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Riders doing best to ride responsibly

Those riders still exercising their right to ride before what could be the inevitable lockdown are acting as responsibly as they can during this pandemic crisis.

Many rider Facebook pages are now advising followers that they are no longer organising or sanctioning group rides.

Some are also suggesting riders continue to ride solo and observe social distancing and safe practices such as frequent hand washing.

While rider numbers seem to have dwindled substantially, there are still some heading out in ones and twos and trying their best to act responsibly. 

Ride responsibly

We’ve seen riders using disposable gloves at servos to fuel and pay and some are only fuelling up where they can keep their gloves and helmet on and pay by credit at the bowers.Pandemic ride responsibly

At cafe stops, riders are maintaining their distance from each other — most are even parking their bikes further apart than usual!

Cafe owners report takings have more than halved.

They say authorities have ordered them to remove seating and only offer takeaway service.

They fear they will soon be shut down altogether and are asking riders to support them before the inevitable lockdown.Pandemic ride responsibly

Health advice

Health authorities have pointed out to us that a helmet is not an effective surgical mask and motorcycle gloves are really no barrier as the coronavirus can survive for up to a day on material.

In the meantime, if you touch your face, put your gloved hands anywhere that other people might touch (fuel pump, table, credit card machine) or take your gloves off with a bare hand, then you could transmit a live virus.

Scientists say Covid-19 can survive in the air up to three hours, up to four hours on copper, 24 hours on cardboard, 48 hours on stainless steel and up to 72 hours on plastic surfaces.

As the PM says, use your judgement and act responsibly, whatever that means.Virus responsibly

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Road rage leads to car hitting rider

A 23-year-old male rider is in hospital with cuts and a suspected spinal injury after a road rage incident escalated in Sydney’s inner-west on Friday.

Police appear to have located the driver responsible, but no charges have yet been laid.

The road rage incident began about 10.45pm on Friday (20 March 2020) when the motorcyclist was leaving a friend’s home on Ian Parade, Concord.

Police say a man driving a car pulled up next to the rider and the pair began arguing.

The driver allegedly got out of his vehicle and attempted to push the rider off his motorbike. The rider pushed back and rode off.

The car followed for about two kilometres before running into the motorcycle and driving away.

Officers from Burwood Police Area Command attended and established a crime scene.

The rider suffered cuts and a suspected spinal injury and was taken to Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in a stable condition.

About 8.25pm yesterday (Saturday 21 March 2020), officers executed a search warrant at a home on Northcote Street, Mortlake, and seized a number of items, including a car and clothing.

Investigations are continuing.

Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact Crime Stoppers: 1800 333 000 or https://nsw.crimestoppers.com.au. Information is treated in strict confidence. The public is reminded not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

Tips on handling road rage

We should do all we can to avoid being lured into road rage as riders usually come off second-best to bigger vehicles.

Queensland Police Senior Sergeant Ian Park who created the #ridesafely4me Facebook site says he’s not sure if it’s perception or reality, but “our roads appear to be becoming angrier places”.

“Unfortunately, it seems to involve individuals from all road user groups as both the victims and the perpetrators. Motorcyclists and bicyclists are of course the most vulnerable due to the lack of physical protection around them. But the fundamentals of personal safety of the roads are no different to anywhere else,” he says.

Queensland Police Senior Sergeant Ian Park a social media sensation reasonSgt Park and a group of riders

Here are Ian’s tips to avoiding road rage:

If you find yourself feeling unsafe as a result of the actions of another road user, the first priority is to remove yourself from the situation as safely as possible. Unfortunately far too often incidents of poor behaviour by one road user to another are only exacerbated when the ‘victim’ retaliates. If another party chooses to yell at you, beep their horn or flash their lights – so what? Let them get it out of their system and get on their way. Inflaming the situation by ‘biting back’ rarely assists, and often only makes the situation more unsafe for everyone.

However if the other party continues to behave in a manner that makes you feel unsafe, then consider your environment. Perhaps pull into a service station, licensed premises or shopping centre that is likely to be fitted with external CCTV. This will often discourage the aggressor from taking the matter further if they know their actions (and registration details) are going to be recorded.

