All posts by mcnews

VicPol gets number plate recognition

Victoria Police have enlisted their first patrol car with automatic number plate recognition technology, lagging behind other states.

The technology, developed by Motorola Solutions Australia, is helpful for riders as it will reduce the need for police to pull riders over for licence checks or for dangerous high-speed pursuits.

It will also help police catch those unlicensed riders on stolen and unregistered bikes who crash and adversely affect the road toll statistics for riders.

We couldn’t get quick access to statistics of illegal riding and subsequent crashes.

However, as an example, Queensland Main Roads says more than 5700 infringement notices were issued from 2015 to the end of October last year for riding an unregistered motorcycle or unlicensed riding.

A few years ago VicPol noted that illegal riders represented a third of all fatal motorcycle crashes.

They couldn’t provide a current breakdown for motorcycles, but did provide these sobering crash stats from 2016:

  • Unauthorised drivers were at fault in 16% of all crashes; and
  • One in five injury collisions involving an unregistered vehicle also involved an unauthorised driver/rider.

VicPol plays catch-up

VicPol gets number plate recognition
Number plate recognition device on the roof of a patrol car

The first VicPol patrol car with the recognition technology will be deployed in Bendigo with 220 more to be rolled out across the state over the next two years.

The system will allow police to scan about 5000 number plates per shift. Their vehicles will also be fitted with video cameras for evidence.

However, VicPol is playing a game of catch-up with other states.

NSW Police say all marked Highway Patrol Vehicles and selected general duty vehicles already carry automatic number plate recognition technology.

“Those that ride unregistered motorcycles, or ride unlicensed, continue to put themselves and other road users at great risk,” they told us.

Queensland has 77 police cars and motorbikes with the tech with more due before the middle of the year.

South Australian Police acknowledge they have them but were coy, as usual: “We wouldn’t provide the number of cars with ANPR cameras as we don’t generally discuss our resources.”

But we’re glad they have them!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

KTM Junior Motocross Team announced for 2019

Image: Foremost Media.

KTM Australia press release:

KTM Australia has confirmed its KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team for the 2019 season, the five-rider line-up to include Blake Fox, Ryan Alexanderson, Jett Burgess-Stevens, Jet Alsop and Kayden Minear this year.

Fox, Burgess-Stevens and Alsop return to the factory team, while Alexanderson and Minear are new to the roster after achieving remarkable results last season. Together, the KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team will be targeting another strong campaign nationwide.

New South Welshman Fox will pilot a KTM 250 SX-F and KTM 125 SX in what will be his last year of junior competition. Last season saw the 15-year-old clinch the MX Nationals 125cc Juniors crown and take second in the Rising Star Rookies, plus he claimed ninth in the 125cc Junior World Championship.

Incoming KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team recruit Alexanderson, 14, won the Mini Lites BW 12-U14s title at the 2018 Australian Junior Motocross Championship, now stepping up to the KTM 250 SX-F and KTM 125 SX for the year ahead. Based in Queensland, he’s recognised as one of the sport’s brightest young racers.

Tasmanian talent Burgess-Stevens will return for his second season with the KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team, the 13-year-old riding a KTM 125 SX in addition to the KTM 85 SX BW. After an encouraging showing at the nationals last year, he will be looking to build upon that performance in 2019.

Also back for another term, well-credentialed Queenslander Alsop, 12, will focus upon the KTM 85 SX SW this year. He won two Australian championships in 2018, capturing both the Mini Lites SW 9-U12 and 65cc 11-U12 titles in a terrific achievement. He’s also currently ranked number six in the world on the 65cc.

Minear is also a current national champion after capturing the 65cc 9-U11s championship last year, earning his place in the factory team to ride a KTM 85 SX SW and KTM 65 SX in 2019. At 11 years of age and from Western Australia, he also placed seventh in the 65cc Junior World Championship.

The KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team continues to be supported by KTM Australia’s factory racing partners including Motorex, Troy Lee Designs, Dunlop, Kustom MX and EK Chains. KTM PowerParts, KTM PowerWear and KTM Original Spare Parts are also significant supporters of the program.

