Tag Archives: Ducati

Virtual tour of Ducati museum in Bologna

Even though the Ducati Museum in Bologna has been closed for several weeks due to the coronavirus pandemic, you can still take a virtual tour from the safety of your computer, tablet or phone, thanks to Google Maps.

CLICK HERE TO TRY IT OUT

Navigation is easy. You can move your mouse around to scan left and right and up and down and use the arrows on the floor to move forward, back or into the side rooms.

The Ducati Museum attracts about 40,000 fans a year from around the world.

I visited the museum a few years ago as well as touring the factory and have included some photos on my Pinterest page. You can also check out my BMW and Harley museum pix.

Ducati museum - Buyers ducati world theme parkThe factory Ducati museum

Displays include the 1946 Cucciolo to the most recent Desmosedici GP and World Superbikes. The Museum covers an area of 850 square metres and the exhibition surrounds a giant red helmet with motorcycles displayed on an illuminated track. There are also seven thematic rooms, with displays, historic videos and mementoes.

The museum was officially recognised in 2012 by the Ministry for Cultural Heritage and Regional Activities as a site of significant cultural value and for the fourth consecutive year it has been awarded the TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence.

In 2014, more than 40,000 people from all over the world visited the Ducati Museum with TripAdvisor reviewers giving it a score of 4.5 out of 5.

To select the winners of the Certificate of Excellence, TripAdvisor uses a special algorithm that takes into account a range of factors such as the quality, quantity and relevance of the reviews. It also considers the opinions posted by travellers over the last 12 months, the position of the attraction in the site’s popularity rankings and how long it has been in those rankings.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Ducati Streetfighter V4 may be delayed

Ducati has revealed its new Streetfighter V4 in a live streaming show as its scheduled delivery may be delayed by the pandemic.

The live streaming may have been planned to satisfy anxious customers, although it didn’t reveal much more than we already knew.

Delivery delayed

It was scheduled to be available from March 2020.

However, given the company has closed it factory until further notice over the pandemic, deliveries are expected to be delayed.

Ducati Streetfighter V4 ready to brawl

The Steetfighter will come in a “base model” at €19,990 (about $32,500) and a V4 S version at €22,990 (about $A37,500).

Aussie prices may vary and the delivery schedule is not yet confirmed.

Power packed

It is only slightly detuned from the Panigale V4’s 211 (157kW) to 208hp (155kW) and weighs in at 201kg.Ducati Streetfighter V4 ready to brawl

To control all that power and keep the front wheel on the ground, it has an aero package that creates 28kg of downforce at 270km/h.

The aggressive street brawl design is highlighted by two sets of wings on either side of the bike.Ducati Streetfighter V4 ready to brawl

Here is the Ducati press release and tech specs:

The foundation of the Steetfighter V4 is a Panigale V4 stripped of its fairings and equipped with high, wide handlebars. Weighing 178 kg, it is powered by a 1103 cc Desmosedici Stradale engine, its 208 hp kept under control by biplane aerofoils and a latest-generation electronics package: a combination of factors and modifications that Ducati calls the “Fight Formula”. The result is an over-the-top naked Ducati, modern and technological, with an assertively eye-catching design. A bike that does nothing to hide its segment-leading performance, but which also ensures practicality and full-on fun during everyday rides.

The minimalist full-LED headlight with its V-shaped DRL captures the spirit of the Streetfighter V4 perfectly. On the one hand, it recalls the front of the Panigale V4 and, on the other, evokes the crazy grin of the Joker (the comic strip character from which the Ducati Style Center drew inspiration for this new Bologna-built naked).Ducati Streetfighter V4 ready to brawl

On the Streetfighter V4, the Front Frame and Desmosedici Stradale engine take centre-stage. Only partially screened by superstructures that have been cut to a bare minimum, their sharp lines create a clean, essential whole.