If no such place is available continue to drive without reacting to the aggressor until a place of safety is available, avoid making eye contact and attempt to disengage from the situation as best and safely as you can.

If you feel that you are in imminent danger, pull over and call triple zero (000). Don’t forget that ‘000’ from a mobile phone doesn’t necessarily go to your nearest operator, so always be ready to say ‘I need police in (name of City/town or nearest regional centre)’.

When speaking with a 000 operator, pass on relevant information that could assist police to investigate the matter, for example, registration details, descriptions of the person/s in the vehicle, time, date, correct location (in case there are traffic monitoring cameras located nearby etc.), descriptions about any features of the vehicle that are not standard (i.e. post factory fitted wheels, decorations, accessories, damage).

Emergency first-aid apps reason

If you carry any kind of video recording device, ensure the footage is set aside so that it doesn’t get recorded over before being provided to police. Make sure you don’t just secure the footage of the incident – also keep footage leading up to and beyond the incident to help clarify any potential counter claims by the other party that it was actually you that was the aggressor.

If the situation is over, but you are still of the belief that the matter warrants investigation with a view to action by police, you always have the right to report it. You can either attend your nearest open police station to speak to someone, contact the non-urgent police reporting number which is now 131 444 in almost all Australian Police Jurisdictions. Similarly most policing services across Australia also provide on-line reporting services. Just search the police service in your State or Territory to find their websites and follow the prompts.

Be mindful, however that any complaint of an incident involving one person upon another without any supporting evidence is often difficult to successfully prosecute. A successful prosecution requires sufficient evidence being presented to a court to determine that an offence was committed beyond reasonable doubt.

However, this should not prevent you from reporting the matter, but is something to keep in mind if police determine there is not sufficient evidence for a matter to proceed. It doesn’t necessarily mean police don’t believe you! If you provide police with a video recording you must be willing and able to give evidence.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Triumph winds down Hinckley production

Triumph Motorcycle will move more of its production from Hinckley in the UK to Thailand in a bid to target rapidly growing Asian markets.

In 2002, Triumph opened its first factory in Thailand where it now has three facilities making about 80% of last year’s total of 60,131 bikes.

There are also factories in Brazil and India supplying for the local markets.

And last month Triumph announced an agreement with Baja to build a range of 200-750cc motorcycles in India.

Proposed Triumph 250Proposed Triumph 250

Hinckley factory

Their factory in Hinckley, Leicestershire, mainly makes engine components and will become a research and development centre.

It will continue to build their new Triumph Factory Custom (TFC) motorcycles with production wound down from about 6500 a year to about 4500.

Triumph Thruxton and Rocket 3 TFC ace diamondTriumph Thruxton and Rocket 3 TFC

They will lay off about 50 workers on the assembly line, paint shop and weld shop.

However, they will add about 20 design engineer jobs in their upgraded R&D facility.

Thai advantages

Apart from the cost advantages of making bikes in Thailand, most major component suppliers are nearby, including an Ohlins factory.

Australia also has a free trade agreement with Thailand, which keeps a lid on prices.

Triumph boss Nick Bloor says the move is part of “Triumph’s next wave of strategic growth”.

“We want to maximise the growth opportunity for the brand globally, particularly in the Asian markets,” he says.

“This is why we are increasing our design resources here in the UK, and focusing our mass-production capabilities in Thailand.

“There will still be manufacturing capability in the UK but the role of our facility in Hinckley will be reconfigured to enable us to create a more flexible and high-value capability.”

Leicestershire automotive jobs have taken a big hit in recent weeks with Norton Motorcycles closing down and going into administration amid allegations of fraud, misappropriated government funding and unpaid taxes.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Two riders die in Sunday accidents

Two riders have died in separate accidents on the Central Coast of NSW and in far west Queensland yesterday (23 February 2020).

NSW Police say a 59-year-old rider from Mardi died in a crash with a Mitsubishi SUV on the Great North Road, Bucketty, 40km north-west of Somersby, about 4.30pm.

