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Marc Marquez and Pol Espargaro don’t gel at Repsol Honda?

“I believe that they’re going to start over, with a good relationship, and that’s that. It’s in everyone’s interest that it goes well. It’s also in Marc’s best interest that Pol is there to help improve the bike and that they agree on various technical aspects to be as strong a possible when it comes to working with the factory in Japan and, obviously, Pol is smart and knows that Marc carries a lot of weight there. Obviously, he’ll have the best bike, the same as Marc, an official bike, but the current World Champion is Marc Marquez. I don’t think there will be favourites in HRC, but he’ll need to know how to play his cards in such a strong team.”

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

Win a Tissot watch signed by Saturday’s MotoGP™ poleman

All you have to do is try and guess, to the thousandth of a second, what Saturday’s fastest lap in MotoGP™ qualifying will be. Easier said than done. To give you a helping hand and make sure you’re in the right ballpark, 2019’s pole lap by Fabio Quartararo (Petronas Yamaha SRT) was a 1:36.880. Plus, the Frenchman then set the fastest ever lap around the Circuito de Jerez – Angel Nieto two days later at the Official Test – a 1:36.379.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

Top 15 split by a second in opening Jerez Test session

And MotoGP™ was back with a bang in the 90-minute morning session, with the top 15 riders covered by one second. Marc Marquez (Repsol Honda Team) came out the blocks quickest to set a 1:37.941, just over a tenth quicker than he went in last year’s race – impressive to say the least. Alex Rins (Team Suzuki Ecstar) and Valentino Rossi (Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP) were two tenths adrift from the number 93, with Aprilia Racing Team Gresini’s Aleix Espargaro making it four different manufacturers in the top four in the morning.

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

Watch After the Flag LIVE and FREE from Jerez

And bringing you all the reaction from the test will be Matt Birt, Steve Day and Simon Crafar. The trio are on the ground in Jerez and will be running through all you need to know from what’s happened in the MotoGP™ class on Wednesday, as well as looking ahead to the weekend. Don’t miss out on this must-see for FREE, which goes LIVE at 18:00 local time (GMT+2).

Source: MotoGP.comRead Full Article Here

User-pays incentive for electric vehicles

An automotive group is calling for a”fairer” distance-based user-pays road tax system and incentives to encourage more people to take up electric vehicles.

The Motor Trades Association of Queensland call supports the Queensland-based Motorcycle Advocacy Group Facebook group who last month called for rego to be scrapped and a user-pays tracking system for electric vehicles.

Future mobility

MTAQ CEO Dr Brett Dale says the uptake of electric scooters and motorcycles will have a “huge place in the future of mobility”.

“They are undoubtably more environmentally friendly and the uptake should be supported with a focus on safe riding,” he says.

“We all know the future of mobility will be underpinned by electrification and micro-mobility options will be a big part of that future.

“Government needs to support the new clean technology revolution through incentives for all vehicles that contribute to a reduction in carbon emissions.

“A fair user-pays system would appear to be the most equitable and costs should be determined by the volume of kilometres driven, where the vehicle has travelled (city congestion), the emissions and possibly the size of vehicles.”

Cost incentive

He says the expense of electric vehicles is a major impediment to their uptake.

For example, the new Harley-Davidson electric LiveWire will cost $A49,995 ($NZD53,995).

Harley-Davidsoxn LiveWire electric motorcycle year one day
Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycle

That’s more expensive than all but the Harley CVO range and Trike Glide Ultra Classic. It is more expensive than the feature-laden Ultra Limited tourer at $A41,495 ride away and Freewheeler Trike at $45,995.

Dr Bell says Canada, China, USA, India, Japan and many European countries provide price subsidies and tax reductions, exemptions and credits to encourage the uptake of EVs.

Motorist taxes

Providing an incentive to buy electric vehicles could have two major ramifications for the community if there is a shift from petrol-powered to EVs.

One would be a power drain on the already stressed electricity grid.

However, some EV manufacturers such as Damon Motorcycles are including or considering a system were the vehicle actually puts stored power back into the grid, propping it up during peak load times.

Damon Hypersport Premier and HS
Damon Hypersport

The other issue is that road maintenance and construction could be impacted by EV users avoiding the 50c-a-litre fuel tax that contributes $13 billion a year.

However, Dr Dale says a user-pays system based on distance would help fill the funding gap.

More benefits

Dr Dale also points out that the MAG call to scrap rego would benefit people with multiple vehicles.

“It makes sense that second vehicles in particular, are not paying premium prices in registration,” he says.