Tam Paul – Brand Manager, KTM Australia: “Last year was extremely successful for the KTM brand in junior racing, including the factory KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team. We have two new riders, Kayden Minear and Ryan Alexanderson, joining the team alongside returning riders Blake Fox, Jett Burgess-Stevens and Jet Alsop. KTM has bikes for every rider in junior competition, from the KTM 50 SX to the KTM 250 SX-F, and we’ve got a spread of riders covering a number of classes, so our bases are well-covered entering 2019. It’s important that we have riders in a number of states and different categories, so we always look to find that balance and I am confident we have a very strong program for the year ahead. We are also pleased to be entering our second year working closely with KTM-accredited coach Ross Beaton from Beaton’s Pro Formula in regards to further mentoring and development of our young team riders, this has been really beneficial to our program and we look forward to having Ross on board with KTM again this season.”

Blake Fox – KTM 250 SX-F/KTM 125 SX: “It’s great to be back with the KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team again. Last year was pretty good for me, aside from some injuries that put me out of the junior nationals, so hopefully we can come back strong and deliver the best results possible in both classes.”

Ryan Alexanderson – KTM 250 SX-F/KTM 125 SX: “I am really proud to be part of the KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team for the first time in 2019 and it’s exciting for me to be stepping up to the KTM 250 SX-F and KTM 125 SX. I can’t thank KTM Australia and everybody involved enough for the ongoing support to join the official team.”

Jett Burgess-Stevens – KTM 125 SX/KTM 85 SX BW: “To be on the KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team again is really good and I’m very happy to be a part of it. I learnt a lot last year, so coming into 2019 I will be trying my best and really want to make the most of this opportunity.”

Jet Alsop – KTM 85 SX SW: “I’m really happy to be on the KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team again, I love being part of KTM Australia’s factory team and will be doing all I can to get more good results this year and hopefully another Australian title later in the season.”

Kayden Minear – KTM 85 SX SW/KTM 65 SX: “It has been my goal to be a part of the KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team and I am really excited to join the team for 2019. I really like riding the KTM 85 SX SW, it’s such a good bike and now I’m looking forward to doing as well as I can this year.”

Source: MotoOnline.com.au

KTM Australia announces five-rider junior motocross squad

Fox, Alexanderson, Burgess-Stevens, Alsop and Minear make up 2019 team.

Image: Foremost Media.

KTM Australia has confirmed its KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team for the 2019 season, the five-rider line-up to include Blake Fox, Ryan Alexanderson, Jett Burgess-Stevens, Jet Alsop and Kayden Minear this year.

Fox, Burgess-Stevens and Alsop return to the factory team, while Alexanderson and Minear are new to the roster after achieving remarkable results last season. Together, the KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team will be targeting another strong campaign nationwide.

New South Welshman Fox will pilot a KTM 250 SX-F and KTM 125 SX in what will be his last year of junior competition. Last season saw the 15-year-old clinch the MX Nationals 125cc Juniors crown and take second in the Rising Star Rookies, plus he claimed ninth in the 125cc Junior World Championship.

Incoming KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team recruit Alexanderson, 14, won the Mini Lites BW 12-U14s title at the 2018 Australian Junior Motocross Championship, now stepping up to the KTM 250 SX-F and KTM 125 SX for the year ahead. Based in Queensland, he’s recognised as one of the sport’s brightest young racers.

Tasmanian talent Burgess-Stevens will return for his second season with the KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team, the 13-year-old riding a KTM 125 SX in addition to the KTM 85 SX BW. After an encouraging showing at the nationals last year, he will be looking to build upon that performance in 2019.

Also back for another term, well-credentialed Queenslander Alsop, 12, will focus upon the KTM 85 SX SW this year. He won two Australian championships in 2018, capturing both the Mini Lites SW 9-U12 and 65cc 11-U12 titles in a terrific achievement. He’s also currently ranked number six in the world on the 65cc.

Minear is also a current national champion after capturing the 65cc 9-U11s championship last year, earning his place in the factory team to ride a KTM 85 SX SW and KTM 65 SX in 2019. At 11 years of age and from Western Australia, he also placed seventh in the 65cc Junior World Championship.

“Last year was extremely successful for the KTM brand in junior racing, including the factory KTM Junior Motocross Racing Team,” said KTM Australia brand manager Tam Paul. “We have two new riders, Kayden Minear and Ryan Alexanderson, joining the team alongside returning riders Blake Fox, Jett Burgess-Stevens and Jet Alsop.