Such powerful design demands a powerful engine, and the 1103 cc 208 hp Desmosedici Stradale fits the bill: for a naked, it packs an impressive punch, yet dedicated engine mapping lets the rider control the power with confidence. The engine – combined with a kerb weight of 178 kg (“S” version) – boosts the power/weight ratio to an impressive 1.17. Performance can be further improved by mounting the full-racing Ducati Performance exhaust by Akrapovič, which raises power to 220 hp and reduces weight by 6 kg.Ducati Streetfighter V4 ready to brawl

The feisty performance of this bike is stabilised by sophisticated electronics lifted directly from the Panigale V4 and the ‘biplane’ aerofoils developed by Ducati Corse aerodynamicists. Brought forward to maximise their effect, the aerofoils generate 28 kg of downforce at 270 kph, attenuating front wheel ‘floating’ at high speed and the tendency to wheel-up. They also boost stability during braking at the turn-in point and through the corner. On the road, this dynamic behaviour instils confidence. On the track, instead, it boosts performance by limiting electronic control intervention and allowing delayed braking.Ducati Streetfighter V4 ready to brawl

The latest-generation electronics package on the Streetfighter V4 is based on a 6-axis inertial measurement platform which instantly detects the bike’s roll, yaw and pitch angles. The electronics oversee every part of the ride: some controls manage start, acceleration and braking, others handle traction, while some lend a helping hand on corners and out-of-the-corner stretches. Safety, performance, and bags of personality: the new Ducati Streetfighter V4 has arrived!

Ducati Streetfighter V4 tech specs

Engine Desmosedici Stradale 90° V4, rearward-rotating crankshaft, 4 Desmodromically actuated valves per cylinder, liquid cooled
Displacement 1,103 cc
Bore X stroke 81 x 53.5 mm
Compression ratio 14.0:1
Power 153 kW (208 hp) @ 12,750 rpm
Torque 123 Nm (90.4 lb-ft) @ 11,500 rpm
Fuel injection Electronic fuel injection system. Twin injectors per cylinder. Full ride-by-wire elliptical throttle bodies.
Exhaust 4-2-1-2 system, with 2 catalytic converters and 2 lambda probes
Transmission
Gearbox 6 speed with Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) up/down EVO 2
Primary drive Straight cut gears; Ratio 1.80:1
Ratio 1=38/14 2=36/17 3=33/19 4=32/21 5=30/22 6=30/24
Final drive Chain; Front sprocket 15; Rear sprocket 42
Clutch Hydraulically controlled slipper and self-servo wet multiplate clutch
Chassis
Frame Aluminium alloy “Front Frame”
Front suspension Fully adjustable Showa BPF fork. 43 mm chromed inner tubes
Front wheel 5-spokes light alloy 3.50″ x 17″
Front tyre Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa II 120/70 ZR17
Rear Suspension Fully adjustable Sachs unit. Aluminum single-sided swingarm
Rear Wheel 5-spokes light alloy 6.00” x 17”
Rear tyre Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa II 200/60 ZR17
Wheel travel (front/rear) 120 mm (4.7 in) – 130 mm (5.1 in)
Front brake 2 x 330 mm semi-floating discs, radially mounted Brembo Monobloc Stylema® (M4.30) 4-piston callipers with Cornering ABS EVO
Rear brake 245 mm disc, 2-piston calliper with Cornering ABS EVO
Instrumentation Last generation digital unit with 5″ TFT colour display
Dimensions and weights
Dry weight 180 kg (397 lb)
Kerb weight* 201 kg (443 lb)
Seat height 845 mm (33.3 in)
Wheelbase 1.488 mm (58.6 in)
Rake 24,5°
Front wheel trail 100 mm (4 in)
Fuel tank capacity 16 l – 4.23 gallon (US)
Number of seats Dual seats
Equipment
Safety equipment Riding Modes, Power Modes, Cornering ABS EVO, Ducati Traction Control (DTC) EVO 2, Ducati Wheelie Control (DWC) EVO, Ducati Slide Control (DSC), Engine Brake Control (EBC) EVO, Auto tyre calibration
Standard equipment Ducati Power Launch (DPL), Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) up/down EVO 2, Full LED lighting with Daytime Running Light (DRL), Sachs steering damper, Quick adjustment buttons, Auto-off indicators, Passenger seat and footpegs. Ducati Multimedia System (DMS).
Additional equipment
Ready for Ducati Data Analyser+ (DDA+) with GPS module, Ducati LinkApp, anti-theft, heating grips, Ducati Lap Timer GPS (DLT GPS)
Warranty
Warranty (months) 24 months unlimited mileage
Maintenance (km/months) 12,000 km (7,500 mi) / 12 months
Valve clearance adjustment (km) 24,000 km (15,000 mi)
Consumption and Emissions (only for countries where Euro 4 standard applies)
Standard Euro 4
*Kerb weights indicate total bike weight with all operating consumable liquids and a fuel tank filled to 90% of capacity (as per EU Regulation 44/2014 Annex XI).

