Tag Archives: MotoCap

MotoCAP rates leather gloves for safety

MotoCAP has published the safety ratings on 13 pairs of leather gloves ranging from half a star to four stars, but has not released any comfort ratings.

In the latest round of testing, the highest performing gloves are the Rev’It RSR 3 unisex gloves which received a four-star rating.

One pair of Alpinestars gloves (pictured top of page) rated three stars, DriRider and Merlin rated two stars, six rated one star and three rated half a star.

Click here for the full results.leather gloves

No comfort ratings

The world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing provides comfort ratings for thermal comfort and waterproofing on jackets and pants, but not gloves.

That is despite some of the gloves tested having perforations for airflow.

It also comes as the latest Canstar Blue customer satisfaction research found Baby Boomers are more likely to choose comfortable motorcycle gloves while Millennial riders buy for style.

However, three pairs of gloves were tested and rated for water resistance because they were advertised as having this feature.

The highest performing pair are the DriRider Apex 2 unisex gloves, which received a score of eight out of ten for water resistance.

MotoCAP ratings

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched The world’s first motorcycle clothing safety ratings program, MotoCAP, has given only half a star to two stars to eight more pair of textile pants.
A dummy dressed in riding gear is tested for abrasion resistance

MotoCAP has now tested 31 textile and leather jackets, 18 pairs of jeans and leggings, seven pair of leather pants, one pair of textile pants and 26 pairs of gloves.

Deakin Uni Institute for Frontier Materials Senior Research Fellow and Honda GB400 rider Chris Hurren says the site will have 150 clothing products on its site by the end of June.

“We have purposely targeted only 10% of the market in the first year so that manufacturers have a chance to come along with the scheme,” he says.

“We do not want to put a manufacturer out of business as we want them to improve their products and think about protection and thermal comfort in their design.”

“If they follow this path like car manufacturers did for ANCAP then the rider will always be the winner.”

So far, no article of motorcycle clothing has been provided by a manufacturer.

All have been bought by MotoCAP using a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

Click here to find out how products are selected for rating in secret.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

19 products added to MotoCAP ratings

In the biggest addition to the MotoCAP online ratings of motorcycle clothing since it began in August 2018, 19 articles have been added and none scored more than two safety stars out of five.

The world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing has added:

  • 13 textile jackets;
  • three pairs of textile gloves;
  • two pairs of leather gloves; and
  • one pair of textile pants.

MotoCAP has now tested 31 textile and leather jackets, 18 pairs of jeans and leggings, seven pair of leather pants, one pair of textile pants and 13 pairs of gloves.

Interestingly, the $230 Merlin Axe kevlar shirt rated a single safety star which was the same rating as all the newly added textile jackets.

Merlin's Steve Franklin with their flanno leisure gear
Merlin boss Steve Franklin with their Axe kevlar shirt

The shirt also rated just two stars for thermal comfort because “there are no vents fitted to allow airflow to aid cooling in hot weather”.

Poor results

MotoCAP says the latest results highlight the lack of protection in some gear with none of the 19 new products scoring more than two stars for safety.

“There was more variation in the thermal comfort rating, with ratings ranging from one to three stars, with five different textile jackets gaining three stars for thermal comfort,” MotoCAP says.

“Many of the garments were also advertised as water resistant, and were tested for their ability to keep the rider dry in wet weather.

MotoDry Airmax added MotoCAP
MotoDry Airmax

“There was significant variation in performance in this category. The highest performer was the MotoDry Airmax ($250) textile jacket, which scored 9 out of 10 for water resistance.”

Yet the two-star safety rated jacket only scored three stars for comfort.

MotoCAP advises riders to consider both the safety and comfort ratings when choosing the right gear for their ride.

Products added

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched target
MotoCAP testing equipment at the Deakin Uni Geelong campus surprise

Deakin Uni Institute for Frontier Materials Senior Research Fellow and Honda GB400 rider Chris Hurren says the site will have 150 clothing products on its site by the end of June.

