Tag Archives: Latest Bikes

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200 Desert and Alpine Special Editions

If Triumph’s new Tiger 1200 has already piqued your interest then these two special editions of the model might entice you even more towards Triumph’s adventurous big triple.

Triumph Tiger Alpine Desert Duo

Triumph Tiger Alpine Desert Duo

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200 Desert and Alpine Special Editions

The Tiger 1200 Desert Edition and Alpine Edition both feature Triumph Shift Assist and a lightweight titanium Arrow silencer along with special edition branding cues on the machines.

Triumph Tiger Alpine Arrow

Triumph Tiger Alpine Arrow

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200 Desert and Alpine Special Editions

Where the two special editions differ, apart from their differing Sandstorm and Snowdonia White paint schemes, is that the Desert Edition also features spoked rims that are tubeless ready.

Triumph Tiger Desert

Triumph Tiger Desert

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200 Desert Edition

While the white Alpine Edition sports 10-spoke alloys in identical 19/17″ sizings as the Desert Edition.

Triumph Tiger Alpine

Triumph Tiger Alpine

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200 Alpine Edition

Essentially the Desert Edition is modelled off the mid-specification XCx and the Alpine Edition based on the alloy rimmed XRx model.

Triumph Tiger Alpine

Triumph Tiger Alpine

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200 Alpine Edition

Both are powered by the latest generation 1215 cc triple that musters 139 horsepower at 9350 rpm along with 122 Nm of torque at 7600 rpm that transfers through to a shaft drive system.

Triumph Tiger Alpine Engine

Triumph Tiger Alpine Engine

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200 Alpine Edition

Full TFT instrumentation along with cornering ABS and traction control systems programmed into riding modes along with cruise control makes for a high specification list.

Triumph Tiger Desert TFT

Triumph Tiger Desert TFT

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200 Desert Edition

The Desert Edition has five riding modes with an Off-Road Pro selection added to the Rain, Road, Off-Road and Sport of the Alpine Edition.

Triumph Tiger Desert

Triumph Tiger Desert

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200 Desert Edition

Add to that all LED lighting, illuminated buttons, keyless ignition, heated grips, multiple power sockets and an electrically adjustable windscreen.

Triumph Tiger Desert Screen

Triumph Tiger Desert Screen

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200 Desert Edition

WP semi-active suspension is also fitted to both special edition models and the Brembo Monobloc brakes are standard across the entire Tiger 1200 line-up.

Triumph Tiger Desert TSAS

Triumph Tiger Desert TSAS

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200 Desert and Alpine Special Editions feature TSAS

2020 Triumph Tiger 1200
Desert and Alpine Special Edition Specifications

Tiger 1200 Alpine Edition / Tiger 1200 Desert Edition *
Engine Type Liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder
Capacity 1,215 cc
Bore/Stroke 85 x 71.4 mm
Compression Ratio 11.0:1
Maximum Power 141PS / 139 bhp (104kW) @ 9,350rpm
Maximum Torque 122 Nm @ 7,600rpm
Fuel system Ride by Wire, fuel injection
Exhaust 3 into 1 header system, Arrow titanium silencer with carbon fibre end cap, side mounted
Final drive Shaft drive
Clutch Wet, multi-plate hydraulically operated, torque assist
Gearbox  6-speed
Frame Tubular steel trellis frame
Swingarm Single-sided, cast aluminium alloy with shaft drive
Front Wheel Cast aluminium alloy 10-spoke 19 x 3.0 in
Rear Wheel Cast aluminium alloy 10-spoke 17 x 4.5 in
Front Wheel 32 spoke, aluminium rim, for tubeless tyres 19 x 3.0 in * (Desert Edition)
Rear Wheel 32 spoke, aluminium rim, for tubeless tyres 17 x 4.5 in  * (Desert Edition)
Front Tyre 120/70 R19
Rear Tyre 170/60 R17
Front Suspension WP 48 mm upside down forks, electronically adjustable damping, 190 mm travel 
Rear Suspension WP monoshock, electronically adjustable semi active damping with automatic preload adjustment, 193 mm wheel travel
Front Brake Twin 305 mm floating discs, radially mounted monobloc Brembo 4-piston calipers, switchable ABS
Rear Brake Single 282 mm disc, Nissin 2-piston sliding caliper, switchable ABS
Width (Handlebars) 830 mm
Height Without Mirrors 1,470 mm
Seat Height 835 – 855 mm
Wheelbase 1,520 mm
Rake 23.2 º
Trail 99.9 mm
Dry Weight 242 Kg / 246 Kg * (Desert Edition)
Fuel Tank Capacity 20 L
Instruments TFT multi­functional instrument pack with digital speedometer, trip computer, digital tachometer, gear position indicator, fuel gauge, service indicator, ambient temperature, clock and Riding Modes.
Fuel Consumption 5.2 l/100 km (54.3 MPG)
CO2 Emissions 122 g/km

Source: MCNews.com.au

2020 Yamaha XSR900 arrives | $14,849 Ride-Away

2020 Yamaha XSR900 reaches Australian dealers


Yamaha’s popular sport-heritage XSR900 receives a new colour scheme for 2020, with a heritage inspired Dynamic White drawing inspiration from the ’60s, and Bill Ivy’s 125cc world championship-winning V4 two-stroke RA31A.

Yamaha XSR XSRA RW AUS STA
The 2020 Yamaha XSR900 is based on the MT-09 powerplant

The 2020 XSR900 is now available in the new colour option, with the existing chassis and engine combination retained, alongside pricing, which remains at $14,849 inc GST ride away.

Yamaha XSR XSRA RW AUS DET
The XSR900 also boasts traction control and ride modes

Power on the XSR900 is provided by Yamaha’s CP3 847cc triple-cylinder engine, featuring three-levels of traction control (TCS), D-Mode selectable engine maps, and an assist and slipper (AS) clutch.

Yamaha XSR XSRA RW AUS DET
Adjustable forks are also featured

Suspension is a 41mm fork adjustable for compression and rebound, as well as a rear Monoshock adjustable for preload and rebound.

Yamaha XSR XSRA RW AUS DET
Alongside preload and rebound adjustability on the shock

Sport heritage styling cues linking the XSR900 to its forebearers include heritage paint scheme, aluminium tank covers, front and rear aluminium fenders, stitched seat, circular instrument clock, circular tail light and retro-style headlight with aluminium stay.

Yamaha XSR XSRA RW AUS STU
2020 Yamaha XSR900
Yamaha XSR XSRA RW AUS DET
The retro style tail light on the XSR900
Yamaha XSR XSRA RW AUS STU
2020 Yamaha XSR900

Source: MCNews.com.au

Yamaha Tenere 700 Review | Motorcycle Tests

Motorcycle Test by Trevor Hedge – Images by iKap


After one of the longest public gestation periods in motorcycling history, Yamaha’s eagerly awaited XT700 Tenere is now starting to hit the floors in showrooms. 

Yamaha Tenere XT
A great looking bike – Yamaha Tenere 700

It is interesting to compare the approaches of European manufacturers and Japanese brands when it comes to adventure bikes.  The likes of KTM, Triumph, Ducati and BMW throw every bit of technology and about the broadest feature list seen on any class of motorcycle at their adventure bikes. 