Ducati Streetfighter V4 ready to brawl

Ducati Streetfighter V4 S tech specs

Engine Desmosedici Stradale 90° V4, rearward-rotating crankshaft, 4 Desmodromically actuated valves per cylinder, liquid cooled
Displacement 1,103 cc
Bore X stroke 81 x 53.5 mm
Compression ratio 14.0:1
Power 153 kW (208 hp) @ 12,750 rpm
Torque 123 Nm (90.4 lb-ft) @ 11,500 rpm
Fuel injection Electronic fuel injection system. Twin injectors per cylinder. Full ride-by-wire elliptical throttle bodies.
Exhaust 4-2-1-2 system, with 2 catalytic converters and 2 lambda probes
Transmission
Gearbox 6 speed with Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) up/down EVO 2
Primary drive Straight cut gears; Ratio 1.80:1
Ratio 1=38/14 2=36/17 3=33/19 4=32/21 5=30/22 6=30/24
Final drive Chain; Front sprocket 15; Rear sprocket 42
Clutch Hydraulically controlled slipper and self-servo wet multiplate clutch
Chassis
Frame Aluminium alloy “Front Frame”
Front suspension Öhlins NIX30 43 mm fully adjustable fork with TiN treatment. Electronic compression and rebound damping adjustment with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 event-based mode
Front wheel 3-spokes forged aluminum alloy 3.50″ x 17″
Front tyre Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa II 120/70 ZR17
Rear Suspension Fully adjustable Ohlins TTX36 unit. Electronic compression and rebound damping adjustment with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 event-based mode. Aluminium single-sided swingarm
Rear Wheel 3-spokes forged aluminum alloy 6.00″ x 17″
Rear tyre Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa II 200/60 ZR17
Wheel travel (front/rear) 120 mm (4.7 in) – 130 mm (5.1 in)
Front brake 2 x 330 mm semi-floating discs, radially mounted Brembo Monobloc Stylema® (M4.30) 4-piston callipers with Cornering ABS EVO
Rear brake 245 mm disc, 2-piston calliper with Cornering ABS EVO
Instrumentation Last generation digital unit with 5″ TFT colour display
Dimensions and weights
Dry weight 178 kg (392 lb)
Kerb weight* 199 kg (439 lb)
Seat height 845 mm (33.3 in)
Wheelbase 1.488 mm (58.6 in)
Rake 24,5°
Front wheel trail 100 mm (4 in)
Fuel tank capacity 16 l – 4.23 gallon (US)
Number of seats Dual seats
Equipment
Safety equipment Riding Modes, Power Modes, Cornering ABS EVO, Ducati Traction Control (DTC) EVO 2, Ducati Wheelie Control (DWC) EVO, Ducati Slide Control (DSC), Engine Brake Control (EBC) EVO, Auto tyre calibration
Standard equipment Ducati Power Launch (DPL), Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) up/down EVO 2, Full LED lighting with Daytime Running Light (DRL), Ducati Electronic Suspension (DES) EVO with Ohlins suspension and steering damper, Quick adjustment buttons, Auto-off indicators, Passenger seat and footpegs, Ducati Multimedia System (DMS). Marchesini aluminium forged wheels
Additional equipment
Ready for Ducati Data Analyser+ (DDA+) with GPS module, Ducati LinkApp, anti-theft, heating grips, Ducati Lap Timer GPS (DLT GPS)
Warranty
Warranty (months) 24 months unlimited mileage
Maintenance (km/months) 12,000 km (7,500 mi) / 12 months
Valve clearance adjustment (km) 24,000 km (15,000 mi)
Consumption and Emissions (only for countries where Euro 4 standard applies)
Standard Euro 4
*Kerb weights indicate total bike weight with all operating consumable liquids and a fuel tank filled to 90% of capacity (as per EU Regulation 44/2014 Annex XI).

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Alpinestars gloves score top safety rating

Alpinestars GP Plus R2 motorcycle gloves (pictured) have become only the second pair of gloves to be awarded a full five stars for safety by MotoCAP.