“We have purposely targeted only 10% of the market in the first year so that manufacturers have a chance to come along with the scheme,” he says.

“We do not want to put a manufacturer out of business as we want them to improve their products and think about protection and thermal comfort in their design.”

“If they follow this path like car manufacturers did for ANCAP then the rider will always be the winner.”

So far, no article of motorcycle clothing has been provided by a manufacturer.

All have been bought by MotoCAP using a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

Click here to find out how products are selected for rating in secret.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Leather pants surprise MotoCAP ratings

In a surprise result, leather pants may be no safer than some denim riding jeans, according to the latest ratings from MotoCAP.

The world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing has found only one out of seven pairs of leather pants that rated four stars for safety.

Draggin Next Gen and Triumph Hero Riding jeans previously top-scored with four out of a maximum of five stars.

Of the seven pairs of leather pants tested, two rated three stars and four rated just two stars.

Leather pants in surprise MotoCAP ratings
Click here for the full ratings

Deakin Uni Institute for Frontier Materials Senior Research Fellow and Honda GB400 rider Chris Hurren says the leather pants were mainly marked down because of low impact protection, not abrasion resistance.

“The results show the need for a holistic approach to safety, including impact protection, as a number of products performed well in abrasion and burst strength tests, but fell short in impact protection, leading to lower overall ratings,” he says.

“Some would have been five stars if they just had impact protectors in them.”

Chris says many garments don’t come with impact protectors or only a few protectors.

“Some of the garments could be five star if they just had a full set of certified protectors,” he says.

“Then it’s the rider’s choice if they want to throw them away if they don’t want to wear them.”

As expected, leather pants didn’t rate well for thermal comfort with one pair scoring half a star and two pair top-scoring with just two stars.

MotoCAP advises riders to consider both the safety and comfort ratings when choosing the right gear for their ride.

MotoCAP scores

So far, MotoCAP has tested 18 textile and leather jackets, 18 pairs of jeans and leggings, seven pair of leather pants and eight pair of gloves.

These latest ratings mean they have now tested products in every class: gloves, leather jackets, leather pants, textile jackets, textile pants, ladies leggings and denim jeans. 

In the next few weeks MotoCAP will post ratings for more gloves, textile jackets and textile pants.

Chris says they will have more than 150 products on the website by June 30.

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched target
MotoCAP testing equipment at the Deakin Uni Geelong campus surprise

“We have purposely targeted only 10% of the market in the first year so that manufacturers have a chance to come along with the scheme,” he says.

“We do not want to put a manufacturer out of business as we want them to improve their products and think about protection and thermal comfort in their design.”

“If they follow this path like car manufacturers did for ANCAP then the rider will always be the winner.”

So far, not article of motorcycle clothing has been provided by a manufacturer.

All have been bought by MotoCAP using a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

Click here to find out how the pants were selected in secret.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP employs secretive buying

MotoCAP, the world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing, uses a secretive system for buying and selecting gear for testing to guarantee integrity.

The Australian ratings system for motorcycle pants, jackets and gloves launched in September 2018 and has attracted a wide range of support as well as criticism.

Deakin Uni Institute for Frontier Materials Senior Research Fellow Chris Hurren says they have so far not been supplied with any test products by any manufacturer.

“At this point the scheme is totally funded by Australian State Governments, some of the auto clubs and insurers and the NZ ACC,” he says.

“All garments are purchased from retail and online without the manufacturers knowledge or involvement.”

Secretive buying system

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched target
MotoCAP testing equipment at the Deakin Uni Geelong campus

Their sourcing system is quite secretive with one of the two garments used for testing bought in stores in Australia and New Zealand.

“We never buy more than one garment type at a time so a typical buying run may consist of one leather jacket, one textile jacket and a pair of denim jeans,” Chris says.

“Another buying run may be a textile jacket, a pair of textile pants and a pair of gloves. The person doing the in store purchase is a rider and they try on the garments like a normal buyer so almost impossible to detect.