“Certainly motorcycles can fall into that category and a user-pay system is far more reasonable.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Hit-run driver sentenced on scooter crash

A 55-year-old Toyota Hi-Lux driver who hit and injured a woman, 34, riding a Vespa scooter last August before driving off has been sentenced in a Sydney court today.

Paul Andrew Brown was found guilty in May at a hearing in Burwood Local Court on charges of failing to stop and render aid, negligent driving occasioning grievous bodily harm, and not exchanging particulars.

He was sentenced to undertake a 12-month intensive correction order, an 18-month community correction order, both supervised by Burwood Community Corrections.

His licence has also been disqualified for 18 months and he was ordered to pay a $600 fine for not exchanging particulars.

The collision occurred at the intersection of Wellbank and Spring streets, in Concord, about 7.45pm on 14 August 2019.

Police told the court the driver of the utility failed to stop to render assistance to the rider and continued to drive north on Spring Street.

The scooter rider, a 34-year-old woman, suffered serious injuries and was taken to Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

Crash Investigation Unit officers found the ute parked in North Strathfield about 2.30pm the next day.

After a short foot pursuit, police arrested Brown and took him to Burwood Police Station were he was charged.

Spate of hit-and-run crashes

The incident follows a worrying spate of hit-and-run crashes leaving riders injured and dead.

In NSW, the requirement for those involved in a crash to remain at the scene until police arrive was dropped in 2014, even if a tow truck is required.

However, the motorists must report the incident to police and remain at the scene if anyone is injured.

If they don’t, police can charge a motorist with failing to stop at the scene of an accident which is considered a serious offence.

Depending on whether someone is injured or killed in the crash, the motorist responsible could face serious charges with up to 10 years in jail.

Police say motorists leaving an accident scene where someone is injured decrease a victim’s chance of survival.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

American state relaxes helmet laws

Most riders in the American state of Missouri will soon be able to ride without a helmet if they are aged 26 or more and have health insurance.

That leaves only 19 out of 50 states where all riders must wear a helmet.

This is not the first time Missouri has been attempted to repeal its helmet law.

Missouri voted in May 2019 to repeal its helmet laws, but Governor Mike Parson vetoed the Bill only because of a provision to confiscate licences of people who don’t pay fines for minor traffic offences.

The Governor had no qualms with allowing riders over 18 to decide whether they want to wear a helmet or not.

In fact, Parson supported repealing the helmet rule as a legislator.

So on Tuesday, he signed the proposal as part of wider legislation. The new helmet law will come into effect from 28 August 2020.

American laws

crash accident helmet Sturgis insurance claim

Missouri is not the only American state reversing mandatory helmet laws for all riders. There have been several in recent years including Nebraska which last year finally rejected the idea.

US helmet laws were introduced in 1966 when the feds withheld 10% of states highway construction funds unless they introduced certain safety regulations, including helmet laws.

Within a decade, 47 states had complied.

But in 1975, Congress amended the Highway Safety Act to prevent the use of federal highway funding as leverage against states.

Despite evidence of helmets protecting riders form death and severe head injury, 28 states have repealed their helmet laws with more likely to follow.

It seems strange to Australian riders since we were the first nation in the world to make helmets compulsory in 1961.

Most American states introduced compulsory helmet laws in 1967, but there is a growing movement toward “more freedom” for riders with a strong civil liberties lobby actively fighting the laws.

In recent years, states such as Michigan have relaxed their helmet laws and the latest to consider the move is Tennessee, despite the overwhelming evidence that helmets save lives.

Safety

As Dudley (William H Macy) tells Woody (John Travolta) in “Wild Hogs”: “62 per cent of all motorcycle fatalities could be prevented with the use of an approved DOT helmet.”

Liberal helmet laws
Wild Hogs

According to the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, for every 100 motorcyclists killed in crashes while not wearing a helmet, 37 could have been saved had they worn helmets.

Yet, the use of motorcycle helmets in the US continues to decline to about half from 71% in 2000.

So the temptation when you visit America is to try some of that freedom for yourself.

I must admit to having tried it a few times, usually at slow speeds around town, but on one occasion at the speed limit on an Indiana highway.

While I felt very vulnerable, I have to admit it was absolutely exhilarating … but also deafening.

The wind in your hair is one thing, but the wind in your ears is another.

It also blows your hat off! I’m surprised Billy in Easy Rider could ride without getting his cowboy hat blown off.

