Tag Archives: E-Bike

Husqvarna Pilen gets electrified

Husqvarna E-Pilen Concept


Husqvarna’s parent brand, KTM, is no stranger to electric motorcycles, with the Freeride E long offering a enduro/trails crossover battery powered version of the Freeride. Recently Husqvarna also introduced the E-Pilen concept to take battery power to the urban road enviroment.

Where the sporty Freeride E offers an 18 kW output, the new E-Pilen will produce significantly less at 8 kW. A 100 km range should prove sufficient for urban and suburban short-hop commutes.

Seemingly a battery powered alternative to the Husqvarna 125 models announced for 2021, the E-Pilen will offer less power. A modular and swappable battery system may offer increased flexibility and possibly even range if infrastructure for swapping, rather than waiting for a charge, becomes available. One would imagine that a system such as that mooted for Europe may not prove quite as economically viable in our broader Australian landscape.

2021 Husqvarna E-Pilen Concept E-Motorcycle

Husqvarna have also signalled their intention to increase their dealer presence in urban and metro areas – most likely in Europe – to further push their E-mobility range, where they are most likely to be well received, thanks to shorter trips and greater charging infrastructure being the norm.

Information at the moment on the new model is very light, with more details said to be on the way in the near future, however it seems a smart strategy alongside the e-balance bikes to get new riders onto electric machines. Possibly in the hopes of preventing the comparison to traditional alternatives for a new generation of riders, while also capturing the interest of first adopters.

2021 Husqvarna E-Pilen Concept E-Motorcycle

The looks of the E-Pilen certainly align well with the Svartpilen and Vitpilen models and despite the fairly low claimed output figure in comparison to what we’ve come to expect in motorcycles – even small capacity machines – has a real sporty edge.

The E-Pilen could well also be a viable option for those seeking something more than an e-bicycle, without making the jump to traditional motorcycle or scooter, and the 100 km range would cover many rider’s regular commute. We’ll have to wait and see what speeds the bike is capable of without greatly effecting that range.

2021 Husqvarna E-Pilen Concept E-Motorcycle

It will also be interesting to see if more powerful alternatives are offered in the future, aligning with the availability of 125, 250, 401 and 701 Vitpilen and Svartpilen models.

Price is also likely to be a hot topic with this model, with the Svartpilen and Vitpilen models having seen a fairly drastic price drop from their original figures, which has since put them in a fairly competitive position in the Aussie market.

2021 Husqvarna E-Pilen Concept E-Motorcycle

Whether the E-Pilen is an affordable alternative to a small capacity machine or ends up in a similar position to Harley’s Livewire – as a premium, fairly exclusive option –  remains to be seen. Affordability is a huge factor in this segment of the small motorcycle/scooter market.

Source: MCNews.com.au

Electric Bike Manufacturer Delfast Reaches $2M in Sales in 2020

Electric Bikes for the Future

Based in Ukraine, Delfast has some of the most impressive e-bikes out there. These electric bikes are just short of being motorcycles and the company seems to be doing pretty well with them, having reached $2 million in sales in 2020.

Delfast recently launched a crowdfunding campaign on Fundable with the goal of $3 million. The Fundable campaign’s plan is to help the company build a new research and development center that will help Delfast reach the increasing demand for high-quality e-bikes.

Delfast saw massive jumps in sales since the pandemic. There was a 405 percent increase in sales in Q2 when compared to Q1 and a 222 percent increase in sales over the last three months. In 2019, the company did $552,000 in sales, which is a pretty far cry from the $2 million it has done in 2020.

livewire mother earth NAWA

This company came to be after a successful Kickstarter campaign that managed to raise $165,000 with the help of 75 backers. The company was founded in 2014 by Daniel Tonkopiy and Serhii Denysenko as an eco delivery service. Now Delfast has been registered by the Guinness World Records as the company that holds the greatest distance traveled on an electric bicycle—367 km on a single charge. 

