Tag Archives: Forcite

Forcite Helmets Attract Investors

Australian smart helmet start-up Forcite is about to go on sale and has attracted major investment support.

The first batch of 1000 limited-edition carbon fibre helmets sold out at $1599 each and the MK1 helmet is now available for order at $1299 with deliveries around December after suffering production setbacks due to the coronavirus pandemic.

In 2019, the company received funding from Australia’s longest-running research commercialisation fund Uniseed.

Now it has also attracted funding from fund manager Atlas Advisors Australia, bringing the combined post-sales funding to $1.2 million.

The money will be used to finalise production lines for a roll-out of product in Australia.

Forcite’s smart helmet is the only smart helmet to pass ECE 22.05 safety accreditation pre-testing.

Forcite Chief Executive Officer Alfred Boyadgis claims the helmet’s technology which warns of road hazards with flashing lights can reduce the number of accidents and save lives.

“Our smart helmets have a unique system that can give advanced alerts much like K.I.T.T. from Knight Rider as well as communications and camera systems integrated into one complete unit,” he says.

“We are now developing on building human-machine interfaces with top motorcycle manufacturers which we plan to exhibit at EICMA 2020.”

However, the world’s biggest motorcycle show has been postponed to November 2021 due to the pandemic.

The MK1 helmet features Forcite’s patented RAYDAR helmet system, combining Formula 1 LED technology, audio interactivity, military-grade camera recording and a fingertip handlebar controller.

Click here for more details.

Forcite’s smart helmet is designed to deliver road alerts and visual and audio turn-by-turn navigation without a phone, enabling riders to see or predict things before they happen to avoid danger.

It also automatically records dashcam footage of multiple lanes without distracting the rider.

All the technology is incorporated into the helmet without the need for an externally mounted device.

More Investment

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Alfred with early-design helmets

Forcite will open a Series A investment round later this year to scale up in European and United States markets as well as conduct further research and development into in-bike computer vision and LiDAR systems that link with the helmet.

Royal Enfield Himalayan concept stores

Industry heavyweights such as Casey Potter, former head of brand for the United States helmet giant Bell will be joining to lead Forcite’s United States operations.

Executive Chairman of Atlas Advisors Australia Guy Hedley said it was a unique opportunity for investors in a $35 billion marketplace.

“Foreign investors via the Business Innovation and Investment Program are playing a critical role in supporting the Australian economy, pouring money into venture capital and seed-stage companies,” he says.

“This is helping Australian grown companies to drive innovation and create intellectual property for new market-leading products.”

Chief Executive Officer of Uniseed, Dr. Peter Devine says investing in start-ups like Forcite is positioning Australia at the forefront of disruptive technological developments including in industries like motoring.

“We are building the next generation of local companies that will go onto to become regional and global market leaders generating more employment and value opportunities for our nation,” Dr. Devine said.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Aussie Forcite helmet sells to USA, Europe

Australia’s first smart helmet has already sold 1000 to be delivered around Christmas and is launching in the USA and Europe next year.

Forcite CEO and co-founder Alfred Boyadgis says their MK1 smart helmet has been a huge success since its unveiling at roadshows around Australia over the past couple of months.

It costs $949 but there is a “special $549 limited pricing in early 2020”.

The company will launch in the USA and Europe in the second quarter of 2020.

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Alfred with some early design helmets

Vapourware

Meanwhile, Alfred says other promised “smart helmets” are just “vapourware” which means they have been advertised but are not yet available, because they are just concepts or are still being developed.

“Up until now, the promise of a smart motorcycle helmet has been underwhelming, to say the least,” Alfred says.

“Much of the tech out there is vapourware, over-promising and under-delivering.”

He says their helmet will keep riders “fully informed of what is going on around them”.

“Forcite is here to wage war with the big brands and fly the flag high as the leader in smart helmet tech globally,” he says.

Forcite MK1 features

The MK1 features Forcite’s patented RAYDAR helmet system, combining Formula 1 LED technology, audio interactivity, military-grade camera recording and a fingertip handlebar controller.

