for seven pairs of leather and textile motorcycles gloves which also recorded a fail in the MotoCAP safety ratings.

The MotoCAP website now lists 47 pairs of gloves in its list of 144 products tested and rated.

So far, not one pair of gloves has rated a full five stars.

Click here for the full results.

Comfy jeans

All five pairs of jeans tested have scored either three or four stars out of five for thermal comfort, which is an improvement in this category compared with previous releases.

The highest overall performing pair of jeans is the Draggin Jeans Twista jeans, which scored four out five stars for thermal comfort.

kevlar jeans
Draggin Twista jeans

While thermal comfort was good, safety was another fail.

Twista scored two out of five stars for protection, while of the other jeans tested, three scored one star for safety and one scored only half a star.

MotoCAP has now tested 41 pairs of jeans.

Click here for the full jeans results.

No comfort ratings

The world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing provides comfort ratings for thermal comfort and waterproofing on jackets and pants, but not gloves.

That is despite some of the gloves tested having perforations for airflow.

It also comes as the latest Canstar Blue customer satisfaction research found Baby Boomers are more likely to choose comfortable motorcycle gloves while Millennial riders buy for style.

Transport for NSW says that to measure for comfort a large square of fabric must be obtained.

“There is not enough material in a glove to obtain a sample for the thermal comfort measure,” they say.

However, they do test for waterproofing and three pairs of gloves were tested because they were advertised as having this feature.

The highest performing pair are the DriRider Apex 2 unisex gloves, which received a score of eight out of ten for water resistance.

Transport for NSW says there has been “interest from some manufacturers to have their items rated”.

However, all gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

Click here to find out how products are selected for rating in secret.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Varied protection for country and urban riders

Urban and country riders need different levels of abrasion, impact and seam-bursting protection in their riding gear, according to MotoCAP chief scientist Chris Hurren.

He explains the differences in this video from MotoCAP, the world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing which launched on 18 September 2018.

Jackets and pants tested

Almost a year after launching, the Australian testing facility has now rated 146 items.

The latest inclusion is comfort and safety ratings for four jackets and seven pairs of pants.

Alpinestars SP-X perforated leather pants four stars for thermal comfort, the highest rating for leather pants in this category yet.

The pants also obtained three out of five stars in protection.Chris Hurren Varied protection for country and urban riders MotoCAP

The MotoDry Advent Tour textile pants received the maximum score of 10 for water resistance, only the second pair of pants so far to earn the highest score.

The pants only scored half a star for protection, but were awarded three stars for comfort.

The Merlin Hamlin Zip-up Hoodie jacket was awarded the highest rating for thermal comfort in this release, scoring three out of five stars, and one out of five stars for protection.Chris Hurren Varied protection for country and urban riders MotoCAP

MotoCAP ratings explained

The brief MotoCAP video follows recent seminars across the country by MotoCAP researchers from the Deakin University.

If you are interested in having a MotoCAP researcher talk to your riders group, click here to contact them.

Chris says he briefs riders on MotoCAP aims, how a rider can use the service to select the right gear, what is tested and why, plus “some of the science that we do to back up our work”.

Typical rider questions are:

  • Q: Who funds the program?
  • A: MotoCAP is a not-for-profit organisation in partnership with and funded by: from NSW – Transport for NSW, SIRA and the NRMA; from Victoria – VicRoads, TAC and RACV; from South Australia – DPTI, MAC and RAA; from Queensland – TMR and RACQ; from Western Australia – the Western Australian Road Safety Commission; plus the Australian Motorcycle Council and the New Zealand Accident Compensation Corporation.
  • Q: How many garments are tested a year?
  • A: It was launched in September 2018 and has so far tested 146 articles of clothing.
  • Q: Are any companies getting on board with the program?
  • A: Despite invitations, no manufacturer has yet come forward to have their gear tested. Instead, they use a system of secret buying.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

What does CE approved clothing mean?

(CE certification article contributed by Pando Moto)

Motorcycle protective rider gear has become a lot safer over the years since Europe introduced a CE legal standard for motorcycle clothing, known as EN13595, in 1994.

It was originally designed as a standard for professional racers, but now any motorcycle clothing that does not meet the standard cannot be sold as ‘protective’ wear in Europe.

This CE standard (Conformité Européene or European Conformity) is now used throughout most of the world.

In Australia, it gets a little more confusing as we also have an independent MotoCAP testing regime for safety and comfort. Click here for the latest news on gloves that failed their tests.

If you are confused with the various labels, CE markings, standards and information about impact protection, double-stitched seams, and abrasion testing, read on.

CE markings and regulations

When buying protective motorcycle clothing, it is important to know whether the garments you are considering are produced to at least a minimum CE standard.

A label should have a CE marking permanently attached to the garment.

Pando Moto CE label

Any CE-approved product must come with a certificate of conformity.

What do CE standards mean?