The internationally awarded safety and thermal comfort ratings system for motorcycle clothing has added 15 more gloves to its list of tested gear.

The Australian safety intitiative, launched in September 2018, is the first of its type in the world.

It has now rated 201 items of clothing, including 50 pairs of pants, 90 jackets and 61 pairs of gloves.

Of those gloves, only the Alpinestars costing $225 and Ducati Corse C3 ($442) – both racing-style gloves – have scored a full five stars.

Ducati Corse C3 glovesDucati Corse C3 gloves

Only three others scored four stars, five got three stars, 20 received two stars, 23 got one star and the rest were awarded just half a star.

No comfort ratings

While MotoCAP also supplies thermal comfort and waterproofing on jackets and pants, it does not provide a comfort rating for gloves.

That is despite some of the gloves tested having perforations for airflow.

However, they do test for waterproofing.

Comfort is a big factor among baby boomers when selecting gloves, according to a Canstar Blue customer satisfaction survey that also found Millennial riders buy for style.

Transport for NSW says that to measure for comfort a large square of fabric must be obtained.

“There is not enough material in a glove to obtain a sample for the thermal comfort measure,” they say.

All gear rated so far has been obtained through a secretive buying system to guarantee integrity.

Click here to find out how products are selected for rating in secret.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Ducati selling more premium bikes

Ducati has posted its 20129 financial results which shows a record in turnover for per bikes sold which indicates they are selling more premium bikes.

The financial results come amid the factory being closed by the pandemic for cleaning and restructuring to allow workers to have more distance between them.

Ducati expects to reopen the factory on Wednesday (25 March 2020).

Several motorcycle factories have also closed across Europe and Asia for cleaning as well as Harley-Davidson in the USA.

The latest to join the factory closures is Royal Enfield in India and the UK until March 31.

All these production halts may not have an immediate effect on motorcycle supplies, but could result in longer term delays, especially on spare parts.

Ducati resultsDUCATI MOTOR HOLDING premium

Ducati has announced it “delivered” 53,183 motorcycles last year. That doesn’t necessarily mean that’s how many were sold.

It’s the fifth consecutive year the Bologna factory has receded deliveries above 50,000.

Ducati report turnover of €716 million ($A1332m) and €52m ($A97m) in operating profit, equal to 7.2% of operating margin.

While the Scrambler has become the biggest-selling model since its release in 2015, Panigale and Multistrada are generating the most income.

The company says turnover per bike of about €13,500 ($A235,120) per motorcycle represents the highest value in the history of the company.

They say this indicates a move toward the premium part of the market.

Panigale was the best-selling super sports bike in the world for the second consecutive year, with a market share of 25%.

The Multistrada family recorded the highest value of motorcycles sold since entering the market in 2003. last year the Multistrada family added the 950 S and 1260 Enduro.

Premium Streetfighter V4

Ducati EICMA Streetfighter V4 voteDucati Streetfighter V4 wins most beautiful bike at EICMA

The premium Streetfighter V4 should also help lift turnover-per-motorcycle when it is released this year.

It was unveiled in November 2019 at the EICMA motorcycle show in Milan where it won the most beautiful bike award.

Price and delivery have not yet been revealed.

However, we expect they may be announced when Ducati telecasts a presentation on Wednesday (25 March 2020) featuring techs involved in developing the bike.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

BMW joins motorcycle manufacturing halt

The coronavirus pandemic has halted motorcycle manufacturing in the USA and Europe with BMW Motorrad the latest to temporarily stop assembly lines.

BMW Motorrad has halted manufacturing at its Spandau factory n Berlin, but we believe G 310 production is continuing in the TVR plant in India.

The company has also closed its Munich HQ and two museums.

In Australia, BMW’s GS Safari has been postponed from this month until May 24-29.

The recent 2016 BMW GS Safari was a huge success with 200 riders traversing the glorious off-roads of the Great Dividing Range around the NSW-Queensland border and hinterland. joins recallGS Safari in doubt

A spokeswoman says the event will “most definitely go ahead in May”, but we think that’s unlikely given the pandemic expected to be at its peak then.

“We are aware that medically we will still be in the midst of dealing with the COVID-19 virus Australia wide however under advisement the current travel restrictions will have changed which will allow us to run the event as planned,” the spokeswoman says.

Click here for other motorcycle event cancellations.