“We then use the same covert purchasing system for an online purchase of a second garment generally of a different size and/or colour if available.

“The delivery address is changed regularly and never to the University.

“This is all done to ensure that manufacturers can not trick up the garments to get a higher score. The only time industry knows that they have been sourced for testing is when the results are displayed on the website.”

Manufacturer involvement

However, manufacturers have been invited to submit rider gear for testing and rating.

“There are two methods for manufacturers to organise for their product to be tested but neither of these have been utilised yet as the program is still in its infancy,” Chris says.

“A manufacturer can pay for a garment to be purchased using the above method and added to the testing program.

“A manufacturer may also get their product tested before it enters the stores by providing a number of boxes (50+ garments depending on the product and size of company) of their manufactured product in a warehouse where it is randomly sampled for three garments.

“Two of these garments will be tested and the third held to be compared with retail stock when it arrives in store. If what turns up in store is different to what was tested then their rating will be rescinded and they will be prosecuted by the ACCC for false advertising.

More ratings

MotoCAP rates eight textile jackets complex secretive
MotoCAP textile jacket ratings

So far, MotoCAP has tested 18 textile and leather jackets, 18 pairs of jeans and leggings and eight pair of gloves.

The last ratings posted were for textile pants about five weeks ago.

In the next few weeks MotoCAP will post ratings for seven pairs of leather pants and an additional posting of gloves, textile jackets and textile pants.

That means they will have every product class covered: gloves, leather jackets, leather pants, textile jackets, textile pants, ladies leggings and denim jeans. 

Chris says they will have more than 150 products on the website by June 30.

“We have purposely targeted only 10% of the market in the first year so that manufacturers have a chance to come along with the scheme,” he says.

“We do not want to put a manufacturer out of business as we want them to improve their products and think about protection and thermal comfort in their design.”

“If they follow this path like car manufacturers did for ANCAP then the rider will always be the winner.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP ‘important but too complex’

MotoCAP, the world’s first safety and comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing, is important but may be too complex and not comprehensive enough, says a British motorcycle manufacturer.

The Australian ratings system for motorcycle pants, jackets and gloves launched in September 2018.

Since then, MotoCAP has copped some criticism for “faulty comfort ratings” and for only targeting 10% of rider gear for testing and rating per year.

However, many Australian rider representatives have supported the service for reminding riders about the importance of having quality safety gear.

MotoCAP is important

Steve Franklin, major shareholder of Manchester-based Merlin motorcycle clothing company, agrees that MotoCAP is important and should not be underestimated.

Merlin's Steve Franklin with their flanno leisure gear
Merlin’s Steve Franklin with their flanno leisure gear

He says he misjudged the importance of the British the Safety Helmet Assessment and Rating Programme (SHARP) which is a similar system to MotoCAP, but for helmets only.

Merlin’s $300 Everson textile jacket rated only two stars for safety and half a star for comfort in the MotoCAP ratings.

MotoCAP rates eight textile jackets complex
MotoCAP textile jacket ratings

Complex testing

Steve says he has concerns that the MotoCAP the rating and testing regime is too complex for consumers to understand.

“It needs to be more simple. Customers want proper and simple advice,” he told us while in Australia recently to meet retailers and distributors Link International.

“There is nothing wrong with trying to improve road safety.”

However, he says the complex MotoCAP rating system could give consumers the wrong impression.

“If we give consumers the wrong info, we lose their confidence,” he says.

Click here for the Merlin catalogue.

Testing times

MotoCAP has also copped criticism for only targeting 10% of rider jackets, pants and gloves testing and rating per year.

Steve says it is “early days yet” for MotoCAP, but is concerned that boots are not included.

Meanwhile, helmets are covered in SHARP and Australia’s CRASH testing.

Helmet still crash tested in Australia rotation
CRASH testing

“While MotoCAP is evolving, at least we know that our CE standards are right,” he says.

“The tricky part is giving consumers info that they can understand.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP rates textile pants low on safety

The world’s first motorcycle clothing safety ratings program, MotoCAP, has given only half a star to two stars to eight more pairs of textile pants.