Officers from Hunter Valley Police District were told he was riding north and the Mitsubishi SUV was travelling south and the crash occurred in the southbound lane.

“The SUV left the road, crashing down a ravine trapping the driver, while the motorcyclist was thrown down the same ravine,” police say.

Paramedics were winched by helicopter down the ravine to the injured motorcyclist.

Sadly, he died a short time after being brought up to the roadway.

Our sincere condolences to the rider’s family and friends.

A 44-year-old woman, from Paxton, was released from the wreckage of her SUV and escaped with relatively minor injuries.

She was taken to Wyong Hospital for mandatory testing.

The scene was also attended by NSW Ambulance paramedics, Rescue helicopter crew, RFS and VRA volunteers.Crash accidents

Police will prepare a report for the Coroner.

Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000. Information is confidential. The public is reminded not to report crime via NSW Police social media pages.

Longreach crash

A 19-year-old rider has died in a crash at the intersection of Falcon and Duck streets, Longreach about 3am yesterday.

Police say their initial investigations “suggest the male rider lost control of his motorcycle”.

The Forensic Crash Unit is investigating the circumstances surrounding the crash.

If you have information for police, contact Policelink on 131 444 or provide information using the online form 24hrs per day.

You can report information about crime anonymously to Crime Stoppers, a registered charity and community volunteer organisation, by calling 1800 333 000 or via crimestoppersqld.com.au 24hrs per day.

Quote this reference number: QP2000379024.

Our sincere condolences to the rider’s family and friends.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Are white line bumps dangerous to riders?

In response to rider concerns about the safety of white line bumps, Transport for NSW conducted tests with a range of riders and found concerns may have been overstated.

The raised bumps of thermoplastic material in painted lines are called audio-tactile line-markings (ATML) and sometimes erroneously called ripple or rumble strips.

Roads and Maritime Services and Transport for NSW claim they alert motorists when they veer out of their lane, reducing fatalities and injuries from head-on and run-off crashes by 15-25%.

Rider concerns

Ripple strips on the Oxley highway bumpsRipple strips on the Oxley highway

In May 2018, riders and the Motorcycle Club of NSW raised concerns about ATLMs in the centre and side lines of two sections of the Oxley Highway, saying they were slippery, dangerous and “madness”.

“They are slippery, wet or dry and will make a motorcycle unstable at the slightest contact,” said a former council member.

Bumps tested

ATLM motorcycle bumps Safe System SolutionsLines being tested at Crashblab

In response, the Transport for NSW Centre for Road Safety invited motorcyclists to ride over ATLMs in a variety of conditions in a study observed by the Motorcycle Council of NSW and facilitated by independent consultant Safe System Solutions Pty Ltd.

The study began last year and involved a pre-test survey, practical session at the Crashlab in Huntingwood, NSW, and post-test survey and discussion.

Five motorcyclists with a range of riding experience rode over the bumps in straight lanes and on curves, in wet and dry conditions, while braking and accelerating at speeds up to 95km/h. First-aid officers were on site.

Each rider was asked about their perception of safety of ATLM before a practical session riding on ATLM at Crashlab, and then again after the practical session.

After the practical session, all of the participating motorcyclists reported higher confidence in riding over the strips.

Their perception of the safety of the strips on a scale of one to 10 went from 6.75 in the dry to 8.6 and from 5.45 in the wet to 7.60.

Be wary

Aussie knowhow helps Thai riders stay safe Safe System Solutions Pty Ltd learn learner novice training licensed licensingDr Tana Tan

Safe System Solutions Research and Evaluations Lead, Dr Tana Tan says riders should still be wary of the road bumps.

“Riders who understand that ATLMs are not as detrimental to a motorcycle’s stability and handling as first thought are still likely to be aware of the presence of ATLMs but perhaps not be as concerned about them as before,” says the Honda VTR1000 rider.

“I would still encourage riders to not ride over them on purpose and treat them as they would any other line marking.”