Despite having a wide variety of technology available in their wider line-up, Japanese brands take the opposite approach, deliberately keeping their adventure bikes relatively spartan when it comes to kit. Suzuki’s V-Strom has been marching on largely unchanged for a long time while, despite the optional DCT gearbox, Honda also took a fairly low-spec’ approach when they first introduced the CRF1000L Africa Twin. Both Suzuki and Honda are putting a bit more standard kit on their adventure offerings for the coming 2020 models, but still, nothing like the endless list of tech’ and big horsepower boasted by the European manufacturers is currently available from a Japanese brand.

Yamaha Tenere iKap XT D
Yamaha Ténéré 700

Now Yamaha have perhaps gone the most basic of all with the new XT700 Tenere. No traction control, no cruise control, no tyre pressure monitoring, no electronic suspension, no riding modes, no quick-shifter or slipper clutch, no heated grips…

Obviously Yamaha are reckoning that less can be more in the bush, and that their reputation for producing reliable and bullet-proof motorcycles at a very competitive price point will be what makes for sales success.

Yamaha Tenere XT
Yamaha Ténéré 700

Early indications are they may be right…

Yamaha had already sold over 350 of the bikes well before they arrived and any new customers putting a deposit down are now likely to have wait until February before they can ride off into the sunset on their new beast.

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

Most of the press got two days on the bike, but I enjoyed a full five days and almost 2000 predominantly off-road kilometres on the motorcycle. I was glad to have that extended opportunity to really gel with the bike which allowed me to gain a proper insight in to what a buyer can expect to experience if taking one home for good.

Yamaha Tenere XT
Yamaha Ténéré 700

While most of the off-road riding was not overly technical in nature, we did get a few little special tests thrown in to sample the machine in terrain that the more adventurous motorcyclist might negotiate from time to time during their travels. A lot of these later in the week were in situations where it was not feasible to have a photographer stationed due to time constraints etc. so as for the rutted out twin-track and rocky ascents you will just have to take my word for it. Plus, it was damn hot and I just wanted to ride the bike to get to the beer at the other end!

The bikes also fared very well and kept their cool despite ambient temperatures on most days rarely dipping below 35-degrees celsius. This water play in the cover shot at the top might look nice and refreshing but it was actually 39-degrees down there in that river and cooking!

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Tenere 700 on the beach

A short play on the beach early on day one saw me not get too carried away as it was already warming up. My fitness levels are not as good as they once were, which had me playing the long game and conserving energy where possible, so I had plenty in the bag for when it was really needed. At the end of the week I actually had fewer aches and pains than what I had started it with! Which must be a great testament to the Tenere 700, while serving as a stark reminder how unhealthy riding a computer is!

The ergonomics on the Tenere 700 were, for me, pretty much spot on.  The bend of the leg felt completely neutral and comfortable for my 178 cm frame. There seems to be an almost endless amount of leg-room available while seated for seven-footers let along six-footers.

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Tenere 700 – Ergonomics work well

Seated or standing the riding position worked well for me. Those that always ride up on the pegs simply rotated the bars away a little further to change the reach and with it the angle of the levers. The standard brake lever is adjustable for span while the non-hydraulic clutch lever is not. I rode a few different spec’ bikes kitted out with various options and while the standard levers work well enough, I would fork over the coin for the very trick optional levers ($188 for the brake and $151 for the clutch), in the Yamaha catalogue. I loved them. Just make sure you get some Barkbusters to protect them while you are at it.

Yamaha Tenere XT
Yamaha Ténéré 700 ships with plastic hand-guards as standard but these optional BarkBusters offer better protection

The seat is slim and extends a long way up the bike but does not go quite as far towards the head-stem as you would see on pukka dirt-squirters. Thus really hard-core riders coming from an off-road competition background might prefer something that extends a little further forward, but for the other 99 per cent of us the slight ‘sit-in’ nature of the Tenere 700’s pew is perfectly amenable in every scenario. 

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

The standard seat height is 870 mm but the narrow mid-section of the bike and relatively flat seat make it easy to throw a leg over. An optional lower seat reduces it a little further to 863 mm and for those who are really short of leg and want the machine as low as possible Yamaha offer a lowering link that positions the perch at 845 mm. This would really be an option of last resort as suspension performance is sure to be compromised slightly when changing the linkage.

A rally seat is another option and one that could be quite handy for adventurers. It replaces the standard dual-seats with a flatter and narrower single piece seat with more grip on the sides. Another unexpected advantage of the rally seat is that it makes removing the whole seat unit a simpler process. With a turn of the key the whole seat pops off, while with the standard set-up the rear pillion seat pops off with the key, but a supplied allen key is then required to remove the rider’s seat.

Yamaha Tenere Australian Launch
Yamaha’s Tenere 700 – The pub did have beer….

After long hours in the saddle the seat had started to gnaw at my bum a little on the first couple of days but then I adapted and toughened up a little, and was actually finding it more amenable as the week progressed.  Don’t expect it to be 1000 kilometres a day on the tar comfortable, but it is more comfortable than something like a standard DR650 seat, or much else that is this capable on the dirt.

And it is very capable.

Yamaha Tenere XT
Yamaha Ténéré 700 – Optional radiator protection seen here

KYB provide the fully-adjustable forks and shock. The 43mm inverted forks are adjustable for compression and rebound damping while the piggyback shock has a handy wheel to dial in your pre-load.

There is 240 mm of ground clearance and the forks offer 210 mm of travel while the shock works through 200 mm.  Dakar riders such as Rod Faggotter had an active role providing feedback to Yamaha’s chassis engineers late in the development cycle of the model and it shows.

Yamaha Tenere Trio Accessorised
Yamaha Ténéré 700 colour line-up

The suspension offers a good balance between all-round suppleness and hard-core capabilities.  Those that want to get big air over erosion banks and hit things hard might want to firm things up at both ends beyond what is achievable via the quite large range of adjustment via the clickers. But even at my current weight I reckon I would just roll with the standard set-up for the most part, unless I really wanted to start to push the envelope and was riding the bike predominantly off-road and regularly hitting things hard in anger. More travel would be nice for those that really like to ride consistently hard off-road, but the large reservoir on the shock helps to prevent fade and ensured consistent performance long after I had started to fade…

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

When the going gets rough a 21-inch front is always a massive asset and one that the Tenere puts to good use. The rims proved strong during the test but require tubes and are not tubeless ready.

The outright performance on the road during my time with the bike was always going to be compromised by the off-road specific Pirelli Scorpion Rally rubber, however, it did seem to work well enough when pushed to hint that on the road the Tenere 700 will cut a line well. I suspect it might prove a reasonable weapon on a tight and twisty back-road.

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

Will it feel underpowered on the road?

Depends on the road I guess… The engine is punchy and will almost get you to 200 km/h if you persist, but where it really shines is on the dirt.