“KTM has bikes for every rider in junior competition, from the KTM 50 SX to the KTM 250 SX-F, and we’ve got a spread of riders covering a number of classes, so our bases are well-covered entering 2019. It’s important that we have riders in a number of states and different categories, so we always look to find that balance and I am confident we have a very strong program for the year ahead.

“We are also pleased to be entering our second year working closely with KTM-accredited coach Ross Beaton from Beaton’s Pro Formula in regards to further mentoring and development of our young team riders, this has been really beneficial to our program and we look forward to having Ross on board with KTM again this season.”

Source: MotoOnline.com.au

Regular schedule return a boost anticipates Wilson

Popular Husqvarna pilot maintains top five championship placing.

Image: Supplied.

Dean Wilson is anticipating a return to his regular mid-week schedule will offer a boost in his 2019 Monster Energy AMA Supercross Championship campaign.

Wilson, who officially returned to the Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing squad at Minneapolis last weekend, has had his training schedule hampered by an injury scare at Oakland before poor weather conditions prevented him from riding.

Putting an eighth place finish from Saturday night behind him, the popular number 15 is optimistic of improvements as he commences his time back with the factory squad.

“The night wasn’t great but not too bad, either,” said Wilson. “I’m not super pumped on it but I came out healthy. I think the past couple weeks of not getting into my normal schedule, due to the rain and resting the week after Oakland because of my knee, definitely had me feeling it and it was a tough Main Event the whole time.

“I think just trying to get back to my normal schedule will help a lot. It was awesome to be back with the team this weekend and we’re just going to get better from here.”

After starting the season as privateer, Wilson sits now sits fifth in the championship standings as the series heads to Arlington in Texas this Saturday night.


Source: MotoOnline.com.au

Espargaro declares 2019 MotoGP season a year of improving

Teammate Zarco to play important role in RC16 development.

Image: Supplied.

Pol Espargaro has already declared this season as a year of improving entering his third campaign as part of Red Bull KTM Factory Racing’s MotoGP program.

Espargaro, who was on-hand at the team’s presentation last night in Austria, stated there’s a big target to achieve throughout 2019, and he’s adamant to appointment of Johann Zarco as his teammate will prove beneficial to the program.

“We have a big target in front of us this year and I think we are in a good place,” Espargaro explained. “Johann has integrated into the team well and already looks fast. It means that we are set for the season. I thought Miguel was very fast at the test and that was surprising for a rookie and I know Hafizh is working really hard.

“All the info the Tech3 guys can bring will be helpful for me, the team and all the engineers. I know, from my experience, that Tech3 are good for helping and teaching the riders, and also improving the bike. 2019 will be about improvement – nobody is perfect and I learn something every year.

“I think with Johann as a teammate hopefully I can learn from him and apply it to myself to be a better rider and a better worker. I just want to give the best of myself in 2019 and the most I can to the team.”

The Spaniard will be out on track with the entire MotoGP contingent at Losail International Circuit in Qatar on 23-25 February, the same venue that will host the season-opener on 10 March.

Source: CycleOnline.com.au

Automatic brakes in cars; motorbikes next?

Automatic brakes that sense an imminent crash and activate an emergency stop have been endorsed in all new cars from 2020. Are motorcycles next?

The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe says 40 countries have agreed to require new cars and light commercial vehicles be equipped with automatic brakes.

Those countries include Australia, Japan and the European Union, but not the US, India or China.

The decision is based on a joint study by Euro NCAP and Australasian NCAP which concluded that automatic brakes would lead to a 38% reduction in real-world rear-end crashes at low speeds.

Automatic brakes concern riders

Riders have two major concerns about this mandate.

The first is that the systems work on sensors which may not sense a small motorcycle.

After all, they haven’t been too successful so far with several incidents where automated cars have crashed into motorcycles.

Surely these sensors should be perfected before they are mandated.

ABS alcohol locks autonomous combined mileage automatic brakes

Another major concern for riders is that these automated braking systems could be coming to motorcycles soon.

Bosch is already developing similar systems with companies such as BMW, Ducati and KTM.

Once developed, it won’t be long before UN authorities decide they should also be mandated.

Such systems have been advocated by internationally awarded Aussie academic Professor Raphael Grzebieta who also supports wire rope barriers, lower speed and hi-vis riders!

If you don’t think it can happen, ABS and linked brakes have already been mandated on bikes sold in Australia thanks to overseas agreements and academics’ whims and research.