If a product bears any type of CE marking, this means its manufacturer has constructed this garment to an applicable standard of safety and protection legislation.

This means the product is made to at least a particular level of quality for the consumer’s reassurance.

In 1995, Cambridge University played a big part in the development of CE marking, which aided an increase of knowledge for anticipated CE personal protective clothing regulations.

CE tested, certified or approved?

There is a huge difference between the terms “CE Tested”, “CE Certified”, and “CE Approved”:

CE Tested: The term normally implies that the manufacturer tested the whole or just a piece of a garment within their own facility that might meet certain standards. However, the garment is not necessarily tested in a certified testing facility to meet officially accredited standards.
CE Certified: This term is more secure, as it states that the garment samples were tested in certified testing facilities. In this case, you need to find out which part of a garment was tested.
CE Approved: This term means several parts of a garment were tested in certified facilities and are accredited to meet or surpass the required standards in all zones.

Garment testing zones

The certification test EN13595 uses two test levels, with the body divided into four zones (see illustration with zones below):

CE Testing zones

Zone 1: must-have impact protectors and needs to last 4 seconds on the Cambridge Abrasion Machine to meet Level 1 protection, and 7 seconds to meet Level 2.
Zone 2: must-have impact protectors and needs to last 4 seconds on the Cambridge Abrasion Machine to meet Level 1 protection, and 7 seconds to meet Level 2.
Zone 3: requires 1.8seconds for Level 1 and 2.5 for level 2.
Zone 4: can be used for ventilation and stretch panels, but must still last 1 second on the abrasion rig for Level 1, and 1.5 seconds for Level 2.

Cambridge abrasion machine

EN17092 has five test levels, covering three key zones of the garment – Zone 1, Zone 2 and Zone 3, with samples tested on a Darmstadt machine that spins them at a set speed until they’re dropped on to a slab of control concrete where they slow to a stop.

Darmstadt machine

Usually, you will see A, B or C letters on a label that indicates garments classification.

Classification AAA: The highest level, demanding four seconds of abrasion resistance with the machine spinning at 707.4rpm (the equivalent of 120km/h) in Zone 1, two seconds at 442.1rpm (about 75km/h) in Zone 2 and one second at 265rpm (around 45km/h) in Zone 3.
Classification AA: More suited to touring gear, this specifies two seconds in Zone 1 at 412.6rpm (about 70km/h), one second at 265.3rpm in Zone 2 and 0.5 seconds at 147.4rpm (the equivalent of around 25kmh) in Zone 3.
Classification A: Deemed suitable for urban riding, with Zone 1 requiring one second of abrasion resistance at 265.3rpm and half a second at 147.4rpm in Zone 2.
Classification B: same as A, but impact protectors are not required.
Classification C: covers garments such as the mesh under-suits that have impact protection for off-road riding.

Samples are taken from each zone to be tested for seam strength and abrasion resistance.

A company using the same materials and construction methods in two or more jackets, for example, could meet approval with one test, so long as the tested parts are put together in a tested way within the tested zones, and subsequent garments are added to the certificate.

Once these materials and construction methods are approved, they cannot be changed, and that includes the specific supplier of the material.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Gloves fail MotoCAP safety ratings

Seven pairs of leather and textile motorcycles gloves are the latest to fail the MotoCAP safety ratings.

Only two scored two stars and four one star.

The Neo Freerider leather gloves (pictured above) rated just half a star because of the minimal abrasion protection, impact resistance and seam strength.

The MotoCAP website now lists 43 pairs of gloves in its list of 135 products tested and rated.

So far, not one pair of gloves has rated a full five stars.

Click here for the full results.Gloves fail MotoCAP safety ratings

No comfort ratings

The world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing provides comfort ratings for thermal comfort and waterproofing on jackets and pants, but not gloves.

That is despite some of the gloves tested having perforations for airflow.

It also comes as the latest Canstar Blue customer satisfaction research found Baby Boomers are more likely to choose comfortable motorcycle gloves while Millennial riders buy for style.

Transport for NSW says that to measure for comfort a large square of fabric must be obtained.

“There is not enough material in a glove to obtain a sample for the thermal comfort measure,” they say.

However, they do test for waterproofing and three pairs of gloves were tested because they were advertised as having this feature.

The highest performing pair are the DriRider Apex 2 unisex gloves, which received a score of eight out of ten for water resistance.

Transport for NSW says there has been “interest from some manufacturers to have their items rated”.

However, all gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

Click here to find out how products are selected for rating in secret.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Women’s jackets join MotoCAP testing

For the first time, women’s riding jackets are among a new crop of leather and textile jackets tested by MotoCAP as researchers start advising riders about their service at seminars across the country.

The world’s first motorcycle clothing safety ratings program has added six textile jackets and nine leather jackets to its growing list of 128 products.

It includes seven jackets designed exclusively for women and two advertised as “unisex”.