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

It really does pull well from down low, so much so that on the penultimate day I was really starting to revel in the bike through a seemingly endless series loose gravel based switchbacks.  The surface had little grip but was consistent, a quick closure of the throttle was enough to have the back end of the Tenere breaking away under compression, before then transitioning into gentle throttle on the way out to continue the arc. Apex speeds were sometimes below 40 km/h but after initially playing in third gear, I then started to just slide from apex to apex in fourth. The dampened response off the bottom in the higher gear made it so playful and easy to control, which, along with a little weight shift on the pegs, had the bike just ever so slightly drifting from turn to turn. It was immensely satisfying and rewarding, fecken poetry is what it was.

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

The engine is the well regarded 689 cc parallel twin that has been powering the MT-07 and XSR700 for the past few years. It breathes a little differently in XT700 guise due to a different air-box and exhaust but is virtually unchanged as a power unit from its road siblings. Australian and New Zealand delivered bikes have an oiled air-filter for better protection from dust ingress while overseas the bikes ship with a standard paper based filter.

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

The numbers are 74 horsepower at 9000 rpm, and 68 Nm of torque at 6500 rpm. The engine is genuinely useful as low as 2500 rpm and there are no grumbles while lugging it around in the upper gears with the engine driving out of the basement. Of course there are no huge gobs of torque hitting the rear tyre in comparison to much larger and more powerful engines available, but I didn’t miss that massive grunt as much as I thought I would. 

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev Mono
Yamaha Ténéré 700 – Wheelie around the bend

More power would have just had me doing more wheelies from higher speeds, and turning that rear 150/70-18 rear Pirelli into gello. The lighter weight and lesser power of the XT700 is going to translate into dramatically reduced rear tyre wear when shod with off-road rubber in comparison to big-bore adventure bikes and the engine has a proven track record for bullet-proof reliability.

Yamaha Tenere XT
Yamaha Ténéré 700 – Stoppers work well with good power matched with good feel at the lever

The brakes are Brembo front and rear and Yamaha have not skimped on the fit-out. A pair of 282 mm disc rotors up front and a 245 mm rear proved well up to the task of hauling up a fully fuelled 204 kilograms of Yamaha complete with a larger than the average bear test pilot on board. The control at the levers felt progressive and I have no complaints. The ABS system is switchable but is well tuned enough for it to be left on in most scenarios. I bucked the trend of the other testers and deliberately left the ABS on for much of the off-road work, to see how it fared, and the system was largely unobtrusive and cycled quick enough for it not to be a massive drawback. Loose shale descents or mud aside, many riders will still be safer off-road with it on rather than deactivated. ABS has come such a long way, I really do urge you to try these latest systems before dismissing them out of hand.

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

Yamaha offer a titanium Akrapovic slip-on muffler and while it looks tasty it doesn’t really give the bike any discernible increase in power.  I believe it is rated at the same decibel level as the standard pipe, but it does add a little more timbre to its bark that is quite enjoyable, particularly when short-shifting in the tight stuff. That said, I would probably keep that $1149 in my pocket and spend it on other things. Save you crying when you dent it too….

Yamaha Tenere XT
Yamaha Ténéré 700 – Adds a tiny bit more bark but no more bite

I do wish the XT700 had pannier mounts integrated into the rear sub-frame, so the optional hard panniers sat closer to the bike, but unfortunately racks are required to mount the hard luggage. Soft throw-overs will be the go.

Yamaha Tenere Acessories
Yamaha Ténéré 700

Yamaha have a full suite of protection ready to go in their accessories catalogue including radiator guard ($197), engine guard ($424), skid plate ($466) and headlight guard ($172.70) that would be wise investments. 

Yamaha Tenere Acessories
Yamaha Ténéré 700

The stark four-eye look first seen on the T7 concept all those years ago has thankfully not been lost in translation from prototype to production line.  It looks pukka desert rally raid. I am not yet in a position to comment as to its effectiveness as our riding was completed during the day.

Yamaha Tenere XT
Yamaha Ténéré 700

The rally style cockpit theme not only extends to the tall screen but an almost tablet style LCD is mounted on rubber blocks that help isolate it from vibration. One would imagine this would be primarily for longevity, but I did find that as the display was well forward of the windscreen that this made it somewhat more susceptible to dust covering the display. The screen is greyscale not colour, thus the dust quickly made it hard to read.

Yamaha Tenere XT
A power outlet is provided as can be seen in the bottom left of this shot – Yamaha Ténéré 700

My primary bugbear though regards to the tripmeter functions.  There is a fuel gauge that indicates the level remaining in the 16-litre tank, but by the time you get to the last bar you still have more than 100 kilometres of range remaining, then when the system deems itself as fuel critical and starts flashing, a trip counter then starts recording the further distance travelled. There is no indication of the range to empty. This is an annoying oversight in my opinion, and one I raised when questioning Yamaha’s project leader for the Tenere 700 in this interview (Link).

Yamaha Tenere XT
Yamaha Ténéré 700

Yamaha claim a touring range of over 350 kilometres and while I think that is entirely doable, it would be much safer banking on a range to empty of around 300 kilometres when planning your routes.

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

One rider broke a standard plastic hand-guard in a fall. Another had a side-stand spring go walk-about in rough terrain which required some trail smarts to secure the stand to prevent the side-stand switch cutting the ignition. While another rider suffered a rock impact with the side-stand switch. Thus this was the only real foible we discovered that might strand you on the trail and require some MacGyvering to get mobile again. We could have just got unlucky, like the time I witnessed three Fireblades on the launch of the 929 back in 2000 all end up with punctured radiators from stone damage. Still, it might pay to bypass the side-stand switch if you are heading out bush and take this possible point of failure out of the equation all together.  The switch bypass is something that was generally done back in the day as a matter of course for off-road bikes when side-stand switches first started appearing on every motorcycle 25 years ago.

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

That aberration aside the Tenere 700 is a great piece of kit and looks set to become Australia’s most popular adventure motorcycle.  Its competitive ride away price of $17,149, combined with the solid engineering integrity that Yamaha is famous for, will ensure that success.

Would Yamaha get my money in the present market?

I think they might. I reckon it would prove bullet-proof while being easy to maintain and cheap to service. I might miss the grunt of the bigger options out there while playing silly buggers, but that value equation keeps coming back to front of mind and might win me over when it came down to which brand was going to get my coin…

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

Do I reckon there might be an even more off-road specific Tenere 700 with much longer travel suspension and even more off-road chops? 

I think that depends on the success of this model.  Check out my interview with project leader Takushiro Shiraishi where I ask him exactly that.

Tenere Launch Takushiro Shiraishi iKap XT LD
Takushio Shiraishi – Yamaha Tenere 700 Project Lead Interview

Thanks to Greg Yager and his RideADV crew for looking after us and the bikes during the Tenere 700 launch. 