Delfast is working to deliver bikes worldwide. Currently, there are riders in over 40 countries. If you’re interested in learning more about Delfast or its bikes, click here.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Kiwi electric motorbikes boost range

New Zealand electric motorcycle company UBCO has launched their 2021 models with an off-road 2X2 Work Bike and a 2X2 Adventure Bike.

Spokeswoman Kat Sutherland says the fifth-generation bikes are tougher with improved torque, power, traction and a third more range at top speed.

“These GenX5 bikes have been in development for over 18 months,” she says.

“The bikes were well underway before the NZ Defence Force began trials of their bikes this year. “The trial is still ongoing but going well by all accounts.

The UBCO Story from UBCO Ltd on Vimeo.

“They are looking at the bikes for reconnaissance and surveillance.”

Meanwhile, the 2021 models boast improvements including a 10% increase in motor efficiency as well as 23% more battery capacity for a 33% increase in range at top speed.

Along with of improvements to the control and handling, the bike and battery are  designed for disassembly,  improving the sustainability of the electric utility vehicles.

UBCO 2X2s have been used for a number of applications from food delivery (eg: Domino’s) to tourism (eg: Motubikes) to military (eg: NZDF) as well as on farms, for recreation and commuting.

“We now have the world’s toughest utility bikes,” says UBCO CEO Timothy Allan. “Our bikes are what we like to call all-terrain, all-utility, and all-performance.

“Over the past two years plus, our product development and international supply chain team have made huge improvements to the performance, durability, security, and intelligence of our bikes. Now the rider experience is next level,” he says.

The 2X2 Work Bike is “all black” with lever guards and off-road tyres.

The 2X2 Adventure Bike comes in traditional UBCO white and can be fitted with the UBCO telematics platform, allowing full fleet management and connectivity.  This includes vehicle diagnostics, predictive maintenance, fleet monitoring and more.
UBCO have also introduced the stand-alone KXH Power Supply, available in three capacities.

By mixing and matching bike and power supply they have effectively launched six new models, allowing customers to mix and match to suit their needs.

The bikes have a top speed of 50km/h (limited to 45km/h in Europe) and weigh as little as 64kg (depending on the model).
=Range is around 130km between charges.

The bikes are on sale in Australia, New Zealand, the USA, Europe and the UK.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Chopper styled electric e-Moped going on sale in Australia

EMoS Wyld

EMoS is launching a new Wyld chopper style e-Moped this week to coincide with World Electric Vehicle Day.

EMoS Wyld

EMoS have received Australian full volume compliance approval for its chopper styled bike they refer to as an e-Moped and have given the model name Wyld.

This new single seater combines the last or first mile urban mobility with the appeal of motorcycle related styling.

EMoS Wyld

By the look of those square shouldered tyres it might not be the most nimble urban commuter but the vehicles classification will allow it to be ridden with a normal car drivers license in QLD, SA, NT and WA.

The speed is limited to 50 km/h to satisfy the legislation requirements that permit car licence holders to ride the vehicle.

CEO and co-founder Harry Proskefallas

Our philosophy has been from the start to be “different”, we want people to turn their heads for our vehicles, we want them to be excited about the form and the function and to make a statement for electric vehicles and that is the same for the WYLD which was “Born to be WYLD”.

EMoS Wyld

EMos Wyld Specifications

  • Motor 60V 2000W / 60V 1500W
  • Battery Removeable; 60V12Ah, 20Ah, 30Ah
  • Range 60-80km
  • Max Speed 50 km/h
  • Load Capacity 200 kg
  • Rims 12-inch
  • Brakes Discs
  • Suspension Rear Twin Shock
  • Suspension Front Forks
  • Weight 74 kg without battery
  • Price – $2999 with base motor and battery
EMoS Wyld

Who is EMos?