The only other women’s gear tested and rated in the past year since MotoCAP began were women’s leggings.

Top jackets

For women, the $650 Dainese Mike Lady jacket scored the highest MotoCAP protection rating with three out of five stars.

Dainese Mike Lady jackets
Dainese Mike Lady jacket

The unisex $1495 Klim Badlands Pro also scored well with a protection rating of three.

Klim Badlands Pro jackets
Klim Badlands Pro jacket

For men, the $500 Merlin Hixon men’s jacket scored the highest MotoCAP protection rating of this batch with four stars.

Merlin Hixon jackets
Merlin Hixon jacket

All 15 jackets listed were awarded between half and two stars for the MotoCAP thermal comfort rating.

The new ratings can be viewed on the MotoCAP jackets rating page.

MotoCAP seminars

The latest round of testing results come as researchers from the Deakin University who carry out the MotoCAP testing have been giving seminars to riders to explain what the service is about.

Senior researcher Christopher Hurren will give a seminar this Saturday (10- August 2019) at the Scarborough Community Centre, 163 The Esplanade, Western Australia.

He was invited by Dave Wright of the Motorcycle Riders Association of Western Australia who successfully applied for a grant under the Road Safety Community Grants Programme.

Riders and rider group representatives can attend from 10-11.30am and motorcycle dealers and motorcycle clothing retailers from 1-2.30pm.

Contact Dave Wright for more information and to reserve your place via 0418 954 424 or email, or visit their Facebook event page.

It follows seminars by leading researcher Liz de Rome for Q Ride in Queensland a few weeks ago and for the MRA in Victoria a few months ago.

Chris says he will brief riders on MotoCAP aims, how a rider can use it to select the right gear, what is tested and why, plus “some of the science that we do to back up our work”.

When Chris delivered a similar presentation in New Zealand in February as part of the “Shiny Side Up” tour, the main questions were:

  • Q: Who funds the program?
  • A: MotoCAP is a not-for-profit organisation in partnership with and funded by: from NSW – Transport for NSW, SIRA and the NRMA; from Victoria – VicRoads, TAC and RACV; from South Australia – DPTI, MAC and RAA; from Queensland – TMR and RACQ; from Western Australia – the Western Australian Road Safety Commission; plus the Australian Motorcycle Council and the New Zealand Accident Compensation Corporation.
  • Q: How many garments are tested a year?
  • A: It was launched in September 2018 and has so far tested 128 articles of clothing including 64 jackets, 29 pants and 35 gloves.
  • Q: Are any companies getting on board with the program?
  • A: Despite invitations, no manufacturer has yet come forward to have their gear tested.

If you are interested in having a MotoCAP researcher talk to your riders group, click here to contact them.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Why does riding gear fail abrasion tests?

Motorcycle jackets and pants tested in the MotoCAP safety and comfort ratings have failed in the abrasion tests, but could easily be made safer, says a technical expert.

Back in 2015, Deakin University fibre science and technology senior researcher Chris Hurren warned that eight out of 10 of the most commonly worn motorcycle suits in Australia had failed their abrasion tests.

These tests were the precursor for the development of MotoCAP, the world’s first safety ratings for motorcycle protective gear which launched in September 2018.

Over the past few years, motorcycle clothing does not appear to have improved.

In recent MotoCAP ratings, leather and textile pants and jackets have failed dismally in abrasion tests.

Textile abrasion fail

Chris says textile pants and jackets are typically made of 600 denier woven nylon or polyester fabrics.

“These have relatively low abrasion resistance when tested on the Cambridge impact abrasion tester,” he says.

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched target abrasion tests
MotoCAP testing equipment at the Deakin Uni Geelong campus

“Where these fabrics are used as the shell fabric in important protection areas such as the elbow and shoulder of a jacket they generally do not provide the levels of protection desired in a protective motorcycle garment.

“These jackets could be improved in their protective performance by manufacturers by adding further protective layers or by use of a heavy shell fabric in these critical protection areas. 

“These garments are still capable of providing better protection to a rider than if they were to ride in normal clothing especially when they are worn with their shoulder and elbow impact protectors in place. This is the class of garment that will benefit the most from improvement in protection levels into the future.”

Leather abrasion tests 

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched The world’s first motorcycle clothing safety ratings program, MotoCAP, has given only half a star to two stars to eight more pair of textile pants. abrasion tests
A dummy dressed in riding gear is tested for abrasion resistance

More interestingly, leather appears to be not much better than textile gear.

“A number of the leather garments reported in (the latest tests) were made from thinner, supple leather,” Chris says.

“While this is more comfortable for the wearer, these leathers typically do not provide the same level of abrasion protection of a thicker leather.

“Where a thinner leather is used there needs to be additional protection put into the critical abrasion risk areas.

“The high level of impact protection seen in some of these garments was quite encouraging.”

Motorbike Writer publishes every new release of gear tested by MotoCAP, so stay tuned for more updates.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com