Yamaha Tenere 700 Specifications XT700

Specifications
Engine Type 2-Cylinder, 4-stroke, liquid-cooled, DOHC, 4-valves
Displacement 689 cc
Bore x Stroke 80.0 mm x 86.6 mm
Compression Ratio 11.5 : 1
Maximum Power 74 hp @ 9000 rpm
Maximum Torque 68 Nm @ 6500 rpm
Lubrication System Wet sump
Clutch Type Wet, Multiple Disc
Fuel System Fuel Injection
Ignition System TCI
Starter System Electric
Transmission System Constant mesh 6-speed
Final Transmission Chain
Frame Double cradle steel tube
Front Suspension Telescopic forks, 210 mm travel
Rear Suspension Swingarm – link type suspension, 200 mm travel
Front Brake Hydraulic single disc, 282 mm
Rear Brake Hydraulic single disc, 245 mm
Brake System Switchable ABS
Front Tyre 90/90-21 54V M+S Spoke wheels / Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR
Rear Tyre 150/70-18 70V M+S Spoke wheels / Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR
Overall Length 2365 mm
Overall Width 915 mm
Overall Height 1455 mm
Seat Height 880 mm
Wheelbase 1590 mm
Min Ground Clearance 240 mm
Wet Weight  204 kg (Full tank and all fluids)
Fuel Tank Capacity 16 L
Colours Ceramic Ice, Competition White, Power Black
Warranty Two years, unlimited kilometres
Price $17,149 Ride Away

Yamaha Tenere XT Trev
Yamaha Ténéré 700

Yamaha Tenere XT Atmos
Yamaha Ténéré 700

Source: MCNews.com.au

Honda CMX 500 scores improved suspension and updates for 2020

2020 Honda CMX 500

Honda announced at EICMA that their entry level CMX 500 cruiser, also known as the Rebel in some markets, will receive a host of updates for 2020, including updated suspension, full LED lighting, a gear position indicator, slipper clutch and new seat for better comfort.

HONDA REBEL Cover
2020 Honda Rebel

Honda Australia are yet to confirm the local delivery schedule and any movements in pricing but are expected to do so early next year. The CMX has proved a winner as one of Australia’s most popular cruiser options, claiming the #8 position on the sales charts for the YTD as of Q3 in overall road motorcycles, as well as the #3 position in the cruiser category.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’

A 2020 ‘S’ model variant will also be available in some markets offering factory-fit accessories – as a styling option, and including a headlight cowl, blacked out fork covers and gaiters, plus a diamond-stitch seat. We’re yet to hear whether the S model will be available in Australia.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’ S headlight and cowl

The CMX retains the 471cc parallel twin-cylinder engine which is now Euro5 and produces a LAMS approved 34kW at 8500rpm, while peak torque is 43.3Nm reached at 6000rpm.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’

The CMX actually draws its powerplant from the CBR500R offering generous performance both for the segment and capacity, with PGM-FI fuel injection –further optimised – and valve and ignition timings revised to focus on bottom-end torque.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’ 471cc parallel-twin

A six-speed gearbox is also featured, with the new assist and slipper clutch lightening clutch lever operation by 30 per cent, while downshifting aggressively will remain smooth.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’

Part of Euro5 compliance necessitated a new LAF exhaust sensor, while the exhaust system is a 120mm shotgun-style affair.

The lean Bobber styling of the CMX is retained, but now includes full LED lighting including the indicators, for a premium feel, alongside the existing 11.2L fuel capacity and fat ‘bars.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’ LED headlight

The CMX has also had the black out treatment, with fork tubes and discs being the main areas not conforming. The taillight is also new and features mini-circular LED indicators, with a compact main light and die-cast aluminium mount.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’ LED taillight and indicators

The headlight is a compact 175mm item, with die-cast aluminium mount, and the LCD display now includes a new gear position indicator and fuel consumption reading. Ignition remains below the tank on the left side of the bike.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’ LCD dash

The pillion seat and footpegs are also easily removed, with Honda adding to the accessory line-up, as well as offering the S edition in a special Matte Axis Grey Metallic colour, with the accessories mentioned above.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’ seat and pillion seat

Suspension has seen both shock and 41mm forks revised, with new spring rates in both.

The Showa shock units are also now nitrogen charged, and feature reshaped damper rubbers, with Honda promising a firmer action as a result. The shocks are still five-step preload adjustable.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’

The 16inch front and rear wheels are retained from 2019, as is the 296mm front rotor and twin-piston caliper setup, with a single-piston rear caliper. Dunlop tyres are fitted in 130/90 -16 and 150/80 – 16 sizes. Two channel ABS is standard fitment.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’ forks feature new springs

The 2020 Honda CMX weighs in at 191kg at the kerb, with an ultra-low 690mm seat height and 1490mm wheelbase.

HONDA REBEL
2020 Honda CMX ‘Rebel’

2020 Honda CMX (Rebel) Specifications

Technical Specifications
Engine
Type Liquid­ cooled, DOHC
Engine Displacement (cm³) 471cc
No. of Valves per Cylinder 4
Bore ´ Stroke (mm) 67 x 66.8
Compression Ratio 10.7:1
Max. Power Output 34kW/8,500rpm
Max. Torque 43.3Nm/6,000rpm
Oil Capacity 3.2 litres
Fuel System
Carburation PGM­FI
Fuel Tank Capacity 11.2L
Fuel consumption 27km/litre
Electrical System
Starter Electric
Battery Capacity 12V
ACG Output 0.5kW
Drivetrain
Clutch Type Wet multiplate
Transmission Type 6­speed
Final Drive Chain
Frame
Type Steel Diamond
Chassis
Dimensions (LxWxH) mm 2,205 x 820 x 1,090
Wheelbase 1490mm
Caster Angle 28°
Trail 110
Seat Height 690mm
Ground Clearance 125mm
Kerb Weight 191kg
Turning radius 2.8m
Suspension
Type Front 41mm Telescopic forks
Type Rear Showa twin shock
Wheels
Rim Size Front 16M/C x MT3.00
Rim Size Rear 16M/C x MT3.50
Tyres Front 130/90­16M/C 67H
Tyres Rear 150/80­16M/C 71H
Brakes
ABS System Type Two channel
Instruments & Electronics
Instruments Digital
Headlight LED
Taillight LED

Source: MCNews.com.au

New up-sized Triumph Tiger 900 five-model range

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT & Tiger 900 Rally


Triumph Tiger GT Action
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT

Huge news out of Triumph Motorcycles this morning with the 2020 Tiger 900 officially announced in five variants a standard Tiger 900, Tiger 900 Rally – with up-spec Rally Pro, plus a Tiger 900 GT – also with a GT Pro version available. The 2020 Tiger 900 is expected to arrive in Australia in March, with pricing yet to be announced.

Triumph Tiger Rally
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally

Featuring a new 900cc triple-cylinder powerplant the Tiger 900 boasts 10 per cent more torque than the 800, alongside a nine per cent power boost in the mid-range, while Triumph also introduce a new 1-3-2 firing order for a new character and better feel, which should be particularly noteworthy with a new exhaust soundtrack.