ABS regulationsabs mandatory combined braking assist regulations automatic brakes

From November 2019, all new motorcycle models sold in Australia over 125cc must have ABS, while bikes with lower engine capacities must have either ABS or combined brakes systems (CBS).

The new Australian ABS regulations only affect new models made after that date.

All other existing models won’t need to be upgraded to ABS until November 2021.

(The laws only affect new motorcycles made after these dates. It is not retrospective.)

There are exemptions for enduro, trials bikes and trail bikes under 250cc.

If the bike has switchable ABS, the default setting when the bike is turned off and turned back on again will be for ABS to be active. We do not know of a motorcycle that allows ABS to switched off on the fly.

Click here for the full regulations.

CBS is described as any braking system where one control pedal or lever activates some portion of the brakes on front and back wheels.

ABS regs worldwide

ABS alcohol lock road safety safe automatic brakes

While ABS is becoming mandatory around the world, the USA has no such requirement.

Europe: Mandatory ABS for all new models above 125cc from January 2016 and for all existing models above 125cc from January 2017. 50cc can have ABS or CBS.

Japan: ABS on new models above 125cc from October 2018 and all existing models above 125cc from October 2021. 50cc must have ABS or CBS.

India: ABS >125cc on new models from April 2018 and all models >125cc from April 2019. Under 125cc ABS or CBS.

China: New models >250cc from July 2019 and existing from July 2020 must have ABS on front and rear wheels. Under 250 ABS or CBS.

Brazil: ABS for 300cc and above ramping up from 2016-19. Below 300cc ABS or CBS, off-road excluded.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Aiden Wagner talks returning to ASBK in 2019

MCNews catches up with Aiden Wagner


The rider that had everyone’s tongues wagging with his strong performance over the two days of the recent test at Phillip Island was Aiden Wagner. The 25-year-old Queenslander makes a return to Australian domestic racing after three ill-fated years overseas and overcoming injuries sustained in the process.

ASBK Testing SB Phillip Island Rob Mott Aiden WAGNER Wheelie
Aiden Wagner at the recent ASBK Official Test – Image by Rob Mott

He looks like he means business, as in a very talented bunch he was second fastest, splitting the pair that came second and third in the title last year in Wayne Maxwell and Troy Bayliss, on an R1 that he claims has a completely standard engine – at the moment.

Before he head overseas, Aiden was a fierce competitor in the Supersports class with strong results in 2013 when he finished seventh in the class although he didn’t compete in the final round.

Aiden Wagner
Aiden Wagner at Imola in 2015

In 2014 he finished in the top three of the championship and did a Wild Card ride at the Australian Moto2 Grand Prix with the MarcVDS Team before he headed to the Supersport World Championship in 2015 with the CIA Landlords Insurance Honda Team, alongside Englishman Gino Rea. He finished 20th with best results of three 13th places and two 14th places.

Aiden Wagner - Image by Russell Colvin
Aiden Wagner at Phillip Island in 2016 with GRT Racing – Image by Russell Colvin

In 2016 he moved to the GRT Racing team on an exotic MV Agusta but maybe a bit too exotic as it was a season plagued with problems that yielded 26th overall for nine points.

His best result was a 10th at his home race at Phillip Island and things looked promising but from then on progress stalled with a 15th at Burinam and a 14th at Misano his only other points scoring races in what was a challenging season in the pit box.

For 2017 he signed again for the WSS, this time back on a Honda with the Gemar Team Morini. A 14th at Phillip Island was followed by an eighth place at the next round in Thailand.

Aiden Wagner - Image: Beegee Images
Aiden Wagner in 2017 – Image: Beegee Images

From the outside things looked to be on the up after finishing 17th at the next round at Aragon, but by round four at Assen in the Netherlands the relationship was all over and Wagner came home soon after.

Since his return to the Land Down Under he has been having some repairs to his body, which he described as ‘falling to bits’ following Europe.

With an extensive rehabilitation successfully behind him and a good team around him Wagner adds another spicy ingredient to an already mouth-watering combination of talent to fight out the championship.

MCNews.com.au caught up with him at the test.


Aiden Wagner Interview

MCNews: Are you surprised with what you’ve done with the last couple of days?

