Honda Neowing three-wheeler to replace Goldwing?

A Honda Neowing leaning three-wheeler looks likely to be coming soon, possibly as a replacement for the ageing Goldwing.

Honda has now applied for a patent for the power steering of its Neowing leaning three-wheel concept (pictured above) unveiled at the 2015 Tokyo Motor Show.

If it does go into production, Honda would be following the bike tracks of the Yamaha Niken leaning three-wheeler.

And why not? The Niken has scored some sales success in Europe.

Leaning three-wheeler scooters have been around for about a decade, but Yamaha is the first with a big-capacity three-wheeler.

Yamaha Niken neowing
Yamaha Niken

We’ve ridden several leaning three-wheel scooters and they are great fun.

The advantages are more front-end grip, better handling and increased braking performance.

However, the disadvantages are extra weight and price.

The Niken is based on the triple-cylinder MT-09 which sells for $12,299 (plus on-road costs) up to $15,499 for the Tracer model and $16,999 for the Tracer GT.

Niken starts at $21,999 with a GT model coming in March 2019. That’s about a third more expensive!

Yamaha Niken three-wheeler neowing
Niken

Powerful Neowing

While Yamaha’s three-wheeler is powered by an 847cc triple, Honda’s Neowing could be a lot more powerful.

The concept featured a four-cylinder horizontally-opposed engine with electric motors in each wheel.

However, the patent drawings for the electric power steering do not show the engine, only the complex steering system.

Neowing patent drawings (Image: Morebikes.co.uk)
Neowing patent drawings (Image: Morebikes.co.uk)

They also don’t show any electric motors in the front wheels.

But it would need to be powered by a hefty engine to cope with the extra weight and power requirements of the steering system.

Yamaha’s Niken is marketed as a sport tourer.

The Neowing could be more of a tourer, perhaps to take over from the ageing Goldwing with its six-cylinder boxer powerplant.

Some might say these leaning three-wheelers are not strictly motorcycles.

But if they provide the same thrill as a motorcycle, yet with more grip, then who cares!

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

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