Here is the official Forcite press release providing technical information about the MK1:

RAYDAR

Forcite’s patented RAYDAR system connects motorcyclists to roads, communities and cities like never before. The server-based software system leverages AI to gather information from the millions of data points being communicated through mobile applications, GPS and cameras around the world that are currently inaccessible to motorcycle riders. RAYDAR then transmits that information to riders via a unique LED display that delivers colored visual cues similar to high-tech Formula 1 steering wheels. This enables riders to receive relevant information such as directions, hazards and alerts without dangerous HUD distractions, and without having to take their eyes off the road.

HD Camera

The MK1 features a Sony HD Camera with near infrared sensitivity, super-wide 166° diagonal field of vision lens, and up to five hours of continuous recording time.

Superior Audio

Ultra-thin speakers and dual microphones provide crisp, clear audio in surround sound without road noise. Riders can take phone calls, listen to music or communicate with other MK1 users via Forcite’s voice-over-internet comms system. 

Intuitive Controller

Handlebar-mounted controller puts control at a rider’s fingertips without unnecessary distractions. 

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Argon transforms helmet into Iron Man

Argon Transform hi-tech helmet accessory transforms a standard helmet into an Iron Man helmet with head-up display, bluetooth, GPS and more.

Singapore start-up Whyre claim their Argon Transform is the world’s first dual-camera Augmented Reality attachment for a motorcycle helmet.

The $US795 ($A1140) unit doesn’t look too different to us from several others which are available or coming to market soon.

They include the HUDWAY Sight and Kiwi-designed Reyedr which is still seeking funding.

It also follows a growing wave of smart helmets that integrate HUD, and other tech into a motorcycle helmet.

The latest is the Australian-designed Forcite MK1 which has an LED light strip rather than HUD and includes a HD, wide-angle camera, Bluetooth and VOIP intercom and handlebar-mounted control unit.

Test Forcite smart helmet
Forcite

The advantages of aftermarket tech is that you can swap it to your new helmet when you retire the old one.

Argon TransformArgon Transform HUD

The Argon Transform comes as several Bluetooth-connected stick-on units for the side, front and back of the helmet, plus a screen on the inside of the chinbar.Argon Transform HUD

They combine a see-through head-up display with a Bluetooth handlebar controller, inbuilt GPS unit, plus front and back cameras.

Whyre claim the front and rear units weigh only 150g and balance each other out.

Argon Transform HUD
Rear camera

Riders will be able to see tailor-made info such as caller ID, GPS navigation arrows and speedometer, as well as what’s behind them. Video is recorded and stored on an SD card or accessed via an Argon app.

Argon Transform HUD
Rider’s view of the periphery screen

It will also allow riders to access specific ride statistics, Argon settings, a social community and a logbook that records last maintenance dates, spare part changes/cost etc.

The intercom has range only up to 100m, but the speakers are claimed to have active noise-cancelling which should mean clear sound without background wind noise and no need for earplugs.

Argon Transform HUD
(Never put your helmet on the ground like this unless you wants ants or other bugs in your helmet!)

The offline built-in GPS does not require data and operates in remote areas where phone reception is weak.

Argon claims the lithium-polymer battery will last for eight hours on a charge. 

Whyre has launched an Indiegogo Campaign to get a $US25,000 and is already a third of the way there.

Early customers will get the Argon Transform for $US398 ($A570) compared with the retail price of $US795 ($A1140). They plan to ship in February 2020.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Your chance to test Forcite smart helmet

Here’s your chance to be a test pilot for the Forcite smart helmet that integrates a camera system, navigation and intercom in the shell and was developed right here in Australia.

The ultralight and ultra-hi-tech smart helmet will hit the market in December, but you can test it in July and August.

CEO and co-founder Alfred Boyadgis says their 6500 early supporters or “test pilots” can register to test the MK-01 helmet on their Launch Tour around Australia.

Dates are listed below and you can click here to register to attend.

Test Forcite smart helmet

The tour kickstarts with a track-day in Sydney and demo events in all states and territories.

“Throughout the tour, we will be gathering and utilising all the valuable feedback our Test-Pilots give us to further improve and refine the MK-01 helmet to make it the best we possibly can before delivering it to them in December,” their invitation says.

Test pilots will also be able to buy a limited-edition founder carbon composite helmet with gold logos for under $1000.Forcite smart helmet funding

Forcite sales director Dylan Ross says the planned retail price for the helmet when it comes to market in December 2019 will be $A1299.

Flaws fixed

In this video he admits that their earlier Mach 1 model had a few flaws such as the camera position on the top.