Ongoing testingATLM motorcycle bumps Safe System Solutions

Centre for Road Safety executive director Bernard Carlon says they will continue to “work closely with peak motorcycling groups” and monitor locations where ATLMs are installed.

“The marking is particularly effective in managing driver fatigue, one of the leading causes of road crashes in NSW,” he says.

As we continue to monitor the locations where ATLM has been installed, all road users, including motorcyclists, can benefit from the marked improvement in safety they offer.”

The requirements for materials of ATLM are provided in the Roads and Maritime QA Specification R145 Pavement Marking (Performance Based)

The performance requirements in R145 are for dry and wet retro-reflectivity, skid resistance, colour, colour change, luminance factor and degree of wear.

Have you experienced any issues with these line bumps on your motorcycle? Leave your comments below.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Ducati Superleggera V4 is super sexy

We already knew the Ducati Superleggera v4 would be super light and super powerful and now we can see it’s super sexy and super exclusive!

The 159kW (214hp) Superleggera V4, unveiled overnight, is wrapped in exposed carbon-fibre and other exotic materials with a Desmosedici GP19-inspired livery.

It will be limited to 500 exclusive units with no price tag yet announced.  But as they say, if you have to ask the price, you can’t afford it.

Super exclusive Superleggera V4Ducati Superleggera V4

Ducati expects this bike will be shipped around the world by its cashed-up buyers to be ridden on some of the world’s most famous tracks.

There they will be able to monitor lap times via the exclusive lap timer that records finish line and split times for five circuits: Laguna Seca, Mugello, Jerez, Sepang and Losail.

These can be recalled at the start of each track day without having to repeat the set-up procedure.

Buyers of the Superleggera V4 will also get to ride exclusive Ducati race bikes: the WSB Panigale V4 on the Mugello test track and the Desmosedici GP20 used by Dovizioso and Petrucci, with the close support of the Ducati Corse technicians.Ducati Superleggera V4

As you would expect, there is a host of exclusive details from a solid aluminium radiator cap to a dedicated ignition key with an aluminium insert showing the bike number.

The bike ID number (XXX/500), which matches the VIN, is displayed on the frame, fork yoke and ignition key.

Ducati has not made pricing and full tech pecs publicly available.

However, select Ducati VIPs (that’s those who’ve previously bought their exclusive bikes) have received a e-mail signed by CEO Claudio Domenicali  which has a link to an exclusive page with these details.

Ducati says deliveries will start in June 2020 in Europe at a limited rate of only five bikes a day with all bikes produced this year.

Superleggera customers can also buy an exclusive Superleggera V4 Dainese leather suit with integrated air-bag and an Arai carbon fibre helmet in the bike’s colours and graphics.

Presumably they’re the ones in the photos.Ducati Superleggera V4

Super light

The Superleggera V4 is the world’s only street-legal motorcycle with the entire load-bearing structure of the chassis (frame, subframe, swingarm and wheels) made from composite material.

Ducati Superleggera V4

That helps it achieve a dry weight of just 159kg which is 16kg less than the Panigale V4, resulting in a record power-to-weight ratio of 1.41hp/kg.

But wait, there’s more … or less!

In track kit, power is increased to 175kW (234hp) and weight drops to 152.2kg, raising the power-to-weight ratio to 1.54hp/kg.

Apart from their GP models, this is the most powerful motorcycle ever produced by the Bologna manufacturer.

Ducati says their official tester, Alessandro Valia, took the bike, fitted with the racing kit and slick tires, around the Mugello circuit in 1:52:45.

That’s less than two seconds from the lap time of the Panigale V4 R SBK, winner of the 2019 Italian Motorspeed Championship (CIV) with Michele Pirro.

Ducati claims the lightweight components have been “100% tested using the most sophisticated techniques borrowed from the aerospace industry, such as thermography, ultrasound inspections and tomography”.

The chassis dimensions have been modified for optimised track use by increasing the length of the swingarm.

“The overall result is unparalleled deceleration power, faster leaning down into corners and sharper lines riding out of bends,” Ducati says in its official press release.