Liberal helmet laws
Motorbike Writer in Indiana

State laws

When you are again able to fly to the United States, maybe for Daytona Bike Week in March or the Sturgis Rally in August, don’t get too excited about not wearing a motorcycle helmet.

As soon as you get off the plane in California, you will have to wear a helmet to ride. In fact, 20 states, mainly on the west and east coasts of the US, have compulsory helmet laws.

American states with motorcycle helmet laws for all riders are: Alabama, California, DC, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington and West Virginia.

Only three states (Illinois, Iowa and New Hampshire) have no helmet use law.

The remaining 28 states have varying laws requiring minors to wear a motorcycle helmet while six of those states require adult riders to have $10,000 in insurance and wear a helmet in their first year of riding.

About half the states also allow you to ride a low-powered motorcycle such as a 50cc bike or scooter without a helmet.

State Riders Required To Have Helmets
Alabama All riders
Alaska 17 and younger
Arizona 17 and younger
Arkansas 20 and younger
California All riders
Colorado 17 and younger and passengers 17 and younger
Connecticut 17 and younger
Delaware 18 and younger
District of Columbia All riders
Florida 20 and younger
Georgia All riders
Hawaii 17 and younger
Idaho 17 and younger
Illinois No law
Indiana 17 and younger
Iowa No law
Kansas 17 and younger
Kentucky 20 and younger
Louisiana All riders
Maine 17 and younger
Maryland All riders
Massachusetts All riders
Michigan 20 and younger
Minnesota 17 and younger
Mississippi All riders
Missouri All riders (changes on 28 Aug 2020)
Montana 17 and younger
Nebraska All riders
Nevada All riders
New Hampshire No law
New Jersey All riders
New Mexico 17 and younger
New York All riders
North Carolina All riders
North Dakota 17 and younger
Ohio 17 and younger
Oklahoma 17 and younger
Oregon All riders
Pennsylvania 20 and younger
Rhode Island 20 and younger
South Carolina 20 and younger
South Dakota 17 and younger
Tennessee All riders
Texas 20 and younger
Utah 17 and younger
Vermont All riders
Virginia All riders
Washington All riders
West Virginia All riders
Wisconsin 17 and younger
Wyoming 17 and younger

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Is Jawa developing long-range electric?

Former Czech motorcycle company Jawa is now developing an electric motorcycle in India that could have the longest range yet.

There is hardly a motorcycle company in the world that is not developing an electric motorcycle, so it comes as no surprise that rumours have surfaced that the now Indian manufacturer is also working on an electric bike.

But what is surprising is the look and performance of the bike.

Rather than developing something that looks like a sci-fi movie prop, the traditional manufacturer is developing an electric bike with similar design to the modern retro models.

It will also have similar range!

Since the current Jawa 42 model has a 14-litre tank and sips fuel at 37.5km/l, that’s range of 525km.

Jawa Classic Legends
Jawa 42

That would make it the longest range of any electric motorcycle on the market.

Interestingly, Indian startup Mankame Motors is working on an affordable electric motorcycle capable of 250km/h and 480km range to hit the market in 2022.

Mankame Motors EP-1 electric motorcycle with a claimed 480km range vector
Mankame Motors EP-1 electric motorcycle

The current (pun intended) longest range record is 360km which belongs to Zero Motorcycles with the extended battery fitted.

Jawa developing bike independently

Indian auto manufacturer Mahindra bought the rights to make Jawa for the Indian market and in November 2018 they released their Classic Legends models.

Jawa Classic Legends
Mahindra relaunches Jawa in 2018

Mahindra has an electric department that is making various electric vehicles, but Jawa is developing the electric Jawa project totally independently.

It is believed Jawa is outsourcing some of its development which would allow them to cherry-pick the latest developments in battery and motor technology.

But most interestingly, the companies working on the project have been told to make the motorcycle close to their petrol models, including design, mileage and power.

That’s interesting, because a traditional look and long range would certainly appeal to motorcycle riders.

However, there would be little appeal in the low power of the modern Jawa which has output of just 20kW (27bhp) and 28Nm of torque.

Jawa Classic Legends
Jawa Classic

In fact, the main attractions of electric motorcycles are their speed, acceleration, instant maximum torque and linear power delivery.

Furthermore, the brief to developers is to make power delivery less linear and more like a conventional bike!

Rumours say the bike will be available in 2023, but probably only in the local market.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

BMW celebrates GS models’ 40th birthday

Two letters that have become the very meaning of adventure motorcycling are GS and they are celebrating their 40th birthday this Northern autumn.