He says that the top-mounted camera worked for sports bike riders, but those sitting upright mainly videoed the sky. And if the rider raised their visor, it obscured the camera.

The 160-degree camera has now been repositioned in the chin area.

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Chin bar helmet

Alfred also confirms that they have not altered the physics of the helmet which still complies with European ECE22.05 standards.

He says none of the lightweight electronics (<200g) is embedded in the foam lining to ensure the integrity of the helmet’s protection.

The Forcite helmet’s electronics are powered by two ceramic batteries that are guaranteed not to rupture or ignite in a crash.

Uni design project beginnings]

The Forcite helmet evolved from an undergraduate UNSW design project with co-founder Julian Chow.

It followed Alfred’s “near-death experience” when he crashed his motorcycle in an oil spill about five years.

He says he broke his knee and cracked his helmet in half. The attached action camera almost penetrated his skull.

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Alfred with Mach 1 and founder helmets

The helmet is based on similar smart helmets Forcite has developed for other industries, and the business recently received mentoring in the UNSW 10X Accelerator. 

They say their helmet and software package give riders “greater situational awareness and allows them to overcome their lack of visibility on the road by communicating essential information about their ride in a completely safe manner”.

It can also alert riders to nearby safety hazards with audio and light signals in the chin bar.

The helmet also provides video and audio recordings of the ride and it can be controlled via a smartphone app.

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Mobile app monitors helmet technology

All the technology is integrated inside the helmet with no external attachments.

Alfred says helmet attachments are illegal in NSW and being investigated by standards bodies in many countries.

(Our understanding is that NSW and Victorian police still believe external fittings render a helmet illegal, but NSW have been ordered not to fine riders until the issue is officially resolved.)

He says helmet attachments add weight to a helmet and at high-speed impact, can crack helmet shells, leading to death or injury.

There is also concern that they can cause dangerous head rotation in a crash.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December

Australian motorcycle helmet startup Forcite has promised its ultralight and ultra-hi-tech smart helmet will hit the market in December.

The Forcite helmet integrates a camera system, navigation, intercom and active noise-cancelling in the shell. It also features an electronically tinted visor that changes tint within a few milliseconds.

CEO and co-founder Alfred Boyadgis says their early supporters or “test pilots” will soon be able to buy a limited-edition founder carbon composite helmet (pictured above) with gold logos for under $1000.

Forcite sales director Dylan Ross says the planned retail price for the helmet when it comes to market later this year will be $A1299.

Flaws fixed

In this video he admits that their earlier Mach 1 model had a few flaws such as the camera position on the top.

He says that the top-mounted camera worked for sports bike riders, but those sitting upright mainly videoed the sky. And if the rider raised their visor, it obscured the camera.

The 160-degree camera has now been repositioned in the chin area.

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Chin bar helmet

Alfred also confirms that they have not altered the physics of the helmet which still complies with European ECE22.05 standards.

He says none of the lightweight electronics (<200g) is embedded in the foam lining to ensure the integrity of the helmet’s protection.

The Forcite helmet’s electronics are powered by two ceramic batteries that are guaranteed not to rupture or ignite in a crash.

December delivery

Forcite smart helmet funding

Last year Forcite invited riders to test the helmet in Australia and the US and received more than 2000 registrations to be test pilots. 

Those test pilots will soon be able to try out the helmet on a closed track at a Sydney racetrack.

It will be followed by a “Launch Tour” with demo events in select dealerships around the country.

Dylan says they will disclose the names and locations of participating dealerships soon.

“But you can certainly announce that we’ll be travelling to Melbourne, Adelaide, Perth, Tasmania, Brisbane, North Queensland, Canberra and multiple locations in Sydney/Greater Sydney region,” he says.

We’re still confirming some of the structural components of the Launch Tour, but we are going national with this and getting in front of as many riders as we can.

“This isn’t juiced-up internet hype, this is a product with real-world usability, built by riders with input from the riding community over several years.” 

The good news is that riders who attend the demo days and order the helmet will get it at a discounted price under $1000. They promise delivery in December.

Uni design project

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Alfred with Mach 1 and founder helmets

The Forcite helmet evolved from an undergraduate UNSW design project with co-founder Julian Chow.

It followed Alfred’s “near-death experience” when he crashed his motorcycle in an oil spill about five years.