EMoS is the recently rebranded company formerly know as e-Motion Concepts Pty Ltd. EMoS claim to be the premier Australian light electric vehicle provider, with the largest portfolio of electric road registerable for urban transport of people and goods, ranging from the 3 wheeled Personal Mobility Device (PMD) iLARK to the cargo carrying three wheelers CT-KARGO and the CT-KUBE. The Wyld is another first of its kind in Australia for EMoS and continues and complements our “out of the box” thinking increasing electric vehicle portfolio, with another three exciting vehicles in the pipeline.

Source: MCNews.com.au

Katalis EV.1000 – New Indo-French electric motorcycle project

Katalis EV.1000
TheArsenale Special Edition

This is not the first time we have showcased one of these independent builds marketed by TheArsenale, a company founded by Frenchman Patrice Meignan that market themselves as ‘the ultimate marketplace for the independent builders and the most innovative studios in the mobility sector and all its forms.’

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

Anyway, it basically seems as though TheArsenale is an on-line shopping marketplace for engineering oddities for people that have taken way too much acid but somehow still have a shitload of money to spend on some pretty random machinery. They have a significant footprint to the well-heeled Chinese market via an outlet in Macau.

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

Their partner this time around is an automotive brand and design studio based in Jakarta, Katalis Company, who in collaboration with the French automotive gallery have launched an electric motorcycle with a vintage inspired design. That’s their words but we reckon it has a somewhat steampunk sort of bent, that does have some appeal…

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

The motorcycle called Katalis EV.1000 TheArsenale special edition, is the newer edition of its predecessor, Katalis EV.500 which was released in April 2020.

According to the Head of Strategy of Katalis, Joseph Sinaga, “Initially, we were asked by TheArsenale to display the Katalis EV.500 in their gallery in the City of Dreams, Macau. However after some discussions, we both decided to collaborate in creating a new design, the one and only of its kind in the world.”

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

The EV.1000 is characterized by its dominantly black matte colour, wrapped with an orange striped ornament. “The colour is derived from TheArsenale’s brand guidelines, which we hold as reference in the visual design of the Katalis EV.1000,” explains Principal Designer of Katalis, Julian Palapa.

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

Julian, who has a background in architecture further explains, a motor with a capacity of 1000 watts is installed in the motorcycle, supported by a 48V 45Ah battery. This motorcycle is also supported by a controller with a power of 48-72 Volt.

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

Basically, this motorcycle can be accelerated up to 70-80 kilometres per hour, and can travel around 90 kilometres with one battery charge,” adds Julian.

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

The performance is of a vintage that matches the old style styling then…

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

This studio produced the overall frame and swing-arm of the motorcycle from a new material made from aluminium series 6061. “With a design which combines the nostalgic military design of the past with electric technology of the future, we feel that an electric motorcycle with a metal body is quite rare,” explains Julian.

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

Joseph Sinaga adds, “Katalis EV.1000 is a blueprint of a vehicle of the future. From the visual and positioning of the product, we are trying to appeal to the younger generation to start a new habit of using electric vehicles which are more environmentally friendly.” He also hopes, through the EV.1000 Indonesia’s younger generation will be inspired to create more products which can enter the international market.

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

Established in early 2020, Katalis currently focuses on the development of product design in mobility,  technology and the creation of brand strategy and communication.

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

Located in Jakarta, Katalis currently owns a main studio in Fatmawati area, South Jakarta, fabrication and  assembling partner with Garuda Motorsport in Cibubur and Frontwheel MC in Bogor.

Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

Katalis EV.1000
TheArsenale Special Edition

  • Battery : Lithium Battery 48 Volts
  • Motor : 1000W
  • Range : approx. 60 km
  • Top Speed : 70 Km/h
  • Transmission : Automatic
  • Controller : Votol em 30s
  • Carrying Capacity : 150 Kg
  • Wheel base : 1130 mm
  • Front Wheel : 14″ spoke wheel,
  • Rear Wheel : 14″ spoke wheel,
  • Tyres : 80/90 R14 (Front & Rear)
  • Length : 1630 mm
  • Height : 900 mm
  • Body Width : 172 mm
  • Handlebar Width : 610 mm
  • Ground Clearance : 200 mm
  • Carrying Capacity : 150 Kg
  • Wheel base : 1130 mm
  • Frame : 3 mm of 6061 Aluminium Alloy
  • Body Cover : 1.2 mm of 6061 Aluminium Alloy
  • Swing Arm : 3 mm of 6061 Aluminium Alloy
  • Front Suspension : Up Side Down
  • Headlights : 5.75″ Daymaker Headlight
  • Brakes : Nissin Disc Brake (Front & Rear)
Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition
Katalis EV.1000 – TheArsenale Special Edition