Long before Charley Boorman and Ewan McGregor made the GS name famous, BMW’s GS models were conquering the Dakar Rally and taking adventurous riders to remote parts of the world.

GS stands for Gelände/Straße in German which literally translates to “terrain/road”.

But it is also referred to as “off-road/road sport” which means it will tackle all sorts of roads in a lively fashion.

I can verify that meaning having owned an R 1150 GS, R 1200 HP2, R 1200 GS and an R 1200 GS Adventure.

BMW Motorrad GS 40th birthday
HP2 takes MBW deep into the forest!

They have all taken me to distant and remote regions in reliable comfort.

BMW Motorrad Australia says it is organising some special events to celebrate the GS 40th birthday, but details are not yet available. Stay tuned for more information as it comes to hand.

GS 40th birthday

Meanwhile, here is this official BMW Motorrad history of the GS models for the 40th birthday in both video format and unedited text:

In autumn 1980, BMW Motorrad presented the R 80 G/S, a motorcycle which combined two very special areas of riding for the first time: Off-road and on-road. Thanks to its unique combination of road, touring and off-road capability – without compromising on everyday use – the R 80 G/S became the conceptual forerunner of the new motorcycle category of touring enduros created by BMW Motorrad. And what is more: The BMW GS models became the perfect synonym for the perfect partner on two wheels to explore even the most remote corners of our planet. To date, BMW Motorrad has been able to hand over more than 1.2 million BMW GS models to customers.

Legendary BMW GS talents: Riding dynamics, off-road mastery, comfort and robustness.

But it wasn’t just motorcycle adventures that were ideally suited for the BMW GS right from the outset; the R 80 G/S and its descendants also quickly proved their qualities in racing. In 1981 Hubert Auriol rode to victory in the equally prestigious and challenging Paris – Dakar Rally. This is just one of the many motorsport successes that BMW Motorrad was able to celebrate with a GS. The outstanding talents of the boxer GS models – riding dynamics, off-road mastery, comfort and robustness – have been continuously maintained and developed by BMW Motorrad over the past 40 years and successfully transferred to other BMW Motorrad model series. In 1993, the F 650 “Funduro” was the first single-cylinder BMW enduro to come onto the market. While this bike drew its riding dynamics from its low weight and the thrust of the 47 hp single cylinder, the changing of the guard took place simultaneously on the BMW GS models with boxer engine.

1980 BMW R 80 GS rallye 40th birthday
1980 BMW R 80 GS

The GS as an innovation driver: Four-valve technology and Telelever.

With the BMW R 1100 GS, BMW Motorrad not only presented the first GS with a 4-valve boxer and 80 bhp output, but also trod new paths with regard to suspension technology for large touring enduros. For the first time in an enduro, the engine and gearbox acted as load-bearing elements of the chassis, making a main frame superfluous. While the BMW Paralever rear wheel suspension system had already eliminated the drive reactions of the shaft drive in the models with the two-valve boxer years earlier, the BMW engineers had now created an innovative way of guiding the front wheels using the Telelever suspension. With the pitch compensation and highly sensitive response they set new standards in this area. In addition, the new R 1100 GS was the first enduro ever to be equipped with ABS – a safety plus that is now standard equipment on all BMW motorcycles.

The GS models of the F series: GS fascination for the middle range.

In addition to numerous new and further developments, including the F 650 GS (first single-cylinder with electronic fuel injection, catalytic converter and ABS), which was manufactured in Berlin from the year 2000 onwards, the F 650 GS and F 800 GS models launched in 2007 marked another outstanding milestone in BMW GS history. With their powerful, high-torque 2-cylinder in-line engine and torsionally stiff tubular frame, they interpreted the BMW GS theme in their own, yet very typical BMW way. With these new models, BMW Motorrad not only presented the successors to the extremely successful F 650 GS with its single-cylinder engine, but at the same time expanded the enduro offer in the medium range.

BMW Motorrad BMW G 650 GS Sertao with free on-roads is $10,990 rideaway motorcycle discounts
BMW G 650 GS Sertao

Advanced DOHC boxer with two overhead camshafts.

BMW Motorrad presented another highlight in autumn 2009 with the launch of the revised BMW R 1200 GS. Now equipped with the even more free-revving DOHC boxer with two overhead camshafts per cylinder, it offered 81 kW/110 hp and even more advanced riding dynamics. In the 2010 anniversary year, BMW Motorrad paid tribute to the 30th anniversary of the GS models and their successes in both production motorcycle manufacturing and motorsport alike with the “30 Years GS” special models of the BMW R 1200 GS, R 1200 GS Adventure, F 800 GS and F 650 GS painted in the BMW Motorrad Motorsport corporate colours.