MotoCAP launched in September 2018 with ratings for 10 leather jackets and 10 pairs of rider jeans.

In November they added ratings for 10 textile jackets which rated lower than the leather jackets on safety and leggings in January which only rated half a star for safety out of five.

MotoCAP has set a target of testing 10% of available jackets, pants and gloves in its first year of operation.

Textile pants

BMW and Triumph textile pants tested by MotoCAP
BMW and Triumph textile pants tested

This latest batch of eight textile pants includes BMW Rider ($570) and Triumph Malvern Jeans ($812) which rated two out of five stars for safety but three for comfort.

DriRider Vortex Adventure 2 ($330), Neo Mugello ($199) and Rev’It Factor 3 ($350) only rated one star each for safety and comfort.

However, only half a star for safety and comfort was earned by DriRider Nordic 2 ($250) and RJays Voyager V, while Spidi X-Tour ($350) scored half a star for safety and one star for comfort.

Since all pants were advertised as water resistant, they were tested for water resistance.

MotoCAP reports a wide range of water resistance performance from one point out of 10 to the RJays Voyager V scoring 10 out of 10.

Voluntary system

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched The world’s first motorcycle clothing safety ratings program, MotoCAP, has given only half a star to two stars to eight more pair of textile pants.
A dummy dressed in riding gear is tested for abrasion resistance

The five-star ratings system is a voluntary system that manufacturers can display on their gear as information for riders.

When MotoCAP was launched, the motorcycle clothing industry was not invited to pay for testing to guarantee independence.

However MotoCAP has invited companies to submit products for ratings.

So far, all rated clothing has been bought off the shelf using a random sampling process.

The ratings were not commissioned by the companies and the motorcycle gear was not supplied by the companies.

MotoCAP is a not-for-profit organisation in partnership with the following: from NSW – Transport for NSW, SIRA and the NRMA; from Victoria – VicRoads, TAC and RACV; from South Australia – DPTI, MAC and RAA; from Queensland – TMR and RACQ; from Western Australia – the Western Australian Road Safety Commission; plus the Australian Motorcycle Council and the New Zealand Accident Compensation Corporation.

A Transport for NSW spokesperson says MotoCAP is designed to “reduce road trauma and injury severity for motorcyclists” by informing riders of their choices.

“It is hoped this will be achieved by raising consumer awareness of, and demand for, better protective clothing, and manufacturers and suppliers will respond to that demand,” he said.

“The MotoCAP rating system will be continually monitored and feedback will be considered to identify any improvements that can be made.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Rider leggings get poor safety ratings

The world’s first motorcycle clothing safety ratings program, MotoCAP, has given just half a star each to three sets of rider leggings and mixed reviews on gloves.

MotoCAP launched in September with ratings for 10 leather jackets and 10 pairs of rider jeans.

Last month they added ratings for 10 textile jackets which rated lower than the leather jackets on safety.

MotoCAP has set a target of testing 10% of available jackets, pants and gloves in its first year of operation.

Leggings tested

BulliIt Fury Jeggings leggings
BulliIt Fury Jeggings

So far, no women’s jackets or pants had been tested, but now they have tested three pairs of women’s leggings.

The Bull-It, Draggin and Oxford leggings rate just half a star for safety out of five.

The Draggin Stealthz leggings also rated half a star for comfort, while the Oxford Super Leggings rated three and a full five stars for the Bull-It Fury SP120 Lite Jeggings.

Click here for the full ratings for all pants.

Gloves tested

Ducati Corse C3 gloves leggings
Ducati Corse C3 gloves

Finally gloves have been tested with a mixed range of results.

Ducati Corse C3 gloves received maximum protection ratings, while Macna Catch Mesh and DriRider Air Ride scored just one star.

No ratings were given for comfort.

Four stars went to Harley-Davidson Circuit waterproof and Alpinestars SP-2, three to Ixon RS Rallye HP and Five Gloves Sportcity and two stars to Dainese Mig C2.