Source: MCNews.com.au

Yamaha release new 50 Nm e-bike drive unit that weighs only 2.9 kg

Yamaha at forefront of E-Bike development

Yes we know this is not strictly motorcycle related but we do believe it does have links to motorcycling due to these being the latest developments from Yamaha, and that technology will, without a doubt, trickle through to Yamaha Motorcycles in some way, shape or form in the years ahead.

Yamaha already have plenty of runs on the board with their supply of drive units to various e-bike manufacturers around the world and this week they released details of their newest and lightest consumer drive unit that will make its way into plenty of e-bikes from numerous manufacturers later this year.

Yamaha PWseries CE

In order to ensure an even faster and more flexible service to European bicycle manufacturers in what is a rapidly expanding marketplace, Yamaha HQ in Japan transferred the responsibility for distributing its OEM e-Bike systems to Yamaha Motor Europe (YME) from July 1st, 2020.

Yamaha invented the very first Electrically Power Assisted Cycle back in 1993, and since then the popularity of the e-Bike has grown at a phenomenal rate. In the last decade the introduction of highly efficient motors and more powerful batteries has transformed the performance and range of this environmentally-friendly vehicle, and today the e-Bike is emerging as a good alternative to public transport.

Urban Mobility is a key issue for everyone who lives or works in the city, and for 2021 Yamaha will respond to the public’s needs by introducing the PWseries CE drive unit and the External Crossover 500 battery, both of them perfectly suited to power the new generation of e-Bikes.

Rated at 250W and producing 50Nm of torque, the new PWseries CE drive unit weighs just 2.9kg, making it the lightest drive unit ever created by Yamaha. It’s also extremely compact, enabling European e-Bike manufacturers to develop next-generation chassis designs with a sharper, slimmer and cleaner profile.

Yamaha’s engineers have worked tirelessly to make the PWseries CE operate as quietly as possible, and various noise-reducing features have succeeded in making this the company’s quietest ever drive unit.

In order to give a better riding experience the new PWseries CE drive unit features Yamaha’s industry-leading software that operates the innovative Automatic Support Mode. This intelligent system instantly responds to changing riding conditions and selects the most appropriate support mode to give its rider the best-suited support at any time, from smooth to strong. A well-balanced level of support is also available when the bike is being pushed, the refined Walk Assist function makes it much easier to manoeuvre and park a bike that needs to be taken up a slope or may be carrying a load, no matter what gear ratio the rider has chosen.

Yamaha PWseries CE Key Features

  • The lightest-ever Yamaha drive unit weighing from just 2.9kg (with coaster brake support, without brake support: 3.0kg)
  • Yamaha’s quietest-ever motor
  • Ultra-compact motor design gives the e-Bike a sharper and cleaner look
  • Automatic Support Mode software delivers a more natural ride
  • Improved Walk Assist function makes parking and manoeuvring easy
  • Centre-mount drive
  • 250 W rated power
  • 50Nm torque
  • 25km/h maximum support speed
Yamaha PWseries CE

External Crossover 500 battery

Yamaha offers a wide range of batteries, including multi-location designs that can be integrated into the frame, as well as external batteries for customers looking for practicality and convenience. Designed to be mounted either on the downtube or in front of the seat tube, Yamaha’s new External Crossover 500 battery features a simple lock-and-release system that makes it easy to remove and then recharge or store at home.