Triumph Tiger GT
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT – 888cc triple-cylinder

Other updates include a host of new chassis components, higher spec brakes, new LED lights, new bodywork and much more.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 features

  • New 900cc triple engine
  • 10% more torque – 87 Nm at 7,250 rpm
  • More power – 9% more in the mid-range
  • New 1,3,2 firing order
  • New lightweight modular frame
  • Brembo Stylema monobloc brakes
  • New 20L tank
  • New 7” TFT instruments (GT/Rally)
  • Updated cornering ABS & traction control (GT/Rally)
  • New LED lighting & DRL
  • Updated styling & bodywork

900cc Euro5 triple-cylinder

The new ‘900’ powerplant is an 888cc liquid-cooled 12-valve DOHC in-line three-cylinder, with a bore and stroke of 78 x 61.9mm, with compression run at 11.27:1. Triumph are promising an increase in peak torque by 10 per cent, alongside nine per cent more mid-range power, with a 1-3-2 firing order for a whole new engine character that according to Triumph boosts both tractability and throttle response.

Triumph Tiger Rally
Triumph are promising a new character from the 900 powerplant alongside better tractability

The boost in capacity comes via a 4 mm increase in bore which helps boost torque from 79 Nm to 87 Nm. Peak twist now arrives 800 rpm earlier at 7250 rpm while peak power remains unchanged at 94 horsepower, although Triumph have promised that 10 per cent mid-range boost.

Triumph Tiger GT
The new Tiger 900 features an 888cc in-line triple with 1-3-2 firing order

Triumph also promise more responsive acceleration, with faster with 0-60mph, 0-110mph and 6th gear roll on times, although they haven’t shared the exact improvement.

A new twin-radiator is also featured, allowing a reduced coolant volume with better cooling performance, particularly as felt by the rider, while allowing for a stylish radiator shroud setup that highlights the three-into-one header setup.

Triumph Tiger GT
A new dual-radiator setup has allowed for redesigned radiator cowls

Tiger 900 chassis

The 2020 Tiger 900 is also up to 5kg lighter than the outgoing model, depending which variant you choose, with a new modular steel trellis frame and bolt-on aluminium sub-frame.

Triumph Tiger Rally Pro chassis
The Tiger 900 features a new modular trellis steel frame

Suspension is offered by either Marzocchi on the Tiger 900 GT, or Showa on the Tiger 900 Rally, with the Marzocchi setup including a set of 45mm USD forks with compression and rebound damping. The standard GT features a rear shock with preload and rebound adjustment, with 170mm of travel.

Triumph Tiger GT
The Tiger 900 GT features shorter travel Marzocchi forks, but is a step up from the standard version’s non adjustable items

The GT Pro on the other hand features an electronically adjustable unit that also offers preload and rebound damping. The electronic rear shock will be controllable via a special menu on the TFT display, with nine levels of damping control and four preload settings.

A lower seat height version on the standard GT also looks like it’ll run a shock with a shorter 151mm travel.

Triumph Tiger GT
The 2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Pro features an electronically adjustable rear shock from Marzocchi

On the Tiger 900 Rally and Rally Pro a set of Showa 45mm USD forks offer preload, rebound and compression adjustment alongside a longer, more off-road orientated 240mm of travel and are matched to a Showa rear shock, featuring preload and rebound adjustability, with 230mm of travel.

This puts the Rally suspension in a similar category to the 790 Adventure R which boasts 245mm travel, while the new Tenere 700 offers 210/200mm but only offers a single model variant.

Triumph Tiger Rally
The Tiger 900 Rally and Rally Pro feature longer travel Showa suspension, with 240/230mm front/rear

A standard Tiger 900 model will also be offered, featuring non-adjustable Marzocchi 45mm forks and a Marzocchi rear shock with preload adjustment only.

Brakes have also seen an update across all models, with the Tiger 900 boasting Brembo Stylema four-piston monobloc calipers and a radial master-cylinder. Rotors are 320mm items, while the standard Tiger 900 includes ABS, with updated cornering ABS found on the GT and Rally variants.

Triumph Tiger Rally
Stylema Brembo calipers are found across all Tiger 900 models, but the standard version only includes regular ABS

The new tubular steel frame with bolt-on sub-frame and cast aluminium swingarm help deliver great agility and capability, while ergonomics have also been optimised for touring and off-road riding, with a narrow seat, 10mm closer handlebars and more upright seating position.

Triumph Tiger GT
Footpeg placement on each Tiger 900 model is optimised for their expected uses

Each model also features footpeg positions to match the intended riding type, alongside a height adjustable seat with the standard and GT models offering a 810 or 830mm range. The Rally in comparison runs a 850 or 870mm seat height due to the longer travel suspension.

Triumph Tiger GT
The Tiger 900 GT offers a 810 or 830mm seat height, while the Rally has a taller 850 or 870 height.

The standard Tiger 900 and GT models also run a rake of 24.6 degrees with a trail of 133.3mm, while the Rally models feature a rake of 24.4 degrees and trail of 145.8mm. All models feature the slightly larger 20L fuel tank, with the Tiger 900 weighing in at 192kg dry, the GT at 194kg, GT Pro at 198kg, the Rally at 196kg and the Rally Pro at 201kg.

Triumph Tiger GT
The 2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT models feature cast alloy wheels, with a 19 inch front and 17 inch rear

The Tiger 900 and Tiger 900 GT variants will all come fitted with cast alloy wheels, with a 19 x 2.50 inch front and 17 x 4.25 inch rear, clad in 100/90 – 19 and 150/70 – 17 inch rubber.

The Tiger 900 Rally and Rally Pro will feature spoked tubeless rims with a 21 x 2.15 inch front and 17 x 4.25 inch rear. Tyres will be a 90/90 – 21 front and 150/70 – 17 inch rear.

Triumph Tiger Rally
The Tiger 900 Rally variants feature spoked, tubeless rims, with knobby tyres

Tiger 900 Electronics & Rider Aides

The Tiger 900 GT and Rally variants all feature a new 7 inch TFT display compared to the standard models’ 5inch item, with the My Triumph connectivity system found standard on the up-spec GT Pro and Rally Pro models.

Triumph Tiger Rally
A new 7 inch TFT display is found on GT and Rally models

Both GT and Rally models also include an updated and optimised cornering ABS and cornering traction control system with a Continental IMU which measures roll, pitch, yaw and acceleration.

Up to six riding modes are on offer, although how many you’ll get access too depends on the model variant, with the standard Tiger 900 featuring just Rain and Road modes.

Triumph Tiger Rally
Ride modes start with just two on the standard Tiger 900, while the Rally Pro offers six

Both base Rally and GT models offer Rain, Road, Sport and Off-Road, while the GT Pro adds a rider configurable mode, and the Rally Pro does the same plus Off-Road Pro.

All Tiger 900s will also include new LED lighting and daytime running lights (DRL), with auxiliary fog lights standard fitment on the GT Pro and Rally Pro models.

Triumph Tiger Rally
New LED lights and DRL are featured with additional fog lights on the Pro models

Triumph’s Shift Assist is also found on the Tiger 900 GT Pro and Rally Pro models, and is available as an accessory on all other Tiger 900 models.

Triumph Tiger GT
Both GT and Rally ‘Pro’ models include an up/down quickshifter

Other features include a secure department for a mobile phone, also allowing USB charging, on the GT and Rally models, situated under the seat, while the GT Pro and Rally Pro models include heated seats and a TPMS or Tyre Pressure Monitoring System as standard.