Testing target

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched target
MotoCAP testing equipment

In October, a Transport for NSW spokesman told us leather pants are also being tested.

When MotoCAP was launched, the motorcycle clothing industry was not invited to pay for testing to guarantee independence.

The gear was bought anonymously from stores and local online outlets.

However, MotoCAP has invited companies to submit products for ratings and pay a low fee to cover testing.

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched testing

It is not yet known if these new items were randomly selected or provided by distributors.

Companies can voluntarily advertise their rating using the MotoCAP logo.

MotoCAP is a not-for-profit organisation in partnership with the following: from NSW – Transport for NSW, SIRA and the NRMA; from Victoria – VicRoads, TAC and RACV; from South Australia – DPTI, MAC and RAA; from Queensland – TMR and RACQ; from Western Australia – the Western Australian Road Safety Commission; plus the Australian Motorcycle Council and the New Zealand Accident Compensation Corporation.

The Transport for NSW spokesperson says MotoCAP is designed to “reduce road trauma and injury severity for motorcyclists” by informing riders of their choices.

It is hoped this will be achieved by raising consumer awareness of, and demand for, better protective clothing, and manufacturers and suppliers will respond to that demand,” he said.

The MotoCAP rating system will be continually monitored and feedback will be considered to identify any improvements that can be made.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MotoCAP rates eight textile jackets

The world’s first motorcycle clothing safety ratings program, MotoCAP, rates eight new textile jackets poorly for safety and comfort.

Unlike the 10 leather jackets MotoCAP rated when it launched in September, none of the textile jackets rates more than two stars for comfort or safety.

An official MotoCAP release says they expect better gear with higher ratings to become available as the industry responds to customer demand.

When it launched, only 10 pairs of protective jeans and 10 leather jackets were tested. No gloves have yet been tested.

MotoCAP has set a target of testing 10% of available jackets, pants and gloves in its first year of operation.

Textile rates worse than leather

The new textile jacket ratings are for the Merlin Everson, Ducati Giacca Tour V2, RJays Dune, Dainese D-Blizzard D -Dry, DriRider Air-Ride 4, BMW AirFlow, Alpinestar Chrome Sports Hoodie and Harley-Davidson Bentan.

All are men’s jackets. No women’s gear has yet been tested.

Prices for the eight jackets vary from the $200 DriRider to $659 for the BMW jacket. They both rated just one star for safety and two for comfort.

Click here to see the full ratings for the jackets.

By comparison, the 10 leather jackets rated from two to fives stars for safety and half to two stars for comfort.

Testing target

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched target
MotoCAP testing equipment

Last month a Transport for NSW spokesman told us that gloves have been tested and the results would be published “soon”.

Leather pants are also being tested.

The clothing is bought anonymously from stores and local online outlets.

Motocap Motorcycle clothing rating system launched testing

Invitation to industry

When MotoCAP was launched, the motorcycle clothing industry was not invited to pay for testing to guarantee independence.

However, MotoCAP has invited companies to submit products for ratings and pay a low fee to cover testing.

It is not known if these eight textile jackets were randomly selected or provided by distributors.

Companies can voluntarily advertise their rating using the MotoCAP logo.

MotoCAP is a not-for-profit organisation in partnership with the following: from NSW – Transport for NSW, SIRA and the NRMA; from Victoria – VicRoads, TAC and RACV; from South Australia – DPTI, MAC and RAA; from Queensland – TMR and RACQ; from Western Australia – the Western Australian Road Safety Commission; plus the Australian Motorcycle Council and the New Zealand Accident Compensation Corporation.

The Transport for NSW spokesperson says MotoCAP is designed to “reduce road trauma and injury severity for motorcyclists” by informing riders of their choices.

It is hoped this will be achieved by raising consumer awareness of, and demand for, better protective clothing, and manufacturers and suppliers will respond to that demand,” he said.

The MotoCAP rating system will be continually monitored and feedback will be considered to identify any improvements that can be made.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com