Weighing just 2.9kg, this 36V Lithium Ion battery has a capacity of 500 Wh and can be charged in approximately 4 hours, making it an ideal power source for the new PWseries CE drive unit.

Crossover 500 Key Features

  • External-mount design with compact dimensions and ergonomic handle
  • Lock-and-release system for easy removal and charging
  • 36V Lithium-Ion design
  • 500Wh
  • 4 hour charge time (approx.)
  • 2.9kg

Source: MCNews.com.au

Ducati adds folding electric bicycles

A week after Ducati unveiled their second electric bicycle, the e-Scrambler, they have added three folding e-bikes showing they are now serious about electric power.

There is still no word on an electric motorcycle.

However, their move in this direction will give them vital technical expertise that they can apply to a full-size electric motorcycle.

There is no word yet on how much the SCR-E, SCR-E Sport and Urban-E folding bicycles will cost.

The e-Scrambler will cost €3699 ($A6065) while their first e-mountain bike, the MIG-RR launched in October 2018 costs €6255 ($A10,255).

Last week, Ducati Australia confirmed they would begin importing those two bikes next year, so we presume the folding bikes will also be coming.

Folding bikes

SCR-EDucati SCR-E folding e-bike

Like the e-Scrambler, this bike trades on the popular Scrambler brand and features fat 20” x 4” wheels.

It has a 374.4Wh battery integrated into the aluminium frame with range of 70km if you don’t pedal. More if you!

Of course, the most interesting aspect of all these bikes is that they easily fold uop s you can ack them in your car or take them up the lift and into your office.

SCR-E SPORTDucati SCR-E Sport folding e-bike

This model has full suspension with a front fork and rear spring shock integrated in the frame.  The 468Wh battery has range of up to 80 km.

Urban-EDucati Urban-E folding e-bike

The Urban-E comes in black or grey and was created by the designers of the Centro Stile Ducati in collaboration with Italdesign’s Industrial Design division.

The handlebar has a fully integrated LCD display in the stem that allows the rider to control all the assistance functions, to check the remaining battery charge and to switch the LED lights integrated in the frame on and off.

The 378Wh battery is integrated into the frame.

It features a suspension fork,  fat 20″ x 4″ tyres with Kevlar anti-puncture technology mounted on double-wall aluminium rims.

e-Scrambler

Ducati e-Scrambler
Ducati e-Scrambler

This model doesn’t fold.

It features a 250-Watt Shimano Steps E7000 motor with 504Wh battery, Pirelli Cycl-e GT tyres, Sram NX 11-speed gearbox and Sram 4-piston brakes.

There is also a set of accessories including luggage racks, mudguards, stand and signal lights.

Booming sector

Ducati’s move into e-bikes is designed to plug into the booming market in Europe where sales have boomed from about 500,000 to almost 3m in the past decade.

BMW, Harley-Davidson and other motorcycle and car manufacturers now have e-bikes available in Europe and the USA.

rude boy bicycles ebikes
Harley e-bikes

More importantly, how long do we have to wait for an electric Ducati motorcycle?

In 2017, VW Group Chairman Matthias Mueller and Ducati Western Europe manager Edouard Lotthe said the company would have an electric motorcycle and scooter by 2020.

Well, that didn’t happen!

In 2017, Ducati licensed the Milano Scuola Politecnica di Design (Design Polytechnic School) to produce the Ducati Zero futuristic design concept.

And in 2015, an electric pedal-assisted moped was made under licence and painted in the Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro colours. 

Neither were real Ducatis.

Nor is the embarrassing Chinese-made, Ducati-branded, Aussie-imported electric Super Soco scooter!

‘Ducati’ electric scooter under $5000

Meanwhile Ducati has filed documents with the US Environmental Protection Agency that show upcoming models:Ducati Diavel Lamborghini, together with the Ducati Multistrada Enduro Grand Tour and the Ducati Scrambler 1100 PRO Dark.