GT and Rally models also include a five-way joystick on the switchblock, with electronic cruise control and heated grips as standard.

Triumph Tiger GT
A five-way joystick allows easy control of the 7 inch TFT features on the GT and Rally

2020 Tiger 900 styling and colours

Triumph are showing off new styling for the Tiger 900, with more aggressive and cleaner bodywork, as well as the pronounced beak and smaller headlight setup.

The Tiger 900 will be available in Pure White, with the Tiger 900 Rally and Rally Pro to be available in Matt Khaki, Sapphire Black and Pure White, with a white frame.

Triumph Tiger Rally
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally

The Tiger 900 GT and GT Pro will be available in Korosi Red, Sapphire Black and Pure White.

The Tiger 900 GT Low Ride Height, or LRH, offers a 760 to 780mm seat height care of a dedicated suspension setup and lower seat.

Triumph Tiger GT Action
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 GT

Triumph are also promising an accessory range of over 65 items, with a Trekker kit including Trekker panniers, top box and back rest, sliding carriage kit, tank pad and screen deflector.

An Expedition kit aimed at more off-road orientated riding includes Expedition panniers, 40 litre roll bag, headlight guard, fork protectors, aluminium radiator guard, upper engine bars and LED fog lights.

Triumph Tiger Rally
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 / Tiger 900 GT, GT Pro / Tiger 900 Rally, Rally Pro Specifications

Triumph Tiger GT Rally Pro Specifications
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Specs

Source: MCNews.com.au

E-Racer Motorcycles introduce Edge & Rugged Mark2

2020 E-Racer Motorcycle

Edge & Rugged Mark2


E-Racer Motorcycle have introduced two new specials, the Edge and Rugged Mark2, which are based on the Zero SR/F Café Racer and FXS models respectively, due to arrive in Spring of 2020 and offering a cafer racer and lower performance dual-sport style machine.

Both are available for 6000 Euros plus the cost of the base bikes, while in America the Zero FXS starts at $8,995 + ORC (USD), and the top spec SR/F on the other hand comes in at $19,495 RRP + ORC (USD).

Zero Motorcycles withdrew from consumer sales in Australia in 2017, citing that they were unable to build an economically sustainable retail business as the reason, partly due to exchange rates and taxes.


E-Racer Edge

The E-Racer Edge customises the SR/F offering a different headlight, side-tank and tail design, while bodywork is reversible and mounted to the SR/F with no modification, ensuring the bike can be returned to standard trim.

E Racer EDGE sx
E-Racer Edge

The Edge is also lighter than the original, with a full LED headlight, clip-on handlebars, a handmade stitched saddle and CNC machined triples.

E Racer EDGE headlight
E-Racer Edge

The minimalist headlight in particular looks like it would be a popular standalone item in the custom scene, incorporating a position light, low beam and high beam into a single headlight, and produced in Germany. Two LED daytime running lights are also featured.

E Racer EDGE back lights
E-Racer Edge

The Edge also features a special ex-military armour paint in areas, designed to ensure high levels of scratch resistance.

E Racer EDGE front
E-Racer Edge

E-Racer have also created an Audio-Forceback (E-RAF) system, which fills two roles, the first being to provide audible warning to pedestrians and other road users of the electric vehicles presence, using low frequency for high audibility, as well as trebles for closer proximity warnings that help ensure the sound created offers a clear source.

E Racer EDGE front
E-Racer Edge

The second part of the system is in providing feedback to the rider, with vibrations that vary according to speed, helping to provide that motorcycle-like feel, if perhaps not a real exhaust note.

E Racer EDGE tank open
E-Racer Edge

The Edge is due to be delivered in Spring 2020, for the first five units which are built to individual customer specifications, and are priced at 6000 Euro plus the base cost of the Zero SR/F motorcycle.

E Racer EDGE saddle
E-Racer Edge

The Edge’s claimed performance figures are quoted as being 110hp, with 190Nm of max torque, with a max speed of 200km/h. Charging time is an hour to reach 95 per cent, with a range of 259km in the city, or 132km at highway speeds of approximately 113km/h.

E Racer EDGE Airtender
E-Racer Edge

The overall weight is 220kg, with a Z-Force 75;10 permanent magnet AC motor, clutchless direct drive and 14.4kWh battery.


E-Racer Rugged Mark2

The Rugged Mark2 is based on the Zero FXS and features an auxiliary aluminium frame with side-rings designed for towing or hoisting, with the FXS originally a purpose built military motorcycle.

E Racer RUGGED front
E-Racer Rugged Mark2

On the Rugged you get full LED lights, with two polyellipsoidal micro units on the front as headlights.

E Racer RUGGED front headlight
E-Racer Rugged Mark2

Underseat storage has also been added, with double USB socket and room for a rain jacket, or a 15-metre charging cable (for the bike) that allows it to be charged where a nearby outlet is not available.

E Racer RUGGED under saddle
E-Racer Rugged Mark2

The seat is also apparently designed to allow carrying up to three people, with the Rugged intended as an option for large boats, being easily winched on board and offering increased passenger and carrying capacity.

The bike is also finished with Line X, a resistant armour paint, and features the same E-RAF system as the Edge.

E Racer RUGGED saddle open
E-Racer Rugged Mark2

The Rugged will also be available in Spring 2020 for the first few units, and is 6000 Euros plus the base cost of the Zero FXS.

E Racer RUGGED back lights
E-Racer Rugged Mark2

The Rugged also offers reduced range and power in comparison to the Edge, with 46hp and 106Nm of max torque. Top speed is still 137km/h, with a range of 161km, or 64km on the highway at 113km/h.

E Racer RUGGED back
E-Racer Rugged Mark2

Charging time is 1.3 hours to 95 per cent, and the Rugged Mark2 weighs in at 136kg, with 17in wheels front and rear.

E Racer RUGGED saddle
E-Racer Rugged Mark2

See the E-Racer Motorcycle website for more info: https://www.e-racer.it

More information on the base Zero Motorcycle models can be found at the Zero website. https://www.zeromotorcycles.com (link)

Source: MCNews.com.au

Husqvarna announces updated 701 line-up for 2020

2020 Husqvarna 701 Supermoto & 701 Enduro


Husqvarna have announced updates to the 2020 701 Supermoto and 701 Enduro models, including new switchable ride modes, a Bosch cornering ABS system, “Easy Shift” function and lean sensitive motorcycle traction control, alongside the existing features which have made the model a favourite amongst owners.

Husqvarna SUPERMOTO CLOTHING
2020 Husqvarna 701 Supermoto

For the first time, each model also has their own unique new graphics.

Husqvarna ENDURO
2020 Husqvarna 701 Enduro

2020 Husqvarna 701 Supermoto & Enduro features

  • New switchable Ride Modes
  • New Bosch cornering ABS
  • New Easy Shift function
  • New lean-angle sensitive Motorcycle Traction Control
  • New graphics and slim bodywork
  • Chromium-molybdenum steel trellis frame
  • Aluminium swingarm
  • Polyamide rear subframe with integrated fuel tank
Husqvarna ENDURO
2020 Husqvarna 701 Enduro

The Australian market saw the 2019 701 Supermoto launched earlier in the year, arriving for $15,995 RRP. Australian pricing and availability of the 2020 models yet to be announced.