BMW Motorrad continued the success story of the GS models in autumn 2010. With the BMW G 650 GS, BMW Motorrad added another attractive member to the BMW GS family. Thanks to its slender, wiry off-road stature, the new single-cylinder enduro looked bold, light and adventurous. At the same time it clearly stood out from its competitors in terms of quality, equipment and comfort. In combination with its comparatively low weight and the reduced seat height, it was the attractive entry bike into the world of motorcycling and into the fascinating BMW GS world of experience.

Maschine Alpine Explorer tour BMW R 1200 GS Adventure tips
BMW rides his R 1200 GSA

The power GS: Newly designed boxer featuring vertical flow.

The dynamic development of the BMW GS theme continued unabated in the fourth decade. When BMW Motorrad presented the new R 1200 GS at Intermot in autumn 2012, interest was particularly focused on the completely redesigned engine. The air/liquid-cooled flat twin engine introduced cylinder heads featuring vertical flow; they had an integrated gearbox and a shaft drive on the left side from then on, supplemented by state-of-the-art chassis technology and electronic control systems such as ABS, traction control or semi-active chassis. With an output of 92 kW (125 hp), the new R 1200 GS also provided superior riding performance. Barely one and a half years later, in March 2014, the 500,000th BMW motorcycle of the boxer-engine GS model series rolled off the assembly line at the plant in Berlin – this was an R 1200 GS Adventure.

The GS for the capacity segment below 500 cc: the G 310 GS.

In autumn 2016, BMW Motorrad presented yet another GS model. This time it was the G 310 GS. It transferred the core qualities of a BMW GS to the engine capacity segment below 500 cc and interpreted these in its own style. Extremely compact, yet fully grown and comfortable, it opened up a whole new world of experience in its segment and became unique in the entry-level segment, above all due to its versatility. With the new R 1200 GS, BMW Motorrad expanded the GS portfolio not only with further product optimisations but also by broadening the motorcycle’s range of properties. For the first time, customers were able to give a BMW GS a more marked touch of enduro or distinguished style to suit its preferred area of use by ordering the style packages Rallye and Exclusive.

BMW G 301 GS cheapest GS yet
G 310 GS

In the same year a completely different interpretation of the GS theme came on the scene: the R nineT Urban G/S. The R nineT Urban G/S drew on the genes of the very first and legendary BMW R 80 G/S of the year 1980, transporting them into the modern era with contemporary technology in the form of a classic enduro-style BMW motorcycle with boxer engine. As with the other R nineT models, the powerful, air/oil-cooled boxer engine with 81 kW (110 hp) output in combination with a six-speed transmission was installed.

New engine, new chassis: The new GS models of the F series.

In 2017 BMW Motorrad continued to write GS history with the two completely redesigned F 750 GS and F 850 GS enduro models. BMW Motorrad consistently built on the typical GS strengths in the successor models to the successful 2-cylinder F 650 GS, F 700 GS and F 800 GS motorcycles with the aim of making good things even better. As before, the GS abbreviation again represented a perfect synthesis of touring and long-distance capability combined with racing dynamics and supreme offroad performance. In short: A BMW GS is the perfect companion when it comes to discovering remote corners of the world by motorcycle. At the heart of the new development was a newly designed, powerful 2-cylinder in-line engine with two balancer shafts and 270/450 degrees ignition distance for optimised running characteristics and emotional sound. It generated 57 kW (77 hp) for the F 750 GS and 70 kW (95 hp) for the F 850 GS from 853 cc, thus providing superior drive power for both GS models.

This meant even more power, torque and efficiency for the big boxer-engined GS.

BMW R 1250 GS and RT VVT
BMW’s 1250cc Shiftcam Boxer engine with variable valve timing

In autumn 2018, BMW Motorrad once again introduced a radical upgrade for the boxer engine of the large GS models in order to further improve power and torque yield as well as reduce fuel consumption and emission values. For this purpose, BMW ShiftCam Technology was used for the first time in the serial production of BMW Motorrad engines: this allowed valve timings and valve stroke on the intake side to be varied. In addition, the intake camshafts were designed for asynchronous opening of the two intake valves, resulting in enhanced swirl of the fresh, incoming mixture and therefore more effective combustion. Other technical changes to the engine related to the camshaft drive – now taken care of by a toothed chain (previously a roller chain) – optimised oil supply, twin-jet injection valves and a new exhaust system.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com