They also claim the carbon fibre fairing with biplane winglets has greater aerodynamic efficiency than the current MotoGP bikes.

Superleggera V4 provides downforce of 50kg at 270km/h, 20kg more than on the Panigale V4 MY20 and V4 R.

Super powerfulDucati Superleggera V4

The 998cc  90° Desmosedici Stradale R engine is also lighter and more powerful.

It weighs in at 2.8kg less than the 1103cc V4 and when fitted with the road-legal Akrapovič exhaust produces 167kW (224hp) while the track-only titanium Akrapovič exhaust lifts in the track kit lifts that to 175kW.

The track kit is included in the purchase price.

There is also a dry clutch and an individual manual adjustment of the Desmodromic timing system.

In this mode, riders will see an instrument display similar to that used on the Desmosedici GP20.Ducati Superleggera V4

The Superleggera V4 display was designed with input from Andrea Dovizioso.

Electronic controls are designed for racing nature of this motorcycle with the latest traction controls, up/down quickshifter three reprogrammed riding modes (Race A, Race B and Sport).

For the first time there are five extra modes that can be personalised with the rider’s preferred settings.

Other exclusive items include a lighter Öhlins suspension system, with a pressurised fork and lighter machined aluminium fork bottoms, a titanium shock absorber spring and GP-derived valves for improved damping on road bumps in the initial compression stage.

Brembo supplies the brakes, with an MCS calliper featuring a remotely adjusted lever gap and Stylema R callipers for greater front-brake stroke consistency in long track runs.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Winter Motorbike Maintenance – The How-To Guide

(Contributed Post for our Northern hemisphere readers)

There is no way to sugarcoat it – winter can be very tough on your motorbike. This does not mean, however, that you can’t get it out for a ride every once in a while. That, of course, with the right maintenance, to make sure your bike can stand any challenge that winter may throw its way.

Depending on how though winter gets in your area, you can either park your bike away and protect it from the cold, or if you want to still enjoy a good ride from time to time, ensure you are keeping your bike in prime condition.

No matter if you decide to keep using your bike for the winter, or store it away until Spring is approaching, this article is meant to help you take proper care of your ride, to ensure winter will come and go in a breeze. 

Consider storing it away

Many bikers decide to store their bike away during winter, either because the roads become sort of dangerous when they get all snowy and frozen, or because they don’t want the shine to wear off. If you chose to park your bike away until the weather gets brighter, do keep in mind that there are some things you need to take care of before.

First of all, you need a good place to store it. You definitely don’t want kids or someone else in the family knocking it over or turning it into a storage shelve. If you have a big garage, then you can safely store it away there and put some protective sheets over it, or even build a cover. If you don’t have a garage, you need to find a good parking spot. A good option would be to rent a spot in covered parking. Just like this San Francisco monthly parking service, you can find such options in almost every city.

Once you decided on a place, you need to prepare your ride for the long hiatus. Make sure you plug and cover your pipes, to protect them from corrosion during winter. By spraying a little light oil into the pipe ends and covering them with some plastic bags, you should be able to keep moisture from getting in and give yourself some peace of mind.

If you, do however, decide you want to keep using your motorbike during the winter season, here’s what you need to do:

Check battery health

When the temperature starts to drop, there will be even more strain put on your battery life. Cold starts, lights turned on more often, bar warmers, they all drain your battery life more than they did before. Make sure to periodically check the power, to avoid unfortunate situations, such as being left with 0 life in your battery in the middle of nowhere.

A healthy battery such be above 12.6 v, but cold temperatures can make it drop significantly lower. Especially before a long ride, make sure to charge your battery and check the voltage periodically, to ensure you can enjoy a risk-free ride. Also, if you find your battery draining way too fast, you may want to consider replacing it before you take the bike for another ride.

Check tires before every ride

Tires tend to lose pressure from time to time, especially during the winter, when the air inside gets cold. If you didn’t already, you should get into the habit of checking your tires before every ride, to ensure there is no damage from previous rides, as well as to verify that the pressure is optimal.