The Husqvarna 701 models feature a 692.7cc single-cylinder engine with Ride-by-Wire and producing 72 hp at 5000rpm. A Keihin EFI system includes a 50mm throttle-body controlled by the EMS.

Husqvarna SUPERMOTO
2020 Husqvarna 701 Supermoto

A lightweight trellis frame is manufactured with chomium-molybdenum steel, with a self supporting rear subframe including an integrated 13 litre fuel tank in polyamide thermoplastic. A light-weight aluminium swingarm maximises traction and stability.

Suspension is provided by WP Performance Systems, with Brembo brakes and spoked wheels, with the Supermoto featuring 17-inch wheels, and the Enduro running a 21-inch front and 18-inch rear with 250 mm suspension travel at each end.

Husqvarna ENDURO
2020 Husqvarna 701 Enduro

On the Supermoto suspension is WP USD split-function 48mm forks matched to a WP monoshock fitted with Pro-Lever linkage. A single 320mm rotor is matched to a Brembo four-piston caliper while a 250mm rear rotor is joined by a single-piston Brembo floating caliper.


2020 Husqvarna 701 Enduro LR

Also joining the 701 line-up in 2020 is the brand new 701 Enduro LR (Long Range), which shares the same electronics as the 701 Enduro but offers additional touring capabilities for riders wanting to travel further.

Husqvarna ENDURO LR
2020 Husqvarna 701 Enduro LR (Long Range)

Remaining a lightweight and nimble machine, the additional 12-litre auxiliary fuel tank increases the total fuel capacity to 25 litres, meaning a significantly bigger fuel range for more enduro capability. 701 Enduro LR availability is yet to be confirmed for Australia.

Source: MCNews.com.au

BMW Big Boxer | Nuts & bolts of the new retro BMW powerplant

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

BMW has let some detail out of the bag about the new generation Big Boxer that will power a new cruiser range scheduled to debut in 2020 from BMW Motorrad.

BMW Motorrad Big Boxer Cruiser Concept R
BMW Cruiser Concept R 18 /2

A combination of art deco design cues fuelled by nostalgia and history have driven the desing of the new 1802 cc is a beautiful showpiece that delivers 158 Nm of torque and 91 horsepower. Those numbers are pretty much line-ball with Harley-Davidson’s 114 cube Milwaukee Eight.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

With its OHV valve drive along with a separate engine and transmission housing, the new “Big Boxer” has the same structural features that distinguished the very first BMW Motorrad boxer engine, which at that time had laterally controlled valves.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

The highest-capacity twin-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production is a 1802 cc engine, resulting from a 107.1 mm bore and 100 mm stroke. The engine output is 67 kW (91 hp) at 4750 rpm. The maximum torque of 158 Nm is already available at 3 000 rpm. More than 150 Nm is now available from 2000 to 4000 rpm.  The maximum engine speed is 5750 rpm, while the idling speed is 950 rpm.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

The new “Big Boxer” is air/oil cooled, has large ribbed cylinders and cylinder heads and weighs 110.8 kg including gearbox and intake system. It has a vertically split aluminium engine housing.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

Unlike the classic air-cooled 2-valve boxer engines made by BMW Motorrad, however, the “Big Boxer” crankshaft, forged from quenched and tempered steel, has an additional main bearing at the centre, which was necessary due to the enormous cylinder volume in order to prevent undesirable bending vibrations of the crankshaft.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

Like the crankshaft, the two connecting rods with I-shaft are mounted on plain bearings and are likewise forged from quenched and tempered steel. They accommodate cast aluminium pistons with two compression rings and an oil wiper ring. The running surface of the light metal cylinders is coated with NiCaSil.

Lubricating and cooling oil is supplied by a wet sump lubrication system with a two-stage oil pump via sleeve-type chain driven by the crankshaft.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

Although the new “Big Boxer” has four valves, dual ignition, a modern combustion chamber architecture, intake manifold injection and the BMS-O engine management system for the best possible torque as well as optimum consumption and emissions, it uses the classic OHV configuration for its valve drive – as was the practice pursued by BMW Motorrad over a period of some 70 years.

When developing the valve drive for the “Big Boxer”, BMW Motorrad engineers were inspired by a very special engine design in the history of BMW Motorrad – in keeping with the Heritage concept: the 2-cylinder boxer engine of the R 5/R 51 (1936 – 1941) and R 51/2 (1950 – 1951), the latter having been the first BMW motorcycle with a boxer engine after the Second World War. In contrast to other OHV designs by BMW Motorrad, this engine – highly valued by connoisseurs – has two camshafts driven by the crankshaft via a sleeve-type chain.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer technical information and images

As in the historical role model, the two camshafts are also positioned to the left and right above the crankshaft in the “Big Boxer”. The advantage of this “twin camshaft boxer” is the shorter pushrods. This also makes for reduced moving masses, minimised deflections and lower linear expansions. A generally stiffer valve drive with improved control precision and higher speed stability is the consequence of this more elaborate construction.

In the traditional BMW Motorrad boxer design, the two pushrods actuate one pushrod per cylinder side for the intake and one for the exhaust side, guided in a sealed pushrod tube on the top of the cylinders. The two intake and exhaust valves in the cylinder head are actuated in pairs via fork toggle levers.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

In contrast to today’s widespread engine technology, valve clearance compensation is not effected by means of hydraulic elements, but – as was the case in most classic air-cooled BMW two-valve boxers for decades – via one adjusting screw with one lock nut for each valve. As was formerly the case in the classic 2-valve boxers, valve clearance adjustment (0.2 – 0.3 mm) in the R18 “Big Boxer” is also achieved very quickly. The valves are made of steel, with a disc diameter of 41.2 mm on the inlet side and 35 mm on the outlet side. The valve angle is 21 degrees on the inlet side and 24 degrees on the outlet side.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

As in most BMW Motorrad boxer engines for decades (with the exception of vertical-flow, air/water-cooled boxers since 2012), a single-disc dry clutch transmits the torque generated by the engine to the transmission. For the first time it is designed as a self-reinforcing anti-hopping clutch, thereby eliminating unwanted stamping of the rear wheel caused by engine drag torque in the event of hard downshifting.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

The constant mesh 6-speed transmission is located in a dual-section aluminium housing and is designed as a 4-shaft transmission with helical gear pairs. The gearbox input shaft with lug dampers drives the two gearbox shafts with the gear wheel pairs. An output shaft is provided to bridge the distance and reverse the direction of rotation. A reverse gear is available as an optional extra. This is driven by an intermediate gear and an electric motor and can be shifted manually.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

As in all BMW motorcycles with boxer engines, torque is transmitted from the gearbox to the rear wheel in the R 18 via a propeller-shaft or universal-shaft drive with universal joint, shaft and rear-axle drive with bevel and ring gear.

BMW Big Boxer Engine
BMW Big Boxer

The propeller shaft and universal joint are examples of fascinating classic motorcycle technology since they are nickel-plated and open, as was commonly the case in BMW Motorrad models up to and including model year 1955. A so-called tripoid joint is applied on the gearbox side for the purpose of length compensation.