He says he broke his knee and cracked his helmet in half. The attached action camera almost penetrated his skull.

The helmet is based on similar smart helmets Forcite has developed for other industries, and the business recently received mentoring in the UNSW 10X Accelerator. 

They say their helmet and software package give riders “greater situational awareness and allows them to overcome their lack of visibility on the road by communicating essential information about their ride in a completely safe manner”.

It can also alert riders to nearby safety hazards with audio and light signals in the chin bar.

The helmet also provides video and audio recordings of the ride and it can be controlled via a smartphone app.

Forcite smart helmet delivered in December
Mobile app monitors helmet technology

All the technology is integrated inside the helmet with no external attachments.

Alfred says helmet attachments are illegal in NSW and being investigated by standards bodies in many countries.

(Our understanding is that NSW and Victorian police still believe external fittings render a helmet illegal, but NSW have been ordered not to fine riders until the issue is officially resolved.)

He says helmet attachments add weight to a helmet and at high-speed impact, can crack helmet shells, leading to death or injury.

There is also concern that they can cause dangerous head rotation in a crash.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Funding boost for Aussie Forcite smart helmet

Australian motorcycle helmet startup Forcite has received a welcome funding boost that will ensure its ultralight and ultra-hi-tech smart helmet hits the market in the next few months.

The Forcite helmet integrates a camera system, navigation, intercom and active noise-cancelling. It also features an electronically tinted visor that changes tint within a few milliseconds.

Uniseed funding

It looks so impressive, Australia’s longest-running research commercialisation fund Uniseed, has invested in the company, bringing Forcite’s total funding to $2.8 million. 

Forcite spokesman Alfred Boyadgis says the money will allow them to “focus on completing the product and getting ready for test-days”.

“It also means we can stop eating pop tarts and two-minute noodles,” he jokes. Forcite smart helmet funding

Alfred says the helmet will be launched in late April to mid-May.

A founder’s limited-edition helmet in carbon composite with gold logos will be available at around $US949 (about $A1330) to those who come along to their test days.

“This makes our helmet the most affordable smart helmet to be on the market,” Alfred says.

“The founder’s edition is only available to “test pilots” and will be heavily discounted as the point of it is to give something special to those who help us.

“We are selective with the test group and only 10% of people make it in.” 

Smart helmet revolutionForcite smart helmet funding

The smart helmet revolution is coming with several hi-tech helmets or add-on units hitting the market in the next few years, changing riding forever. 

Not to be outdone by Silicon Valley and Asian tech wizards, Alfred and Julian Chow of Forcite Helmets in Sydney have developed their own smart helmet software package.

It evolved from an undergraduate UNSW design project after Alfred’s “near-death experience” in a motorcycle accident where his helmet cracked in half and the attached action camera almost penetrated his skull.

The helmet is based on similar smart helmets Forcite has developed for other industries, and the business recently received mentoring in the UNSW 10X Accelerator. 

They say their helmet and software package give riders “greater situational awareness and allows them to overcome their lack of visibility on the road by communicating essential information about their ride in a completely safe manner”.

It can also alert riders to nearby safety hazards and provides video and audio recordings of the ride.

“We have seen riders attach all sorts of equipment to their helmets in an effort to record their rides – either for fun or for safety,” Alfred says.

“However, the practice of attaching cameras to helmets is currently illegal in NSW and being investigated by standards bodies in many countries as the devices add to the weight of the helmet and at high speed impact, can crack helmet shells, leading to death or injury.” 

(Our understanding is that NSW and Victorian police still believe external fittings render a helmet illegal, but NSW have been ordered not to fine riders until the issue is officially resolved.)

Forcite futureForcite smart helmet funding

Forcite recently invited riders to test the helmet in Australia and the US. More than 2000 riders registered to be test pilots. 

Alfred says the company is now in discussions with major motorcycle brands and distributors in Australia and the United States.

“The early interest has resulted in a groundswell of momentum that will culminate when our helmets hit the road early this year,” he says.

Uniseed investment manager Natasha Rawlings says the need for the product is “immense”.

She says the market for helmets with electronics embedded is already worth more than $17 billion a year and will grow 10% in the next eight years.

“Our funding will enable the company to address this growing unmet need and deliver a safer, better experience for thousands of riders worldwide,” she says.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com