Manufacturing halt

Break in new harley-Davidson engine factoryHarley’s Pilgrim Rd engine factory

Several motorcycle factories have closed across Europe while Harley-Davidson joined the temporary closure to clean its factories after a worker tested positive at their Milwaukee engine plant.

Ducati has extended its factory closure until March 25 and Brembo and Yamaha have closed their European factories until next Monday.

Moto Morini, KTM, Husqvarna and GasGas had already closed their factories in Italy and Austria.

The Piaggio Group – owner of Aprilia, Moto Guzzi and Vespa – closed its factories last weekend for a “deep clean” and returned to production this week.

Meanwhile, MV Agusta in Lombardy, the epicentre of the Italian coronavirus contagion, continues with a reduced workforce.

All these manufacturing halts may not have an immediate effect on motorcycle supplies, but could result in longer term delays, especially on spare parts.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Harley-Davidson suspend production

Harley-Davidson has joined several other motorcycle manufacturers in temporarily suspending production due to the pandemic threat.

The company announced it will suspend the majority of its production at its US manufacturing facilities until March 29 after an employee at their Pilgrim Rd, Milwaukee, plant tested positive for Covid-19.

Ducati has extended its factory closure until March 25 and Brembo and Yamaha have closed their European factories until next Monday.

Moto Morini, KTM, Husqvarna and GasGas had already closed their factories in Italy and Austria.

The Piaggio Group – owner of Aprilia, Moto Guzzi and Vespa – closed its factories last weekend for a “deep clean” and returned to production this week.

Meanwhile, MV Agusta in Lombardy, the epicentre of the Italian coronavirus contagion, continues with a reduced workforce.

Harley production halted

Harley-Davidson 115th anniversary 110th 105thPilgrim Rd factory

Now Harley has temporarily suspending production at their York Vehicle Operations in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin facilities at Tomahawk Operations and Pilgrim Rd Powertrain Operations.

Harley-Davidson plans to continue monitoring the situation closely and make additional adjustments in accordance with WHO guidelines.

All these manufacturing halts may not have an immediate effect on motorcycle supplies, but could result in longer term delays, especially on spare parts.

Harley acting boss Jochen Zeitz says they “recognise the unprecedented nature of this global crisis” and want to “support our employees”.

“We will continue to monitor the situation and take necessary steps to prioritise employee health and safety,” he says.Break in new harley-Davidson engine factory

The majority of Harley’s US production employees will be on temporary layoff with medical benefits. The company will use this time to continue deep cleaning and disinfecting its production areas and common areas to further protect workers upon their return.

There is no word on any changes at their Indian factory which produces Street models for Australia and New Zealand and the Thai assembly plant which produces models fr Europe to avoid the high tariffs.

Harley-Davidson says they are working with dealers to assess individual impacts.

All Harley-Davidson sponsored events have been cancelled until mid-April.

Harley-Davidson Australia says that includes the national HOG Rally on the Gold Coast what was planned for July.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Virus forces motorcycle factory closures

The list of motorcycle factory closures due to the coronavirus pandemic is growing daily.

Ducati has now announced it will extend the closure of its factory in Bologna until 25 March 2020 and Brembo and Yamaha have closed their European factories.

Moto Morini, KTM, Husqvarna and GasGas had already closed their factories in Italy and Austria.

Ducati closed its factory in Borgo Panigale last Friday and was due to reopen tomorrow (18 March 2020).

However, the closure has been extended while the company implements changes to the production lines to keep workers further apart.

The company has also introduced a multi-shift work programme to halve the number of people on the assembly line at the same time.

Brembo has also closed its Bergamo factory until next week and Yamaha has announced the closure of its Italy and France facilities until 22 March.

The Piaggio Group – owner of Aprilia, Moto Guzzi and Vespa – closed its factories over the weekend for a “deep clean” and were due to return to production this week.

Meanwhile, MV Agusta in Lombardy, the epicentre of the Italian coronavirus contagion, continues production with a reduced workforce.

However, they “guarantee production continuity”.

Production continues in “full compliance with the urgent provisions contained in the Prime Minister’s 11/03 decree and with the guidelines issued by Confindustria Lombardia”.

MV Agusta RVS#1 RVS heritage f4MV Agusta factory

What closures mean to riders

While motorcycle factory closures may not have a huge impact on the production of models, it could impact spare parts.