Also, you need to make sure you change your tires with winter-ready ones when roads start to get icy so that you don’t encounter grip problems. On snowy or icy roads, summer tires may be too slippery or prevent you from breaking on time. Changing your tires will ensure you don’t run the chance of accidents.

Use a good antifreeze

Liquid-cooled machines need water in their radiator to keep it cool, but we all know what happens with water in cold temperatures – it freezes. This is why you also need to add anti-freeze to the cooling system, to ensure the radiator does not overheat, but to also avoid frozen water in your pipes.

Ideally, you need to use antifreeze or coolant that has a low freezing point, usually down to -68 °F, so you don’t risk it freezing if the motorbike is parked outside. Also, make sure to check the antifreeze level periodically, to ensure it does not go beyond the lower limit.

Don’t forget lubrication

During the winter, ice on the roads is usually melted with salt. The combination of water and salt can get to the chains and make them rusty. This is why you need to make sure you clean and lubricate the chains periodically, to prevent salt or dirt from accumulating and damaging them.

Other moving parts, such as the controls (brake, pedals, and throttle) can also get damaged from ice or salt, so make sure to lubricate them as well.

What’s more, you should also consider changing the engine oil, as it can get dirty over time, which again, creates the perfect environment for corrosion.

Protect from corrosion

Over time, but especially during winter, the metal on your bike tends to accumulate moist. The problem with moist is that it creates the perfect environment for corrosion to damage your motorbike when you least expect it. Washing, drying and waxing your bike periodically will protect it from damage and ensure it keeps its shine even in freezing temperatures.

You can also apply anti-rust spray to the areas you consider vulnerable, to protect them. For better protection, make sure you apply it regularly, after cleaning your bike, so you don’t seal in the dirt.

Also, keep in mind that corrosion can happen if your bike is stored away as well, you remember to take it out for a cleaning session from time to time.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Are helmet attachments now legal?

More riders can now wear helmet cameras and bluetooth intercom attachments and fit tinted visors after South Australia joined the ACT in formal acknowledgement of 2015 changes to the Australian Road Rules (ARR).

That leaves Victoria as the only state where police have an issue with these attachments, although we have not heard of any recent fines.

It has never been an issue in Western Australia, Tasmania, Northern Territory or Queensland where a former Police Minister actually encouraged helmet camera use for evidential reasons.

Australian Motorcycle Council Protective Clothing sub-committee chair Brian Wood says their advice from the NSW Centre for Road Safety is that cameras and communication devices are legal provided the helmet manufacturer approves their use.

“I’m not aware of anyone in NSW being booked for having a camera or communication device on their helmet for a couple of years,” Brian says.

Attachments legal

South Australian Ride to Review spokesman Tim Kelly says the state accepted their submission to accept the ARR.

Hew says it means the requirements for adherence to a helmet standard “become point-of-sale only”.

“This means helmet attachments will become legal, tinted visors will become legal and MX sun visors will become legal,” he says.

The only amendment to the ARR was the inclusion of a reference to a helmet being in good repair and proper working order and condition.

Rider warned

Confusion grows on on helmet attachments jail cameras
Eric Aria (Photo courtesy Channel 7)

In 2017, Adelaide rider Erica Aria went to the Sturt Police Station to submit video of drivers cutting him off in traffic but instead received an official warning for an “illegal helmet camera”.

The police said he could cop a $450 fine if he was caught again with the camera.

Eric has now welcomed the changes to the state rules.

“At least now people know if they can legally wear them or not and there’ll be no double standards with police wearing them and not the riders who genuinely need the camera for safety and insurance reasons,” he says.

Safety testing

Brian says the NSW Centre for Road Safety did some “oblique impact testing” at Crashlab several years ago on the effect of helmet attachments.

It has been suggested that they can rotate the rider’s head in a crash, causing neck injuries.

However, the Centre’s report on this testing is yet to be released.

“It should eventually be released, we just don’t know when,” Brian says.

The Centre told us they had completed three sets of tests on attachments fitted to motorcycle helmets:

The final series of tests were completed earlier this year.  The results and recommendations from the tests are currently been reviewed and a report is expected to be published in 2020.