BMW Motorrad Concept R Big Boxer
BMW Concept R18 ‘Big Boxer’

Source: MCNews.com.au

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel announced

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel


For 2020 the Moto Guzzi V85 TT receives a new version, called the ‘Travel’, offering a range of standard fitment accessories specifically chosen to offer the ideal adventure-touring kit-out, straight off the showroom floor. Limited numbers have been confirmed to be arriving in Australia in mid-2020, with pricing to be announced closer to release date.

Moto Guzzi V TT Travel
2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

The V85 TT Travel will feature a higher touring windshield offers increased rider protection for long distance hauls, with 60% more surface area than the standard screen.

Two lightweight durable plastic panniers are also included, with a 37L capacity on the right case and with 27.5L on the left, with matched keys and room for a full face helmet in the larger pannier.

Heated grips are another standard inclusion, ensuring cool weather doesn’t take the shine out of riding, with control via the left switchblock, keeping everything well integrated.

Moto Guzzi V TT Travel
2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

Additional LED lights are also fitted, with the V85 TT Travel also feature the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia platform that allows smartphone syncing.

The Travel also features an exclusive Sabbia Namib colour scheme, including dedicated graphics.

Michelin Anakee Adventure tyres are also in line with the V85 TT Travel’s adventure-touring theme, run on the 2.50 x 19inch front and 4.25 x 17inch rear spoked wheels.

Moto Guzzi V TT Travel
2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

The V85 TT features an air-cooled tranverse 90° V-twin, with two valves per cylinder and a capacity of 853cc. The final drive is a fully enclosed shaft drive transmission keeping maintenance to a minimum, with a 23L tank offering a large range in excess of 400km.

Compression is run at 10.5:1 with a bore and stroke of 84 by 77mm, while peak power is 80 hp at 7750 rpm, while max torque is reached at 5000rpm and is 80 Nm. Fuelling is delivered via a 52mm throttle body with Ride-by-Wire, alongside a modern electronic package offering Riding Modes and MGCT traction control, as well as ABS.

Moto Guzzi V TT Travel
2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

The chassis consists of a high-strength steel tubular frame, 41mm USD forks with preload and rebound adjustability and a single shock with preload and rebound adjustability connected to the box-type double-sided swingarm. Travel is 170mm at each end.

Brakes consist of 320mm rotors with Brembo radial-mount four-piston calipers on the front, and a 260mm rear rotor with two-piston caliper.

Moto Guzzi V TT Travel
2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

Australian arrival is expected in mid-2020 with limited numbers available, while pricing is yet to be released, so keep an eye out for an update.

The standard Moto Guzzi V85 TT is currently available in Australia for $20,690 Ride-Away for the uni-colour options, or for $21,390 Ride-Away for the Evocative option. For more information see the Australian Moto Guzzi website: http://www.motoguzzi.com/au_EN

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel Specifications

SPECIFICATIONS
ENGINE
Type Transverse 90° V twin, two valves per cylinder (titanium intake).
Cooling Air
Capacity 853 cm³
Bore x stroke 84 x 77 mm
Compression  10.5: 1
Max power 80 HP (59 kW) at 7,750 rpm
Torque 80 Nm at 5,000 rpm
Fuel system Electronic injection; Ø 52 mm single throttle body, Ride-by-Wire
Fuel capacity 23 litres (including 5 litre reserve)
Emissions  Euro 4
Consumption  4.9 l/100 km
CO2 Emissions 118 g/km
TRANSMISSION
Clutch Dry single disc
Transmission 6 gears
CHASSIS
Frame High strength steel tubular frame
Front Sus. 41 mm hydraulic telescopic USD fork, with adjustable spring preload and hydraulic rebound
Front travel 170 mm
Rear Sus. Double-sided swingarm in box-type aluminium with a single shock on the right side, with adjustable spring preload and hydraulic rebound
Rear travel 170 mm
Front brake Double 320 mm stainless steel floating discs, Brembo radial-mounted callipers with 4 opposed pistons
Rear brake Ø 260 mm stainless steel disc, floating calliper with 2 pistons
Wheels Spoked
Front rim 2.50″ x 19″
Rear rim 4.25″ x 17″
Front tyre With air chamber 110/80 – R19″
Rear tyre With air chamber 150/70 – R17″
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
A/C Gen. 430 W
Sys. voltage 12 V
Battery 12V – 12 Ah

Source: MCNews.com.au

Husqvarna 701 Enduro Trek returns to NSW in 2020

2020 Husqvarna 701 Enduro Trek


The Husqvarna 701 Enduro Trek is set to return for 2020 when the ‘Northern Explorer’ event takes place between April 27 to May 1, in New South Wales.

An ideal opportunity for Husqvarna 701 Enduro riders to take the ultimate one-model adventure together, next year’s edition follows on from the inaugural event held in the Victorian High Country earlier in 2019.

Husqvarna Enduro Trek
2020 Husqvarna 701 Enduro Trek announced

The Husqvarna 701 Enduro Trek: Northern Explorer represents the pioneering brand’s Simple, Progressive mantra and riders who take part will be treated to an unforgettable four-day experience with fellow adventurers.



Boasting an assortment of terrain including everything from sandy coastal tracks to lush rainforest with rocky water crossings and impressive hillclimbs, there will also be a mix of open cattle country for participants with a wide range of abilities including optional harder routes.

Starting and finishing in Coffs Harbour, the Husky Trek will explore Northern NSW from coast to country with overnights in Glen Innes, Tenterfield and Yamba – aiming to support local businesses in the region which have been affected by drought and devastating fires recently.

Husqvarna Enduro Trek
The 2020 Husqvarna 701 Enduro Trek will offer varied conditions and cater to different rider skills

At $1495 per rider, the entry fee includes approximately 1200-kilometres of adventure riding over four-days with lead riders, course markers, GPS files, luggage support, technical and tyre support, back-up vehicle, sweep and medical support, as well as dinner every night.

Participants will also receive a Husqvarna Motorcycles Riders Bag (t-shirt, stickers and more), as well as enjoy the opportunity to ride with professional riders and special guests.

Husqvarna Enduro Trek
The 2020 Husqvarna 701 Enduro Trek will be held over four days out of Coffs Harbour

In addition riders can relive the Husqvarna 701 Enduro Trek: Northern Explorer through an event video featuring all of the highlights and official event photography provided by a dedicated media crew.

Riders will be required to have a road-registered Husqvarna 701 Enduro motorcycle fitted with knobby tyres, as well as third-party property damage insurance or comprehensive motorcycle insurance (recommended) and a full open unrestricted motorcycle licence.


Space is limited in the 2020 Husqvarna 701 Enduro Trek: Northern Explorer, so be certain to secure your entry when registrations open Wednesday December 11th at 9.00am AEST at:

https://ridehusqvarna.com.au/2019/11/27/2020-husqvarna-motorcycles-701-enduro-trek-northern-explorer/

Husqvarna Enduro Trek
2020 Husqvarna 701 Enduro Trek

Source: MCNews.com.au