The closure of the Brembo factory is of more concern as it could hamper the supply chain and the production of many models such as BMW and Triumph.

Meanwhile, the pandemic has forced the postponement and cancellation of many motorcycle racing events and rallies.

Global motorcycle racing body Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme says the 2020 season could be extended into 2021.

A petition has also now been circulated to close the Isle of Man TT races in May-June.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MV Agusta continues amid pandemic

While the pandemic is closing some motorcycle factories in Europe, MV Agusta in Lombardy, the epicentre of the Italian coronavirus contagion, continues production.

KTM, Husqvarna and GasGas will close their Austrian factories at the end of the month for two weeks and Moto Morini in Italy has already temporarily closed.

The Piaggio Group – owner of Aprilia, Moto Guzzi and Vespa – closed its factories over the weekend for a “deep clean” and plan to return to production this week.

There is no word from the Ducati factory in Bologna.

MV Agusta continues

MV Agusta has released a statement this morning (16 March 2020) to say it has reached an agreement with workers’ representatives to continue manufacture at their factory on the shores of Lake Varese, near Milan.

Despite a reduced workforce, they “guarantee production continuity”.

Production continues in “full compliance with the urgent provisions contained in the Prime Minister’s 11/03 decree and with the guidelines issued by Confindustria Lombardia”.

MV Agusta RVS#1 RVS heritage f4MV Agusta factory

A company statement says measures to reduce the presence of staff within the premises have immediately been adopted, such as the closure of non-essential departments, ‘smart working’, unused holiday allowances and Cassa Integrazione (redundancy fund) once the official decision will be announced.

For those employees who will continue coming to work, the company has introduced a number of measures to prevent and contain the spreading of the Covid-19 epidemic, such as the supply of face masks, gloves, sanitising gel and detergents for the sanitation of work spaces and surfaces in addition to limiting access to common areas,” the statement says.

Precise rules of conduct, by which every employee is required to abide, have been posted in every department (Covid-19 information circular on ‘rules of conduct and safety provisions’).

“Safety distances between workers are being respected in all areas of the plant, also thanks to the temporary reduction of the number of personnel on site.

Up to the present moment, the company has no evidence of employees with symptoms connected to Covid-19.

Normal production activity will therefore continue, yet with all due precautions, except for new Government provisions.”

MV Agusta 75th anniversaryTimur Sardarov

CEO Timur Sardarov says it is their “duty not to give up in this crisis situation, so that the economy of this community can recover once the emergency is over”.

“We took this decision with a great sense of responsibility, towards our employees in the first place, but also towards our local community, which cannot afford a breakdown of its production capability, and towards all the related industries on which so many workers and their families depend,” he says.

“The company has implemented all the information, prevention and containment measures required by the circumstances. We are determined to continue doing our best to support this community, fully respecting the rules and with maximum safety.”

Speed weekPepper, the Harley Road Glide Speed Week missile

The latest motorsport to be impacted is the Dry Lakes Racers Australia 30th Anniversary Speed Week and World Speed Trials Australia #2 at Lake Gairdner in South Australia.

It has been postponed to a date yet to be confirmed.

The announcement follows postponements and cancellations in F1, MotoGP, World Superbikes and many other motorsports.

Originally the DLRA had planned for three doctors to be in place for the two events, but as of today they only have one and there is no guarantee that even he will be available by the end of the week.

The South Australian Country Fire Service is also calling on its members to reduce their extra curricular volunteer activities as they are forced to replace members who have been inflicted with the virus.

“We could no longer guarantee the appropriate medical and fire services that are required for such and event,” the DLRA says.

“Now that the coronavirus has been officially identified as a pandemic, most public liability insurance policies consider any episodes to be exempt which would leave the DLRA open to financial ruin.

“Even with the concerted efforts that the DLRA were prepared to put into place through its mitigation plan would not be enough to ensure a safe risk free environment.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Coronavirus panic hits motorcycling

As panic buying sets in over the coronavirus, bans are placed on large gatherings and northern Italy goes into lockdown, motorcycling looks set to be one of the victims.

Despite all the doom and gloom, there is no need for riders to panic and stay at home.

After all, we wear a face mask of sorts, protective gloves and riding a bike puts us in a type of isolation.