Ducati is owned by the VW Group which includes Lambo, so the Lambo model will likely be a limited edition with special paintwork, graphics and some extra standard features. The Multi will probably have a lot of extra features and maybe standard luggage. And the Dark will simply be matte black.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Motorcycling at turning point: Erik Buell

Innovative motorcycle engineer Erik Buell has turned his back on fossil fuels and says motorcycling is at a turning point.

Last year Erik launched the Fuell Flow electric motorcycle and Fluid e-bike that he claims is virtually future proof with a replaceable and updatable battery, motor and charger.

It also has a connected dashboard that automatically downloads software updates.

Fuell Flow and Fluid electric motorcycleFluid and Flow

Now, Erik has released the first in a two-part assessment of the current state of motorcycling and the electric future in a post-pandemic world.

Erik says our streets are getting more crowded, yet people want more space and the obvious solution is single-track vehicles … in other words, motorcycles.

Here is his assessment of our riding future.

Erik gets “close and personal”:

Let’s get personal here. I’m talking close and personal.

That is the closeness of city streets and personal freedom to travel. Because cities are getting bigger, and more packed. Yet people want freedom to move. We don’t want to be trapped and limited. We want to go where we want, when we want to.

When I look to the future, there is one compelling solution for urban/suburban transportation. Well, two actually, two wheels… two wheels in a single track with green power. Whether it’s a human pedaled bicycle, a pedal assisted electric bicycle or an electric moto, two wheels are the clear solutions for urban mobility.

On a single track two-wheeler, you basically take up the same space as you do walking. Driving a car or riding in an Uber is like walking down the street with your arms stretched wide out, taking the street for yourself.

Mass transport works to some extent, but it’s just not a pleasant experience, and it only gets you vaguely near the place you want to be. It’s also a very expensive endeavor that burdens city budgets. Sometimes these huge expensive vehicles are full and sometimes near empty. In either case they keep running from point A to B at Y o’clock despite the fact that you need to get from C to D at Z o’clock.

In Europe where streets are smaller, the support and infrastructure for two wheelers is exploding. In the US it is starting as well. In Asia, two-wheelers have always been the solution, and now the growth is in making them greener, less polluting, less noisy. Replacing the 60 million new gasoline powered two-wheelers sold annually with electric creates a huge impact on quality of life.

Motorcycling at turning point: Erik BuellFuell Flow

What is happening now?
These past months have definitely reinforced the importance of personal space and safety. Worldwide, the movement to change our habits is accelerating. Urban transportation should be a comfortable personal tool empowering us to better live our multitasking lives.

Personal urban transportation needs to incorporate communication and safety devices, so that the experience creates a connection between rider, vehicle, and the environment (city, suburbia, open outdoors).

A really well designed two-wheeler becomes one with the rider, with speed and range far beyond the rider’s ability. Those great two-wheelers make you feel like you have super-powers!

We have to blend this feeling with the needs of today and tomorrow. So quite frankly, innovation is critical – you cannot build a new future hanging onto the old ways. New urban electric vehicles must not only feel approachable but also integrate with the digital environment and technology that is part of our society.

The goal is not autonomous two wheelers. We know riders do not want to give up control – if they did they’d be on a subway reading a book. What riders do want, in fact, is more control. They want unobtrusive innovative safety devices. They want the next wave of technology integrated into their personal urban mobility vehicles.

And Beyond?
We can imagine many other form factors coming to the market as technology, needs and regulations evolve. One can think about compact electric 3 and 4-wheelers, but must think first of the importance of single track wherever possible to minimize space use.  We cannot take the engineering easy way out, but instead must push, push ourselves to innovate in the two-wheeler format. And this innovation must include a complete integration with smart cities (the famous V2V and V2X protocols to connect all infrastructure and vehicles) and further safety assistance.

Today we are at a turning point. The only question is, which way will we go?

Erik Buell

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Triumph launch Trekker GT e-bike

Triumph started in 1889 as a bicycle company and now they are returning to bicycles with an e-bike called the Trekker GT.