Brian points out that in the ACT it is legal to have a camera or communication device on a helmet provided that the mount is ‘frangible’ which means it easily breaks off in a crash.

“What constitutes a frangible mount is not defined,” Brian says.

“Hopefully, the CfRS report will give guidance on this. 

The NSW Police wear cameras and communication devices on their helmets.

“I believe they have done their own oblique impact testing at Crashlab. They use a 3M product called Dual Lock. 

I believe Dual Lock was part of the CfRS testing. However, there are several versions of Dual Lock. I don’t know which one or ones have been tested.”

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Guy Martin attempts Great Escape jump

Former TT racer and all-round larrikin daredevil Guy Martin will attempt the failed Steve McQueen jump from the 1963 film, The Great Escape.

His attempt will be aired on the UK’s Channel 4 at 9pm next Sunday (8 December 2019).

He won’t be doing it on a Triumph TR6 like in the original movie stunt, but on a new Triumph Scrambler 1200.

Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE jump
MBW Practises his own escape!

Jump mystery

The movie stunt, which is one of the most famous in movie history, remains a bit of a mystery.

We know it was not done by McQueen – not because he couldn’t do it, but because the filmmaker’s insurance company wouldn’t let him.

Many believe it was done by his friend and bike fettler Bud Ekins who died earlier this year and has been honoured with special edition T100 and T120 models.

However, there remains some doubt.

Several endurance riders who were competing nearby at the European motocross championship were invited by McQueen to visit the filming.

Tim Gibbes The Great Escape Triumph TR6 Steve McQueen
Tim Gibbes

They included Australian Tim Gibbes and another unnamed Aussie rider who had a go while the cameras were rolling, so it is not clear which take was used.

Some home movies of the filming shot by Tim have recently been unearthed.

Guy’s jump

Guy will jump a reconstructed Nazi wire fence to simulate the leap to freedom in Switzerland.

In the film, McQueen jumps the first 5ft (152cm) fence, but fails to clear the 8ft fence (244cm).

Steve McQueen in The Great Escape
Steve McQueen in The Great Escape

That’s why Guy has chosen the much more powerful and better suspended Scrambler.

Even the stock the suspension has been bolstered for the attempt.

Obviously most modern MX bikes could easily do the jump, but after all, this is showbiz!

And Triumph has done its best to exploit this particular moment in cinematic moment for many years.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

MV Agusta rush out Rush 1000

The MV Agusta Rush 1000 has been unveiled just days after the company revealed their 2020 range led by the sexy new Superveloce 800 and the return of the Brutale 1000RR.

But don’t get too excited. The Rush 1000 is basically a limited-edition version of the Brutale 1000 RR, so expect it to cost an arm and a leg.

MV Agusta Brutale 1000 RR model
MV Agusta Brutale 1000 RR

To us, it’s an exercise in over-styling. Too much is simply too much.

MV has simply thrown every bit of carbon, titanium and CNC machining at it that they have in their arsenal.

At its core, the Rush 1000 is a Brutal RR which has 208hp output from the four-cylinder engine.

MV Agusta Rush 1000
MV Agusta Rush 1000

We can’t afford a Rush 1000 and we don’t even want one, but it’s interesting to look at.

MV Agusta Rush 1000 tech specs

Engine 16-valve 998cc 4-cylinder
Bore x stroke 79 x 50.9mm
Compression 13.4:1
Power 153kW (208hp) @ 13,000rpm
Torque 116.5Nm @ 11,000rpm
Transmission 6-speed, cassette style
Wheelbase 1415mm
Length 2080mm
Width 805mm
Seat 845mm
Clearance 141mm
Fuel 16.1L tank
Suspension (front) electronic adjustable USD Öhlins Nix EC
Suspension (rear) Öhlins EC TTX shock
Brakes (front) 320mm discs, Brembo radial calliper
Brakes (rear) 260mm disc, Brembo radial calliper
Wheels 3.50” x 17”; 6” x 17.6” alloys
Tyres 120/70 – ZR17; 200/55 – ZR17
Economy 6.7L/100km
Emissions 153g/km

When the Italian company unveiled its 2020 model range over the weekend, they also promised to improve their sadly lacking delivery of spare parts.