Aiden Wagner: Yea, I had pretty high hopes coming into it. A lot of people wrote me off after going overseas and the results overseas were not that great. But I always knew I had gained experience doing that, as bad as some of the bikes were. So I always knew we could be fairly strong, I knew we could probably go for the privateer cup, but I still wanted to maybe go for the championship and fight for podiums really. So it’s good to be right up the pointy end, not just above the privateers. We’ve got more left in the bike yet. It’s a fully standard motor, so we know we’ve got little bits and pieces to make up 10ths here and there.

ASBK Testing SB Phillip Island Rob Mott Aiden WAGNER
Aiden Wagner – Image by Rob Mott

MCNews: Has this refocused your ambition for the year?

Aiden Wagner: Definitely, I’ve had a couple of reconstructive surgeries and just sat at home. I started riding the motocross bike, and started impressing a few people on that, with lap times and what not, with what I was doing on the motocrosser. So I thought well, bike fit, body fit, might as well throw a leg back over and came together with Lambridge Transport, and thanks to mum and dad and everyone who helped me get back on the bike. I’ve got a few good people in my corner helping me. Adrian Monty is in my corner on the suspension, and with the guys in my corner we’re making leaps and bounds. So definitely focused back for the whole championship.

Aiden Wagner - Image by GeeBee
Aiden Wagner, pictured in Sepang 2016- Image by GeeBee

MCNews: So what happened in Europe?

Aiden Wagner: A lot of the time I was diagnosing problems for the main rider, and the issue with my bike, when a part would fail they would unbolt the part from the main rider’s bike and bolt it onto mine and he’d get the new part. So I tried to stick with it for as long as I could, but it just came to a head, where we just weren’t making any progress for a couple of seasons, just in the same sorta positions.

ASBK Testing SB Phillip Island Rob Mott Aiden WAGNER
Aiden Wagner #28 – Expect to see podiums from him, privateer or not…

Also my shoulder and knee were falling to bits, so we thought pull the pin, get those fixed. I’ve had a couple of little calls, but nothing promising. Especially with the depth of the ASBK paddock now, in the Superbike class there’s quite a few fast guys up the front, so racing back home is a lot more interesting and a lot more fun. So as long as we’re enjoying it on the bike, we’ll be strong and competitive for the whole season.

MCNews: So you’re happy with the weekend?

Aiden Wagner: Very happy with the weekend, I know we’re only going to go forwards. Races aren’t won in the one weekend, have to make it through the whole season and stick to the black stuff. But you know, from what we’ve shown already, we’ve put together a pretty strong package and got some good guys that are making the bike really ridable for me.

ASBK TBG FebTest PI Aiden Wagner TBG
Aiden Wagner – Image by TBG

The first round of the Australian Superbike Championship will be held alongside the opening round of the Superbike World Championship at Phillip Island 22-24 February.

Kawasaki Superbike – Phillip Island Test – Merged classification
  1. Wayne MAXWELL (VIC) Suzuki GSX-R EL R 1:32.312
  2. Aiden WAGNER (QLD) Yamaha YZF-R1 1:32.451
  3. Troy BAYLISS (QLD) Ducati Panigale FE 1:32.631
  4. Josh WATERS (VIC) Suzuki GSX-R EL R 1:32.676
  5. Daniel FALZON (SA) Yamaha YZF-R1 1:32.784
  6. Troy HERFOSS (QLD) Honda CBR RR SP 1:32.984
  7. Bryan STARING (WA) Kawasaki ZX10RR 1:33.181
  8. Cru HALLIDAY (NSW) Yamaha YZF-R1 1:33.211
  9. Glenn ALLERTON (NSW) BMW S RR 1:33.614
  10. Mike JONES (QLD) Kawasaki ZX10RR 1:33.786
  11. Mark CHIODO (VIC) Honda CBR RR SP 1:33.934
  12. Arthur SISSIS (SA) Suzuki GSXR RL7 1:34.018
  13. Max CROKER (NSW) Suzuki GSX-R 1:34.171
  14. Sloan FROST (VIC) Suzuki GSX-R 1:34.427
  15. Ted COLLINS (VIC) BMW S RR 1:34.494
  16. Alex PHILLIS (VIC) Suzuki GSXR 1:34.536
  17. Lachlan EPIS (NSW) Kawasaki ZX10RR 1:34.735
  18. Glenn SCOTT (NSW) Kawasaki ZX10RR 1:35.128
  19. Ryan YANKO (QLD) Ducati 1299 1:36.468
  20. Phil CZAJ (VIC) Aprilia RSV4 RFW 1:36.617
  21. Patrick LI (VIC) Yamaha YZF-R1 1:37.891
  22. Heath GRIFFIN (NSW) Suzuki GSX-R 1:39.054
  23. Murray CLARK (QLD) BMW S RR 1:39.123
  24. Scott TUDDENHAM (VIC) Suzuki GSX-R 1:39.467
  25. Will DAVIDSON (NSW) Yamaha YZF-R1 1:39.819