We also usually ride out in the country where there is less chance of big group gatherings.

If you are concerned, use your credit card instead of cash when buying fuel and food and make sure to wash your hands thoroughly. And maybe pack your own toilet paper!

Pandemic panic

Meanwhile, the world of motorcycle racing is starting to feel the impact of the coming pandemic.

The first two rounds of the MotoGP in Qatar and Thailand have been abandoned and now the third round in Austin, Texas, on 3-5 April 2020 is under threat as the city moves to prevent crowds of more than 2500.

World Superbikes also cancelled their first round this weekend in Qatar and even the Isle of Man TT, from 30 May to 12 June, could be under threat.

Some of these events may still go ahead for TV only, with no on-site crowds as F1 is considering.

Meanwhile, the Daytona Bike Week festivities are going ahead in Florida as planned.

Bike production

Ducati factoryDucati factory

The spreading contagion in Italy — now the worst affected country outside China — also looks likely to affect production of Aprilia, Moto Guzzi and MV Agusta motorcycles and many motorcycle components.

Their factories are near Milan which is an epicentre of the virus in the Lombardi region which is in virtual shutdown.

There are also factories in the region that make automotive components.

Ducati is in Bologna which is just outside the northern contagion regions of Lombardy and Veneto.

Ducati, Moto Guzzi and Vespa have already closed their museum and factory tours.

While the affects of these shutdowns won’t be felt here for some time, we expect there could be some shortage of parts in coming months.

But that doesn’t mean you panic and start clearing the shelves of oil filters!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Covid-19 could impact bike manufacture

Ducati and Piaggio (Aprilia, Vespa, Moto Guzzi) have closed their museums due to the outbreak of the Covid-19 virus (coronavirus) in Italy, but their factories are still operating.

Chinese motorcycle factories were closed for a prolonged period over the Chinese Lunar New Year, but many, including Honda and CFMoto, have now restarted.

In the case of CFMoto, the factory is at around 80% due to workers still returning from extended new year celebrations with 100% production capacity expected over the next two weeks.

CFmoto factory coronavirusCFMoto factory

Supply chain

However, many component factories that supply automakers around the world have not reopened.

And now the virus has moved from a Chinese emergency to one that involves South Korea, Japan and Italy, three major manufacturers of motorcycles, cars and automotive parts.

The impact on motorcycle manufacture and supply of components could now be affected with Fiat-Chrysler the first to warn it could halt production at a European plant in weeks.

Data and analytics company GlobalData automotive editor David Leggett says this is an “inevitable consequence” on the automotive supply chain.

“Many factories in the Wuhan and Hubei province have been on lockdown since the start of the Chinese New Year holidays,” he says.

“The emerging problems for FCA outside of China are likely to be mirrored by other vehicle manufacturers and reflect both the long-run internationalisation of parts supply-chains and the predominance of ‘just-in-time’ lean manufacturing processes that keep inventory low.

“The next few weeks will be critical for automakers. The typical car is made up of 20,000 parts, and there is an elongated supply-chain of parts and sub-assemblies put together in complex sequence to create the finished vehicle.

“Korean manufacturers were the first to show up as impacted by China supply-chain disruption reflecting shorter shipment distances between China and Korea, but the FCA news indicates that impacts across the world are now coming over the horizon on shipment transit schedules.”

Museums close

moto guzzi factory museum V85Moto Guzzi museum’s big red doors will remain closed

As of yesterday, Italy had 374 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 12 deaths.

The epicentres of Covid-19 contagion in Italy are in Lombardy and Veneto regions where most of the auto factories are located.

Ducati’s factory in Bologna is just outside these central regions.

Public institutions and venues in these regions have been closed and mass meetings cancelled, including Ducati and Piaggio museum and factory tours.

The companies have notified the public that they have closed their museums for several weeks, but both confirm their factories are still operating.

We have not heard from MV Agusta which is near Milan in Lombardy, but their Facebook page has no reference to any closures.

Meanwhile, the organisers of the Geneva Motor Show, one of Europe’s premier motoring events, have confirmed the event is still due to take place as scheduled next week despite the first case of coronavirus in Switzerland.

The Covid-19 virus has already had some impact on Australian consumer confidence and our January motorcycle sales.

Now it could have a longer-term impact on motorcycle production and the supply of parts.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com