Here is the rest of the 2020 MV fleet.

Superveloce 800

MV Agusta Superveloce model
Superveloce 800 in red

Their solo-seat Superveloce is not a new platform, but based on the F3.

It will come in two models: the Superveloce 800 in red or white and a limited-edition Serie Oro (gold series) with delivery of the first 300 units expected in March 2020.

MV Agusta Superveloce
Superveloce 800 in white

The 798cc triple in both delivers 108kW of power and 88Nm of torque and they have the same Marzocchi forks, Sachs rear shock and Brembo brakes.

However, the Oro has different paint, serial numbers and lots of carbon fibre and CNC parts.

MV Agusta Superveloce Serie Oro model
Superveloce Serie Oro

It’s been years since the Italian company has released an all-new model while it has struggled with financial difficulties.  Earlier this month, new Russian boss Timur Sardarov promised new “premium and medium-capacity” bikes under a new five-year plan.

Superveloce 800 Serie Oro will be available in Australia for $49,990 ride away and $54,990 in New Zealand. There is no word yet on the Superveloce 800 price.

Overnight, the company released a short press release, tech specs and a lot of very attractive model photos.

There was no mention of the long-term deal signed in July 2019 with Chinese industrial giant Loncin Motor to build a four-model “all-new family of MV Agusta products in the 350-500cc displacement”.

Unedited official 2020 model press release:

Quality, technology, performance. But also quick delivery of spare parts and professional service. There’s more: expansion and improvement of the dealers network to offer clients timely, impeccable assistance. These are the short-term guidelines for MV Agusta, which has just set off on a growth path clearly envisioned by its CEO, Timur Sardarov.

Brutale 1000RR

MV Agusta Brutale 1000 RR
Brutale 1000 RR

To mark the company’s determination in pursuing the 2020 objectives, production of the Brutale 1000 RR, the four-cylinder naked Superbike replica, has started in Schiranna. 208hp maximum power, advanced chassis and suspension as well as leading-edge aerodynamic solutions all make the four-cylinder Brutale a defining example of MV Agusta’s excellence in motorcycle manufacturing. As core priorities of the brand,  these values are reinforced today by the attention and the investments in Research and Development.

Superveloce 800

MV Agusta Superveloce
Superveloce

From the production line to dealers showrooms: Superveloce 800 Serie Oro and Superveloce 800 bring MV Agusta’s timeless fascination to the roads, with their intoxicating curves, classic and contemporary at the same time. The engine and the chassis are the pinnacle of engineering that position the Superveloce 800 among the most fascinating and dynamic sports bikes on the scene.

Brutale and Dragster

MV Agusta Dragster 800 RR model
Dragster 800 RR SCS

Beauty and functionality, exciting and confidence-inspiring riding:  Dragster 800 RR SCS and Brutale 800 RR SCS both feature the revolutionary SCS 2.0 (Smart Clutch System) for clutch-free starts and stopping. A technical innovation that allows to stop and restart without touching the clutch lever, making the most out of the in-line three-cylinder engine mated to a counter-rotating crankshaft. All of this with only 36g weight increase compared to a traditional clutch.

MV Agusta Dragster 800 RR
Dragster 800 RR SCS

The magic and technology of MV Agusta, at a competitive price. Thanks to the rationalisation of the production process and to efficiencies gained in the engineering phase, MV Agusta proudly presents its new Rosso Range, made up of Brutale 800, Dragster 800 and Turismo Veloce 800. The Rosso Range models stand out for their bright red livery and their comprehensive outfitting, despite a price tag that is lower than that of the models they derive from.

Vision, futuristic technology, and the pursuit of a dream: these are the values behind the creation of a new Concept Bike that will be revealed at EICMA as world premiere and which production is due to start in the coming months. The irreverent spirit of American drag races was the inspiration for a project that elevates the performance of the bike it derives from in the most daring of interpretations.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com