Source: MCNews.com.au

Season-best performance a step in the right direction for Savatgy

Season-best performance a step in the right direction for Savatgy

Premier class rookie earns fourth at Minneapolis supercross.

Image: Supplied.

Joey Savatgy says his season-best performance at Minneapolis’ sixth round of the Monster Energy AMA Supercross Championship last Saturday is a step in the right direction.

The 450SX rookie led majority of the 26-lap encounter, succumbing to pressure from the regular front-runners to secure fourth position – his best result since stepping up to the premier class.

Displaying plenty of promise, the Monster Energy Kawasaki rider’s confidence has received a significant boost after enduring a mixed start to his campaign.

“Man today was just awesome,” Savatgy expressed. “Of course I would have liked to win the main event, but we learned so much. You have to start somewhere with getting the experience of leading laps and tonight we accomplished that. My KX450 was a rocket ship all day long and helped me get the day started properly as we qualified first and then got third in the heat race.

“In the main event, I got a great jump out the gate and was able to make a quick pass into first. I need to clean up a few mistakes but tonight was a big step in the right direction.”

The main event was ultimately taken out by Red Bull KTM Factory Racing’s Cooper Webb, a three-time winner this season, while Ken Roczen (Team Honda HRC) controls the points standings by one marker over the number two.


Source: MotoOnline.com.au

Airbag suit to ‘save millions’ of riders

A patent is pending for a motorcycle seat that ejects a rider in a crash and then cocoons them in a full-length airbag suit to protect them from injury.

Brooklyn start-up Airbag for Bike has posted a digital animation of the patent-pending device, claiming it could save “millions from serious accidents and death”.

They also say it would allow “millions of new riders previously hesitant to sit on a motorcycle because of safety, to enjoy motorcycling”.

However, we’re not even sure a working prototype has been made or even tested. So far there is only this animated video for a patent drawing that is yet to be approved!

How the airbag suit works

Unlike the Honda Goldwing airbag that inflates a bean-bag-sized pillow in front of the rider, this airbag suit system is in the seat which the rider straps themselves into with a special seatbelt.

Click here for details on the mandatory recall on the Goldwing over its Takata airbag.

The idea is that the seat ejects with the rider and then deploys several full-length airbags around the rider. 

We reckon this photo of the airbag as it starts to inflate is simply rude!

Airbag suitAnd we’re not so sure we would like the explosive device that deploys the airbag this close to the family jewels!

We thought it would be hilarious if the airbags went off when you parked and got off your bike, but the patent says the airbag deploys only if the motorcycle is traveling at a certain speed.

It has various motion sensors and gyroscopes that detect a sudden deceleration or acceleration if hit from behind, or “a loss of balance that would not be correctable by a human”.

Also, the belt system “automatically unfastens in a crash that is not severe enough to warrant a system deployment (to allow the rider to jump off the bike) or if the rider tries to stand up from the bike while it is stopped”.

So it wouldn’t be of any use in racing like the airbag race suits by Dainese and Alpinestars as the belt would come undone on the first corner when the rider slipped out of the seat to get their knee down!

airbag suit
Alpinestars airbag vest

The belt would also unfasten if you stood up when riding across rough or loose surfaces.

Airbag for Bike

We contacted Airbag for Bike for more details about the inventor and whether they have made a prototype yet and intend to produce the airbags or just sell the idea.

No reply yet, but stay tuned for updates.

The problem with these sorts of inventions is that some road safety expert will agree it will reduce deaths and injuries.

Then politicians will make it mandatory!

Experts like UNSW Sydney Professor Raphael Grzebieta who won an international award for advocating wire rope barriers, lower speed limits and mandatory hi-vis vests for riders, and alcohol interlocks and electronic rider aids on bikes.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com