They are not the only motorcycle manufacturer looking to ebikes as a supplement to their motorcycle business.

Ducati and even Harley-Davidson are getting into the ebikes trend.

It all comes as some riders are calling for ebikes to be registered before they dominate bike lanes, chew up available parking space and lawless riders give all motorcycle and scooter riders a bad name.

The move to add ebikes also comes as Triumph Motorcycle recently announced it would slash 400 jobs globally, blaming the pandemic for falling sales.

Triumph also made bicycles in the 1970s, but this is a modern pedal-assisted electric model with some hi-tech features such as digital instruments.

Triumph Trekker GT ebikeTrekker GT weighs just 2.88kg and is powered by a 250w 60Nm Shimano Steps E6100 motor and Shimano E8035 504Wh battery, all neatly hidden in the front stem of the frame.Triumph Trekker GT ebike

It was designed in-house and will be available in Europe with other markets to follow.

There is no word yet on price.

Triumph Trekker GT E-bike tech specs

Frame

6061 Hydro-formed aluminium frame with integrated lockable battery

Suspension

RockShox Paragon forks with 65mm travel

Drivetrain

Shimano Steps E6100 250w motor

Fully integrated Shimano E8035 504Wh battery

Wheels

Shimano hubs & Alex Volar rims 27.5”

Tyres

Schwalbe Energizer Green Guard 27.5 x 2.0 tyres

Rear Mech

Super-silent Shimano Deore Shadow 10-speed rear mechanism

Brakes

High-performance Shimano Deore M6000 180/160 brakes

Saddle

Ultra-comfortable Selle Royal Vivo saddle

Grips

Triumph branded lock-on grips

Standard-fit Specification

LED lighting, full length mudguards, side stand,
pannier rack & ABUS Proshield lock

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Call for Ebikes to be registered

Ebikes or pedal-assisted electric bicycles are growing out of control in many countries, creating danger for other road users, robbing motorcyclists of parking and giving all riders a bad name.

There are now calls in Australia and around the world for regulation or registration for these vehicles.

In China it is so bad, more than 10 major cities have restricted or banned them, despite the bikes providing cheap and easy transport.

Many see them as a green transport alternative that free up the city and provide cheap transportation with some health benefits.

However, some Chinese authorities claim ebikes are dominating bike lanes, endangering bicycle, motorcycle and scooter riders as well as other motorists. They are also riding on footpaths and paying little attention to road rules.

Ebikes epidemic

ebikesChinese bikes destined for Europe (Image: Electrek)

Many other countries are now finding similar problems with the burgeoning growth of ebikes and the EU has complained about China dumping bikes in Europe.

There is a fear that they will grow even faster in the post-pandemic world where people eschew public transport because of the dangers of infection.

Motorcycle manufacturers such as Ducati and even Harley-Davidson are getting into the ebikes trend.

rude boy bicycles ebikesHarley ebikes

Like many countries including Australia, you can ride an ebike without a licence.

In Australia, they are limited to 25km/h, but illegal and virtually untraceable modifications can make them such faster and more dangerous.

Ebikes menace

Long-time motorcycle advocate Rodney Brown says they are a menace.

“Ebikes are unregistered, the riders unlicensed, some not roadworthy, uninsured and electrical grid drainers,” he says. 

“They need to be registered, insured, roadworthy, speed restricted, age restricted and need to heavily enforced.”

Rodney Brown Rider's call for ute tarps rejected bike lanesRodney Brown

He says they are also taking up valuable footpath parking space in Melbourne.

This follows calls last year by the the Tasmanian Motorcycle Council for free identification numbers, not registration, for cyclists over 18 so their traffic offences can be reported and riders fined.

Their call was backed by Emeritus Professor of Transport Marcus Wigan who says electric bicycles and scooters blur the lines between bicycles and registered motorcycles and scooters.

He says bicycles are legal transport and as such should be bound by the same features of ID as other vehicles using the roads.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com